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Decisions of the Superior Courts of New South Wales, 1788-1899

R. v. Agnew

assault

Supreme Court of New South Wales, Port Phillip

Willis J., 26 April 1841

Source: Port Phillip Herald, 27 April 1841

Henry Agnew was indicted for an assault upon Sarah Chant at Melbourne, on the 7th April. The second count charged him with a common assault.

This case probably was as flagrant a one as ever came before a Court of Justice. Prisoner who it transpired kept a brothel, induced the prosecutrix, who had but lately emigrated to the Colony, to come to his house as a servant, stating that she would find it the best service in the Colony. In about a fortnight he produced an agreement wishing her to sign it, thereby binding herself to remain for three months, upon her refusal, the unmanly brute knocked her down, kicked her in the side, face, breast, and various other parts of her body, this course of treatment was repeated several times, the discoloration arising from the kick in the face was visible at the time of her giving evidence. Guilty. His Honor who designated the assault brutal and unmanly, sentenced the fellow to be imprisoned for six months, to pay a fine of £59, and to be further imprisoned until the fine be paid.

Willis J., 26 April 1841

Source: Port Phillip Patriot, 29 April 1841

William Gemmell was indicted for an assault with intent to commit an unnatural offence on the person of a youth named Richard Bell, at Geelong , on the 3 rd of March last; the second count charged the prisoner with a common assault, and the jury pronounced a verdict of Guilty on the second count.

His Honor sentenced the prisoner top be imprisoned on Her Majesty's gaol, at Melbourne, for two years, and be kept to hard labor.

Willis J., 26 April 1841

Source: Port Phillip Herald, 27 April 1841

Henry Agnew was found guilty for an aggravated assault upon a young woman named Sarah Chant. The whole particulars of this case have also appeared. He was sentenced to be imprisoned for six months, to pay a fine of £50, and to remain in gaol until the fine be paid.

Willis J., 22 May 1841

Source: Port Phillip Herald, 25 May1841

The Registrar brought up the conviction of Henry Agnew, sentenced to pay a penalty of £50 for assault. Execution was ordered to go...

Published by the Division of Law, Macquarie University