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Colonial Cases

Montana v. Anglo-Egyptian Bank, 1907

[banking]

 

Montana v. Anglo-Egyptian Bank

Supreme Consular Court, Alexandria

Cator J, 6 December 1907

Source: The Egyptian Gazette, 7 December 1907; 3

 

SUPREME CONSULAR COURT.

MONTANA v. ANGLO-EGYPTIAN BANK.

  Yesterday afternoon and this morning the case of Mr. Montana v. the Anglo-Egyptian Bank was heard at the British Consulate before Judge Cator of the Supreme Consular Court.  Counsel for the plaintiff was Mr. Halford assisted by Mr. Moss, the Counsel for the defence being Mr. A. W. Preston.  Mr. Montana claims a sum of £3,000 (approximately) on the grounds of having instructed on July 3, 1907, the Anglo-Egyptian Bank to pay in London by telegram the sum of £11,016 due on July 16, 1907, and that his instructions were not carried out.  The amount having been deposited at the Anglo-Egyptian Bank, Alexandria, the Bank telegraphed the same to their London office. But, it is alleged, neglected to insert in their telegram that the sum mentioned was domiciled at the Bank of Egypt; the complainant thus claims damages on the ground of loss of credit.  During yesterday afternoon the witnesses heard were Mr. Ralli, Mr. E. Moss, Mr. Triandas and Mr. G. Morris.  The case was adjourned at ten minutes to one this afternoon until 2 p.m.


 

Source: The Egyptian Gazette, 10 December 1907; 3

  Judgment was given yesterday evening in the case of Montana v. the Anglo-Egyptian Bank Limited. The Court rose at 6 p.m. and judgment was given at 6.45 p.m. after the jury had deliberated for three quarters of an hour. The Court found for the plaintiff to the sum of £1706 0s. 6d. and costs. The Anglo-Egyptian Bank had admitted liability with the defence and had paid £200 as sufficient damages to meet the case. The jury was composed of Messrs. Percy W. Carver, Frank Hasleden, Captain Samuel Fawcett, Henry Thomas and Henry Harvey.  Owing to the length of time this case had taken these gentlemen have been excused from serving on a jury for three years.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School