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Colonial Cases

Maryland

PROCEEDINGS OF THE PROVINCIAL COURT, 1658-1662 (MARYLAND STATE ARCHIVES).

Vol. 41, page 452; 1661.

INQUEST ON THE BODY OF THOMAS ELSTON.

We whose names are underwritten having viewed the body of Thomas Elston And we do find that she was accidentally drowned as Witness our hands April 10th 1661. John Jarboe, Peter Pake, John Miles his mark,Richard Lloyd, Richard Fowks, William Tettershall, Peter Caradine, the mark of Robert Steel, German Gillard his mark, Thomas Harper, John Warren, John Davis.

INQUEST ON THE BODY OF JANE COPLEY.

We whose names are underwritten having viewed the body of Jane Copley, Servant to Mr. Thomas Turner, lying in the root of a tree in the woods, do verily believe that she was running away from her master, was starved in the same place as Witness our hands April 7th 1661.  William Assiter, Charles Maynard, James Martine, William Walters, Robert Joynor his mark, Peter Kemp his mark, Robert Thomas his mark, Thomas Thomas his mark, William Jackson his mark, Bartholomew Phillips his mark, Charles Alexander, John Marcarke.

Vol. 41, page 458; 1661

INQUEST ON THE BODY OF MARTHA ------.

We whose names are underwritten having viewed the body of Martha ------ do find that she was casually drowned as Witness ... Peter Caradine, Robert Shelle his mark, German Gillard his mark, Thomas Harper, John Davis.

 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE PROVINCIAL COURT, 1663-1666 (MARYLAND STATE ARCHIVES).

Vol. 49, page 215; 1664

We the Jurors of Inquest being impannel'd by Samuel Chew,  high Sheriff of the County of Ann Arundell to view the body of  Ann Beetle Servant to William Hunt of the aforesaid County do find  a wound upon her left eye brow and having had it Searched by a Chirurgeon do find it not mortal but do according to the best of  Our knowledge Judge that she drowned her self wherefore we the  Jurors of Inquest Do indite the said Ann Beetle she not having the  fear of God before her eyes of wilfully murdering herself and  so give up Our VerdictOne Consent by Our foreman this 17th day of March 1664.. Samuel Chew Coroner.  Francis Holland foreman.

The names of the Jury of Inquest that viewed the body of Ann  Beetle Servant to Wm Hunt of Ann Arundell,   foreman,  Francis Holland,  John Sollers,  Dennis Macconoy,  George Symmons , Nathaniell Smyth,  Jeremy Sudeuan,  Andrew Bake, Thomas Martin ,  James Maxell,  Edmund Joyce,  John Pert,  Henry Archer,  Henry Perry.

   Henry Savage aged 34 years or thereabouts Sworn Sayth-That he saw William Hunts wife shove Ann Beetle Servant to the said William Hunt from the bed and she the said Ann Beetle rose up with her eye brow bloody and further sayth not. March the 17th 1663, the mark of Henry X Savage. Sworne before me Sam: Chew.                           

 Moses Groome aged 18 yeares or thereabouts Sworn sayth that comming to the house of William Hunt saw Ann Beetle Servant to the said William Hunt have a great Cut on her eye brow and her face and Clothes bloody and a great Clod of blood on the wound and head. Mrs Hunt very angry with the said Ann Beetle and further sayth not.    March 17th 1663.  Moses Groome his X mark. Sworn before me Samuel Chew.

 

INQUEST ON THE BODY OF JOHN COWILL.

We the Jurors of Inquest being impanell'd by Mr Samuel Chew high Sheriff for the County of Ann Arundell to search the body of John Cowill Servant to Mr Francis Holland of the County aforesaid and having viewed him do find according to the best of our knowledge that he the said Jno Cowill did wilfully of his own accord hang himself to death. Wherefore We the said Jurors of Inquest do indite the said John Cowill, he not having the fear of God before his eyes for feloniously murdering himself, And so give up Our Verdict by one Unanimous Consent by Our foreman this day of May 1664.  Samuell Chew Coroner. John Stansby.

   The names of the Jurors to view the body of John Cowill Servant to Mr Holland.  Foreman, Jno Stansbye.  Thomas Martin, Richard Wells, Nathaniel Heathcott, Jeremy Suddevan, William Hunt, Daniel Dickes, Markes Clare, John Peart, William Adams, William Roper, Samuell Thornebury,  Henry Perry.

 

SPECIAL COURT.

At a Special Court called by a Special Warrant from the Lieutenant General for the Examination of one Elizebeth Greene that being brought to bed of a Bastard had feloniously made it away; And held the 31th May at the house of Robert Kingsbury in Petuxcut River in the County of Calvert anno 1664-present Major Thomas Brooke, George Peake, Thomas Leitchworth, Hugh Standley, Gentlemen.  Charles Brookes, Tobias Norton.

   Whereas there was information Given to Mr George Peake that One Elizebeth Greene had been brought to bed of a Bastard Child and that she had feloniously made away wth the said Child which being by the High Sheriff related and made known to the Lieutenant General there came a Special Order from the Right Honble Charles Calvert Esq Governor to call and hold this Court for the Examination of the said Elizebeth Greene and to swear the several witnessés knowing any thing in this business, whereupon Grace Parker, Sarah Waring, Judith Sharpe, Christian Ellinsworth, Martha Carr, Elizebeth Harwood, Sampson Waring and Nic° Carr were One after the other called and severally Sworn as followeth (vizt) Mrs Grace Parker Examined & sworn sayth That Elizebeth Greene did deny that she had had any Child, but being pressed farther did     afterwards Confess she had had a Child and had burned it, And this deponant said sure thou hast not burnt it, thou hast buried it and the said Elizabeth Greene made answer she had buried it in a swamp, and would shew it to this deponant and the rest of the women aforesaid the morrow morning And that this Deponent and the rest of the women went the next day but could find no Sign of any such thing, And that then the said Elizabeth Greene did Confess again she had burnt it, And further this deponent saith that (to the best of her knowledge) the said Elizebeth Greene had gone near her full time and had had a Child, And farther this Deponant sayth not.

   Sarah Waring and Martha Carr Examined & Sworn say Verbatim, as Mrs Grace Parker-But Judith Sharpe, Christian Ellenworth,  and Elizeb: Harwood say Verbatim the same as the other women but  refuse to make oath.

    Sampson Waring Called Examined and sworn sayth That Elizebeth Greene had Confessed before Mr Peake & Nicholas Carr that  he had Child and had burnt it, & farther sayth not.

   Nicholas Carr Examined & sworn sayth, the same Verbatim as Sampson Waring, but one thing more, that coming along wth the said Elizeb: Greene in the path he should ask her wherefore she                       Committed so heinous an act to bring herself into ruin and she  should say she had a thing Came from her like a dog head, And farther sayth not.

     That One William Wheeler said to One Thomas  Taylor do you not hear something cry and he said what and he  made answer I hear something Cry like a pig or a Child, and the  said William Wheeler going into the room found the said Elizeb: Greene lying on the ground and he asked her why she lay there and bad her go into the bed, And farther saith not.

   Then the Court being informed that One Elizebeth Billingsley could say something in this Case and she being called and examined saith the same as the other women but refuseth to take Oath.

    And Elizeb: Greene upon Examinatoon before the Court confessed  she had burnt something that came from her but not so any Child  nor knew what it was and that she had kept it two days by her.

    And the Court was informed that One William Wheeler and Thomas  Taylor can say much in Consequence to this business but were not here for this information was since this last Order from the Governor  and so Could not be Summoned.

    Lastly it is Ordered the high sheriff have a mittimus to take  the said Elizebeth Greene and to keepe her in Safe Custody and to  bring to the next Provincial Court which was done.

     Vera Exemp of this Courts proceedings  in the Case aforesaid p me  James Thompson, Clerk.

 

Otsego Herald, 28 November 1816

   In the neighbourhood of Boomsborough, Maryland, a child of about six years old was lately scalded to death in a kettle of boiling apple butter.  The step-father of the child was committed to jail on a charge pf having thrown it into the kettle. - Alb. Register.

 

CATAWBA JOURNAL (Charlotte, N.C.), 26 April 1825

From the Baltimore Patriot.

A gentleman of Baltimore who has just returned from Philadelphia, has given the Chronicle the following details of a murder committed about a mile and a half from Charlestown, Cecil county, Mld.

   A young lady, on Monday last, left her father's house, in company with her little sister, about four years of age, to visit her grand father, distant about a mile from the residence of her father.  Both were missing until the Friday following, when the melancholy catastrophe which had befallen her, was made known by her little sister, who had wandered in the woods from the fatal period of her sister's murder until then.

   The account which she gave to the person whose house she providentially reached, was, "that a big ugly man had met her sister and self while on their way to their grand father's, and after dragging her sister into the woods, murdered her." The body was immediately sought for and found by the neighbors - the monster had nearly separated the young lady's head from her shoulders - four other wounds were inflicted upon her body; one on either side of the breast, one on each of her sides, just below the ribs, either of which, it is said, would have proved mortal; but not content with the cruelty already inflicted, he gave her several other stabs in different parts of the body.   Our inform ant adds, that a lad who was examined before the jury of inquest, proved that on the day on which the murder was committed, he was riding in a gig along the road, where he overtook a man on foot answering the description of the one given by the little girl of the murdered of her sister, who asked leave to ride with him a short distance; that he took him up, and after riding a short distance he got out, when the lad turned round and discovered the young lady, who was subsequently murdere3d, and her little sister rising a hill a short distance e in the rear; that the man who had been riding with him sat down by the road side, and he drove off.  It was therefore supposed in the neighborhood that he must have been the perpetrator of this foul deed.  Our informant adds, that a man answering the same description, had committed some infamous acts in the neighborhood of the route of the Delaware and Chesapeake Canal, where he was at work and had eloped the day before; which circumstance seems to affix the suspicion upon him still more strongly.  So great was the excitement in the neighborhood that $300 were raised in about 20 minutes, and offered as a reward for the arrest and conviction of the murder, and many persons had gone in pursuit.  It was therefore expected he would be taken and brought to punishment,.

   Our informant saw the body and was summoned on the inquest, but was excuses on account of his being a traveller and solicitous to reach his home. [continues: jewellery missing, ...]

   It is seldom we have to record a more melancholy instance of the incertitude of human life and enjoyment, than falls to out lot in narrating the circumstances of a recent and most afflicting g dispensation of Providence, in an adjoining county.  On the 3d inst. Dr. John A. Woolley and Mr. Angus M'Aulay, jr. attempted to cross Little river, a short distance above Butler's mill dam, in Montgomery county, in a flat worked by four men.  The excessive rains of that and the preceding days, had so swelled the river as to render their efforts to reach the shore in the flat unavailing; and, as it approached the dam, all hope of crossing being extinct, the men who worked the flat plunged into the river and swam to shore.  But the Doctor was lame, and incapable of saving himself in a similar manner.  He entreated Mr. M'Aulay not to desert him, and they remained in the flat until it arrived near to the dam, when M'Aulay sprang out with the hope of gaining the shore.  Vain hope ! The violence of the current washed him over the dam, and from the waters beneath his lifeless body was taken on the following morning.

   Dr. Woolley, in the meantime, made a desperate attempt, after divesting himself of his clothes, to save himself by swimming; but, his lameness rendering the attempt abortive, he regained the flat, fell upon his knees, and in that attitude calmly and deliberately awaited impending and inevitable destruction.  The awful suspense was of short duration; but a moment, and the flat was precipitated over the dam, where the fate of this unfortunate gentleman was sealed forever.  His body was not found until Saturday last, the eighth day after he was drowned.

   We understand that Dr. Woolley has left a wife and three young children; ... Fayetteville Observer.

 

CATAWBA JOURNAL (Charlotte, N.C.), 13 March 1827

A Coroner's Inquest was held by John Aisqueth, Esq. yesterday afternoon, over the body of John Tilyard, aged three years, son of Henry W. Tilyard.  Verdict of the Jury, that he came to his death, by being accidentally shot by Jesse C. Earle.

   The following account of this very afflicting accident we copy from the Chronicle:- "As Mr. Jesse C. Earle, Surgical Instrument Maker, of this city, was yesterday making preparation to go a shooting, he took a fowling piece which he had been in the habit of hiring to hiring persons, and which had been uniformly returned without a load.  He put a small charge of powder into the piece, and after having primed it, attempted to fire it, but the gun flashed, when he took a gun pick, and after clearing the touch hole, put in more priming, and again drew the trigger, when shocking to relate, the gun went off, an d a full charge of shot, which without his knowledge was in  it, was lodged in the body of the son of Mr. H. W. Tilyard, Lombard street, a child about 3 years old, who was just entering the room, hand in hand, with the son of Mr. E.  The child died immediately, and on examination , it was found that ten shots had entered the heart of the innocent sufferer. - Balt. Patriot.

 

The Pilot & Transcript, 20 May 1840

CORONER'S INQUEST. - A Coroner's inquest was held on Sunday morning last, by Luther Ratcliffe, Esq. over the dead body of a white male infant, found buried in a field about three miles from the city, on the right of the Liberty road.  The corpse appears to have been buried about a month.  The coffin was of Baywood, which wood bears close resemblance to mahogany, and was well made.  The burial clothes were remarkably good.  Nothing calculated to elicit the cause of its death and singular burial was discovered by the jury.  Verdict - came to its death from causes unknown to the jury.

                                

The Pilot & Transcript, 5 January 1841

   A coroner's inquest was held on Sunday evening last in a house in Conway street, on the body of a colored man named Daniel Thomas aged 35 years.  Verdict of the Jury, that the cause of his death was intemperance and exposure.

 

SETTLER AND PENNON (Smethport, Pa.), 11 November 1843

ANOTHER HORRIBLE MURDER.

There was a horrible murder committed at Middle Brook Mills, Montgomery co., Md., on the 18th inst.  It appears that a man, calling himself George Dunn, travelling with a woman supposed to be his wife, is the perpetrator of the deed, and the unfortunate woman the victim.  The two were observed, on the day above mentioned, seated together at a spot about two hundred and three yards from the dwelling of Mr. House, apparently in conversation for two or three hours; the man was last seen between 12 and 2 o'clock, about fifty yards from the place, hastily moving away, and considerable stained with blood but no suspicion of foul play was entertained, nor any inquires made until Friday the 20th, when the body of the female was discovered, at the spot where she was last seen in company with Dunn on Wednesday, horribly mutilated, the throat cut and the head and face dreadfully disfigured and mashed, as if to prevent the recognition of the person.  On tracing the course the man was observed to take, when seen leaving the spot, a book was found lying close by, and in it a card of bill was found indicating that he had boarded some time during the summer with Michael Conolly, Baltimore.

   Mr. Conolly states that a man agreeing with the description given to Dunn boarded at his house during a part of the summer, calling himself Thompson.  He had a woman in company whom he passed as his wife, but it was ascertained by report that he had another wife living somewhere in Virginia, with two or three children.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 14 November 1844

Melancholy Death. - The body of a female, named Eliza Sparks or Parks, was taken from the Falls yesterday morning, in an almost lifeless condition; soon after which she clapped her hands upon her heart and died almost instantly.  We learn that she had been seen in the neighborhood the previous evening, with a small female child in charge, and it is supposed that passing down Pitt-st., she may have missed the bridge, and thus fallen into the Falls,.  We also understand that the voice of some person, supposed to have been in distress, was heard in the neighborhood, on the previous evening, but no one could ascertain from whence it proceeded.  An inquest was held by Coroner Hare, and a verdict rendered of accidental drowning.  The remains of the unfortunate deceased were taken to the Middle District watch-house, to await the arrival of her friends, who reside in Baltimore county.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 20 November 1844

CITY INTELLIGENCE.

Daring Murder - Arrests. - About 8 o'clock on Monday night last, a party of Spaniards having left the brig Tom, lying at the wharf, Fell's Point, for the purpose of visiting the city, were attacked by some persons in the neighborhood of Caroline and Wilks streets, when the sailors, in passing the residence of Henry  Hershel, who was standing at his door, made a furious assault upon him, and inflicted several wounds which resulted in his death.  The testimony elicited during an inquest held soon after by Coroner Colton, proved that the deceased was quietly standing in his own door at the time of the attack; that he received a stab in his left breast, penetrating the heart, and another behind the right ear, and that he fell dead without uttering a word.  The police were on the alert, and succeeded in arresting about fifteen of the crew of the brig.  On examination yesterday, before S. S. Briggs, Esq., two of them were committed for further examination, and the others discharged.  A large knife supposed to have been used in the assault, was found yesterday morning, in front of the house of the deceased.  The unfortunate affair has created much excitement in the city in which it occurred, and we hope for the sake of outraged justice that the perpetrators of the foul deed may be brought to punishment.

SUDDEN DEATH.

   Yesterday afternoon, Mr. Peter Hitzelberger fell suddenly dead, while passing along in the neighborhood of the Bal Air Market.  He was immediately conveyed to his residence, North  Gay street, near Saratoga, but all efforts to restore him proved unavailing.  He had for a long time suffered from the asthma, and died of an affection of the heart.  An inquest was held by Coroner Hare, and a verdict rendered in accordance with the above facts.  Mr. H. was far advanced in life, and was respected for his industry and propriety of life.  He leaves a wife and family to mourn his sudden death,

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 6 December 1844

Inquest. Coroner Colton held an inquest yesterday afternoon, over the body of Rosdanna Francis, who died suddenly about 3 o'clock in the morning.  Verdict of the jury - died by the visitation of God.  The deceased was about 45 years of age, and lived in Bond, near Gough st.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 14 December 1844

Coroner's Inquest. - Yesterday morning about eight o'clock, a new born infant was found in Schroder's Woods, that had in all probability been left there by some heartless and abandoned mother.  An inquest was held upon the body by A. H. Greenfield, Esq. Coroner.  Verdict in accordance with the facts.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 16 December 1844

Coroner's Inquest. - An inquest was held, late on Friday evening, by Jacob D. Hare, Esq., Coroner, of the body of Elizabeth Ross.  The deceased was a white woman, advanced in years, and lived at the corner of Front and French streets.  She lived entirely alone, her only companions being three dogs, who were so attached to her, that they flew at and bit one of two of the neighbors who had gone in to pay attention to the body that the dictates if humanity called for.  She was found dead in her bed, and the jury returned a verdict that she died by the visitation of God.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 17 December 1844

Coroner's Inquest. An inquest was held yesterday, by Coroner Hare, over the body of a child found in Potter's Field, under suspicious circumstances.  Verdict - death from causes unknown.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 25 December 1844

Another Murder. - John Haines, a colored man, who was wounded in the forehead with a hatchet, by a man named Richardo weeks ago, while they were fighting - died at a late hour on Sunday night at the Hospital, from his injuries.  The Coroner held an inquest last evening and the verdict embraced that the wound was the primitive cause of death.

ANOTHER ANTI-RENT MURDER.

   The Troy Budget of the 20th, says:

Murder of Elijah Smith at Grafton. Coroner Betts.

 

Also:

MELANCHOLY AND FATAL ACCIDENT. - The Wilmington Journal states that on Thursday last, a young man named William E. Maull, ship carpenter, while working on a steam boat, in the employ of Betts, Harlan and Hollingsworth, fell from the promenade deck, to the deck below.  When he had fallen about four feet his head came in contact with an obstacle, fracturing his skull and doing him other serious injury.  He  died about six o'clock in the evening.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 8 January 1845

Coroner's Inquest. - An inquest was held yesterday, by Wm. Colton, Esq., Coroner, over the body of William Galloway, mate of the brig George Gardner.  The deceased had partaken too freely of intoxicating drink the evening previous, ands as the brig was to have left port yesterday, he had partaken too freely on intoxicating drink the evening previous, and as the brig was to have left port yesterday, he had recourse to laudanum  for the purpose of destroying the effects of the liquor, or in other words to sober him, so as to render him fit for duty.  The quantity taken proved too much, and from the effects of which he died.  The verdict of the jury was  - Died by a too free use of laudanum.  The deceased was aged about 35 years, and has left a wife and two children in Harford County, in this State.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 18 January 1845.

TERRIBLE TRAGEDY AT NORFOLK.

   A singular and distressing affair occurred at the house of William Harrison, on Six street, in Norfolk, on Wednesday afternoon, of which the Herald gives the following account:

   It appears that Mrs. Collins, whose residence is in the vicinity of Fort Barbour, accompanied by her niece, Sarah Broughton, a young girl about 13 years of age, had been down town in the forenoon, and while on their return home, being fatigued, they called at Mrs. Harrison's (a relation of Mrs. Collins)they found Harrison and his wife at dinner; and while at the table, Harrison (who appeared to be much excited) drew a pistol and said something about the intrusion of cats upon his premises, and threatening to shoot them.  He then cocked the pistol, which in a few moments more was fired, and the ball took effect upon Sarah, just below the left eyebrow, passing entirely through the head and causing almost instant death ! - We forbear for the present to notice other circumstances calculated to criminate the wretched man who has caused the death of this young and innocent girl.  He immediately went to the mayor and delivered himself up, declaring that the affair was entirely accidental, as it undoubtedly was, so far as the unfortunate girl was concerned.  The Coroner's Inquest however, found the following verdict: "That the deceased came to her death by the intended discharge of a pistol held by William Harrison, while in a room in his own house."

   Harrison was formerly one of the Borough Watchmen.  His wife is said to be an excellent woman and ill-treated by her husband. - She manifested the most sincere and touching grief on the dreadful occasion.

   It is a remarkable coincidence that the house in which this bloody deed was performed, is the same in which, just 24 years ago, a Frenchman named Lagaudette was butchered by two Spaniards named Garcia and Castillano.  Since then it was stood unaltered and unimproved, presenting the same appearance at this day when a Jury of Inquest deliberated upon the limbless, headless trunk of Lagaudette.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 30 January 1845

Coroner's Inquest. - An inquest was held on Tuesday about 2 o'clock, by A. H. Greenfield, Esq. coroner, over the body of a new born mulatto infant, found in a box near the Sharp-st. burying ground.  Verdict - that it came to its death by the hands of some person or persons unknown.

   About 7 o'clock the same evening the coroner was again called to hold an inquest over the body of a similar child, also found in a box., in Orchard st., near the African church.  The verdict of the jury was the same as above.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 1 February 1845

Coroner's Inquest. - An inquest was held yesterday morning, by Jacob D. Hare, Esq., Coroner, over the body of James Mullen, who was found by watchman Lawton floating in the water at the foot of Bowly's wharf.  It appeared in evidence before the jury, that the deceased was  engaged as a private watchman, in watching a quantity of sugar lying exposed on the wharf, and in  walking too near the water, it is supposed that he accidentally fell in.  The deceased was aged about 45 years, and was by birth an Irishman.  Verdict of the Jury - Accidental Drowning.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 4 February 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held on Sunday afternoon about 3 o'clock, by William Colton, Esq., Coroner, over the body of a free negro woman, named Gracy Green.  She lived in Strawberry valley, and was found dead in her house.  Verdict of the Jury - Death by exposure and debility.  The deceased was about [85] years old.

Death from Exposure.

   The dead body of a man was found about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon lying on the commons near the intersection of Wilk and President streets.  Coroner Hare being sent for had the body conveyed to the Middle District Watch house, where an inquest was held over it, and the jury returned a verdict of Died from Intemperance and exposure.  The name of the deceased is unknown, and he was apparently about thirty years of age.  The body was kept at the watch house all night, and will be interred under the direction of the coroner this morning.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 5 February 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held early yesterday morning, at that celebrated part of Old Town known as "Louse Alley," over the body of a negro woman, who had died suddenly from intemperance.  The inquest was held by Jacob D. Hare, Esq., the Coroner, and the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 11 February 1845

MYSTERIOUS DEATH AT HAVRE-DE-GRACE.

   We learn from the Wilmington Republican that an inquest was held on Saturday at that place, over the body of a man named N. B. Woodward, a resident of Frederick, Md., who came to his death at Have-de-Grace, under mysterious circumstances.  It appears that he arrived at Wilmington from Chester county, Pa., on Tuesday evening last, and put up at the "Bull's Head" tavern, where he remained until Thursday morning, when he started for Philadelphia, bur as is supposed, changed his mind after starting, and returned to Wilmington again.  On Friday he applied at the railroad depot for a ticket to Baltimore, but the agent observing something in his countenance and manners indicating bewilderment, refused to furnish him with one.  He then proceeded on foot to Newark where he procured a ticket for Baltimore and left in the train about seven o'clock in the evening, and on the same night he was found dead at Havre-de-Grace with two incisions in his throat, apparently with a knife, and the back part of his head dreadfully crushed.  His body was taken back to Wilmington, where an inquest was held over it by Coroner Pierce, and a verdict rendered that he "came to his death by accident - cause unknown."  His valise was found, containing three gold watched and 80 dollars in money.  This is probably the case which gave rise to the rumored murder, as noticed in the paragraph which we copied yesterday from the Elkton democrat.

CITY INTELLIGENCE.

Died from Injuries received. It will be remembered that a female, named Frances McDowell, living at the corner of Potter-st. and Necessity alley, was so severely beaten, about the first of last month, by Joseph Wilson, that her life was despaired of; and that the said Wilson was put under bonds of $500, to answer at the criminal court.  The fears of her friends proved well founded, for she died on Sunday night, between 9 and 10 o'clock.

   An inquest was held yesterday morning, over the body, by Jacob D. Hare, Esq., coroner, and after a thorough and searching investigation, in which all the facts were brought out, the jury found a verdict that her "death was caused by chronic inflammation of the brain, superinduced by blows inflicted at the hands of Joseph Wilson, on the 2d January, 1845."

   During the investigation, and for the satisfaction of the jury, a post mortem examination of the body was held by Drs. Jennings, Leonard, Durkee and Baldwin, upon whose opinions the jury found the above verdict.  The deceased was aged about forty-two years.  Wilson was arrested about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, by officer Sayder, and committed to jail by Walton Gray, Esq.

Loss of three Lives.

   Captain Kirwan, of the schooner Thomas Hooper, communicates the following melancholy information: On the 2d inst. while lying at anchor at the mouth of the Piankatank river (Chesapeake Bay) the mater, Christopher R. Gayle, in company with Capt. Hammond, (late of the brig Motto, condemned at St. Thomas) left the schr. In a small canoe to go on shore, and on their return with another man from the shore, named Lewis Sadler, the boat capsized and all three were drowned. Their hats and some other articles were afterwards picked up floating.  Captain Hammond belonged to the eastward, where he has a family residing, for whose information we are requested to state that his effects can be obtained by applying to, of addressing Mr. THOMAS PIERCE, Bowly's wharf. - Exchange Reading Room Books.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 21 February 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday morning by William Colton, Esq., coroner, over the body of a free colored woman, named Ann Maria Sheppard, aged about 21 years,.  The deceased died suddenly, and after a careful examination before the jury by Dr. Handy, they returned a verdict of death from apoplexy.  The inquest was held in Granby street.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 25 February 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held on Friday night, by Wm. Colton, Esq.  coroner, in Spring street, over the body of a white male infant, found exposed #upon the commons. Verdict, Death by hands unknown.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 11 March 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  The body of a white male child was found on Saturday by some boys, in a pond of water near Perkins' Spring, in the North-western part of the city.  The child is supposed to have been in the water for a week, and was about three days old.  A. H. Greenfield, Esq., coroner, held an inquest over the body, and the jury returned a verdict, "that it came to its death by means unknown to the jury."

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 22 March 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday morning by James Hooper, Esq., Coroner, over the body of a still born child found exposed upon the common in the rear of the Hospital.  Verdict in accordance with the facts.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 28 March 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday morning, in Armstead lane, by James Hooper, Esq., coroner, over the body of Ann Robinson, a white woman who died suddenly in the early part of the morning.  The jury returned a verdict "that her death was caused by intemperance."  Drs. Baltzell and Webster were in attendance, and examined the body.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 2 April 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday morning in the New Potter's Field, by Jas. Hooper, Esq., coroner, over the body of a colored infant, found exposed upon the common.  Verdict, death from some cause unknown to the jury.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 4 April 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday morning by James Hooper, Esq., Coroner, over the body of a female colored infant, found exposed upon the commons in front of White's distillery.  It was supposed to be about 48 hours old; verdict, death from some cause to the jury unknown,.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 5 April 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held late on Thursday evening by R. B. Gallup, Esq., Coroner, over the body of a female mulatto child, found exposed in an open lot, near the intersection of Eulaw and Hill sts.  Verdict of the jury, that it came to its death from ill-treatment and exposure, from the hands of some person or persons to the jury unknown.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 7 April 1845

Found Drowned.  The body of a man, apparently about thirty years of age, and very genteelly apparelled, was found floating in the river, nearly opposite Bowly's Wharf, on Saturday morning about seven o'clock.  The body was taken in charge by some gentlemen and conveyed in a small boat to Light st. Wharf, where an inquest was held over it by Coroner Hooper.  The name of the unfortunate man was ascertained to be Patrick Payton, an Irishman by birth, from Ballinaugh, of the parish of Baslick, county Roscommon.  He had been in this country five years, and has been missing about four weeks.

 

American Republic & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 10 April 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held by James Hooper, Esq., Coroner, on Tuesday night in Salisbury-st. near the Harford Run, over the body of a colored man named Jacob Brown, aged about 45 years.  The deceased was a hod-carrier and while ascending a ladder on Monday, at the buildings that are being erected in Low-st. near Asquith, he made a false step and  fell to the pavement, causing a concussion of the brain, of which he died in a few hours.  Dr. Armitage was present and examined the body.  The jury returned a verdict that his death was caused by the injuries received at the fall.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 11 April 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday morning about 9 o'clock by J. H. Mullen, Esq., Coroner, over the body of a female colored child, that had been found floating in the back basin, near the City block.  Verdict of the jury, that it came to its death by the hands of some person or persons unknown to the jury.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 18 April 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held on Sunday night about eight o'clock, by Coroner Mullen, over the body of a colored man found floating in the river, near the Larion Railway, Fell's Point.  He is supposed to be the scow-man who fell into the river about two weeks since near the old draw bridge, and named Robert Howard.  Verdict - Accidental drowning.

   The same Coroner held another inquest yesterday morning about 9 o'clock, at the foot of Ann-st. over the body of a colored man who was also found floating in the river.  He had the appearance of having been in the water considerable time.  Verdict - Accidental drowning.

Sudden Death.

   A colored man, named Edward Johnson, aged about 30 years, died suddenly, at his house in French street, on Sunday afternoon about 4 o'clock.  An inquest was held over the body by James Hooper, Esq., coroner, and the jury returned a verdict that "his death was caused by disease of the heart."  Drs. Stevenson and Leonard were in attendance, and examined the body in the presence of the jury.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 12 May 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held late on Friday night, by James Hooper, Esq., Coroner, at the Middle district watch-house, over the body of a new born infant, which had been found by a  watchman lying upon the cellar floor of a house in North Charles street.  The jury returned a verdict, That it came to its death from some cause unknown to the jury.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 31 May 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  Coroner Mullen, held an inquest on Thursday, over the body of a colored buoy named Isaac Hall, which has been found floating in the back basin.  He was aged about 14 years.  Verdict of the jury, Accidental drowning.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 2 June 1845

Death from a Fall.  A German, named Ernst Werner, employed in dyeing, at the carpet factory of Mr. Beck, Marsh Market Space, near Lombard street, met with a fatal accident on Saturday last.  he was engaged in spreading wood upon the roof of the two-story back building, when his feet slipped, and he fell to the pavement below, breaking the rear part of his skull, and so mutilating the brain as to produce death in about ten minutes afterwards. - Prof. Smith and other medical gentlemen were in attendance, but the injury was of such a nature as to defy all medical skill.   An inquest was held by Coroner Gallup, and a verdict rendered in accordance with the above facts. The unfortunate man was of sober and industrious habits, and leaves a wife and two children, residing in Fell's Point, to mourn his loss.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 6 June 1845

The Paul Jones.

   The remains of this unfortunate boat are still lying at the spot where the accident happened.  The steamer Relief, Capt. Sanner, proceeded to the wreck yesterday morning, having in tow two schooners which had been chartered by Mr. Biggs for the purpose of raising the hull and recovering the bodies of the two firemen and the boy.  The Relief returned to the city about one o'clock, with the body of Hiram, the colored fireman, over whose remains an inquest was held by Coroner Hooper.  The verdict of the jury was in accordance with the facts as heretofore mentioned. .  .  .  . 

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 27 June 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday afternoon, by James Hooper, Esq., Coroner, over the body of a colored man named William Miles, aged about 50 years, who died suddenly, in the course of the morning, at a house in Caroline-st.  Dr. Douglas was in attendance, and, after examining the body, gave it as his opinion that death was caused by disease of the heart, and such was the verdict of the jury.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 8 July 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday, by Coroner Hooper, over the body of a white female child, found in a pond near  the Mud Bridge, at the Spring Gardens, with a rope around its neck, and a stone tied to it. - The verdict of the jury was that it came to its death by the hands of some person unknown.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 9 July 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday morning, by Coroner Mullen, over the body of a German, named Henry [Sonicken], aged about 30 years, who had died suddenly sometime during Monday night,  at a public house kept by Mr. Niemuller in Fell-st., on the Point.  The deceased had been in this country but a few days, and had been drinking quite freely the day previous, which, together with the excessive heat of the weather, is supposed to have brought on a fit of apoplexy. - Such was the opinion of the jury.  The unfortunate man was known to have about $180 in gold, and a large quantity of good wearing apparel; yet when found by the jury of inquest the body was entirely naked, his trunk of clothes gone, and the money missing.  We understand that an investigation will be set on foot today, to ascertain what became of his effects.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 11 July 1845

Inquest.  Coroner Mullen held an inquest on Wednesday over the body of a German emigrant, named Wm. Erecks, found floating in the water at O'Donnell's wharf.  Verdict of the jury - accidental drowning.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 18 July 1845

Cut his Throat.

   A German, employed at Sewell's tan-yard, on the Roisterstown Road, committed suicide yesterday morning, by cutting his throat.  His name was Christian Imer, and he was a man of intemperate habits.  Coroner Cooper held an inquest, and a verdict was rendered in accordance with the above facts.

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday evening, over the body of an infant white child, taken from a sink in N. Exeter-st., by Coroner Gallup.  Dr. Durkee conducted a post mortem examination, and in accordance therewith a verdict was rendered that it came to its death by the hands of some person unknown.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 26 July 1845

Not legible.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 26 August 1845

CITY INTELLIGENCE.

INFANTICIDE.

   A colored  woman named Sally Meggs, was arrested early yesterday morning by officer Joshua Myers and Lieut. Bangs, of the Eastern District Night Watch, on the charge of destroying her new born infant by throwing it into a sink at the rear of a house in Strawberry alley.  She was taken before Justice McAllister, when it appeared in evidence that she gave birth to the child on Sunday night during  the absence at church of the family with which she resided, and that previous to their return she committed the horrid deed.  She resided at the house of Cornelius Johnson, a respectable colored man, who from her appearance after his return from church, suspicioned that all was not as it should be, and he promptly gave the information to the officers which caused her arrest.  She was fully committed for trial at the October term of the Criminal Court.  The body of the child was taken out of the sink after considerable difficulty, and an inquest held over it by Coroner Mullen.  Drs. Landis and Davis held a post mortem examination, and gave it as their opinion that the child was alive when born.  Verdict of the jury, "that it came to its death by strangulation, and by being thrown into the sink by the hands of its merger."  The accused is from Accomac county, Va., and is aged about 20 years.

A Ripe Old Age.

   An inquest was held yesterday morning about 12 o'clock, by Coroner Mullen, at the house No. 105 Strawberry Alley, over the body of an old colored woman named Mary Clary, who died suddenly in the early part of the day.  The jury returned a verdict that she died by the visitation of God.  She was aged 100 years.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 18 September 1845

Inquest.  An inquest was held yesterday morning by Coroner Mullen over the body of a negro man, name unknown, found floating in the river near the Lazaretto.  From the appearance of the body it had been in the water for a considerable time.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental drowning.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 129 September 1845

Sudden Death.  We learn that a German, while engaged at work yesterday morning at the stand banks near the hospital, died suddenly from apoplexy.  An inquest was held by Coroner Hooper, and the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the fact.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 20 September 1845

Inquest.  The body of the little girl, Eliza Sprain, who was accidentally drowned on Tuesday last in Harriss' Creek, at Canton, was yesterday recovered and an inquest held over it by Coroner Mullen.  Verdict - accidental drowning.  She was aged but 5 years.

A Slight Mistake. The sudden death of the German, which we mentioned yesterday morning, occurred at the mine banks, about four miles from this city, on the Washington Road, and not at the sand banks near the Hospital, as we were previously informed.  The unfortunate man was aged about 30 years, and had been in this country but three months.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 1 October 1845

Killed by a Fall.  Catherine Wigenbrop, aged  76, walked out of the garret window of house No. 18, New street, about two o'clock, on the night of Monday, and fell upon a brick building with such force as to cause a contusion of the brain, from which she died about 8 o'clock yesterday morning.  Dr. Knight attended her. - Coroner Hooper held an inquest and rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 7 October 1845

Inquest. An inquest was held late on Saturday evening by Coroner Mullen, over the body of a mulatto female infant, found exposed in Pitt street, near Eden.  Verdict of the jury, that it came to its death from some cause to the jury unknown.

Body recovered. The body of Mr. John Brown, the young man who was accidentally drowned on Thursday last, was recovered yesterday afternoon about 3 o'clock.  It was found floating in the river near Fort McHenry.  An inquest was held by Coroner Mullen, and the jury returned a verdict of accidental drowning.   .  .  .  . 

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 1 November 1845

Coroner's Inquest.  An inquest was held earlty yesterday mierning by James hooper, Esq. Coeroner, over the body of a white male infant found e xposed on a dray in Albermarle-st., near Plowmarket.  Verdict of the jury - that it came to its death by the habnds of some person or opersons unknown.

Death from Intemperancde.

   A young whitev womsn, named Mry  Lamb, aged about 25 years, dieds suddenly on bThursday morning,  fromn the effects of Mania potu, while bering conveyed cto the Alms House.  She was foubd the evening oprevious, exposed on a [ ] on N. Cuovert-st. and taken to the watch-house.  She was not able to aspewak from the trime she was fouhnd until her death. She has rhree chikdren living.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 29 November 1845

Coroner's Inquest. An inquest was held on Thursday morning, by James Hooper, Esq., Coroner, over the body of a white male child found in a box in Potter's Field.  The jury returned a verdict of still-born.

Accidental Drowning.

   A German sailor, named Conrad Wittig, was accidentally drowned in Jones' Falls, near the site of the old draw-bridge, about 10 o'clock on Thursday night.  It is supposed that he slipped overboard from the logs lying upon the wharf.  His body was recovered yesterday morning, and an inquest held over it by Coroner Hooper.  Verdict of the jury, accidental drowning.  He resided in Light street, where he has left a wife and five children.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 5 December 1845

Fatal Accident.  Mr. William Robinson, a gentleman living on Federal Hill, met with an accident on Wednesday morning, which caused his death in about 3 hours.  He had made arrangements to go down the river on a gunning excursion, and while in the act of getting in a boat at the Railway wharf, by some accident his gun, which was lying in the bottom of the boat, was discharged, the whole laid entering his body.  Dr.  Hall was immediately in attendance, but all his efforts to save him were unavailing.  His body was taken to the residence of his brother-in-law in York-st., Federal Hill, where an inquest was held over it by Coroner Hooper.  The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.

 

American Republican & Baltimore Daily Clipper, 17 December 1845

Coroner's Inquest. An inquest was held on Monday evening by Coroner Hooper, at the dwelling of Barbara Butler, No. 129 Low-st., over the body of Sarah Brooke, a colored child, about 10 months old, which was put to bed at 2 o'clock and found dead at 4.  Dr. Whittaker was called in, and on an examination of the corpse, gave it as his opinion that the child had died in a fit, eating the rind of a tough piece of pork.  The verdict of the jury of inquest was in accordance with these facts.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School