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Colonial Cases

Mixed Court minor cases, 1899

North China Herald, 9 January, 1899
THE MIXED COURT.
   AT the Mixed Court on Tuesday before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor):
   A mafoo was fined $5 for touting for hire with a pony and carriage in the Honan Road.
   A well-dressed compradore was charged with furiously riding a bicycle along the Honan Road to the common danger of the public. Notwithstanding the evidence of the police, which was quite clear, the case was dismissed.
   An unemployed, for stealing a clock, value $3, from a house in French Town received 200 blows and one month.
   Ah Kew, a loafer, was charged with attempting to extort money from a Chinese demi-mondaine. He had previously been in her employ as a mafoo, and since his dismissal had obtained various small sums from her by means of threats. He now demanded $1,000 and threatened violence to the extent of throwing vitriol in her face if the money were not forthcoming. He was sentenced to two months' imprisonment.
   Zang Ah-zu, unemployed, for stealing cotton beds, etc., value $15, received 3 months.
   A coolie got 200 blows for stealing two cotton beds, value $4, from the late fire in Canton Road.
   Two coolies were charged in company with three others not in custody with assaulting complainant and causing him to lose $8.50 and were fined 50 cents each. 
   An old offender was awarded 200 blows, 2 months, and deportation for stealing blankets, etc., value $10.
   Five coolies received 100 blows each for stealing clothing value $8, of which half had been recovered by the police.
   For returning from deportation, Sung Ah-sung, a notorious thief, received 200 blows, 3 months, and to be re-deported.
   A Pootung thief got 200 blows and three months for stealing clothing, value $30, from 532 Canton Road.
   For stealing a quantity of harness, value $40, from 50, Rifle Range, 200 blows and 2 months.
   On Wednesday before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British Assessor):
   Sung Chu-dang, an old offender who had returned from deportation, was charged with being on enclosed premises at No. 13 Nanking Road, and was sentenced to 200 blows, 3 months, and to be re-deported.
   For stealing a brass foot-warmer from the late fire in Canton Road, a coolie received 200 blows and 3 months.
   An unemployed was given 200 blows and a month for stealing a pair of silk shoes value $1 in the Fuhkien Road.
   A mafoo was fined $3 for recklessly driving on the Nanking Road.
   Wong Tau, a servant, was fined $2 for cruelty to chickens by carrying them by their legs and allowing their heads to drag on the road.
   Loh Yung-sung, coolie, was charged with bringing milk into the Settlement without a license contrary to municipal regulations. Case was remanded pending the arrest of his   employer Ah Mai, dairyman.
   On Friday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British Assessor):
   The burglar Sun Tzau-ching who was sentenced on the 21st ult. to twelve months imprisonment for breaking into the premises of Sennet Freres on two occasions was again brought up and at the request of the Provincial Judge was ordered to be sent to Soochow city for a severer sentence as he is wanted on a charge of attempted manslaughter.
   A coolie was arrested by Mr. White of the Associated Wharves carrying a bar of iron weighting 40 lbs. in his bamboo. He was sentenced to two week's cangue and deportation.
   A knacker was charged with feloniously entering the stables of Mr. G. Dallas on two instances and causing the death of a pony. A watchman in the employ of Mr. Dallas was charged with aiding and abetting the said knacker to escape from custody. The former defendant was fined $60 and given 200 blows and six months; the latter getting 200 blows and six months.
   A house thief was charged with two petty thefts and sentenced to 200 blows an three months.
   An unemployed for stealing waterpipe and a pair of silver ear-rings, value $5, from 466 Yunnan Road, got 200 blows and 2 months.
   Tea Ah-woa, dairyman, was fined $50 for selling milk in the Settlement without a licence contrary to the Municipal Regulations.
   Four men found gambling in the Honan Road were awarded 200 blows and a week's cangue.
   For stealing 6 foot of cable chain value $3, from Ewo jetty, 200 blows.
   A lad 14 years of age received 100 blows on the hand and was sent to the Refuge for stealing a skin-lined cap from another youth.
   Two coolies got 200 blows each for stealing a quantity of beans from the China Merchants' Wharf.
   For stealing a quantity of old iron value $1 from Hongkew Wharf, a coolie was sentenced to 200 blows, a week's cangue, and deportation.
   A coolie on suspicion of stealing 3 articles of silk clothing and 7 books value $50 from 20, Quinsan Road, received a month's imprisonment.

 

North China Herald, 16 January, 1899
THE MIXED COURT.
   AT the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Cheng (magistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British Assessor).
   On the 5th ult. the Chinese of a village opposite the Swiss Farm requested a gentleman from the Bubbling Well Road to shoot a mad dog which he promptly did. Inspector Kelly ascertained that the said animal had bitten four children, one of whom had since died of hydrophobia. An appeal was therefore made to the Mixed Court to have all the dogs in the village destroyed. Mr. Cheng in reply has promised to attempt a satisfactory settlement.
   A lad 15 years of age was charged with publicly gambling on the North Honan Road and was sentenced to 200 blows.
   An old offender for stealing a cotton bed and coat, value $5, from 856 Boone Road, and for returning  from deportation, got 200 blows, 3 months, and to be re-deported.
   A childlike youth of 14 was brought up for stealing a box of soap weighing 60 lbs. value $4, from 33 Kiangse Road.  The theft was committed at the instigation of a wheelbarrow collie now in custody. A sentence of 100 blows on the hand was imposed.
   For returning from deportation, a thief was sentenced to 200 blows and re-deportation.
   For stealing a satin jacket, value $8, a coolie got 200 blows.
   A coolie was accused of stealing a licence value $1.40 from off a 'riksha and was awarded 200 blows.
   For fighting with each other and creating a disturbance on the Broadway two coolies were fined 50 cents each.
   For stealing 9 articles of clothing, value $7, from a house in Lower Hongkew a coolie got 200 blows.
   A mafoo was charged with harnessing a pony on the North Fuhkien Road, contrary to Municipal Regulations, and was fined $5.
   On Tuesday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor):
   A coolie was charged with stealing articles of clothing, value $3, and was sentenced to 200 blows and expulsion from the Settlement. 
   A barber and two coolies were brought up for stealing three hams, value $3, from the scene of the late fire and were awarded 100 blows each.
   A brass-smith at the same place stole ten caps value $2.50 and received 200 blows.
   Four men forfeited their bail of $5, being charged with fighting with each other and creating a disturbance on the Honan Road. Half of bail paid to Court.

 

North China Herald, 23 January, 1889
THE MIXED COURT.
  At the Mixed Court on Monday morning, before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor):
   A coolie and an amah were charged on suspicion with having stolen a gold watch and chain, and a brooch made of sovereigns, the property of Mr. Ford of the Jessfield Inn.  The case was remanded for a week for the production of further evidence.
   Two natives were charged with cutting and damaging young trees the property of Mr. Gore Booth, Mohawk Road, on the 15th inst. The prisoners were father and son, but the former instead of answering the summons himself sent a substitute, consequently the case was remanded and a warrant issued for his arrest.
   Three mafoos were charged with dangerous driving along the Bubbling Well Road on the 15th inst. Trooper Thomas proved the case, and a fine of $10 each was imposed.
   A native woman was charged with wilfully and maliciously torturing a little girl by thrusting her hand into a pan of boiling water in the Hing Ching filature on the 15th inst. She was sentenced to receive 100 blows on the face.
   On Tuesday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. Barchet (American Assessor):
   For the theft of cotton blankets, total value $5, a thief was ordered 200 blows and two months' imprisonment.
   A shoemaker was charged with stealing three bicycle lamps from the late fire on Bubbling Well Road and awarded 200 blows.
   For stealing a 'riksha apron, value 50 cents, from 1284 Peking Road, a coolie got 100 blows.
   The No. 2 "boy" at the Yahloong Cotton Mill was brought up for defrauding the lads hired by him of their wages. It appears he had been in the habit of discharging the boys in the middle of the month and telling them that it was by the company's order that no wages were paid. Three cases were proved against him and he was sentenced to 14 days' cangue and to refund $8.40, the amount claimed.
   A mafoo was fined $2 for harnessing a pony to a carriage on the Wetmore Road contrary to Municipal Regulations.
   A destitute Ningpo man was charged with attempting suicide from the Bund foreshore. He was rescued by a boatman. The Court ordered him relief.
   A carpenter was charged with forcing and entering a Chinese dwelling and stealing a bundle of clothing. On departing, two Ningpo men relieved him of his ill-gotten gains. All three were arrested. The carpenter was sentenced to 200 blows and 3 months and his two friends got a month each.
   On Thursday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. Mayes (British Assessor):
   Wong Ah-foo was charged with committing three thefts from various houses, and stealing goods to the value of $21, and with breaking into No. 267 Woochang Road for felonious purposes. He was sentenced to 200 blows and six months' imprisonment.
   For stealing 4 pocket knives, value $5, from 16 Peking Road, a coolie got 200 blows and three months.
   A coolie was awarded 200 blows for stealing sundry articles, value $18, from the scene of the fire at 914 Boone Road.
   For stealing clothing, value $5, from North Chekiang Road, two coolies got a month's cangue each.
   Sung Ah-foo was brought up for six charges of theft from lodging houses and was ordered 00 blows and 3 months.
   For stealing from the Yangtse Road jetty a basket of charcoal, value 50 cents, an unemployed got 200 blows and a month.
   Woo Kag-sun, a theatre proprietor, was charged with allowing an indecent play to be performed. He was on the 22nd of September last fined $50 for a similar offence. Mr. Lambuth said the play was not only objectionable to the governing classes but also immoral and obscene in both word and action. Accused had petitioned the police for permission to produce the play and had by them been cautioned, and told that both native and foreign detectives would be on the watch. Accused was fined $200.
  Five shopkeepers were brought up for being drunk and creating a disturbance. Once who was also accused of molesting a female was fined $5 and the others $3 each.
   A coolie was charged with creating a disturbance in an eating house in Yangtsepoo and with assaulting P.C. 327. A fine of $1 was imposed, with 50 cents compensation. 
   On Thursday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor):
   Six men were arraigned on suspicion of attempted arson. At half past four on Wednesday morning a native constable seeing smoke issuing though the shutters of No. 56 Honan Road, opium and tea shop, and obtaining no reply to his knocking, forced the premises and found thin empty boxes ablaze on a wooden shelf away from any fire or lamp. The flames were quickly put out by the police. The arrested men were on the first floor apparently asleep. It appears the same firm had a fire two years ago and recovered on the insurance; they are now insured for Tls. 7,500. The case was remanded for yesterday. 
   For stealing three articles of clothing, value $8, supposed to have been stolen from Yangtsepoo, a coolie got 200 blows.
   And for stealing copper to the value of $10 from the Boone Road fire another individual was awarded 50 blows.
    A thief, Chang Ah-fong, got 200 blows and three months for stealing property to the value of $56 from various houses in the Settlement.
   Four coolies, for attempting to extort $5.50 from complainant in a Hanbury Road tea-house by means of threats were sentenced to 100 blows each.
   Another extortioner got a month's cangue for trying to get 90 cents by means of threats and by representing himself as a Municipal detective.
   Four brass-workers were fined 50 cents each for creating a disturbance in an eating house, 609 Yangtsepoo Road, and were ordered to pay for the damage to property.
   An unemployed got 200 blows for stealing 58 lbs. of beans from a house in the Canton Road.
   For stealing a copper kettle, value 50 cents, 200 blows.
   On Friday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British Assessor):
   Song King-ching md five others who were charged with attempted arson on the 19th were again brought up.  Mr. Hunter appeared on behalf of Mr. Ballard of the North British Insurance. P.C. 4542 stated that at 3.30 a.m. of the 18th inst. he saw smoke issuing from the windows of No. 56 Honan Road, whereon he called P.C. 468 and together they forced an entrance. The occupants were not asleep nor were they making any effort to extinguish the flames.  There were no buckets of water near. The master of the house declared that he had endeavoured for half an hour to put the fire out. Mr. Hunter pointed out that the master contradicted the evidence of his employees, and asked the Court to examine each individual in private so as to get at the truth. The case was remanded until Monday and prisoners' bail increased to Tls. 1,000. The police were instructed to ascertain and also to obtain written evidence from the banks how they stand financially.
   Zing Ah-tzu, shopkeeper, 45 Tiendong Road, was fined $5 for making structural alterations without obtaining the necessary Municipal permit, and continuing same after being stopped by the police.
   Woo Chin-pah was charged on suspicion of feloniously setting fire to his house at No. 981 Boone Road on the 18th for the purpose of obtaining insurance, and thereby causing loss of life and great damage to property. Prisoner, under great agitation, gave his evidence which was partly substantiated by his employees. The case not being proved, prisoner was dismissed.
   Wong Ah-tzu, mafoo, was accused of furiously driving a licensed carriage on the Foochow Road and knocking down  an unknown person. Mr. J. C. Porter thoughtfully appeared as a witness and asserted that it was impossible to drive furiously as the road was crowded. The constable was ordered to appear before Captain Pattinson.
   A Pootung thief was charged with burglariously breaking into No. 28 Lloyd Road and stealing from Mr. Huang Ai-tang, ex City Magistrate, clothing and jewellery, value $255, and $15 in notes, also 34 pieces of silver total value $655.50. A large quantity of the stolen goods was found in the culprit. The prisoner who was only released from jail for larceny on the 12th instant was sentenced to 200 blows, a month's cangue, and 5 months' imprisonment.

 

North China Herald, 6 February, 1899
THE MIXED COURT.
  At the Mixed Court on Saturday, 28th January, before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Framke (German Assessor).
  A coolie was fined $5 for leaving a wheel-barrow in the North Honan Road unattended and causing an obstruction.
  Two shroffs were fined $20 each for assaulting a Policeman whilst in the execution of his duties.
  A coolie was fined $5 for carrying night-soil during prohibited hours, contrary to the Municipal Regulations.
  Two unemployed were fined $5 each for molesting females on the Dongkahloong alley.
  A silversmith was given 200 blows for stealing $3 worth of silver from his employer.
  Another coolie was given one month and 200 blows for stealing one cotton and one silk waistcoat.
  On Monday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor).
  Chee Kung-tze, a caretaker, was brought up for retaining on three occasions sums amounting to $31 due the Lau Kung Mow Mill Co. Defendant had been in the habit of leasing the kitchen of the premises under his charge unknown to plaintiffs. He also wilfully withheld from their knowledge damage amounting to $300, occupants having broken some $80 worth of glass besides breaking up several of the doors for firewood. His actions had also caused the dwellings to remain tenantless. A sentence of 200 blows and a month's imprisonment was imposed.
  A dairyman was fined $20 (half paid into court) for bringing milk into the Settlement without a license. He had been previously fined and his license was withdrawn.
  A well-known character was charged with stealing 3 fowls, value $1, from a house in the country and was awarded 200 blows and 3 months'.
  For stealing a quantity of bamboo fencing, value 10 cents, a coolie got 200 blows and 2 months', such depredations being too common.
  A Mafoo forfeited his bail of $3 for exercising two ponies in the Sungkiang Road contrary to Municipal Regulations.
  A convict, known as a desperate character got 300 blows for assaulting a fellow convict in the cells.
  Three men were accused of stealing 3 gold hairpins and a Silk jacket, value $70; the case was not proved but accused were given 200 blows and ordered to be deported being known as bad characters.
  For stealing 3 articles, value $3, from a boat in the Soochow Creek a coolie got 200 blows; $15 was found on his person and confiscated as same was probably stolen.
 Wu Yo-si, actor, was charged with allowing and taking part in an indecent and immoral play at his theatre on the Wuhu Road. Mr. Lambuth, intelligence officer, stated that a bribe of $50 had been offered him; the description of the play was too filthy to be uttered in Court and that on his first visit to the theatre he was recognised, consequently the obscene parts were suppressed. As the piece was practically destroyed the audience became irate, declaring that they had been defrauded. A fine of $200 (half paid into Court) was imposed.
  Two burglars were brought up on a charge of having on eight occasions broken into houses on the Boone Road and stolen property aggregating $182 in value. They were sentenced to 200 blows each and six months' imprisonment.
  On Tuesday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor.)
  Lee Sho-sui, mafoo, was charged with furiously driving on the Bubbling Well Road, and was given 7 days' cangue.
  Two widows were brought up for stealing cotton from the Ewo and Laoukungmow Mills and were given 200 blows on the hand each.
  Fr two thefts of clothing, value $19, a coolie was ordered to be deported.
  Two tradesmen got 100 blows on the hand each for fighting in the North Szechuen Road.
  A plaintiff got a month's imprisonment for bringing up a false charge of extortion.
  Tong Kwei-shu was accused by the Police of being known as a notorious burglar and procurer, and as dangerous to the good order of the Settlement. For twelve years defendant could give no satisfactory account of himself. Case was left to Court for further evidence.
  A widow living at 27 Kueichow Road was charged with throwing filthy water from an upper story window upon the public road. Bail ($1) forfeited.
  A carpenter who was deported in December,1895, was allowed to remain in the Settlement on finding a security.
  A mafoo was fined $1 for driving and colliding with complainant's carriage.
  On Wednesday morning, before Mr. U. K. Chang (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor).
  Three men were charged with stealing clothing, &c., value $4, from Chinese dwellings and were sentenced to 200 blows and 3 months' imprisonment.
  The men who were brought up and remanded for kidnapping a girl, 10 years of Age, from 114 North Honan Road, were again remanded for further evidence, the principals being kept under arrest in the meantime.
  Four mafoos, concerned with others not in custody, were charged with assaulting complainant and stealing $7 from him and were sentenced to 100 blows each.
  A coolie got 2 months' for stealing a case of Scrubb's Ammonia, value $24, from 37 Nanking Road, the property of Messrs. Voelkel and Schroeder.
  A thief got 200 blows, 12 months, and to be deported, for stealing jewellery and silk, value $228, from houses in the Nanking Road.
  For steaking a bicycle, value $120, a Pootung man was awarded 200 blows and 7 days' cangue.
  A collie received 200 blows and 3 months for steaking a wheelbarrow, value $8.
  For creating a disturbance on Messrs. Mackenzie and Co.'s premises, a servant was sentenced to 200 blows and 3 months.
  A houseboy in gay attire was fined $5 for being drunk and disorderly in the Foochow Road and assaulting the Police.
  On Friday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor).
  Fook Kah, a carpenter, was charged with steaking a piece of rubber packing from Farnham's Dock, and also being found on the Yangtzepoo Road with a quantity of clothing and being unable to give a satisfactory account of same. Prisoner was given 7 days' imprisonment.
  Hung Shing, dairyman, was accused of bringing adulterated milk into the Settlement. Mr. Christie deposed that the milk in question contained three parts water. On a previous occasion he was charged with adding 50 per cent of water and was cautioned; defendant was fined $100.
  Three convicts were charged with assaulting a fellow convict in the cells. The ringleader got 300 blows and the others 200o each.
  Sze King, shroff, and a married woman, wife of a man wanted by the Police, were brought up for assaulting and obstructing a native detective and a Mixed Court runner whilst executing a warrant at 218 Fuhkien Road, thereby assisting a man named Loh Tsing-foo to escape arrest. Each was awarded 200 blows and to be locked up until such time as the man be produced.
  For receiving and disposing of a coat, value $10, well knowing same to have been stolen, a man got 200 blows.
  A mistress and servant were charged with creating a disturbance in the Honan Road. The latter was dismissed and the former sent to the Refuge. The lady required three men to carry her out of Court.
  A shoemaker received 200 blows for stealing nine bobbins, value $1.50, from the Wo Zung Chang Cotton Mills.
  For carrying fowls downwards a fine of 50 cents was imposed on a Native.

 

North China Herald, 9 February, 1899
THE MIXED COURT.
.  .  .  
THE COUNCIL v. CONFLICTING ATOMS.
A SERIOUS QUESTION.
  At a special sitting of the Shanghai Mixed Court, on Monday afternoon, Mr. U.K. Cheng, Magistrate, sat with Mr. S. F. Sayers, British Assessor, to adjudicate upon a question of serious local importance, if not indeed affecting the general health of the Settlement. The procedure, in harmony with the tribunal, was distinctly mixed, Chinese and English being intermingled with the utmost freedom and without the least attempt to present to the council's officials and others interested in the case an intelligent statement of fact. The issue however was to say the least of it distinctly unsavoury.
  The Council had negotiated with a native contractor to remove nightsoil from houses in the Bubbling Well and Park Roads, he having taken the contract over from another Chinese as from the first of January this year. While working in the Sinza district one of the coolies was accused by certain minor officials and countrymen who alleged that he was infringing their rights and undertaking duties that were theirs by custom and usage. The coolie endeavoured to explain his position when he was assaulted, arrested, taken to the Mixed Court, from thence ordered to the City by the Mixed Court Magistrate and vigorously punished.
  There were counter allegations on the part of several tipaos in attendance in Court in regard to the interference.  Mr. J. O. P. Bland, Secretary to the Shanghai Council, explained that so far no evidence had been brought forward that the coolie in question had interfered with the countrymen. There was, however, proof on the other side that the council's servant had been molested.
  The contractor removed garbage from native houses in the district in question by private arrangement and that could not form an item for discussion in the matter.  The Taotai had recently issued directions that natives in foreign employ should not be taken to the city without trial before a foreign Assessor, but this was an instance subsequent to that notice.
  The Magistrate urged that the coolie referred to was charged in respect of an offence committed outside the Settlement and consequently that he was only carrying out his magisterial functions in directing the matter to the notice of the Chihsien.
  Mr. Bland pointed out that the effect of this action had been that the contractor had been unable to procure men to do the necessary work, with the result that one day no nightsoil on the Bubbling Well Road was removed, the coolies being afraid of the tipao, arrest, and possible chastisement.  Mr. Johnston, an Inspector in the service of the Municipal Council informed the Court of the nature of the Contract under notice and said that the employees of the Council did not exercise any supervision over workmen of the contractor. Such interference on the part of the countrymen or others was likely to injuriously affect the sanitation of the Settlement.
  On the suggestion f the Assessor, in which Mr. Bland acquiesced on behalf of the Council, the Magistrate undertook to issue a proclamation to the effect that any interference with the employees of contractors under them on the part of natives either in or out of the Settlement would be severely dealt with.
.  .  .  
Shanghai, 7th February.
Before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne (British Assessor), and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor).
DODWELL & CO. v. SHENG CHI-SHING.
   This was an intricate matter, the defendant, described as the managing partner of a large native store in which seven others were interested being sued in respect of extensive transactions in piece-goods. A further action in which the China and Japan Trading Company were plaintiffs involving a precisely similar issue being heard at the same time.
  Mr. E. Nelson (Messrs. Johnston, Stokes and Master) represented the plaintiff companies and Mr. W. V. Drummond appeared for the defendant.
  Mr. Nelson explained that the defendants admitted owing a certain sum of money but he desired that the accounts should be submitted to some expert to ascertain the exact amount of the liability. Defendant claimed to have some interest in an ancestral estate and was prepared to assign that interest to the plaintiffs. He (Counsel) was prepared to agree to this and if the Court consented they might proceed to the appointment of some merchant in Shanghai to go through the accounts and the actual amount owing with interest should be adjudged by this party. This would save a considerable amount of time and trouble for everybody concerned and the plaintiffs would agree to an interlocutory judgment and report the examination to the Court.
  Mr. Drummond - I think the Chinese procedure is to take a bond signed by the defendant and lodged in the Court.
  Mr. Nelson - I am not aware of the practice with regard to that. I propose now to take an interlocutory judgment for an amount to be ascertained at a future date against the hong.
  Me. Bourne asked if they were going to appoint an arbitrator, but
  Mr. Nelson explained that a lot of the goods in their possession were not yet sold and they might get a very good market for them and lessen the indebtedness to a very considerable extent.
  Mr. Drummond accepted the suggestion as to the appointment of an independent merchant to investigate the accounts, but remarked that it should be understood that the legal advisers of the parties could be present at the inquiry if they liked. Continuing, he added that
A suit was pending in regard to Sheng's interest  in an ancestral estate and should he be successful in that action, he would recover more than sufficient to cover his indebtedness in both these two suits. He would like to have this assignment officially recorded and recognised by the Court as part of the proceedings.
  Mr. Nelson remarked that there were seven other partners in the hong against whom they said they had a right of action but they wanted this case thoroughly decided before they went against them. Sheng said that he was responsible alone, but although the others might be what in English law were known as sleeping partners they were none the less responsible.
  It was decided by the consent of the parties to refer the matter of the of the accounts to either Mr. A. E. Probst (Iveson & Co.) or Mr. F. Anderson (Ilbert & Co,) amounting therefore to an interlocutory judgment for the plaintiffs. The Court rejected the offer of the assignment of the alleged patrimonial interest.
.  .  .  
Before Mr. Cheng and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne.
BARLOW & CO. v. MAI LIEN YUAN.
  This was an old case which at a recent sitting was referred to the Chamber of Commerce asking them to appoint the arbitrator. The Chamber delegated the duty to Mt. Hutchinson and wrote to the Court to the effect that a better opinion than this could not be obtained in such a matter. Mr. Hutchinson in his award held that the glass which formed the subject of the action was of the quality ordered by the defendant.
  Judgment was accordingly entered for the plaintiffs for Tls. 673.
.  .  .  
TAM WA v. CHOU WEI-CHEN.
  Plaintiff sued for the recovery of Tls. 600 lent to the defendant on the security of a fangtan covering a certain area of ground. Defendant undertook to settle the claim by the end of the first Chinese moon.
  The Court accepted the offer and gave judgment for the plaintiff adding that unless he redeemed the security plaintiff had no right to sell the land. At the request of the plaintiff defendant was ordered to provide security for his re-appearance.
.  .  .
EVANS & CO. v. SU PAO SEN
  Mr. E. Nelson (Messrs. Johnston, Stokes and Master) for the plaintiffs, and Mr. T. Morgan Phillips for the defence.
  The Court gave judgment as follows:
     In this suit which was heard by Mr. Bourne and myself on the 25th 27th of October 8th, 10, 15th, 17th of November and on the 16th December, the plaintiffs in their petition claim Tls. 5,288.03 loss on 190 cases Ellerton I Cotton Flannel bought by the defendant from the plaintiffs but which the defendant refused to accept. There was no written answer to the petition, the Court therefore settled the issues as follows:
  [1.] Was the contract cancelled?
  [2.] Were the plaintiffs entitled to profit on certain exchange contracts?
  The facts as proved in evidence, namely that in July and August,1893, Su Pao Sen, the defendant, being then in the employ of Evans & Co. the plaintiffs, as their compradore, contracted with Mr. Fobes who was then in charge of Evans & Co.'s business as attorney, the head of the firm, Mr. A. M. A. Evans being then in England, to purchase 200 cases of Ellerton I English Flannel. On the arrival of the goods Su declined to take delivery of more than the first ten cases because the goods were stamped with a "Three Stag" chop while the samples from which the order was given bore a "Crown" chop.
  On November Mr. G. W. Noel, a piece-goods expert, being called in by Fobes gave a verbal award or opinion that in consideration of the wrong chop and of a falling market, an allowance of ten cents a piece should be made to Su. Messrs. Askell and Anderson were then appointed arbitrators by the parties and on the 22nd December 1893 they made their award, by the terms of which Evans & Co. were to carry the goods free of charge until the 31st of March 1894 and allow one mace per piece on the contract price.
  So far the facts are not disputed. But while the plaintiffs here allege that they intended to carry out the as modified by a verbal arrangement with Su Pao Sen that they, Evans & Co., should carry the goods for Su till the end of 1894, the defendants Su and Fobes affirm that on the 22nd of December 1893 the award was discussed by Evans, Fobes and Su, when Evans on the advice of Fobes determined to cancel the contract with Su and take over the goods himself rather than carry out the award, as he considered the allowance too large.
  It should be noted here that Mr. A. M. A. Evans who is, as appears from the evidence, Evans & Co., returned to Shanghai early in December 1893 and resumed charge of his business; that Fobes was discharged from Evans' employment on the 17th of May 1894, and that the defendant Su was likewise discharged within a few days of the last date.
  The evidence of Evans on the one side and that of Fobes and Su on the other being directly contrary, I have had to decide from the verbal and documentary evidence put in, which is the more probable account of what actually happened. The great lapse of time - 5 years, and the confused state of the documentary evidence put in by the plaintiff firm have made it very difficult to unravel the facts of this case. But supposing the understanding between the parties in December 1894 was that the award was to be carried out - that the contract was not cancelled - the following facts are very difficult to explain.
  [1.] Half the arbitration fee was by the terms of the award, to be paid by either party, but on the 27th of December 1893 the whole is charged to Evans in the Compradore's Day Book kept in English showing the compradore's receipts and disbursements on account of the firm. In regard to this, Evans says that the compradore put sown what he chose and that there was no squaring up of accounts between them during that year.  Su was in his employment; but in that case Evans must not expect a Court of Justice to make a presumption to take the place of evidence the want of which is due to his own laches. He should have shown that these entries were not carried into his other books; but this he did not do.
  [2.] The import duty was paid by Su and refunded to Su by Evans.
  [3.] The transaction was apparently closed on the 20th of February 1894 by the refund of Tls. 33 by Su to Evans, this being the difference between the cost of the ten cases taken by Su and a sum paid on account by Su on the 8th of November 1893.
  [4.] In statements of outstanding claims sent by Evans to Su in June 1894, these contracts are not included.
     Judgment on both issues for the defendant.
.  .  .  
ALLEGED ARBITRARY CONDUCT BY GERMAN MERCHANTS IN SHANGHAI.
  At the Mixed Curt on Tuesday morning before the Magistrate Mr. U. K. Cheng and Dr. Barchet, U.S. Assessor. Mr. Morgan Phillips (Messrs. Drummond and Phillips) made an application for the release of a native who he alleged was illegally imprisoned at the instance of Messrs. H. M. Schultz & Co., merchants, of Szechuen Road.
  Mr. Phillips said - With the permission of the Court I wish to make an application in connection with a certain case in which I believe the Assessor is not concerned but in regard to which I wish to state certain facts to the learned Mixed Court Magistrate.  It is in connection with the arrest and detention of one Ching Fung, a piece goods merchant, at the suit of Messrs. H. M. Schultz & Co., and I think it is quite certain that the whole of the facts in the case cannot have been brought before you.
  There is a contract which I believe is in the custody of the Court which was entered into on the 22nd November 1898, between Ching Fung and Messrs. Schultz & Co., and by this contract Ching Fung greed to clear certain goods on the 21st December 1898, and another lot of merchandise on or about the departure of the first Tientsin steamer in the spring of 1899. A certain person, Su Kong, was named as the guarantor of this contract and there were certain other terms which I need not refer to except that it was stipulated that if Ching Fung carried out the agreement he was to be allowed a certain reduction of 30 per cent on interest overdue. Ching Fung carried out this first part of the contract and cleared the goods in the 21st of December, and I might add that for a long period he has had business transactions with Messrs. Schultz & Co.
  On the 9th of January this year, my firm wrote to Messrs. Schultz & Co. making a claim on behalf of Ching Fung in respect of certain interest which he claimed had been overcharged by them and again on the 18th of January another letter was written making a formal claim, and stating that proceedings would be taken unless the money was paid to Ching Fung.
  Now it is a very significant fact that after these letters were written a suit was brought by Messrs. Schultz & Co. in this Court with regard to the clearing of the goods in the spring of this year. He was arrested in this court and ultimately placed in custody.  I say it is a very significant fact that after these letters were written making this claim against Messrs. Schultz & co., proceedings should have been instituted against him by them in respect of a contract to be performed in the future.
  I must say it is a very extraordinary proceeding to me and it is an entirely novel one to British Courts. At all events so far as we know there was no prospect that Ching Fung could not carry out his contract and clear the goods at the appointed time, but they thought fit to arrest him. Ching Fung produced the guarantee signed by Su Kong stipulating that with a proper performance of the contract Ching Fung's claim with regard to interest would not be affected.  Apart from this qualification, it was a complete guarantee to carry out the contract, but Messrs. Schultz objected to the insertion of any such provision, and upon their pressure Ching Fung was placed in prison.
  On Saturday last another guarantee was prepared by Su Kong. It is in Chinese characters, and I am told is entirely unqualified, guaranteeing that Ching Fung will clear these goods in March. It was not however accepted by Messrs. Schultz & Co. which seems to me a most arbitrary and extraordinary proceeding in their part.  I should state that after hearing of these matters I went to see Messrs. Schultz, but their managing director refused to discuss the matter in any shape or form and referred me to the German Consulate. I saw Dr. Framke who was not however cognisant of the fact that this security had been forthcoming.
  These are the facts and I do ask that this security being forthcoming, this security asked for, that Ching Fung be released from custody.  I may say in conclusion that I do not wish to comment upon the facts as I have stated them to the Court but they will be commented upon and reflected upon in Shanghai by every person possessed of any sense of justice. Under the circumstances it is a very sad thing that Ching Fung should have been locked up and confined with the rogues and vagabonds with whom you have to deal with in this Court.  I ask on the production of this guarantee that he be released from custody.
  His Worship intimated that he would at once put himself in communication with the German Consulate.

 

North China Herald, 9 February, 1899
THE MIXED COURT.
.  .  .  
  At the Mixed Court in Saturday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Betz (German Assessor).
  For publicly gambling with dice in the North Honan Road Josshouse a man got 200 blows on the hand and three months' imprisonment.
  A female worker received 200 blows on the hand for stealing 7 bobbins containing cotton yarn, value $3, from the Lao Kung Mow Mill.
  A Pootung carpenter was charged with breaking and entering No. 185 Chekiang Road and stealing clothing to the value of $8, and was given 200 blows.
  Kai Ah-doo, unemployed, for breaking into and entering No. 149 Kiukiang Road, and stealing silk clothing, value $32, was sentenced to 200 blows and three months' I imprisonment.
  Mr. C. Cumming, broker, charged a hired jinricksha coolie with assaulting him.  Complainant stated that the coolie absented himself whilst engaged, and that he had to engage another, consequently he refused to pay defendant, who followed him about and eventually snatched his hat from his head and ran away with it. Prisoner was sentenced to 7 days' cangue.
  For stealing old iron, value 30 cents, from the Hongkew Wharf, a loafer got 200 blows.
  Two men of no fixed abode were charged by the Police with stealing $16.50 from some persons unknown. Case dismissed.
  Wong Zang Ching was brought up for kidnapping a girl aged 9 years from her house on the North Shansi Road and selling her for $12. He was sentenced to 200 blows and a year.
  A woman charged a man with obtaining a gold ring and a silver bangle, value $20, from her by means of threats in a lodging house. One examination it was found that the accused had seen complainant acting immorally and was consequently trading on same. Prisoner was sentenced to 200 blows and the complainant 100 blows.
  Two coolies got 200 blows each for stealing two umbrellas, value $1.50, from a steamer at Hongkew Wharf.
  Yesterday morning before the above Magistrate and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor).
  A man got 200 blows and three months imprisonment for stealing silk clothing, value $45, from 19 Soochow Road.
  Wong Ah-king, a hawker, was charged with attempting suicide on the afternoon of the 4th inst. by jumping into the Soochow Creek from off the Garden Bridge. Prisoner was sent to the Refuge.
  A blacksmith received one month's confinement for being in the enclosed premises No. 4 Hankow Road, for purposes of felony.
  A woman, Sze Doo-tze, who was previously remanded on suspicion of stealing a box containing 72 pearls, 4 gold rings, 7 gold hair pins, 3 pairs gold ear-rings, and other jewellery, value $600 from No. 90 Nanking Road, was sent to hospital for examination, she pleading sickness and having to be carried in and out of Court. Others not yet in custody are believed to be implicated in the case.
  For stealing a tarpaulin from a boat in the Soochow Creek a coolie got 100 blows.
  Five young men, carpenters, were brought up for stealing a cotton coat and for a petty extortion by means of threats and were awarded seven days.
  A beggar received 200 blows and three months' for acting as watchman and decoy to a number of gamblers in the North Honan Road Josshouse.
  A coolie was fined $2 and license confiscated for forging two wheelbarrow licenses by altering the Chinese characters thereby defrauding the Municipal Council of 12,000 cash.
  200 blows and one month were given to an assistant for unlawfully appropriating the sum of $21 entrusted to him by his employer.
  A cook was charged by the police with having a quantity of cotton, vvalue $3, in his possession and being unable to give a satisfactory account of same, and was fined $3.
  Wem Tsze Ching, compradre, was fined Tls. 50 for attempting to extort Tls. 25 from a woman. The case had previously been remanded on a raised question of business practice.
  A house thief received 200 blows and three months for petty thefts, value $29.
  A coolie was awarded 200 blows and a month's cangue for fraudulently attempting to obtain $4.50 by presenting a forged ticket at Messrs. Boyd & Co.'s offices.
  Two men were charged with stealing 3 articles of jewellery, value $46, and $14 in cash, from 327 Woochung Road, and sentenced to 200 blows and 2 months.
  For firing bombs on the Woochung Road, contrary to Municipal Regulations, a fine of $2 was imposed.
  A loafer was sentenced to 200 blows and to be expelled from the Settlement for being on the enclosed premises, 252 Dent Road, for the purposes of felony.
  A houseboy was accused of stealing a silver cigarette case, value $15, and received 200 blows and three months.
  And a shop assistant was fined $30 for receiving same.
  Two men were charged with steaking 940 yards of cloth, value $120, from a house on the Bubbling Well Road. The principal offender got 200 blows and six months' and the other 200 blows and three months'.
  On Tuesday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor),
  A boatman, for obstructing the fairway at the Canton Road jetty, was fined $1;
  Whilst another was ordered to give security to remove a boat obstructing the Soochow Creek.
  For dumping garbage in the river near the new Chinese bunding a boatman was fined $2.
  Sing Ah-gee, unemployed, and Yeh Cheng-chu, godown keeper, were charged with being concerned together in stealing a quantity of waste silk from Messrs. Jardine. Matheson & Co.'s godown in the Peking Road and substituting for the same inferior waste. They were each sentenced to three months' imprisonment.
  Two ricsha coolie were fined $1 for annoying the public by touting for hire.
  For being in the unlawful possession of clothing, worth $3, Lee Ah-sai, unemployed, was ordered to receive 200 blows.
  The same punishment being ordered Woo Yang-seng, a servant, for stealing a silk waistcoat, value$3.50, from No. 13 The Bund.
  Two coolies were fined $1 each and ordered to pay $1 compensation for creating a disturbance at a tea-house  at Yangtsepoo and doing 30 cents damage.
  King pao, unemployed, who tried to extort $10 from the complainant by means of threats was fined $20.
  A coolie got 200 blows for the unlawful possession of two hats;
  And another man was fined $2 for discharging a bomb in the Boone Road to the common danger.
  Chang Huang-foh was brought up on suspicion of having assaulted a man in a tea-house in the North Honan Road, from the effects of which he was supposed to have died.  The case was dismissed.
  A known thief, for breaking into a room in a lodging house in the Canton Road with intent to commit a felony, was sentenced to two months' imprisonment and 200 blows.
  A hawker was given a week for stealing a brass incense burner, value32, from 235 Purdon Road.
  An unemployed man got 200 blows and a month for stealing a silk apron and other articles worth $7.
  A hawker was sentenced to 100 blows for assaulting a woman, and stealing a hairpin worth $1.
  For stealing two cotton jackets, value $3,  a man was given 200 blows and one month's cangue.


North China Herald, 20 February,1899
THE MIXED COURT.
  At the Mixed Court on Friday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor).
  A coolie was sentenced to a month's imprisonment for stealing a gold ring, value $18, from some person unknown.
  Two coolies, for stealing a gold watch, value $20, received 200 blows and 3 months' each.
  A suspicious character got 200 blows and a month for loitering on the Dingkaloong for unlawful purposes.
  For stealing a pair of vases, value $14, from 450 Foochow Road, a coolie was awarded 200 blows.
  Chu Yee-loh was charged with being in unlawful possession of articles valued at $35, and with returning from deportation. He was given 200 blows, 6 months' and to be re-deported.
  Chang Lee-sung, a well-known thief, received 200 blows and 12 months' imprisonment for burglariously breaking into and stealing articles of clothing, value $50, from 824 Broadway.  Two minor thefts were also proved against him.
  A mafoo was fined $10 for cruelly ill-treating a pony by working it whilst suffering from sores.
  Another mafoo was fined $5 for a similar offence.
  A well-known local loafer and a woman 17 years of age were charged with being concerned together in kidnapping a girl 13 years of age from the lawful custody of her parents at 294 Nanking Rad. The case was remanded.
  A coolie got 200 blows and a month for stealing a jacket, value $18, from the possession of complainant.
  A youth got 200 blows and a month for publicly gambling with dice on the Honan Road bridge.
  Sung Ah-kung, a well-known character, got 200 blows and 6 months for stealing a gold watch and chain and other articles value $250 from 83 Woosung Road.
  Nine cases of furious driving on the Bubbling Well Road occurred. In each case a bail of $10 was forfeited.
  A barber got a month for stealing clothing, etc., value $40, from a godown on the Ningpo Wharf.
  A bookbinder was fined $5 for furiously riding a pony on the Bubbling Well Road.
  Two coolies were charged with stealing a quantity of brass and old iron, value $2.50, from Messrs. Boyd & Co. and were sentenced to 14 days' cangue and 200 blows.
  Three coolies got 200 blows each for stealing old iron, value $2, from the Hongkew Wharf.
  An unemployed got six days' cangue and 200 blows for stealing 2 silver bangles, value $3, from the person of a child.
  Seven men forfeited the bail of $1 each for firing bombs in the public road contrary to Municipal Regulations.
  For stealing a hammer, value $2, from the Laokungmow cotton mill a coolie got 14 days' cangue.
  A woman, Lu Chu-sze, was charged with stealing a jade stone ornament, value $50, from the person of complainant in a house in the Szechuen Road. The case was described as a very bad one, prisoner keeping a house of assignation where she enticed young girls for immoral purposes. Complainant had gone there to bring away a girl enticed by her. A sentence of 300 blows on the hand and a month's cangue was imposed.
  Chief Inspector Howard charged a mafoo with recklessly driving and colliding with his carriage on the Nanking Road. Bail of $20 was ordered to be paid as compensation.
  Seven persons were charged with gambling in a brothel at 330 Foochow Road, five of whom were on bail for $25 each. The case was dismissed, but two of the accused forfeited their bail for non-appearance.

North China Herald, 20 February, 1899
Mr. R. W. Lambuth, Municipal Intelligence officer, brought in Friday morning before the Mixed Court a case of gambling in a Foochow Road brothel. The Assessor Mr. S. F. Mayers asked him whether he exercised the same diligence over the Shanghai Club and other kindred institutions, and whether that form of gambling came within the meaning of the Municipal Regulations.
In reply Mr. Lambuth stated that the question was a delicate one.  He, however, declared that the gambling had been going on for a long period, that the Municipal Authorities had often refused the Chinese permission to open clubs knowing same to be intended solely for gambling purposes; also the Criterion Club, formerly on the Nanking Road, had been under supervision, and pressure had successfully been brought to bear accordingly. Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) asserted that the dominoes and cards used were not different, from a gambling stand-point, from the cards used by foreigners, and added that every brothel in the Settlement was used for such purposes.
Mr. Mayers further enquired whether raids had been made on the foreign brothels on the Kiangse Road, and, finding such had not been done, refused to take any steps towards punishing the defendants.
WE believe that Mr. Mayers' remarks at the Mixed Court on gambling have been somewhat misunderstood. He did not refer specially to the Shanghai Club but to foreign clubs in Shanghai;  and the position which he took up - as it seems to us very properly - was that while always anxious to support the Police, he would not insist upon the magistrate's punishing Chinese for playing cards or dominoes for money in their Clubs, while no attention was paid to the playing of cards or dominoes for money in foreign clubs.

 

North China Herald, 27 February, 1899
THE MIXED COURT.
  At the Mixed Court on Tuesday before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr,. Barchet (American Assessor),
  Inspector Kelly charged May Ah-sing, mafoo, with cruelly working a pony whilst in a lame and unfit state. The mafoo to be fined on a veterinary surgeon giving evidence to that effect.
  Ding Chung-sze, shroff, was brought up for stealing a quantity of gold and silver jewellery, also a number of pearls, total value $500, from a woman living at 202 North Soochow Road. Prisoner, who was most extravagantly dressed, was sentenced to six months'.
  A cook, employed at the West Hongkew Station, was charged with extorting a cloth waistcoat from one of the prisoners and pawning same as; he was found to be carrying on a wholesale system of squeeze, a fine of $20 was imposed.
  Two convicts were also brought up for assaulting the said cook whilst confined in a cell, accusing him of squeezing them, they covered his face with a blanket and beat him. Inspector Bourke pressed for a heavy sentence as they were known as desperate characters and were undergoing as sentence for highway robbery. A sentence of 300 blows and in addition six months was given.
  The Ningpo man who was charged on the 8th inst. with stealing silk clothing, value $160, and whose case was remanded, was sentenced to 200 blows and a month's imprisonment. On a friend refunding the value in money and giving security, the sentenced was reduced to seven days only,
  Two Cantonese, unemployed, were charged with creating a disturbance and fighting with each other in a lodging-house on the Woosung Road. The aggressor, who was found in possession of two daggers with eight inch blades, got 200 blows, a year, and to be deported.
  On Wednesday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor).
  A well-known loafer got 200 blows and a month's imprisonment for carrying arms contrary to Municipal regulations.
  A 'ricsha coolie was awarded 3 days' for colliding with and knocking down a Chinese.
  Two men, Han Yue-zung (actor) and Wong Ming-yung (broker) were charged with being concerned together in attempting to extort from complainant the sum of $25 in a brothel at 330 Foochow Road. The former was fined $100 or a month's imprisonment, and the latter got three months.
  A mafoo was made to pay Tls. 4 as compensation for recklessly driving a pony and carriage on Foochow Road and colliding with and damaging Dr. Miller's carriage.
  A Ningpo coolie was sentenced to 200 blows and a month for assaulting the foreign lady by whom he was employed.
  For taking a young lady's umbrella, value $4, a 'ricsha coolie received 200 blows.
  On Friday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor).
  Two men and two boys, were charged with stealing a gold and a silver watch, an overcoat and sundry articles, value $150, from a steamer at the Japanese wharf and two others were charged with receiving same knowing the things to be stolen. The lads were dismissed and the remainder were remanded for further investigation.
  Mr. J. Johnston charged his private washer man with illegally pawning three bed sheets, value $9; prisoner was also charged with pawning the clothes of three Chinese. For defence he admitted he pawned the articles in order to buy soap. A sentence of 200 blows and a month's imprisonment was imposed.
  A 'ricsha coolie got 200 blows for appropriating an umbrella, value $4, the property of Mrs. Wilson, said unbrella being left in his 'ricsha.

 

North China Herald, 6 March 1899
THE MIXED COURT.
  At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor).
  A youth, blacksmith, was brought up for attempting to obtain wages from the Old Dock by means of forged work tickets, also with being found in possession of a number of forged tickets. No one on behalf of the Dock Company appearing, the case was therefore remanded.
  Woo Tso-kee, contractor, was charged with neglecting to provide sufficient hoarding in front of buildings on the Peking Road and allowing bricks to fall on the road. Inspector Wilson stated thast defendant had been charged with a similar offence the previous summer and was let off, and also asserted that the falling of brisk was a daily occurrence. A fine of $100 was imposed.
  Two young men, unemployed, were accused of steaking a pony, value $50, from a stable at 126 Hoopeh Road; the pony had been sold at the West Gate for £20. They were sentenced to 200 blows and 3 months' each.
  Sung Hai-she, loafer, and a young woman, Loh Ah-cha, who were remanded on the 17th inst. for kidnapping the girl Wong Cha-foo, were again brought up along with a man, woman, and boy who were also implicated; the gang were sent to the city magistrate.
  Sung Sun-yung, tinsmith, was charged with soldering tins containing kerosene oil in a boat on the Defence Creek to the danger of life and property. Case was remanded for the appearance of his employer.
  On Wednesday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),
  Suh Sun-tai, unemployed, was charged with fraudulently obtaining two books, value $200, from complainants Woo and Tak Kee-foo by means of false representations, and Wong Ah-yue, mafoo, was also brought up for being in unlawful possession of two books supposed to be the above mentioned. The case was remanded for further evidence, as both parties made most contradictory statements.  Complainants were charged with circulating obscene literature and their premises ordered to be searched.
  Three Chinese were fined $1 each for allowing their dogs to be without muzzles on the public roads contrary to Municipal Regulations.
  The four men, who were charged on the 24th ultimo, with being concerned together in the theft of a gold watch, etc., value $150, from a Japanese steamer and who were remanded, were with two others, again brought up. Detective Johnson showed that the men belonged to an organised gang of thieves and that the boys who were dismissed at the previous hearing were apprentices, said lads visiting the theatres for purposes of picket-picking and that the men divided the booty on their return. He also proved that the keeper of the lodging house where the men were arrested connived at their doings. The said house had thirteen rooms but the six men and two boys habited the one room. In fact all slept on the one bed. Nothing would have been known about the gold watch had they not voluntarily mentioned it. A sentence of 200 blows and six months' imprisonment was imposed.
  The lad, a blacksmith, who was remanded on the 27th ult., on a charge of attempting to obtain from the Old Dock Company wages by forged work tickets and also with having a number of the same in his possession, was again brought up. It appears that the tickets were bona fide but the lad had stolen them. A padlock belonging to the Company was also found in his possession. He was sentenced to 200 blows on the hand and a month.
   On Wednesday morning a serious charge was brought against a native who for some time has held a position of more or less trust in the service of the Royal Asiatic Society in Museum Road. The prisoner, a sleek, well-fed individual, was convicted of having falsified accounts for book binding, etc., by dexterously transmogrifying particular figures into higher values in such a way that by altering the corresponding numbers of the total, the bill, casually regarded looked perfectly genuine. Some of them had passed undetected but how tradesman (Chinese) could give receipts for such increased amounts and remain ignorant of the transactions was not explained. A sentence of four months imprisonment under the circumstances was entirely merited.
  On Thursday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. Barchet (American Assessor),
  A mafoo in the employ of Zee Butler was charged with harassing a pony on the Bubbling Well Road, on the 1st inst. thereby causing an obstruction. A fine of $10 was imposed.
  A boy in the employ of W.D. Bell was charged with stealing a cigarette case and several articles of clothing to the value of $30, the property of his employer, from 14 Foochow Road. Prisoner was sentenced to 300 blows.
  A stable keeper of 326 Hupeh Road was charged with keeping his licensed stable in a filthy condition, after being repeatedly warned concerning the same. Inspector Batty said there was no excuse for the defendant, as there was plenty of water laid on, and the stable was not in need of repair. The stench was almost unbearable. Prisoner was ordered to pay a fine of $30 and given three days to clean the place.
  Two natives were charged with attempting to extort money from complainant in a house in Chekiang Road, by representing themselves to be detectives. They were sentenced to 200 blows and a month's cangue each.
  On Friday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),
  Two coolies were sentenced to a month's imprisonment for stealing a ton and a-half of coal from the premises of Mr. F. Maitland.
  For being on the enclosed premises of Mrs. Jansen, 107 Boone Road, for the purpose of committing a felony, a coolie got 200 blows.
  Two cases of allowing unmuzzled dogs on the public roads contrary to Municipal Regulations were brought up; fines not being forthcoming, the animals were ordered to be destroyed. The magistrate agreed, for future cases, on a bail of $10, to be forfeited as a fine in cases where such sum can be paid; otherwise the dog to be confiscated.
  Yue Szee-ding, shopkeeper living in the French Settlement, was arrested on a warrant for allowing the soldering of tins containing kerosene oil in a boat belonging to him on Defence Creek to the danger of life and property. His assistant had been previously brought up and remanded. A fine of $25 was imposed.
  Woo Dah-foo, broker, and Cha Kee-foo, gentleman, were charged with circulating two obscene books. They had previously charged two men with obtaining two books, value $200, on false pretences. It appears that they gave the books to one Sah Sun-sai to sell, and the latter left them with a well-to-do Chinese for examination on receipt of a small sum. The would-be purchaser, hearing that Sah Sun-sai had been arrested, feared trouble, and returned them by a mafoo. The owners of the books contended that the books in Court were not the same that they had given out, but evidence showed to the contrary. They were each fined $30.

 

North China Herald, 13 March 1899
MIXED COURT.
At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),
  A coolie was charged with stealing, on various dates, $100, the property of M. Magnan, 19 Nanking Road. The charge being proved, he was sentenced to 200 blows and three months' imprisonment.
  A coolie was charged with having unlawful possession of a gold watch value $50 and being unable to give a satisfactory account of the same on the 4th inst. Prisoner was sentenced to three months' imprisonment.
  A coolie was charged with allowing his dog to be at large without a muzzle contrary to Municipal Regulations. Prisoner, who did not appear, was ordered to forfeit his bail of $5 and the dog to be confiscated.
  On Tuesday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor),
  Another striking instance of Chinese duplicity was related. Mr. H. Browett appeared on behalf of Mr. W. S. Emens of the American Trading Company, situated in Tientsin, in an action against a native land broker named Woo Yu-chee (who did not appear). It seems that towards the latter end of 1896 Woo, who at one time was Mr. Emens' Chinese teacher, intimated that he wished to sell a certain piece of land.  M r. Emens communicated the fact to Dr. Ivy, a personal friend, who expressed his willingness to treat for the purchase of the same, and Mr. Emens, who acted as go-between, paid Woo on behalf of Dr. Ivy Tls. 700 bargain money.
  There was, however, such a considerable delay in the delivery of the title-deeds, that Dr. Ivy informed the vendor that he was prepared to forgo  the purchase providing that the bargain money was refunded. The land in the meantime had greatly increased in value, and Woo readily accepted the offer and promised to return the sum he had received.
  Notwithstanding repeated applications for payment, Woo failed to keep his promise and a short time ago proceedings were instituted in the Mixed Court, but temporarily withheld in consequence of Woo's offer to tender a promissory note, implying a definite settlement by the middle of March. As, however, he had neither signed such a document, submitted any explanation, or answered the summons, Mr. Browett said he felt compelled to seriously press the claim.
  Mr. Browett agreed to the interest at the rate of seven per cent from December 1896 to the 15th of the present month being assessed at a lump sum of Tls. 100, making the total indebtedness Tls. 800.
  The Magistrate issued a warrant for the arrest of the defaulter.
  Before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate),
  Four natives were charged, in company with others not in custody, with entering the premises at No. 90 Bubbling Well Road, for an unlawful purpose at 3.30 a.m. on the 6th inst. Three of the prisoners were fined $15 each, or in default one month's imprisnment, while the fourth was sentenced to 200 blows and three months'.
  A mafoo was charged with plying for hire in the Settlement an unlicensed carriage contrary to Municipal Regulations, on the 6th inst. The Court ordered the carriage to be confiscated.
  On Wednesday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),
  Sun Hai-ching, Shroff, was fined $5 for flying a kite in the Settlement to which were attached five lamps, a source of danger to life and property.
  Chang Ah-chu, shopkeeper, and Hung Tung-zai, carpenter, were brought up for being concerned together with stealing 100 fathoms of Manila rope, value $100,  from the str. Silesia and also with being in possession of a quantity of paint, value $119.80, and unable to give a satisfactory account of same. They were sentenced to a fine of $100 or 100 day's imprisonment.
Chang Sung-ling, dairyman, Woosung Road who was previously fined $50 for selling milk in the Settlement without a licence was again brought up, defendant pleading inability to pay. The Inspector was instructed to hold two cows as security for 10 days, and if the fine had not then been paid the sale of the animals to be ordered.
  Cha Hung-chu, country dairyman, was brought up on summons by Mr. Christie for selling milk in the Settlement adulterated with 50 per cent water. A fine of $50 was imposed, half going to the Court.
  On Wednesday afternoon before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne (British Assessor),
  The adjourned case of the Central Stores, Limited, against their old compradore  Hsu Yu-tsien was mentioned, the latter having satisfied the judgment of the Court by paying the $500 as ordered.
  The hearing of the action brought by the International Cotton Manufacturing Company, Limited, against the Tien Wah Cotton Hong, for non-delivery of cotton, was resumed. Last week the manager was arrested in connection with the matter, and the firm, stated to be a wealthy one, ordered to comply with the terms of the contract within three days. This order not having been complied with, His Worship issued warrants for the arrest of the principals of the firm, the manager in the meanetime remaining in custody.
  An action of a similar nature against another native cotton hong was on the list, but the defendant did not appear and a warrant was issued for his arrest also.
On Wednesday morning, before M. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor),
  Six natives were charged by Inspector Wilson with being weell-known loafers and a source of danger to the Settlement.  Of the gang, one was charged with returning from deportation, and another with a petty theft. The latter was sentenced to 200 blows and three months' imprisonment.
  The magistrate said there was no specific charge against four of the men, and stated that he did not wish to cause trouble by punishing anyone against whom no charge was proved.  Inspector Wilson said the men were dangerous characters and stopped at nothing that was bad, and that notwithstanding the stationing of extra constables, continual complaints had been made by the firms of Sassoon and Cushny and Snith, and that when the police attempted arrest they evaded them by crossing over into the French Settlement. He also, in reply to the statement of no charge, contended that it was the duty of the police to prevent crime; and that were they unable to punish such characters the Settlement would soon be infested with them. Prisoners, who were Shanghai men, were ordered to be sent to the City magistrate.
  On Friday morning before Mr. U.K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),
  Hoo King-an, printer on the North Honan Road, was charged by the police with being in possession of a quantity of obscener literature and with intending same for circulation.  16 books were found on prisoner who confessed to having 400; his premises were searched and nothing found, the books having been previously removed. A fine of $50 was imposed or three months' imprisonment.
  Mr. James Jones, Manager of the International Cotton Manufacturing Company Ltd., appeared against the managers of the Tien Wah hong to enforce the delivery of 2000 bales of cotton for which $1000 bargain money had been paid, and to ask for substantial damages. It appears that on Wednesday, the 1st inst., before Mr. Cheng and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne (Assessor) the magistrate detained one partner and received a guarantee that the 2,000 bales of cotton would be delivered within 3 days. On the following Wednesday, before the  same Bench, it was decided to issue a warrant for the arrest of the other partners. Mr. Jones, on the re-hearing of the case, stated that he must have the cotton, that the ginning mills had been idle for over three weeks, and that he would have to support the mill hands, having continually assured them that they  would soon have the cotton.
  He showed that a cotton ring had been formed and consequently the price of cotton had gone up and defendants, who were daily receiving shipments from up river, were selling at the enhanced price to others regardless of the $1000 they held as bargain money from him. Attention was also drawn to the fact that he was dealing with the firm and not with any individual.
  In defence the managing partner said he had received the cotton and notified plaintiff to take delivery. This was shown to be false and entirely contrary to custom. He then declared he was unable to obtain the cotton at short notice which was also shown to be incorrect.
  Mr. Mayers here suggested that corporal punishment be applied, but Mr. Cheng protested on the ground that the issue involved was of a civil nature. Mr. Meyers, however, reminded the magistrate that there were precedents for dealing in the way he suggested and also that Mr. Jones had it in his power to prosecute for fraud.
  Two of the partners were, consequently, taken to the Police Station and one was detained at the Mixed Court, the senior partner being released on surety, pending delivery of cotton.
 Mr. Jones then applied for warrants for the arrest of Mung Kim-yu and Lo Yen-fu whose hongs had together contracted for the delivery of 5.300 piculs of cotton. Warrants were granted.

North China Herald, 20 March 1899
MIXED COURT.
At the Mixed Court on Saturday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr, Framke (German assessor),
 A mafoo was charged with furiously driving a pony and carriage along the Nanking Road on the 10th inst. A fine of $10 was imposed.
 A boy in the employ of General Parsons who is staying at the Astor House was charged on suspicion with having stolen the sum of $274 in Hongkong and Shanghai Bank notes from a trunk in Mrs. Reed's room between the 4th and the 9th inst. Suspicion of the prisoner's dishonesty was aroused  by his purchasing a quantity of fine clothes at considerable cost. Prisoner and an amah were the only two servants that had access to the room. The case was remanded until Monday morning for further evidence.
 Mr. E. Nelson (Messrs Stokes and Platt) appeared for judgment in the case of Messrs. Stubbe and Wentzensen v. Eu Yu-lai. Plaintiffs demanded that defendant take delivery of 1,983 casks of cement, the balance of contract for 2,500 casks at Tls. 4 per cask., and also claimed interest on the value from the 21st of July 1898.  Defendant claimed that an advertisement had been inserted in the native newspapers warning the Chinese from buying a counterfeit Ancho chop. Defendant got alarmed and asked the plaintiff to put a notice denying the former advertisement. Plaintiffs did not do this and defendant requested them to communicate with Europe to ascertain his rights. The goods had been left in the godown all the time.  The judgment of the Court was that the contract be carried out, defendant taking delivery of the goods, and that the question of interest be dropped. If any damage or loss be suffered by defendant he should take proceedings in the German Court.
 On Monday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),
 A mafoo was charged with recklessly driving and with colliding against Sikh P.C. 165 on the Nanking Road. Mr. J. Findlay, who was in the carriage, testified that the pony was practically walking and that the mafoo was rounding the Nanking Toad to go to the Central Hotel. He admitted the mafoo was technically wrong but denied the colliding with the policeman, asserting the policeman came towards the pony and caught hold of its head, describing this as a dangerous action. A fine of $5 was imposed for passing on the wrong side of the policeman.
 A servant was charged with stealing $200 in banknotes from No. 3 Siking Road. His employer, having recovered the notes, wanted to withdraw the charge. Prisoner was sentenced to 200 blows on the hand.
 A well-known character was brought up and charged with having escaped from the custody of the native authorities at Tungchow. Prisoner seemed to have a weakness for his chains, the same being found on him. He was sent to the City.
 Two well-known professional loafers, one of whim carried a loaded revolver, were brought before the Court by Inspector Wilson. The Magistrate proposed sending them to the City but the Inspector said that there was no guarantee that they would be punished. They were sentenced to 200 blows and six months' and deportation.
 The boy charged on suspicion with having stolen $274 from a trunk in Mrs. Reed's room at the Astor Hotel was again brought before the Court and remanded.
 On Tuesday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor),
 A native was charged with having stolen three blank cheques and with putting them into circulation on or about the 1st if February, also with being concerned with another man not in custody in forging and uttering one of the said cheques in the name of J. Nissim for the sum of Tls. 1,500 on or about the 4th of February.  The case was remanded for an indefinite period to allow the police to make further investigations.
 A boy was charged with stealing a quantity of clothing, value $50, from his employer, Mr. Ramdor, No. 14 Sans Souci Terrace. Prisoner was sentenced to 200 blows and two months' imprisonment.
 For a similar offence a boy in the employ of Mr. Cottam of the Laou Mow Cotton Mill was awarded 200 blows.
 A native was brought up charged with riding a bicycle at a speed calculated to endanger the lives and limbs of passengers on the Bund on the previous day. A fine of $10 was imposed.
 Wednesday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (Brutish Assessor),
 Two natives, a laoda and an engineer, in the employ of Messrs. S. C. Farnham & Co. Ltd., were charged with others not in custody with having stolen a quantity of iron poles, etc., value Tls. 30, from the Old Dock, the property of the above Company. Prisoners were sentenced to one months' cangue each.
 On Wednesday afternoon before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne (British Assessor),
 Mr. T. W. Kingsmill sued a native for the non-payment of $90 due for rent. The defendant was ordered to be detained in custody until the amount was paid.
  Mr. J. Jones, on behalf of the International Cotton Manufacturing Co. Ltd., sued Meng Ken-yu for breach of contract in not delivering certain cotton which he had agreed to deliver at a specified time. The matter, however, was adjournd for further consideration.
 On Thursday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor),
 The case of Mr. W. S. Emens of the American Trading Company versus Woo Yu-chee was brought up on remand from the 7th inst. The plaintiff sought to recover the sum, of Tls. 700 paid to defendant as a bargain money for the purchase of certain land. Mr. Browett on behalf of the plaintiff stated that on account of a considerable delay in the delivery of the title deeds. Dr. Ivy, for whom the purchase was intended, had informed Woo Yu-chee that he would forego the transaction provided the bargain money was refunded. This being satisfactory to Woo he promised to repay the money which promise, however, had not been kept, although several applications had been made for payment. Judgment was given for the plaintiff for Tls.200 to be paid within two weeks and the balance to be paid by instalments of Tls. 50 a month.
  Kwai Yah-sai was charged with obtaining the sum of Tls. 60 from complainant on the 12th inst. under threats of publishing in the Hupao certain correspondence damaging to the reputation of complainant. The case was remanded until today.
 A native was charged with stealing five articles of silk clothing, five yards of silk, and a cloak value $106 from No. 1209 Amoy Road on the 18th of October last. Prisoner was sentenced to two months' imprisonment.
 On Friday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),
 A cook who has been in the employ of the Consulate twenty years was charged with tampering with a box which was placed in a spare room for examination. Mr. Macdonald having his suspicion aroused went into the room and found the contents of the box strewn over the floor. Prisoner was sentenced to a month's imprisonment.
 Koo Ah-pan, a watchman in the employ of the Shanghai Engineering Works, with another watchman and two coolies was brought up for stealing 80 lbs of brass castings, value $40, from a warehouse belonging to the firm. He was further charged, being the watchman and having the stuff under his care, for so far neglecting his duty as to allow the said material to be stolen. Evidence was given showing that the castings had been removed in the ordinary manner, and that a hole, too small for an ingress, had been made in the wall in order to divert suspicion. Prisoner was given 200 blows and a month's cangue, the others were dismissed.
 Mr. Jas. Jones, Manager of the International Manufacturing Co. Ltd., appeared against Meng Kung-yu who has a cotton hong. Mr. Jones showed that the defendant had signed a contract early in December last for 3,300 piculs of seed cotton at $7.10 per picul and that defendant at that time actually had the cargo. A sudden rise in the market price took place; 1,270 piculs had been delivered leaving a balance of 2,030 piculs. A fortnight after the expiration of contract time a summons was taken out at the Mixed Court, which had brought a guarantee that was accepted both by the magistrate and the Company. Six weeks had elapsed and no part of the cargo being forthcoming, Mr. Bourne, the assessor, on Wednesday last requested the magistrate to have defendant arrested. Defendant offered to pay the difference of market prices or deliver ginned cotton, both of which Mr. Jones declined. Defendant stated that he had no money, and that he was merely a broker, all of which statements were known to be false. It was proved that the defendant was in a partnership with 4 others, said concern being a recognised cotton hong. Mr. Jones asserted that 50 per cent of last year's cotton was still unsold, and that defendant wanted to delay the transaction hoping the cotton would get cheaper. It appears that the seed cotton had been as high as $7.60 per picul and now stood at $6.70 and that defendant had been purposely neglecting his contract in favour of other markets, and had offered the plaintiff Tls. 4,000 to withdraw.
 A previous case had been settled on a Monday morning and the cotton delivered on the Wednesday and Thursday following. Mr. Mayers here insisted on prompt action, and defendant was ordered to deliver the cotton in three days, failing which he was to be locked up and a warrant issued for the arrest of his guarantor.
 On Saturday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Betz (German Assessor),
 A native contractor was fined $10 for stealing water from the Waterworks' hydrant on the Woochang Road.
 A Chinese constable got 200 blows, a month's cangue, and three months' imprisonment for unlawfully receiving and misappropriating the sum of 30 cents (nuisance fine).
 Foong Lee-ching and Szee Soong-yeh, two unemployed but well-dressed men, were brought up for being concerned together in obtaining from the shop at No. 43 Hankow Road, 40 yards of silk, value $27; also getting by means of forged bank orders two pearl head ornaments, value $370, from a store at 287 Shansi Road. A sentence of 200 blows and a year's imprisonment was awarded them.

 

North China Herald, 27 March 1899
MIXED COURT.
 At the Mixed Court on Friday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),
 A coolie was charged with defrauding complainants (Messrs. Arnhold, Karberg & Co.) of a quantity of coal by tampering with a weighing machine at the Soey Chee Cotton Mill, on the 23rd inst. C. Hartzberg, an engineer employed at the Mill, testified to seeing the accused in the act of tampering with the machine. A fine of $50 was imposed.
 Wong Paw-sai, storekeeper on the Foochow Road, was brought up on remand for stealing a bank-book, value £1,300, in Soochow, and for realising the same on the 27th of June last. Prisoner had bought two gold bars, value $510 each, and absconded to Chinkiang, one of which he spent there, while $570 had been recovered. He was sentenced to 200 blows and one year's imprisonment.
 A Chinese was fined $2 and ordered to pay 20 cents compensation for riding his bicycle on the wrong side of the road and colliding with a 'ricsha at the junction of the Nanking and Yunnan Roads.
 Mr. D. W. Crawford applied for an injunction against his contractor that he be restrained from intimidating men employed by him. Mr. Dzau Kit-fooh appeared on behalf of the contractor. Mr. Crawford contended that the defendant had contracted with him to build a house according to specifications and designs drawn out by Mr. Gilbert Davies, architect, and that said specifications had not been carried out, that defendant would not fulfil his contract and prevented others from continuing the work.   Mr. Dzau Kit-fooh asserted that Mr.  Crawford had contracted with his client for the building of a house in the French Sicawei Road and that the work was done according to the design of the architect and also that they were approved by him. He denied that the contractor had in any way intimidated any workmen employed by Mr. Crawford and guaranteed that there would be no intimidation. He argued that the case was one for the Supreme Court, but that Mr. Crawford had asked that the case might be amicably settled out of Court. The question of whether the terms of the contract had been carried out and that if so the plaintiff be ordered to pay Tls. 793 which were due now and a further Tls. 300 when due.
 Several questions were put by the Court relating to the position of contractor as to whether he had contracted with the architect or with the owner of the property, also as to whether the contract prevented the owner from employing anyone outside of the agreement. Mr. Crawford stated it was not a question of money but that he only asked that he may be allowed to employ others so as to finish the building before the coming winter.  He also declared that Mr. Gilbert Davies had admitted that the building was not according to specification.
 The Court decided that the contract, etc., be brought up on Monday and also that Mr. Davies appear to give evidence before notice could be taken of Mr. Crawford's petition.
.  .  .  
 Mr. J. Grant (Messrs. Cushny and Smith) appeared to obtain from Wu Cheng-sun, master of the Tien Foh Theatre, Canton Road, an instalment of Tls. 445 which was due on the 11th inst. It appears that plaintiff lent Tls. 1,125 on security of theatre property, said money to be repaid in three instalments of Tls. 445, Tls. 340 and Tls. 340. The manager of the theatre stated he had been unable to pay owing to losses. The Court ordered the first sum to be paid on Monday, failing which the property would be seized.

At the Mixed Court on Tuesday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor),
 A native broker, Chi Sik-sing, was brought up on remand charged with attempting to utter a forged cheque on the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank and further, with the theft of three blank cheques on the same institution. The case arose out of a land transaction and the main issue was decided in the U.S. Consular Court the previous day when a foreigner named Sprague was sentenced to six months' imprisonment for forging the name of a man named Nissim to the cheque in question. Sprague alleged that he filled in the note and signed Nissim's name at the instance of the prisoner Chu, and that the last-named stated that Nissim had given him authority to act in this way. Nissim had denied it and further said that the cheque and two others had been stolen from his cheque book.  Chu afterwards handed the forgery to a native for collection. The Court convicted the prisoner, who maintained that Nissim had both given him the cheque and authorised him to sign his name.  A sentence of six months' imprisonment was passed.
 On Thursday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor),
 A boy in the employ of Mr. Curtis, No. 6 Canton Road, was charged with intimidating other servants, thereby preventing them from working on the 20th inst. The case being proved, prisoner was sentenced to one months' imprisonment.
 On Saturday morning before Mr. U. KJ. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Franck (German assessor),
 Four natives were charged with a number of others not in custody with burglariously entering the house of Wong Hai-ding, compradore of the Shanghai silk filature, situated on the borders of the Settlement, near the West Hongkew Police Station, and stealing a quantity of jewellery and money amounting to over $3,000. Inspector Bourke stated that the four prisoners in company with a number of others not in custody entered the premises of the compradore at 3 a.m. on the 20th inst., and after threatening to take the life of the occupants, should they give any alarm or report the matter,  they proceeded to search the house and after diligently working for an hour and a-half they decamped with their booty, but when they were leaving the premises the compradore's daughter overheard some of the thieves' names mentioned by others of their party. On their houses being searched by the police two pewter wine pots were found in the house of one of them which were recognised as being the property of the compradore. The robbers carried fire-arms and other deadly weapons. The Court came to the conclusion that the case was one of a superior nature and decided to send the prisoners to the city to be dealt with by the city magistrate.

North China Herald, 3 April 1899

MIXED COURT.

   At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

   Sze Kwei-dong was charged with making structural alterations to his dwelling house 1.465 North Szechuen Road, without obtaining a permit from the Municipal Engineer and completing the same after being cautioned by the police.  Inspector Ramsay testified to having warned the accused on two different occasions against proceedings with the alterations without a permit. Mr. C. H. Godfrey on behalf of the Municipal Council stated that the defendant had never made an application for a permit in regard to the proposed alterations.  A fine of $20 was imposed.

   A Chinese clerk in the employ of Mr. James A. Harvie was charged with embezzling at various time between the 24th of August 1898 and the 8th of February 2899, sums of money amounting to Tls. 4,370 by means of forging complainant's name. Mr. Harvie in evidence stated that the prisoner had obtained possession of bank orders and in witness's name had written to the bank when the bills became due and had asked in cases for a renewal for the period of sixty days.  It was shown that a native not in custody was concerned with the prisoner in the affair but had absconded. Mr. Harvie added that he was not aware of the extent of the prisoner's malpractices. A remand was granted for further enquiries to be made and to admit of the police endeavouring to arrest the confederate.

   Mr. T. Grant again appeared, not having received the Tls. 445 instalment, part of the sum of Tls. 1,125 which was ordered by the Court on the 24th inst. to be paid. One of the partners, who was present, in defence stated that he had not the money. It was shown that the Tien Foh theatre was being profitably worked, and consequently a warrant was made out for the arrest of the master, Wu Chang-sa.

   The Chinese clerk, for whom a warrant was issued on Monday morning in connection with Mr. J. A. Harvie's case gave himself up at the Central Station late last night.

   On Tuesday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor),

      The Chinese clerk in the employ of Mr. J. A. Harvie who gave himself up at the Central Station on the previous day was brought up and charged with embezzling the sum of Tls. 25,000 on various dates. The prosecutor was not present. Defendant said he had only used part of the money and gave the names of others who were implicated; he also stated he was prepared to refund the amount he himself had had. The case was remanded pending the arrest of those mentioned.

   On Wednesday morning before Mr. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayer (British Assessor),

   A Chinese clerk employed by Mr. James A. Harvie was brought up on remand from the 27th inst., together with a confederate, also in the same employ, who has since given himself into custody, charged with embezzling the sum of Tls. 25,500 by the forgery of prosecutor's name. Mr. Nelson (Messrs. Stokes and Platt), who appeared for Mr. Harvie, informed the Court that one of the prisoners was willing to arrange for the refunding of the money and asked the Court to adjourn the case indefinitely and to release the prisoner on substantial bail to allow him to do so, other prisoner being kept in custody. This being satisfactory to all concerned the case was adjourned sine die.

   On Wednesday afternoon before the Magistrate (Mr. U. K. Cheng) and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne (British Assessor),

   Loh Yen-shih appeared in an adjourned summons for breach of contract. An agreement had been entered into between the defendant and Mr. J. Jones on behalf of the International Cotton Manufacturing Company for the delivery of a quantity of seed cotton. He had, however, like a number of other cotton merchants, refused to carry out his contract when the price of the commodity went up, and Mt. Jones now sought to have the defendant ordered to supply the 2,000 bales short.

   When the case was last before the Court defendant was ordered to abide by the terms of his contract, but he had disregarded the finding of the Bench. He was detained in custody pending a settlement.

   Mr. H. Forrester sued a Chinese metal dealer named Sheng Ch'ang for damage to his bicycle occasioned by the negligence of the defendant or his agents. The plaintiff spoke to riding along Broadway, which at the time was crowded with pedestrians, and falling over a quantity of iron bars which had been placed in the road outside the defendant's premises.  His machine was seriously injured the damage having been estimated at $40. The repairs would cost $17.75 but the silver plating could not be renewed in Shanghai hence the increased amount for damage claimed. He had also been put to an expense of Tls. 10 in respect of translation and valuer's fees. Mr. Bourne pointed out that the Chinese ought to be notified that obstructions of this kind could not be tolerated and that offenders in the future would be prosecuted. Inspector Collins, who was in Court noted Mr. Bourne's remarks. Defendant was ordered yp pay $17.75 but his Worship regretted that he could not reimburse the plaintiff for his other expenses as it could constitute a difficult precedent. Mr. Bourne said defendant had got off very lightly and he certainly thought the plaintiff should have received more.

 

North China Herald, 10 April 1899

MIXED COURT.

   At the Mixed Court on Tuesday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor),

   Two convicts were charged with attempting to break out of Hongkew Gaol by filing through the iron bars of the cell. Inspector Ramsay pressed for a heavy punishment involving a term of imprisonment sufficient to have them transferred to the new Municipal gaol. Having five months to serve, they were sentenced to 200 blows each and an additional three months.

   A coolie was awarded a week's cangue for supplying food and money to convicts whilst they were employed in the Municipal chip yard on the Fearon Road.

   A well-known character was sentenced to a month's imprisonment for unlawfully being in the enclosed premises on Quinsan Road, tenanted by Mr. Graham.

   Mr. H. W. Papps charged one Yung Loong, Milkman, with adulterating milk, thereby defrauding the public and injuring ng her dairy business. The case was remanded pending the decision of the suit brought against plaintiff at the British Court.

   On Wednesday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

   Yau Loong-shng, dairyman at 46 Carter Road, was charged by Mrs. Papps and Mr. Christie with adulterating milk and selling it in the Settlement during the past month. Mrs. Papps stated that accused had been in her employ since 1893, that he was the only man who supplied her with cows, and that through the adulteration she had lost a lot of customers, consequently she had tried to get rid of him, but he had placed every obstacle in her way. She owned she could not dispense with his cows, and said that her late husband used to fine defendant whenever there were any complaints from the customers. Defendant had no license, but persisted in surreptitiously bringing the milk into the Settlement. She also stated that if defendant took away from her dairy his cows, her business would be stopped, and that whilst the dairy was hers defendant was supposed to keep as many cows there as were required.

   Mr. Christie showed that defendant had had his license withdrawn, and that he still kept cows on his premises whence he supplied Mrs. Papps with milk. Mrs. Papps stated that she had no means of checking defendant's dealings. Mr. Christie then drew attention to the fact that the milk bottles were sealed with Mrs. Papps's top and that she was therefore responsible. On Mr. Mayers asking whether the bottles were filled and sealed under Mrs. Papps's supervision the sanitary inspector said that defendant was always absent from Mrs. Papps's dairy and that he was not aware of the arrangement between her and the defendant. He also stated that the adulteration had been going on since last August. Mr. Mayers then held that Mrs. Papps was responsible and said it appeared that Mrs. Papps lent the defendant her name whilst the defendant lent her the cows. The defendant was then discharged, the Court deciding that it was a case for the council to prosecute Mrs. Papps.

    Zing Zun-sho and Chang Ah-tso, shopkeepers on the North Soochow Road, were brought up for receiving 5 boxes of steel bars, value $45, knowing same to have been stolen. Mr. Charles Middleton, Manager of the China Merchants' wharves, said that the bars had been stolen from hi wharves and sold to defendants at Pootung and that the China Merchants' Co. lost thousands of dollars yearly in this manner, and that probably the goods were sold to defendants for next to nothing. He knew that half of the ironmongers here belonged to a syndicate of thieves. He also showed that all the bamboo steel imported bore the owners' chop and that consequently those who bought it knew it to be stolen. The water police gave evidence that these men did a big illicit business not only in iron and steel but also in coal, and that it was very difficult to prove a case against them. Mr. Middleton here mentioned that he had been offered a large sum of money, that is, in proportion to the value of the steel stolen, to withdraw this case. The Court then remanded prisoners until Friday.

   In Wednesday afternoon before the Magistrate (Mr. U.K. Cheng and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne (British Assessor),

   Messrs. Cushny and Smith sued a native actor named Wu Chun-shan for the recovery of Tls. 1,000 advanced to him on the security of certain theatrical properties. The actor it was stated had absconded but the Court ordered his guarantors to pay the sum named within one month.

   A British merchant named Tam-wa brought a somewhat serious charge against Wu Shao-shih, a native policeman. The facts adduced went to show that the plaintiff sent a little maidservant to change a dollar. She obtained the cash and returned to her master's house when shortly afterwards the woman who kept the cash shop came to the house and alleged that it was a bad dollar. The constable who was with her kicked the door out of the frame and forcibly arrested the little girl, who was however discharged without trial, the dollar being found to be good. His Worship was inclined to treat the case in the most serious way and proposed to order the man to receive 200 blows, three months' cangue and twelve months' imprisonment. Mr. Bourne pointed out that he had already suffered severely through being dismissed from the police force, and he would not like anything to be done which would be calculated to discredit the native police as they had to assist in maintaining law and order. Mr. Cheng considered it was a most serious outrage and while he recognised that the man had already suffered, he thought it was a case which should be treated with severity. He ordered him to receive 300 blows and two months' cangue, while the woman from the cash shop would have to pay a fine of $50. The plaintiff would be reimbursed on account of the damage to the door.

 

North China Herald, 17 April 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

   At the Mixed Court in Saturday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Baron Lerchenfeld (German Assessor),

   Yuen King-dong, compradore in a German firm, in company with one of the partners in the said firm, sought an injunction against a Chinese landowner.  It appears that the plaintiff owns a piece of land, one mow in area, abutting on some land belonging to defendants, outside of the Settlement and in the vicinity of the Crematorium. Defendant had sold his land to a Chinese who in removing the same had made an excavation some forty feet deep within two feet of the plaintiff's land, cnseqwuently plaintiff's land was likely to subside and had therefore decreased considerably in value. Mr. Cheng said that he had no jurisdiction over land outside of the Settlement and that it was a case for the City magistrate to decide. The case had previously been before Dr. Famke who showed that the Chinese had no law bearing on defendant's action.  However, owing to a parallel case at Yangtsepoo a proclamation had been issued forbidding owners of land digging within three feet of neighbouring property and beyond a depth of five feet. The German gentleman said that he hoped the case would be settled in the Mixed Court as he was indirectly interested in it having a lien on plaintiff's land. Plaintiff asked that the case be put before the City Magistrate and ultimately be brought back to the Mixed Court. Mr. Cheng contended that the decision remained with the city magistrate but that he would write to him asking that the proclamation be enforced, and that as the foreigner only has an indirect interest the case was more difficult for him to deal with. Plaintiff then begged that the defendant be restrained from continuing the excavation pending the decision of the suit. Mr. Chang again pointed out that defendant was outside of his jurisdiction but promised that the documents would be laid before the City magistrate that day, and assured the plaintiff [him] that the magistrate would not delay the matter longer than was necessary.

  At the Mixed Court yesterday morning before Mr. U. K. Cheng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

   A farmer on the Jessfield Road was given 200 blows and a month's cangue for maliciously destroying the trees on the Jessfield Road, the property of the Municipal Council. In all eighteen trees, valued at Tls. 2 each, were cut down.

   Mr. Jespersen, rent collector for Messrs. Morrison and Gratton, appeared for an order of eviction against a Chinese who was occupying P-15, Nanking Road. Evidence was given that the house had been for four years tenanted by another Chinese with whom there was difficulty in getting the rent, and that the said person had sold the goodwill and stock to the other present defendants, who were occupying the house contrary to the desire of the plaintiffs, also that the defendants had sold the business concern to a third party who, hearing there was trouble about the tenancy, refused to take over the stock. Defendants stated that expected at least three months' notice and that, by moving, their business would suffer.  Mr. Myers pointed out that according to the terms of their monthly leased 10 days' notice on either side was sufficient, and that they had already had a month and a half's notice. The Court decided that Messrs. Morrison and Gratton be empowered to remove the contents of the house to one of their godowns.

   On Wednesday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

   Yung Ah-doo, a tailor in Yunnan Road, was charged with throwing a quantity of sulphuric acid upon complainant in an alleyway off the Foochow Road shortly after the 11th inst. with intent to do him grievous bodily harm. Prisoner was sentenced to 200 blows and 3 months' imprisonment.

   An elderly man, who attempted suicide on the 20th inst. by cutting his throat with a knife, was brought up on remand. Prisoner appeared greatly distressed and avowed having been driven to the act by an internal complaint. Prisoner was handed over to his sin who was in Court.

   On Saturday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistratte) and Dr. Framke (German Assessor),

   Two well-known characters, Woo Ching-foh and Loh Tsung-ching who have already spent several years in prison, were brought up and charged with nine cases of petty theft, two of which included burglary. The first named prisoner was also charged with returning from deportation. They were sentenced to three years' imprisonment.

 

North China Herald, 24 April 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

   At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

  A tipao was brought up on a warrant, for allowing the wholesaler destruction of trees on the Jessfield Road. Inspector Kelly stated that previously a summon ns had been taken out against the prisoner but that he had refused to appear. Shortly afterwards the actual perpetrator of the damage was caught and punished. A warrant for the arrest of the tipao was then issued and on Sunday afternoon prisoner was locked up. The tipao refusing to hold himself responsible the Court decided that he be imprisoned until he gave a bond holding himself liable for such wanton acts.

   A rogue was charged with intimidating complainants and extorting money from them, along with others not in custody, in Laukungmow village. He was sentenced to 200 blows and two months.

   On Friday magistrate is evidently minded to be a terror to evil-doers. On Thursday he awarded a Pootung coolie 800 blows and three years' imprisonment for having with others not in custody, extorted $25 from the proprietor of an opium shop in the Shantung Road. He was known to be a bad character and an incorrigible loafer.


 

North China Herald, 1 May 1899

MIXED COURT.

  At the Mixed Court in Monday morning, 23rd ult. before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

   Moh Kwei-too, tailor, late of 344 Woochang Road, was brought up on suspicion of feloniously setting fire to his shop with intent to obtain insurance thereon. Prisoner was released on bail of Tls. 5,000 and the case was remanded until Wednesday.

   A well-known lottery-ticket hawker was charged with selling tickets of the Kiangnan Charity Association, contrary to Municipal regulations. Sergeant Johnstone deposed to seeing prisoner offering the tickets to an employee of Messrs. Hall & Holtz, and thereon took him into custody. A number of Mexican and Canton Wei-sing tickets were also found on him. In reply to Mr. Mayers the detective stated that a proclamation had been issued some two months ago forbidding the hawking of these tickets and that prisoner had been previously warned. Prisoner was fined $40.

   A coolie employed by Messrs. Hall and Holtz to attend the bread-van was charged at the Mixed Court on Thursday with striking a European lady and was sentenced to seven days' cangue.

   On Friday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

   Mr. Geo. Sutherland charged his servant with leaving his employment without giving due notice, thereby causing him (complainant) a great deal of inconvenience at the China Mutual Shipping Company's office. Complaiant stated that the accused was an employee in the company's office and that he made the charge on principle. A representative of Major Bros. said that the Chinese had entered his firm and had informed him that he did not wish to remain with Mr. Sutherland as the latter was in the habit of cutting his wages. Accused was ordered by the Court to pay $5 as wages to substitute, which sum was guaranteed by his present employer.

   A youth was brought up for maliciously thrusting a stick between the spokes of a bicycle ridden by Mr. J. Bell, of 59 Wayside. Complainant stated that he was riding along the Yangtsepoo Road just about dusk when he saw three lads with sticks, one of whom deliberately thrust  his into his (complainant's) wheel, thereby stripping six spokes thus causing the wooden tyre to buckle. He said he did not wish the Court to be hard on the lad, that he simply wished him to be punished as a deterrent to others, and reminded the Court that had a lady been riding the machine the consequences might have been more serious. The boy was fined $3 as compensation for damage to the machine.

   Zing Ur-ching (24), a native of Foochow and a well-known character to the Police, was brought up on remand charged with having committed no less than eight burglaries between the 5th of Feb. and the 18th of April, amounting in value to $7860, $270 of which have been recovered, and also with returning from deportation. Inspector Ramsay drew the attention of the Court to the fact that the prisoner was the most accomplished and notorious burglar and extortioner in the Settlement and that he had been in and out of gaol during the last five years. The Magistrate, who seemed to be in a humorous mood, asked the prisoner how he would like his punishment? - to which prisoner ventured no reply. He then informed the culprit that as he was evidently fond of Shanghai he would invite him to stay longer. Prisoner was then sentenced to two years' imprisonment.

   A Hupeh man was also brought up charged with being concerned in the same burglaries. As it was proved that he was simply a disposer of the stolen goods, a sentence of three months' was imposed.

 

North China Herald, 8 May 1899

MIXED COURT.

   At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Chang (Deputy Magistrate) and Mr. P. G. Carvill (British Assessor),

    Zang Burh-chi of the Yuen-kee Dairy was charged with selling adulterated milk to the Club Concordia. The Club takes about 400 bottle of milk a month from the defendant, whose dairy is situated on the Mohawk Road. On the 25th of April it was found that the milk contained more than 60 per cent of added water. The specific gravity was 1.015 and the percentage of cream only 3 per cent. A fine of $20 was inflicted.

   Two men charged with receiving on the 28th of April a quantity of silk yarn and silk waste, valued at $12, the property of Messrs. Uklysse POils & Co., well-knowing same to have been stolen, were fined $15 each.

 

North China Herald, 15 May 1899
 At the Mixed Court on the 8th instant, before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British Assessor),
  A mafoo living at 161, Chapoo Road, was fined $10 for plying an unlicensed carriage in the Settlement thereby defrauding the Municipal Council. It appears the defendant, learning that a private license cost only $4 per quarter against the $5 monthly public licence, got a compradore in the employ of Messrs. Butterfield and Swire to take out for him a French Municipal private license.
  Chang Yung-kwei, a well-known character, was charged with returning to the Settlement having been expelled from same on the 5th ult., also with extorting by means of threats the sum of $12 from complainant, and on a later occasion with threatening to murder him. Prisoner was sentenced to 300 blows and six months' imprisonment in the new gaol.
  A Kiangpeh man, engaged as a stevedore's coolie on board of the P. & O. steamer Pekin, was charged with broaching and damaging cargo on the above-named steamer whilst lying at the Hongkew Wharf. According to the evidence given prisoner had on several occasions purposely thrown cases down so as to burst them and then extracted part of their contents which he passed to the loafers hanging round the hatchways, three of whom were also in Court. The coolie was given 200 blows and ten days' cangue and the others were awarded 200 blows each.
  On Wednesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy maguistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),
   A 'ricsha coolie was charged with stealing a silver watch and chain and $152 from an old Indian, to whom the money represented the careful savings of years. The watch and chain, however, were recovered. The magistrate describing the act as a wicked crime sentenced the prisoner to 200 blows and a year's imprisonment with hard labour, with the understanding that if the culprit's friends refunded the money his sentence would be revised.
  On Saturday morning before Mr. Wang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. O. Framke (German Assessor),
  Three amahs were charged with assaulting Mr. J. J. Mansfield on the 4th inst., at the house No. 5 Rifle Range. On the 26th ult. Mr. Mansfield 's amah gave notice she was leaving, and demanded her wages, which she was told to come for on the 3rd of the following month. On the 4th the amah made her appearance in company with two others, and after being paid her wages the three women committed the assault. The magistrate ordered them to be cangued for three months.

 

North China Herald, 22 May 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

At the Mixed Court on Wednesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

Mr. J. Jones, Manager of the International Cotton Manufacturing Co., Ltd., applied for the release of the partner of the Sun Tai-shang cotton hong, who had been kept in custody pending the delivery just effected of 2,000 piculs of seed cotton. Also for the release of a partner of the Mang Kan-yu cotton hong, who likewise was under arrest pending the delivery of 2,030 piculs of seed cotton. Prisoner had given a satisfactory guarantee for the delivery of the cotton. Both releases were ordered.

Mr. Jones then requested that the magistrate of the Funghsien district be asked to issue a warrant for the arrest of Chang E-soo, who resides within his jurisdiction.

He showed that at a previous sitting before Mr. Chang and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne, judgment had been given that if the defendant did not within two weeks pay the sum of $724, received by him for the purchase of cotton for the Yuenling Ginning Mill and which had not been executed, his property would be attached and he himself arrested. The partner, Chang Yih-yu, who was brought up in custody, attempted to obtain a fresh hearing, to which the Court objected. The magistrate promised to write a letter to the district magistrate requesting the arrest as petitioned.

On Saturday morning before the magistrate, Mr. Weng, and Dr. Framke, German Assessor),

A Soochow hawker was brought up on remand charged with feloniously cutting and wounding three persons by stabbing them with a knife in various parts of the body in a house om the Woochang Road, one of whom was in the native hospital suffering from a dangerous wound in the abdomen. Prisoner was ordered to be sent to the native city to be there dealt with by the city authorities.

 

North China Herald, 29 May 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

At the Mixed Court on Tuesday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor),

A native dairyman named Zeang Sung, whose dairy is situated on the Back Sinza Road, was charged with selling milk on the Settlement without a license. A license had been withdrawn from him last year for keeping his premises in a filthy condition and he was then fined $20. He was again fined $20.

Yee Sin-chu, another dairyman, was fined $10 for a similar offence, his premises being in the South Sinza district.

A native was charged with cruelty to his wife, whom he had chained by the feet to his bed since last July. The woman appeared in Court with one chain so fastened to her ankle that it could not be removed, the key having been lost. The magistrate decided to try this case alone.

 

North China Herald, 19 June 1899

BANK-NOTE FORGERS, AND COINERS.

  At the Mixed Court on Friday before the magistrate, Mr. Weng, and the British assessor, Mr. Mayers, three Ningpo men were charged with being concerned, with others not in custody, in forging a number of $5 bank notes, the facsimile of the Imperial Bank of China notes, thereby defrauding the Bank and the public; also with being in possession of machinery and plant for their manufacture.

  Deputy Captain Superintendent Mackenzie prosecuted on behalf of the police. Mr. A. W. Maitland, acting Chief Manager of the Imperial Bank of China, stated that on the 10th inst. two notes were handed into the Bank which were forgeries. He communicated with Detective-Inspector Armstrong.  On the 14th inst. four more of the forged notes were presented at the Bank and the men were subsequently arrested. Detective-Inspector Armstrong said he arrested the prisoners on the 14th. For some time he had had his eye on the chief prisoner's movements and noticed that he was continually changing his abode, and upon examination of each of the vacated places traces of burnt parchment and occasionally marks of red and brown paint. On the 14th inst. he arrested this prisoner in the Amoy Road, and in taking him to the station prisoner tried to pass a purse to another man, who was at once arrested. The purse was afterwards found to contain a forged facsimile of one of the $5 notes in question. The first-named prisoner gave information at the police station as to the whereabouts of an accomplice, and he (Armstrong) and Detective Gilfillan, upon searching the accomplice's premises in Seward Road, found in some bedding the wooden stamp used for stamping the Bank Manager's name on the notes, also about 50 of the notes hidden in the roof of the garret. He arrested the occupant. 1128 notes ready for circulation and 200 in different stages of production were shown to the Court, as was also the machinery. After examination of the prisoners by the Magistrate, the prisoner to whom the purse had been passed was discharged for want of sufficient proof of complicity. The other two admitted their guilt and were sentenced to 10 years' imprisonment.

  The Assessor highly complimented Detective-Inspector Armstrong and Detective J. Gilfillan upon the excellent manner in which they had effected the arrest, and requested Deputy Captain Superintendent Mackenzie to bring the fact to the notice of Captain Pattison.

.  .  .  

  Three Nngpo men and a Ningpo woman were charged, with others not in custody, with coining a number of 10 and 20-cent pieces and putting same in circulation, thereby defrauding the public, also with being in possession of dies for the purpose of manufacturing the said coins. The discovery of these "smashers" was made by Constable Lynch, who, while in the performance of the special duty of tax collecting, called at No. 379 Broadway on the 14th inst. and failing to obtain admission, forced the door open and there found a quantity of coins on the floor and the dies for their production. The woman and the one of the men were discharged for ant of evidence against them but the other two were each sentenced to five years' imprisonment.

 

North China Herald, 19 June 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

  At the Mixed Court on Tuesday morning before the magistrate, Mr. Weng, and the American Assessor, Dr. Bardet, Inspector Matheson prosecuted a native for endeavouring to set fire to his premises, 33 Kiukiang Road, at 3 a.m. on Tuesday, the 13th instant. The Inspector stated that he had visited the house and found wood stocked ready for firing, with a quantity of paper and several empty kerosene tins. This had been set on fire but was quickly put out and no alarm had been given.  The prisoner was caught flagrante delicto.

  He would like to have the case remanded until a visit could be made to the place by the magistrate and the assessor. It was decided to do so at 3 p.m. today. The property in the house had been insured in the New Zealand Fire Office for Tls. 800, but only $40 worth was in the house.

  Another native, who had been charged with a similar offence in the Wuchang Road, was discharged for want of sufficient evidence.

  For severely cutting and wounding another man, the culprit was given 500 blows.

  Mr. Ramdor prosecuted a mafoo of the Say Zoong livery stables for extortion and assault. Complainant stated he had been locked in a stable by defendant who took him by the throat and demanded the sum of $3. Mr. Ellis (Messrs. Browett & Ellis) appeared for defendant, and asked for a remand as he had not had time to prepare his case. This was objected to by complainant who said he had ample proof of the assault on his side. The case was remanded until this morning.

  On Wednesday morning, before the deputy magistrate, Mr. Chang, and the British assessor, Mr. Mayers, Mr. O. Middleton's mafoo was charged by Inspector Matheson with driving on the wrong side of the road at the corner of the Szechuen and Nanking Roads on the 13th inst. Mr. Middleton stated that the mafoo was acting under his orders at the time, and further, that he could not see why he should obey the Indian constable, as if he had done so he would have had an accident.

  He went on to speak in disparagement of the new Traffic Regulations, when Inspector Matheson said that this had nothing to do with the case. The assessor said the Police must be obeyed, and fined the mafoo $5, which Mr. Middleton paid at once.

  Another mafoo in the employ of Mr. J. J. Jones for a similar offence and for striking the Sikh constable on the arm with a whip, was fined $10.

  Mr. A. C. Randor's prosecution of his quondam mafoo for extortion and assault, which was adjourned from the 13th inst. came to a conclusion yesterday. Mr. Ellis (Messrs. Browett & Ellis) appeared foe the defendant. Mr. Ramdor himself conducted his case and stated that the mafoo had approached him in Say Zoong's stables about 6.30 p.m. on the 11th inst. and demanded the sum of $3, and upon being refused had closed the folding doors of the stable, bolted them on the outside, jumped through a window into the stable and made his demand afresh, but that seeing complainant had no ready money then with him, defendant disappeared through the window only to re-appear with an IO.O.U. in his hand which he compelled complainant to sign. Some thirty or forty mafoos had assembled outside as soon as the mafoo had shut the door, and some were peeping through the window.  He (complainant) could not get out by means of the window as his left side was paralysed. 

  Mr. Ellis showed how plaintiff had, last month, given a compradore order for $3 on Say Zoong to his client, but that plaintiff had afterwards come to Say Zoong and requested it to be cancelled as the mafoo had since displeased him. Mr. Ellis failed to see the charge of extortion and went on to that of the assault. After some discussion one of Mr. Ramdors' witnesses (of whom there were two, both mafoos) was called and totally contradicted Mr. Ramdors' evidence, stating the assault was first made in the stable by Mr. Ramdor, who had impeded exit by the door, seeing which the defendant had escaped through the window. Witness saw no chit handled at all. The case was dismissed.

  On Thursday morning before the magistrate, Mr. Weng, and U.S. Assessor, Dr. Barchet, there appeared a native who had been accused on the 13th inst. and remanded until a visit had been paid by the magistrate and Dr. Barchet to the scene of the supposed attempt to set fire to the premises, with intent to defraud the New Zealand Fire Insurance Company of Tls. 800. The house was visited on the 14th inst. and had every appearance of premeditated action on part of the accused as wood and paper were arranged in a suspicious manner. But in Court, the magistrate considered there was a want of evidence to support the accusation of "feloniously setting fire," but was not satisfied that an attempt had not had been made to defraud the New Zealand Insurance Co. of Tls. 800, as only a small fraction of such a sum was represented in the house, and therefore committed prisoner to eight months' imprisonment for carelessness and false representation.

  A civil case came before the Court in which Dr. Hart of Wuhu wished for the cancellation of a bank order purporting to be the proceeds of a sale of feathers, received by him as a donation to the hospital at Wuhu, and which could not be cashed. The cheque was for Tls. 1,000, and the Magistrate pronouncing it fraudulent ordered it to be cancelled.

 

North China Herald, 26 June 1899

MIXED COURT.

Shanghai, 20th June.

Before F.S. A. Bourne, Esq., (British Assessor) an Mr. Weng (Magistrate.)

KRONG & CO. v. SUNG-CHI.

  This was a case in which defendant refused to take delivery of three cases of black Italians at Tls. 10.50 as he said they were not up to the sample shown him.

  A representative of Kronig & Co. contended that they were as the sample shown, and he had offered them at an allowance of 5 mace a piece. Samples and goods were produced to the Court.

  The Assessor stated this part of the case had better be left to arbitration by some -one competent to judge and Mr. Meyer of Messrs. Aug. Ehlrs was decided upon.

  In another transaction between the same parties for three cases of Italians at Tls. 11.50, defendant stated the goods were not as white as the samples. He had been offered an allowance of 3 mace a piece on these. Defendant decided eventually to take them on these terms.

J. A. HARVIE v. CHUNG KEE.

  Mr. Harvie prosecuted, but defendant did not appear. Mr. Harvie stated that in 1897 he delivered to defendant a case of cargo valued at Tls. 200, on a promissory note at 60 days.  Chung Kee had since absconded but had lately returned to Shanghai, and he (Mr. Harvie) wished to settle the matter.

  The Assessor appointed Friday morning at 10 a.m. for the rehearing before Mr. Mayer when Chung Kee would appear.

 

North China Herald, 3 July 1899

MIXED COURT.

Shanghai, 28th June.

Before Mr. Weng (Magistrate), and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne (British Assessor).

KRONIG AND CO. v. SHEN CHI.

  This was a case which had been adjourned frim the 20th inst. pending the decision of an arbitrator. Mr. Bourne stated the report of the arbitrator had been handed to the Magistrate. The defendant who claimed that 6 cases of black Italians at Tls. 10.50 were not up to the sample, did not appear, and the Magistrate said he would see that the defendant took delivery of the goods immediately. The plaintiffs mentioned that they wished the interest on the price of the goods, and arbitrators fee to be paid by the defendant, but interest (Tls. 11) only was allowed.

N. E. O. P. CANNING v. WU CHANG-CHIA.

  In this case the plaintiff claimed that defendant had bought some land from him. This the defendant denied, but said he had borrowed $300 from the plaintiff on a mortgage on some land.  Defendant paid into Court $60 as part repayment of the loan and stared he would pay the balance of $240 in a fortnight's time. Plaintiff claimed $12 for the measurement of the land and produced a bill of sale. The Magistrate allowed the $12, and would see that defendant kept his promise.

E. D. SASSOON & CO. v. MEI HUA-LOU.

  The plaintiffs in this case desired payment of $748 for house rent for 17 months from defendant. After a short discussion, the Assessor said he thought it was a matter for a compromise. The Magistrate gave defendant a week to settle and to put the house in proper repair.

.  .  .  

30th June.

Before Mr. Weng (magistrate), and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor).

H. SYLVA & CO. v. WOO CHING-CHING.

  This was a claim by Messrs. H. Sylva & Co. for Tls. 24,401.98 for various shares bought in 1897 by the defendant Woo Ching-ching, through the plaintiffs, for whom Mr. H. Brwett (Messrs. Browett & Ellis) appeared. Defendant denied owing this sum, but that Mr. Sylva had said to him (defendant), in the presence of three witnesses that as the shares were bought on a margin, he would settle the whole account for Tls. 1,000, and he (defendant) thereupon paid an instalment of Tls. 700. Mr. Browett said the shares were not sold on a margin and showed documents to that effect. The case was adjourned pending the appearance of the three witnesses next Thursday afternoon.

.  .  .  

Before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and S. F. Mayers, Esq., (British Assessor). 

ILLEGAL ARREST.

  Inspector Reed of the Yangtszepoo police station charged a native foreman named Ning Ah-hsi in the employ of the Shanghai Paper Mill, and his wife, with stealing and receiving a quantity of cotton wrappers, leather belting, and various other articles, valued at $12, from the Ewo Cotton Mill.  Mr. Nelson (Messrs. Stokes & Platt) appeared for the defendants and examined Inspector Reed - who said the detective Wong Ching-san had been instructed by him to search defendant's premises for some window-glass which it was suspected he had stolen from a house he (defendant) had formerly occupied. The detective had no warrant.

  Inspector Reed said this was often done, and that he could search houses if they were suspected without a warrant. The detective had found the articles then in Court and some broken glass.

  Three employees of the Ewo Cotton Mill failed to satisfactorily identify the goods, when questioned by Inspector Reed.

  Mr. Nelson drew attention to the fact that in the warrant defendant's name was mentioned as Chen Ah-hsi, instead of Ning Ah-hsi, also that he was an employee of the Ewo Cotton Mill.

  Wong Ching-san, the detective, was examined by Mr. Nelson and corroborated Inspector Reed's statement.

Cross-examined - He took the articles found in the house to the Ewo Cotton Mill to be identified and if they had not been recognised he would have taken them to some other mill. He denied removing a box which was now missing and said he did not ill-treat defendant.

   Sergt. O'Keefe stated that he sent a foreign detective with the defendant from the Central Police Station to the Yangtszepoo Station, who handed defendant over to Inspector Reed.

  Mr. Nelson then addressed the Court and said: I this case I consider the police have exceeded their duty to a considerable extent; this prosecution was simply carried on to back up the mistakes made by the detective. The detective went to the defendant's house as he said "for a certain purpose" and he had no authority to go there. What he said that he went there for turned out not to be true, and he then seized the first thing he found in the house. There is no suspicion of the defendant being a thief, his character is good and he has been an employee of the Paper Mill for 12 years. There is no evidence to show that these things belong to the Ewo Cotton Mill except that of Inspector Reed, they may probably been left in the house by some one else. The detective has brought this charge simply out of spite, simply because the defendant would not assist him to obtain some money to patch up some quarrel between another man and his wife and a discharged coolie from the paper Mill.

  Ho Say-ding, managing director of the Paper Mill, spoke to the defendant having been in the employ of the Mill for 12 years and spoke well of his character; also that it was usual for the foreman to take away any soiled paper or refuse if he wished. The Magistrate dismissed the case.

  Mr. Nelson asked for a summons against the detective for illegally entering defendant's house, but the assessor said he preferred to mention the matter to the Captain-Superintendent of Police.

.  .  .

At the Mixed Court on the morning of the 26th ult. before Mr. Weng (magistrate), and Mr. Mayers (British Assessor),

Two men were charged with being concerned with others not in custody in committing an assault upon four foreigners who were employed by Messrs. Atkinson and Dallas to take down some defective structures which the contractor for a house had put up. Mr. Atkinson said he sent the foreigners to a house which was to the rear of Sans Souci terrace as the contractor was not performing the work satisfactorily. One of the complainants stated that he had lost a 'ricksha and some waterproofs, valued together at $55, and one of the prisoners was held responsible for the recovery of same on identification. Two men were fined $20 each, four men were ordered to receive 100 blows, one man two months' imprisonment, and the other three were dismissed.

  A native who had seven separate charges to his credit was given 200 blows. 6 months' and deportation. His visits were as follows: 30 Nanking Road, on the 20th inst. at 5 p.m. a long silk gown, value $7.50; 564 Nanking Road, 22nd inst. 3 p.m. two silver watches, value $11; 25 Foochow Road, 22nd inst. 4 p.m. three ivory fans, value $12; 27 Foochow Road, 23rd inst. 5 p.m. one ivory fan, value $5.50; 121 Canton Road, 23rd inst. 11 p.m. one silver watch and chain, value $2; 360 Shantung Road, 24th inst. 4 p.m. four silver watch chains, value $10; and unlawful possession of a  silk long gown, value $7, the property of some one unknown. The articles were all recovered and handed back to their respective owners in the Court.

  Chang Sze Sing, a watchman, was charged with unlawfully wearing on the 26th inst. a singlet and a pair of socks which had been entrusted to him to wash at the Municipal wash-houses. He was given 14 days. cangue on the Rifle Range Road.

  Mr. E. H. Hall's mafoo was charged with driving a lame pony in a milk cart. Mr. Hall stated that the pony was not lame but weak in the knees and was well fed and looked after; also, that if any charge had to be made it should be made against him. The case was dismissed as being one for H.B.M.'s Summary Court.

  In the afternoon before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. Silvestry (Austro-Hungarian assessor),

The Rapid Aerated Water Company sued the Yue Choy Aerated Water Company for using the former's bottles and claimed Tls. 300 damages. The case was decided by the magistrate ordering defendant to pay the sum of $60 damages, this sum to include all costs.

  On Tuesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor),

  Mr. Chambers of the Shanghai and Hongkew Wharf Company charged two well-dressed natives, a compradore and a storekeeper respectively, with unlawfully obtaining a bale of piece goods valued at $268 from the company's godown. The case was remanded until Wednesday morning.

  A Cantonese was charged with six burglaries, all committed in the vicinity of the Chapoo, Tienndong and North Szechuen Roads, and between the 4th of April and the 10th ult. A quantity of the usual paraphernalia necessary to his calling was produced in Court, consisting of dark lanterns, a Belgian-made revolver with about 50 cartridges, jemmys, screw drivers, etc. Inspector Ramsay pressed for a remand pending further enquiries, which was granted.

  A woman was also charged with receiving and disposing of some of the stolen articles.

   On Wednesday morning before Mr. Wang (magistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British Asserssor),

  The storekeeper who was charged with fraudulently obtaining a bale of pierce-goods from the godown of the Shanghai and Hongkew Wharf Company was sentenced to three months' imprisonment.

 The two forgers of the Imperial Bank of China notes and the two coiners of 20 cent pieces who were sentenced on the 16th inst. to undergo 10 and 5 years' imprisonment, respectively, made their appearance at the Mixed Court on Wednesday morning and were, by request of the Taotai, handed over to the Shanghai magistrate for punishment.

  The man held responsible for the loss of a 'ricksha, and being concerned in assaulting four foreigners on the 24th inst. and who was sentenced on the 26th inst. to two months' imprisonment, had his sentence revised to one month as the 'ricksha and rain-coats were recovered.

   On Thursday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor),

  A native was charged by the Inspector of the S.S. P.C.A. with working a donkey harnessed to a bean-mill in the Tientsin Road, on the 28th inst., with sores upon its shoulders and withers. Fined $2 and expenses of the animal, while in the hospital, until cured.

 

North China Herald, 10 July 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

Shanghai, 6th July

Before Mr. Wang (Magistrate), and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor).

H. SYLVA & CO. v. WOO CHONG-CHING.

  This case came on for hearing again. Mr. Browett (Messrs. Browett & Ellis), who appeared for Messrs. Sylva & Co. said that Woo Ching-ching had seen Mrs. Sylva (whom he had asked to attend the Court), the day before the last hearing, and that he (defendant) had asked her if she would settle the matter for a 10 per cent payment of the whole sum. This Mrs. Sylva refused to do, but offered to settle for Tls. 20,000 instead of Tls. 24,401.98 and that afterwards defendant came to him (M r. Browett) and told him what had transpired. Mr. Browett said the offer to pay 10 per cent of the whole sum was ridiculous, and that this statement by Mrs. Sylva and himself completely proved the account and refuted the statement made by defendant for a settlement of Tls. 1,000.  If that latter arrangement had been made it would have been necessary for the defendant to go to Mrs. Sylva.

  Mr. Irvine, of the firm of H. Sylva & Co., in reply to Mr. Browett, said he saw the late Mr. Sylva when in the hospital often, and every time he went there Mr. Sylva said, "I know I'm going to die and I want you to collect the money for my wife's sake and yours. Perhaps you will not be able to collect the whole of this amount but the greater part of it."

  Mr. Browett thought he had brought sufficient evidence to satisfy the Court and asked for judgment for his client for the full amount.

  After some discussion the magistrate said the man was poor now, and could not pay the whole amount.

  Mr. Browett stated he was instructed by his client to say that he would reduce the sum to Tls. 20,000 in order to facilitate matters.

  Defendant still maintained that three witnesses had heard the arrangement made to settle with Mr. Sylva for Tls. 1,000.

  Mr. Browett considered this a subterfuge on defendant's part in order to cause delay, as one of the witnesses was away in Hankow and would not return for some three weeks or more.

  The Magistrate decided to adjourn the case until the return of the witness.

.  .  .  

  At the Mixed Court on Saturday, the 1st inst. before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Framke (German assessor), Dr. Solvien charged his house-boy on suspicion of having stolen a silver watch and a $10 bank note, total value $25, from his house, No. 28 The Range, on the 28th ult. The case was remanded for a week.

 Four men were given 100 blows and two months for attempting to break into Mr. J. Morgan's house, 14 Quinsan Road, also for stealing several flower pots therefrom.

 On Monday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British assdessor), five men were charged, with others not in custody, with wounding complainant in a tea-shop, off the Hangkow Road, on the 29th ult. Three were given 200 blows, all to be cangued for 14 days in the Foochow Road.

  A native was given 300 blows and six months' for cutting and wounding three complainants, on the 19th ult., in the French Concession.

 On Tuesday before Mr. Warg (magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor), a native reporter of the Hai Shing Jeh Pao was charged with blackmailing Messrs. Olivier, DeLangenhagen & Co.'s compradore. The trouble arose over a case of piece-goods which had been taken from the Shanghai and Hongkew Wharf Co.'s godown some days ago, and to whom the goods were consigned. The reporter wrote a paragraph stating the compradore was the thief and refused to contradict it unless paid the sum of $100. The Court sentenced accused to three ninths' imprisonment.

 On Wednesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), Vie Kai-doo and eight others were charged with a number of others not in custody with unlawfully banding together for purposes of extorting money, also with assisting in feloniously shooting and wounding the complainant with intent to do him grievous bodily harm on the night of the 17th inst. Mr. Nelson (Messrs. Stokes and Platt) appeared on behalf of Vei Kai-doo.  Complainant stated that at about 11 p.m. on the night of the 27th of June whilst on the North Soochow Road he was accosted by a gang of loafers, those in custody being of that number. In attempting to rid himself of the gang he was held by Vei Kai-doo, whilst an accomplice not in custody fired at him with a revolver wounding him between the eyes. Complainant did not know the prisoners personally.  He was a waiter in a tea-house and thereby knew them only by sight. Mr. Nelson pleaded a case of mistaken identity as regarding the supposed ring-leader, Vei Kai-doo. Complainant recognised the accused because of his close contact when being held by him.  A city runner was next called who stated that, in conjunction with a foreign detective and a number of native detectives, he arrested the gang outside of the East-gate on the morning of the 22nd of June. Vei Kai-doo, on learning that they wanted to arrest him, jumped out of the window and ran along a number of house-roofs and disappeared. Detective O'Donnell said he eventually arrested the prisoner in another house, and, at the time, the accused was hiding under the table. The city runner stated that prisoner was known to be a loafer and a bad character.  Mr. Nelson informed the Court he had been instructed that some fifteen or sixteen years ago his client had got into trouble over some tribute rice, but since then nothing had been shown against him. The city runner declared that he knew nothing against the prisoner only that he bore a bad name. Detective Sergrant Wood and his subordinates made the arrest on information of the complainant and that of the man who took him to the hospital. Mr. Nelson stated he did not intend using any arguments, he had been instructed that the prisoner had borne a good character for 15 or 16 years, was in a good position, and that it was simply a case of mistaken identity; also that before and after the crime, he was being treated by a native doctor who was now in Court to give evidence. Detecti9ve O'Donnell stated that when searching for the prisoner a woman detained them  half an hour before opening the door. He saw the prisoner escape from the window and run over the roofs of the adjacent houses, and at the time he did not appear to be sick. The doctor stated he had treated prisoner for sickness of the eyes and feet, but knew nothing further about him. Mr. Nelson requested the magistrate to drop the question of running away, as the Chinese usually run away on seeing the Police.  There were witnesses in Court who would testify to the prisoner's respectability.

  Inspector Ramsay informed the Court that the man owned two boats and that the man who shot the complainant had escaped in one of them. The other witnesses were then called but nothing important was got from them.  Mr. Mayers informed Mr. Nelson that the witnesses so far in no wise established the prisoner's innocence or where he was on the night of the assault. Mr. Nelson stated that he had not come to the Court with the intention  of screening the man but simply because he had been instructed that it was a case of mistaken identity.  Inspector Ramsay said the gang were known to the Police previous to the assault. The leader, Vei Kai-doo, was sentenced to two years' hard labour and in the event of the capture of the man who fired the shot, both were to be sent to the city to be dealt with. One prisoner was discharged, and the remainder were sentenced to 300 blows each, and to be expelled the Settlement.

Nuen Tsung, shop-keeper, was charged with creating an annoyance by breaking a quantity of old iron in a godown off North Soochow Road, thereby annoying the residents in the neighbourhood, and in contravention of Municipal Regulation No. 35. Witnesses were called who not only showed the business of the defendant to be intolerable, but also to be dangerous, inasmuch as the broken rivets struck their windows and in one instance wounded a child. The defendant was fined $$30 and cautioned not to break up any more of the iron on his premises.

  On Saturday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Dr. Framke (German assessor), Mr. F. Pape of the German Post Office prosecuted a native for unlawfully delivering Chinese letters without going through the German P.O., this being contrary to the P.O. Regulations. The case was remanded until tomorrow at 9 a.m.

 

North China Herald, 17 July 1899

MIXED COURT.

At the Mixed Court on Saturday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate), and Mr. Mayers (British assessor), a dairyman named Sui Chun was charged with selling poor milk in the Settlement, contrary to the Municipal Regulations. Inspector Christie, who prosecuted, said five samples had been taken of the milk out of which only one was good. The man's premises were in Sinza Road, he kept 6 cows and 3 calves, and as this was the first offence and his premises were undergoing alterations Inspector Christie did not wish to press the charge. Fined $15. The worst specimen of the milk had more than half the cream abstracted. The specific gravity was 1.025, the percentage of cream 4. The percentage of cream of average good milk is 10.

  On Tuesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor) the two natives who were caught delivering letters which should have gone through the German Post Office on the 7th inst. were sentenced, one to two days' imprisonment, the other to a fine of $20, $10 of which was to go to the German Post Office.

  On Wednesday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British assessor), the Cantonese who was charged on the 28th ult. with breaking into six houses in the neighbourhood of Chapoo, Tiendong, and North Szechuen Roads was sentenced to 300 blows and three years' imprisonment. The woman (his sister) who received the stolen goods was ordered to be deported to Canton.

  A native was charged by Mr. James Jones of the International Cotton Mill with obtaining $20 by means of a forged chop, of the International Cotton Mill.  The chop was shown to the Court and confiscated. The delinquent received six months' hard labour.

  A well-dressed native was charged by Inspector Wilson of Louza Station  with riding a bicycle on the 11th inst.  without holding the handles, such riding being dangerous to the public.  Fined $5.

  On Thursday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor), a house-boy in the employ of Mr. J. C. Wolff was charged with assaulting a native in the Boone Road on the 12th inst. with a loaded revolver. Complainant had marks on his body where the bullets had grazed him. A foreigner in the employ of the I.M.C. spoke to the good character of the prisoner. Prisoner received 300 blows and three months' imprisonment.

  Inspector Mellows of the river Police charged a laodah of a cargo-boat with attempting to steal two tons of coal, being a portion of 18 tons, to be delivered to the Customs. The coal was hidden under the planking in the bottom of the boat. 100 blows and a month.

  In the afternoon before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Framke (German assessor), a civil suit - F. Walthers v. Yeau Tan - was heard. Mr. Nelson appeared for the defendant, while Mr. Walthers conducted his own case.  Plaintiff claimed defendant had made a breach of contract, as out of a contract for 15,000 bags of flour he had only taken about 7,200; the remaining 7,800 he now refused to take, saying the goods were not in contract time. Plaintiff objected to this, and wanted the whole to be taken. Plaintiff brought witnesses who said they thought the goods had arrived in reasonable time. After considerable discussion, an arrangement was at last arrived at between the litigants, which the Court supported, that defendant was to take delivery of 3,900 sacks  within two months, pay all interest  on same (about $1,700) up to date and to take the 4,000 sacks at $1.97 ½ less $200, or pay plaintiff $200, plaintiff to return the 4,000 bags.

  At the Mixed Court on Friday morning g before Mr. Weng (nagistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British assessor), Inspector Batty charged a native with working a pony in an unfit condition. The stable proprietors had been formerly punished for starving their ponies, and Inspector Batty said the pony was total unfit for work. Accused was fined $20, the pony to be sent out of the Settlement to be cured.

  A native carpenter was charged, with a number of men not in custody, with stabbing three men in the Sungkiang Road on the 25th of last May. One of the wounded men died the following day at the Shantung Hospital. The case was remanded for the arrest of the others.

  Mr. Ravett prosecuted two boatmen for intimidating and assaulting boatmen employed by him in conveying paddy husks from Wusieh to this port. The accused said their employers had the monopoly of the trade, but Mr. Ravett produced documents issued by the Shanghai Taotai permitting him to import husks. The chief offender was fined $5, the other $3.

  Tem Lee-zea alias Tem Veng-sau, a native of Hupeh and interpreter at the Italian Consulate, was charged by a native woman with obtaining money from her by means of false representations.  It appeared that in April last a man was sentenced to a term of imprisonment for extortion. His wife wanted to obtain his release and through another woman received promises from Tem that he (Tem) could get her husband released, but in order to do so he would have to pay a certain sum of money, which was to be used in buying presents for the Chief of Police and the Assessor.  The latter, Tem said, was to receive $50. After paying the money and getting no satisfaction she appealed to the Police, who communicated with Mr. Ghisi, the Italian Consul, who suggested that the matter should be settled at the Mixed Court, but upon the Police issuing a summons, the Italian Consul claimed Tem as an Italian subject. As accused did not appear at Court a warrant was applied for to effect his arrest, and the case was remanded. 

  On Saturday morning before Mr. Wang (magistrate) and Mr. Eminger (German assessor), an unemployed native was accused of gross cruelty to a little girl, 14 years old, by burning her thighs and breasts with hot irons and suspending her by her thumbs, also with assaulting and beating her with a bamboo on various occasions last week. The matter came under the cognisance of the police by the girl breaking away from the house and imploring the protection of a tea-ship proprietor, who informed the police. Inspector Reed of Yangtszepoo Station prosecuted. The child's injuries were shown to the Court and accused was sentenced to 300 blows and a months' imprisonment.

   Another man charged with assisting and encouraging in the cruelty was dismissed for want of sufficient proof.

  A native in the employment of Sing Dah, livery stable-keeper, Astor Road, was charged with cruelly ill-treating a pony by working it while suffering from open sores, on the 14th inst. Sing Dah appeared for the mafoo and paid the fine of $5.

 

North China Herald, 24 July 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

Shanghai, 17th July

Before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and S. F. Mayers (British Assessor).

SINGING OF FOUNDATION COOLIES.

  Forty-seven coolies employed on the buildings at the corner of Nanking and Kiangse and Nanking and Szechuen Roads were brought before the Court charged with singing and shouting and refusing to desist when warned to do so by the police. Chief Inspector Howard prosecuted, and said the contractors had all been warned some time before, but that these coolies had persisted in spite of being warned on the 15th and 18th inst., so that when they had finished work on the latter date he had caused them all to be arrested. Messrs. Atkinson and Dallas appeared in Court and said they had done all they possibly could to mitigate the singing and thought it was considerably less than formerly. The assessor pointed out that concerted singing had been stopped by the Council and that this sort of thing had been going on for years, but the time had now come to put a stop to it. Inspector Howard pressed for a punishment of some sort, but as the Court said this was the first offence they were dismissed with a caution. The two contractors of the buildings who were charged with allowing the coolies to sing after having been warned not to do so, were also let off with a caution.

ASSAULT.

  A native fruit hawker was charged with striking Mr. Solomon's little child in Saunders' Compound on the 24th ult. On that day the child was playing with others and attempted to take a strawberry from the man's basket when he struck her over the face with his hand, causing a nasty wound over the child's eye; he then ran away and was not seen again until the 18th inst., when Mr. Solomon had him arrested. The Court sentenced him to 200 blows and a month's imprisonment.

CHARGE AGAINST INTERPRETER OF THE ITALIAN CONSULATE.

  Tem Lee-zen alias Tem Weng-dau, a native of Hupeh and interpreter at the Italian Consulate, appeared before the Court charged by a native woman with obtaining money from her by means of false representations.  He said that some time ago a man named Wong Ming-yang was imprisoned for extorting money, and about the second month of the Chinese year this man's wife came to his (Tem's) house imploring him (Tem) to obtain her husband's release. Tem said he could do nothing. She then asked him to obtain some foreigners' help in the matter, so Tem asked Mr. Attias, in whose enmploy was a Mr. Heidenheimer.  Mr. Attias said Mr. Heidenheimer could settle the matter if he wished and Mr. Heidenheimer consented. Next day Mr. Heidenheimer came to Tem in a tea-shop in Foochow Road and said he had arranged the matter and asked Tem to tell the woman to bring $75. Mr. Heidenheimer had a native servant with him at the time whom Tem sent to bring the woman, who came with another woman and brought $74. Mr. Heidenheimer demanded $75 and the woman not having the other dollar Tem paid it on her behalf to Heidenheimer. In going away Mr. Heidenheimer told the woman it was too late that day (Friday) to do anything, but that on Saturday he would do his best to get her husband out. On Saturday he told Tem, in the presence of the two women in the same tea-shop, that he had seen Captain Pattison, who was at the Race-course and therefore could do nothing that day.

  On Sunday the woman came to Tem's house and asked if Mr. Heidenheimer could do anything for her husband.  Tem told her to see Mr. Heidenheimer who lived in Hongkew and the woman went there with Tem's wife. Mr. Heidenheimer told them that at 10 o'clock the next morning the man would be let out. On Monday at 10.30 a.m. Mr. Heidenheimer came to Tem's office and said it was impossible to get the man out as he was a very bad man; even if he paid $10,000 it would be just as impossible. Tem said, "As you have taken $75 you had better return it." Mr. Heidenheimer said he could not as he had spent it by treating some foreign friends, but when he had the money he would return it. Tem, his wife and the other woman then went to Mr. Heidenheimer's house and demanded the money. Mr. Attias who was present came forward and paid $50, this being a sum Mr. Attias owned to Mr. Heidenheimer for house rent. This money Tem gave to the woman. Mr. Attias said Mr. Heidenheimer had no money and told Tem, to tell the woman that the balance was to be given to Mr. Heidenheimer as a "cumshaw." To this the woman consented.  Tem told Mr. Heidenheimer this morning (17th inst.) to come to the Court, but Mr. Heidenheimer said he preferred to pay back the balance of $24 rather than come to the Court.

  The woman's statement was to the effect that some time ago (she could not remember the date) defendant's watchman's wife came to her house and referred her to Tem as a man able to obtain her husband's release, saying a similar thing had been done before. Complainant said she did not know Tem, but the other woman said she would take complainant to Tem's house. On going there she did not see Tem, and went again next morning, and not seeing Tem she told the whole affair to Tem's wife, and afterwards a coolie came to her house from Tem asking her to go to his house. On going there Tem promised to get her husband released and asked her how much money she could offer. She said about $100. This Tem did not think sufficient, and said she had better get some one to obtain more money. The same evening she went to defendant's house and promised to pay $200. This Tem said was insufficient and wanted $300. 

  Next day Tem reduced the amount to $100 and Tls. 100.  $100 he said was for the fine to the Police and Tls. 100 for his trouble. Tem demanded a security from her and as she did not know how to make it Tem gave her a copy of one, which a friend of hers wrote out. She gave the name of a friend of hers, a shroff to Messrs. Dalwell & Co., from whom she obtained a chop which she took to Tem's house herself, and as Tem was not in she left it there with his wife. On going again in the afternoon he said to her that her husband could be bailed out that afternoon, when he would send for her to sign her name - to what, she did not k now as no money as yet had been paid.  About five o'clock that afternoon a boy came to her from Tem asking her to bring $65 to a tea-shop in the Foochiow Road.  She had no money just then and borrowed from a friend who went with her to the tea-shop.  Tem asked if she had brought the money, and her friend paid it to him on the verandah of the tea-house in her presence. She saw no one else there.  Tem wanted $75 and they (her friend and herself) managed to pay $9 more, making a sum of $74 paid to Tem, who said he husband would now be released. (This was the 22nd of the 1st moon.) Two or three hours afterwards, nit seeing anything of her husband, she went with her friend to Tem's house to find the reason. Tem said it was too late that day, but her husband would be out the next day at 10 a.m.; further that the money would be refunded if he did not obtain her husband's release. The next day she went at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. to Tem's house. At the latter hour she saw Tem who said it being Saturday and a holiday it was impossible to do anything. No one was present besides themselves. 

   On Monday on going to see Tem again he said the Consul (Assessor) and Chief of Police had consented, but that the Mixed Court Magistrate had objected, and asked her if she had any friends who knew the magistrate. She then demanded the return of her money which Tem promised. On the 6th day of the 2nd moon she received $10 in the same tea-shop and no one else was present. Tem told her to wait for the balance which she would receive in a few days. Some time after she received $5, at another time $15, and again $10, and again, the last occasion, a coolie called her to Tem's house where she received $10. On asking for the balance Tem told her the $24 had been spent in buying presents for the Consul and Chief of Police and that if she wanted anything more she could sue him for it. He also told her to tell the police. Questioned by the assessor she said she knew no foreigner in the matter. All the money was paid to Tem. When she asked for the money back Tem told her to come with him to ask for the return of the money. She went with him to a foreigner's house somewhere in Hongkew district, where she saw a foreigner and a foreign woman, but she did not know what transpired there. Tem had told her before reaching the house to demand money. She did so, but got none.

She went there a second time with Tem with the same result.

  The case was remanded for the appearance of Mr. Heidenbeimer and the woman who lent the money. Tem was released on proper security being found.

19th July.

  The hearing of the case was resumed.

  Mr. Heidenheimer said that Tem came to Attias and told him there was a certain case in which the woman was willing to pay $75.  Attias told Heidenheimer he could obtain the release of the woman's husband if he cared to take the matter in hand. He did not write to the Police; he was told that the woman's husband was a very bad man and after this he let the matter drop. He knew nothing more about the affair until he saw his name in the newspapers.

  He saw Tem on the 17th inst. on the morning when the case last came before the Court. He did not know then that any money had been returned. He was willing to pay the balance, $24. He obtained the $75 in a tea-shop on the Foochow Road about 4 or 5 months ago, but could not remember the exact date. The woman paid $74 which she counted out and handed to Tem in his presence and which sum Tem handed to him. Tem added five 20-cent pierces to the amount; this he distinctly remembered. Nothing was done that day, but a few days later, as Tem was pressing for the money to be returned, he told Tem he could do nothing in the matter.  He had spent part of the money in obtaining information. The $75 he gave to Attias the same evening he received it but obtained no receipt.

  Mr. Attias said the plaintiff's statement was untrue and that she deserved punishment also that Tem came to his office some time ago and said a woman desired to obtain her husband's release from gaol.  He (Attias) said he would do it although he was busy then. Tem sent the woman to his (Attias') house who said she was prepared to pay $50 for her husband's release and $25 for expenses which might occur in order to interview the Mixed Court magistrate.

  The Assessor here enquired if it were expensive to interview the magistrate.

  Mr. Attias said it required money in China for everything. He was to request the magistrate, as a personal favour, to release the woman's husband, but the magistrate had said the man was a bad character and no money would get him out.  A few days later the woman came to his house and demanded the money back. The money was handed to him by Heidenheimer for safe-keeping, and was paid to Heidenheimer who was in business with him. The woman wanted $50 returned, she did not ask for more, she said she wanted it to give it to a detective who could obtain her husband's release in less than six months. He was then away and on coming back returned her $50 when she thanked him saying she would not trouble him again. He had not heard or seen her until three or four months afterwards when Tem told him the woman wanted the $25 as her husband had come out of gaol. He (Attias) said he would give $24 which by right should belong to Heidenheimer who had done all the work. He told Tem to tell the woman to go to the Italian Court and not give her the money. He expected Heidenheimer would there be able to show how hard he had worked. He said the woman was a very bad woman and hoped the Court would not give her any protection as she had been a public woman. He would not permit the Italian Consulate to be dragged into this matter.  He (Attias') name had already appeared in the papers but that it would not appear again, as he did not like it. The woman came to him because she knew he had influential people backing him.  He had sufficient income to take any man on. By offering a security he often had men released. He had often arranged such matters with Mr. Scott. This was part of his business.

   The assessor sarcastically desired to know what was the average charge to get a prisoner out of gaol. Mr. Attias replied that there was no charge, but that a letter was generally written to a European, whose good feeling was touched and the prisoner released on his good behaviour.

  The assessor asked if he (Attias) assisted Chinese out of prison when convicted. Attias said they could get a lawyer, and that he knew the right way of doing things, but in this case the man was very bad. Attias thought the money should be paid to Heidenheimer as he deserved it but offered to take it himself if Heidenheimer did not want it.

   Mr. Tem said the $24 had been paid into Court by him, Attias having given it to him. Attias remarked he was $2 or $3 out of pocket in the transaction and hoped the Assessor was satisfied with him.

  The case was remanded until Friday morning and the assessor said he would strongly recommend the prosecution of Attias and Heidenheimer.

21st July.

Tem Lee-sze alias Tem veng-dau, Interpreter at the Italian Consulate, was again before the Court and sentence was passed against him by the Assessor as follows:

  It has been proved undoubtedly, that you have been using your official position as Italian interpreter to help two very unscrupulous foreigners to obtain from this woman (complainant) a certain sum of money under false representations, by saying that they had the power to get her husband out of prison, when you knew very well they had no such power. 

  It is not the duty of this Court to dwell upon the rascality and low cunning which Attias displayed when he was here on Wednesday morning. The share these foreigners took in this business will doubtless be thoroughly inquired into by their various Consuls, you, however, were the channel though which they worked. You have sat in this Court as Italian assessor, and it shows how extremely dangerous it is that a man of your class should be allowed to sit here as foreign assessor.  I do not know what your proceedings have been in other cases, it is not my business to enquire into that. As you have been in the employ of a foreign government the Court is willing to forego sending you to prison, which is what you deserve. The sentence the magistrate has determined upon with my concurrence is that you be fined Tls. 100 and be deported to your native country.

  Tem requested to be taken to the Italian Consul. The Court granted the request, but remarked that he would be deported without delay and ordered Inspector Wilson to take charge of the prisoner.

19th July.

"SHANGHAI MERCURY" v. "HUPAO."

 This was a case in which the proprietor of the Shanghai Mercury, Mr. J. D. Clark, sued the proprietor of the Hupao, a vernacular daily, for copying a map of the new extensions of the Settlement issued by the Mercury.

   Mr. McNeill (Dowdall, Hanson and McNeill) appeared for the defence.

  Mr. Clark said he issued a plan of the extension of the Settlement on the 5th inst. He had employed Mr. A. E. Algar to draw it up and had paid him. He advertised the plan for sale.  On the 7th inst., finding his ale of copies diminishing he made enquiries and found that the Hupao was issuing exact copies of his plan. He gave the order to Mr. Algar soon after the last Ratepayers' meeting. The Hupao issued notice on the 7th that they intended to publish a plan of the extension of the Settlement which an architect had made at great expense, and that the plan would be for sale at 10 cents a copy but gratia with the paper. Mr. Algar made the plan from a small coloured one obtained from the Municipal Council and made his own additions.

  Mr. McNeill produced a large Municipal plan and said he thought that the Mercury's and the Hupao's plans were reduced from it.

  Mr. Clark said if his had been reproduced he would say nothing, but the one he copied from was different to this one.

  Mr. McNeill maintained that Mr. Ckark's plan was sufficiently the same as the one produced by him, (Mr. Mc Neill).

  Mr. Clark showed to the assessor a small error which M r. Algar had made in the plan on the boundary line and which was reproduced upon the Hupao plan.

  The Assessor pointed out the likeness between the Hupao's plan and Mercury's. 

  Mr. McNeill admitted this, as they were both copied from the Municipal Council plan. There was only a difference in shape and one contains relatively the same information as the other. The assessor said it must be admitted that the Hupao's plan was lithographed from the Mercury's.

  Mr. McNeill replied that he had a witness to show that the Hupao plan was in the Hupaos's office some time before the Mercury's was published. The assessor pointed out that the artists had made the same designs. The compass indicators on both maps were exactly the same. Mr. McNeill contended that his client had obtained his copy from a different source than the Mercury; that source he was not just then at liberty to divulge, but it was official and the copy had been a long time in his client's possession, but lately it had been returned. Upon being pressed by the Assessor, Mr. McNeill told the Court the source from which he had obtained the original.

  The Assessor said the magistrate and himself were both of opinion, although they were not experts in architectural plans, that the Hupao's plan was a copy of the Mercury's. 

  Mr. McNeill here stated that it was very improper on the part of the Mercury, to make such a charge against the Hupao when the Mercury was daily copying telegrams obtained at great expense from the North China Daily News.

  Mr. Clark said if he copied the Daily News telegrams he always acknowledged it, and they had never complained to him in the matter. He was sure the Daily News would uphold him. Besides the Chinese told an untruth by saying they had employed an architect. This conduct on the part of Chinese in robbing others' brains should be put a stop to.

  In reply to the Assessor Mr. Clerk said he had sold 120 copies of the plan up to the 7th inst., and had sold only seven copies of the Celestial Empire. He had printed 150 copies of the latter paper and these were now thrown on his hands. He said he had no ill-feeling in the matter, and did not come to the Court for the sake of the money, but thought some payment might be made by fining defendant, which fine could be given to the Ladies' Benevolent Society.  The Assessor asked Mr. Clark what was the amount claimed as damages. Mr. Clark proceeded to point out the falsehood told by the defendant, when the Assessor remarked it was not moral damages. Mr. Clark said he had paid only Tls. 25 for the making up on the plan under special arrangements.

  After discussion it was decided by the Court that the Tls. 25 should be paid by the Hupao to the Mercury as the former had benefited by the plan.

ALLEGED EMBEZZLEMENT.

Who Ching-kwai, a shroff in the employ of Y. Ching-chong was charged with appropriating $2,500 the money of his employer, on various dates between the 21st of March and the 9th of July. Mr. Y. Ching-chong said the Shroff had given the names of about ten men with whom he had gambled this amount away, one of whom was punished on the 20th inst. with 500 blows and three months' imprisonment for obtaining $1,500 of the money by gambling. This gambler. Mr. Y. Ching-chong stated, was very well off, had an excellent residence in Lloyd Road, a number of servants, and every luxury.  The case being one for the guarantor of the shroff to prosecute, Ching Chong became witness only and the case was remanded. The gambler now in custody is to be again brought before the Court in order to ascertain his means, and if he is as represented an order will probably be issued to sell his goods to the amount of $1,500.

AN INCORRIGIBLE ROGUE.

  A convict was brought before the Court charged with "squeezing" his fellow-prisoners, and more so new arrivals at the gaol, when, unless they complied with his demands, he promptly placed in dark cells. A previous addition had been made to his sentence for a similar offence some time ago. On this occasion he was given 300 blows.

ALLEGED BLACKMAIL.

A well-dressed native answered a charge of extorting money from a cash shop proprietor on the 20th instt. by threatening to blackmail him. Another well-dressed native supposed to be a literary graduate and proprietor of the Sai Shang Si Pao was concerned in the same case on the charge of assaulting a native detective whilst in the execution of his duty.  The former man was employed as a shroff on the native newspaper Hai Shang Si Pao, owned by the latter, whose name is Lee Chan-dong.  On the 20th inst. Lee Chan-dong changed a dollar at complainant's shop. No one being in the shop at the time except a small apprentice, a spurious 20 cent piece was given by mistake. Lee went back a short time afterwards and was given the dollar back. The shroff then went to the shop and told the proprietor that if it was known that they had passed spurious money to anyone they (the shop) would be fined $100, but if they wished to hush the matter up they could do so by giving him (the shroff) $50.   To this the cash-shop proprietor would not agree as he had not such an amount. His business being very small, but eventually he agreed to pay the sum of $12, $6 of which was paid down and an I.O.U. given for the other $6. The shroff then wanted $4 more to be given him for his trouble and this led to a dispute and a report of the matter to the police who arrested the shroff. The native detective in taking the shroff to the Louza Station when opposite the Mixed Court was accosted by Lee who said he was a mandarin, and did not want the shroff to be taken to the police station, but demanded the detective to take the case before the Mixed Court at once. The detective not consenting, Lee caught hold of his queue and attempted to drag him there, but with the assistance of two foreign constables Lee and the shroff were taken to the Louza Station.

The assessor thought the evidence of the cash-shop very weak and remanded the case until Monday, prisoners to remain in custody till then.

.  .  .  .  

At the Mixed Court on Wednesday morning before Mr. Wang (magistrate), and Mr. Mayers (British assessor), Inapector Batty, on behalf of the S.S.P.C.A. prosecuted a man in the employ of the Shanghai Horse Bazaar for driving a pony with a raw wound on its shoulder on the 18th inst. From evidence given in Court the Head Mafoo of the Horse Bazaar was held responsible as it was his business to see that all the ponies were in a fit condition before allowing them to go out. He was fined $20.

  Yesterday morning before Mr. Wang (magistrate), and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor), Inspector Batty, of the Shanghai S.P.C.A. charged a man with working a donkey harnessed to a bean-oil mill with a very bad gall upon its off shoulder. The man had been fined $2 some time ago for a similar offence. Fined $3.

  A coolie in the employ of the Shanghai Ice Co. was charged with selling ice entrusted to him for delivery to customers and using the money. It seems the coolies are sent out with a certain quantity of ice, and sufficient to make up for any loss on the way to the customers. Complaints were continually being received by the Company about shortage. The Police happened in this instance to observe prisonber selling the ice to Chinese and telephoned the Ice Company. Prisoner got off very lightly with 2 days' imprisonment.

  On Saturday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. Eminger (German assessor) Inspector Batty on behalf of the S.S.P.C.A.  charged a native stable proprietor, in the Kiangse Road, with cruelly ill-treating a pony by working it with a galled wound upon its shoulder. Fined $20. - The same man was charged with fraudulently obtaining a private license for a carriage which he let out for hire. Fined $10, and to take out a license for a public vehicle.

 

North China Herald, 31 July 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

  At the Mixed Court on Tuesday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), a man was charged with selling milk without a license in the Settlement and fined $20. This man, it seemed, kept one cow with 14 others on the premises of another man in Carter Road. The latter had formerly done business in conjunction with Mrs. Papps, but after the case in the British Court, which Mrs. Papps lost, had left her. His dairy was unlicensed. Assistant Inspector of Dairies, C. Champion, prosecuted, and the Assessor remarked to him that it was preposterous that a man could keep a number of cows in the Settlement without being licensed and wanted to know where the milk went to. Mr. Champion said a man could keep cows without a license, but the notice had already been issued that all dairy-men were to have a license for which they were to fit themselves by the end of this month.

  Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co.'s  mud contractor was charged with compelling his employees to dump mud on the foreshore, contrary to the Harbour Regulations. Inspector Mellows of the River Police prosecuted. The man was fined $100.

  A Shroff in the employ of the Shanghai Horse Bazaar was prosecuted by Mr. Symons, manager of the Bazaar, for embezzling $415. The case was remanded for a week.

  Inspector Batty of behalf of the S.S.P.C.A. prosecuted a mafoo for driving a pony which was suffering from an open sore on its shoulder. The Court decided to send the animal to the Kung Yi stables for a month, or such time as Inspector Batty thought fit.

  At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), a coolie who had formerly been employed in the China and Japan Telephone Company was charged with being in possession of a quantity of bronze and copper telephone wire, obtained during the recent typhoon. He was given 300 blows and a year.

  Two native washermen were charged with using blankets entrusted to them to wash in the Municipal Laundry, Rifle Range Road. They were each given 14 days' cangue and the shroff of the washhouse was fined $10 for neglect of his work.

  The proprietor and editor of the Hai Shang Si Pao was again brought before the Court, together with the shroff in his employ, who was on Friday last accused of extorting money. The shroff was disposed of for three months' while the literary graduate received some most scathing remarks from the magistrate.  The Police put forward a number of issues of the Hai Shang Si Pao containing indecent pictures and advertisements. The proprietor at first attempted to deny all knowledge of same but eventually admitted them and was fined $50.

  On Thursday morning before Mr. Werng (magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American assessor), Inspector Matheson charged seventeen private 'ricksha coolies with plying without a license. They were each fined $5 and ordered to take out a license.

  Five Mixed Court runners' assistants were charged with parading a man and woman (who were sentenced to be cangued some time ago for kidnapping a child) each in a cangue in the roads of the Settlement without being accompanied by a constable from the Police force. The case was remanded, as the Police pressed for punishment while the magistrate declined to punish them as he said it was their first offence.

  On Friday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), Inspector Batty on behalf of the S.S.P.C.A. prosecuted the head mafoo of Yin Dah's stable opposite the Astor House for starving and overworking three ponies. The Inspector said that Mr. Maitland, the Secretary of the S.P.C.A., and Dr. Pratt, M.R.C.V.S. to the stables. Mr. Maitland said that Dr. Pratt would bear him out in the statement that on Wednesday night when they visited the stables two of the ponies could barely walk owing to their having been starved and overworked. He asked that an example be made of this man, for he was well aware of the cruelty he was perpetrating. The stable was owned by some very well-to-do Chinese and they did a very large business. It was well known that this stables had some ponies they kept outside the limits of the Settlement and in order to avoid being seen they brought them in for night work and then they were transferred to the outlying districts again. Inspector Batty knew of four other ponies that unfortunately were absent when they visited the tables. There were cases where Chinese were not aware that they were committing cruelty and in such cases the Shanghai S.P.C.A. did not ask for a severe sentence, but merely one to show the offender that he had done wrong and that there is a Society looking after the welfare of dumb animals. Mr. Maitland stated that the mafoos in the stables knew as well as any foreigner could of the cruelty they were committing. The Court inflicted a fine of $100; the ponies to be in charge of Inspector Batty and sent to the Kung Yi stables until in good condition.

  A dog-catcher was given 300 blows and a month for arresting Mr. Sze Yuen-ming's dog which had a muzzle on at the time of seizure but arrived at the Police Station without it. 

  A native machinist employed at the N.C. Daily News office was charged with attempting to wilfully damage a Linotype Composing Machine. The evidence showed that the man deliberately tangled some of the belting, and he was sentenced to a month's imprisonment.

 

North China Herald, 7 August, 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

  At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Wang (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor), Inspector Kelly charged as mafoo with cruelty in driving a pony with an open sore in a licensed carriage. Inspector Batty and Mr. F. Maitland attended on behalf of the S.S.P.C.A. Inspector Kelly said the pony was suffering from a raw sore, and Mr. Maitland said the Chinese used a medicine of some kind which dried up the sore so as to deceive people as to its real nature. The Court inflicted a fine of $30.

  A native was charged with breach of trust in disposing of a box of medicine and photo stands valued at $90 which had been entrusted to him to deliver at a certain place. He was ordered to pay $68 compensation within three days.

  Lee Chau-dong, editor and proprietor of the Hai Shang Si Pao, the vernacular daily lately convicted of blackmail and pornographic literature, appeared before the Court in default of payment of the $560 fine imposed. He stated that his paper (Hai Shang Si Pao) had ceased to exist. He was given another week to pay the $50.

  On Tuesday morning before Mr. Wang (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor), Inspector Matheson prosecuted twenty-one coolies employed on the foundations of Messrs. Hall & Holtz's new buildings for singing while at work and refusing to desist when warned to do so. Inspector Matheson said that some three weeks ago 47 coolies were brought before the Court for a like offence when they were severely cautioned. Proclamations had since been posted and still they persisted to the annoyance of neighbours. The architects were not to blame as they had employed special men to prevent the nuisance as much as possible. The Inspector pressed for exemplary punishment. The assessor remarked that, owing to the birthday celebrations of H.I.M. the Emperor they could not be flogged and the magistrate thought that the three eldest of the number should be punished and drew attention to the fact that they had already been three days in prison. These three men were ordered to be cangued on the premises for three days, after the expiration of the customary three days' birthday celebrations.

  A mafoo was charged by the police with working a pony with an open sore. Inspector Batty appeared on behalf of the S.S.P.C.A. , and said the sore was not of a very bad nature, but that the animal was in a very weak condition. The mafoo was fined $5, and the pony was ordered to be sent to the Kung Yi stables until recovered to Inspector Batty's satisfaction.

  On Thursday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor), the five Mixed Court runners who were charged on a former occasion with parading cangued prisoners in the streets of the Settlement without the assistance of the Police, were again before the Court and, having been imprisoned for eight days already, were given 100 blows on the spot and dismissed. The magistrate desired to know what the Police had to say about taking the matter out of his hands. Chief-Inspector Howard, who prosecuted, replied that that was a matter for discussion later on. Upon the magistrate asking if the Police were satisfied,  Inspector Howard replied in the  affirmative.

  A 'ricksha coolie employed by Mr. W. A. Leveson of the Municipal Council was charged, with others not in custody, in assaulting a native police constable in the Kiangse Road on the 28th inst., causing the constable to lose his watch and chain, a jacket, and a pair of shoes valued at $14. Ordered to pay $11 compensation and to undergo a month's imprisonment. Mr. Leveson, after sentence was pronounced, spoke to the Assessor on behalf of his coolie, but was informed that it was then too late; had he spoken before, probably the coolie's sentence would have been less. Chief-Inspector Howard also said during the trial that he did not think the constable quite blameless.

  On Friday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), Mr. Symons, manager of the Shanghai Horse Bazaar, charged a shroff in his employ with embezzling various sums amounting to $893.91, also with obtaining $75 by means of a forged receipt from Mr. J. Tulloch and having in his possession a forged receipt for $75 with intent to use same. The shroff paid a sum of money into Court leaving a balance of $43.91. The Court sentenced him to three months' imprisonment.

 Four of the district magistrate's tipaos were summoned by the Police and prosecuted by Mr. T. Llewellyn of the Sanitary Department to show cause why 541 coffins containing dead bodies on the Yangtsepoo Road were not removed. The coffins, Mr. Llewellyn said, were above ground and a nuisance and a source of danger to the health of the Settlement. Inspector Reed said the coffins were in the limits of both the old and new Settlement. The tipaos said the coffins were situated a mile away from the road, but Mr. Llewellyn said some were not more than ten feet from the road. Inspector Bourke stated the Municipal Council had issued notice some time ago that all coffins above ground had to be removed outside the Settlement, and that in Hongkew there were no coffins above ground. Inspector Kelly corroborated. The assessor wanted to know where they were to be taken to, and thought the police should bear the expense of removing them. Inspector Reed said this kind of work had been done before and sometimes the expenses borne by the Sanitary Department. The tipaos were ordered to accompany the Inspector and select a place outside the Settlement limits, and to remove all coffins not buried or bricked over. The Police to aid in moving all coffins today. The tipaos were also warned to see that no other coffins were placed within the limits of the Settlement above ground.

  On Saturday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. Erminger (German assessor), a shroff was charged with throwing prussic acid over another man against whom he had some personal spite. Complainant was asleep at the time, and escaped with only the loss of his queue. A pillow was shown to the Court that was eaten into by the acid. Prisoner received 300 blows and a year's imprisonment.

 A Manila boarding-house keeper charged one Jose Gomez, a native of Argentina, and lately paid off from the Muskola, with creating a disturbance in the house. The assessor desired to know who was the defendant's Consul, and Inspector Bourke stated defendant had been repudiated by the Spanish Consul and it was customary to bring any such foreigner to the Mixed Court. The case was adjourned until today.

 

North China Herald, 10 July 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

Shanghai, 6th July

Before Mr. Wang (Magistrate), and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor).

H. SYLVA & CO. v. WOO CHONG-CHING.

 This case came on for hearing again. Mr. Browett (Messrs. Browett & Ellis), who appeared for Messrs. Sylva & Co. said that Woo Ching-ching had seen Mrs. Sylva (whom he had asked to attend the Court), the day before the last hearing, and that he (defendant) had asked her if she would settle the matter for a 10 per cent payment of the whole sum. This Mrs. Sylva refused to do, but offered to settle for Tls. 20,000 instead of Tls. 24,401.98 and that afterwards defendant came to him (Mr. Browett) and told him what had transpired. Mr. Browett said the offer to pay 10 per cent of the whole sum was ridiculous, and that this statement by Mrs. Sylva and himself completely proved the account and refuted the statement made by defendant for a settlement of Tls. 1,000.  If that latter arrangement had been made it would have been necessary for the defendant to go to Mrs. Sylva.

  Mr. Irvine, of the firm of H. Sylva & Co., in reply to Mr. Browett, said he saw the late Mr. Sylva when in the hospital often, and every time he went there Mr. Sylva saiod, "I know I'm going to die and I want you to collect the money for my wife's sake and yours. Perhaps you will not be able to collect the whole of this amount but the greater part of it."

  Mr. Browett thought he had brought sufficient evidence to satisfy the Court and asked for judgment for his client for the full amount.

  After some discussion the magistrate said the man was poor now, and could not pay the whole amount.

  Mr. Browett stated he was instructed by his client to say that he would reduce the sum to Tls. 20,000 in order to facilitate matters.

  Defendant still maintained that three witnesses had heard the arrangement made to settle with Mr. Sylva for Tls. 1,000.

  Mr. Browett considered this a subterfuge on defendant's part in order to cause delay, as one of the witnesses was away in Hankow and would not return for some three weeks or more.

   The Magistrate decided to adjourn the case until the return of the witness.

.  .  .  

  At the Mixed Court on Saturday, the 1st inst. before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Framke (German assessor), Dr. Solvien charged his house-boy on suspicion of having stolen a silver watch and a $10 bank note, total value $25, from his house, No. 28 The Range, on the 28th ult. The case was remanded for a week.

  Four men were given 100 blows and two months for attempting to break into Mr. J. Morgan's house, 14 Quinsan Road, also for stealing several flower pots therefrom.

  On Monday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. Mayers (British assdessor), five men were charged, with others not in custody, with wounding complainant in a tea-shop, off the Hangkow Road, on the 29th ult. Three were given 200 blows, all to be cangued for 14 days in the Foochow Road.

  A native was given 300 blows and six months' for cutting and wounding three complainants, on the 19th ult., in the French Concession.

  On Tuesday before Mr. Warg (magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor), a native reporter of the Hai Shing Jeh Pao was charged with blackmailing Messrs. Olivier, DeLangenhagen & Co.'s compradore. The trouble arose over a case of piece-goods which had been taken from the Shanghai and Hongkew Wharf Co.'s godown some days ago, and to whom the goods were consigned. The reporter wrote a paragraph stating the compradore was the thief and refused to contradict it unless paid the sum of $100. The Court sentenced accused to three ninths' imprisonment.

  On Wednesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), Vie Kai-doo and eight others were charged with a number of others not in custody with unlawfully banding together for purposes of extorting money, also with assisting in feloniously shooting and wounding the complainant with intent to do him grievous bodily harm on the night of the 17th inst. Mr. Nelson (Messrs. Stokes and Platt) appeared on behalf of Vei Kai-doo.  Complainant stated that at about 11 p.m. on the night of the 27th of June whilst on the North Soochow Road he was accosted by a gang of loafers, those in custody being of that number. In attempting to rid himself of the gang he was held by Vei Kai-doo, whilst an accomplice not in custody fired at him with a revolver wounding him between the eyes. Complainant did not know the prisoners personally.  He was a waiter in a tea-house and thereby knew them only by sight. Mr. Nelson pleaded a case of mistaken identity as regarding the supposed ring-leader, Vei Kai-doo. Complainant recognised the accused because of his close contact when being held by him.  A city runner was next called who stated that, in conjunction with a foreign detective and a number of native detectives, he arrested the gang outside of the East-gate on the morning of the 22nd of June. Vei Kai-doo, on learning that they wanted to arrest him, jumped out of the window and ran along a number of house-roofs and disappeared. Detective O'Donnell said he eventually arrested the prisoner in another house, and, at the time, the accused was hiding under the table. The city runner stated that prisoner was known to be a loafer and a bad character.  Mr. Nelson informed the Court he had been instructed that some fifteen or sixteen years ago his client had got into trouble over some tribute rice, but since then nothing had been shown against him. The city runner declared that he knew nothing against the prisoner only that he bore a bad name. Detective Sergrant Wood and his subordinates made the arrest on information of the complainant and that of the man who took him to the hospital. Mr. Nelson stated he did not intend using any arguments, he had been instructed that the prisoner had borne a good character for 15 or 16 years, was in a good position, and that it was simply a case of mistaken identity; also that before and after the crime, he was being treated by a native doctor who was now in Court to give evidence. Detecti9ve O'Donnell stated that when searching for the prisoner a woman detained them  half an hour before opening the door. He saw the prisoner escape from the window and run over the roofs of the adjacent houses, and at the time he did not appear to be sick. The doctor stated he had treated prisoner for sickness of the eyes and feet, but knew nothing further about him. Mr. Nelson requested the magistrate to drop the question of running away, as the Chinese usually run away on seeing the Police.  There were witnesses in Court who would testify to the prisoner's respectability.

  Inspector Ramsay informed the Court that the man owned two boats and that the man who shot the complainant had escaped in one of them. The other witnesses were then called but nothing important was got from them.  Mr. Mayers informed Mr. Nelson that the witnesses so far in no wise established the prisoner's innocence or where he was on the night of the assault. Mr. Nelson stated that he had not come to the Court with the intention  of screening the man but simply because he had been instructed that it was a case of mistaken identity.  Inspector Ramsay said the gang were known to the Police previous to the assault. The leader, Vei Kai-doo, was sentenced to two years' hard labour and in the event of the capture of the man who fired the shot, both were to be sent to the city to be dealt with. One prisoner was discharged, and the remainder were sentenced to 300 blows each, and to be expelled the Settlement.

Nuen Tsung, shop-keeper, was charged with creating an annoyance by breaking a quantity of old iron in a godown off North Soochow Road, thereby annoying the residents in the neighbourhood, and in contravention of Municipal Regulation No. 35. Witnesses were called who not only showed the business of the defendant to be intolerable, but also to be dangerous, inasmuch as the broken rivets struck their windows and in one instance wounded a child. The defendant was fined $$30 and cautioned not to break up any more of the iron on his premises.

   On Saturday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Dr. Framke (German assessor), Mr. F. Pape of the German Post Office prosecuted a native for unlawfully delivering Chinese letters without going through the German P.O., this being contrary to the P.O. Regulations. The case was remanded until tomorrow at 9 a.m.

 

North China Herald, 14 August 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

  At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate)m, and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), Jose Gomez, a native of South America, was brought up ion a charge of attempted assault. The boarding-house keeper, a Philippina, corroborated by others, said prisoner wanted to fight with some other men in his (complainant's) house and threatened to use a marlin-spike, but was bound and given in charge. Detective-sergeant Gilfillan stated that, when called to the house, he found prisoner mad drunk and bound on the floor. Prisoner had been discharged from the sailing-vessel Muskola for a similar offence. No one would ship him on account of his reputation. The assessor was informed by Inspector Bourke that prisoner had been repudiated by the Spanish Consul. The boarding-house keeper stated prisoner was without money. The Court decided to deport prisoner to Hongkong. Prisoner said he was sick and the Court ordered that he should see a doctor.

  Mrs. Fowler charged a former cook with trespassing upon her premises. The cook said he came for his wages. The case was dismissed owing to the non-appearance of Mrs. Fowler the prosecutrix.

  A native broker was charged by the Police with receiving 16 pieces of cotton sheeting, valued at $62, knowing same to have been stolen. He was ordered to pay $62 compensation.

  A mafoo, for recklessly driving a pony and carriage along the Szechuen and accross the Nanking Road, on Saturday evening, and refusing to stop, when cautioned, was fined $10.

  The three eldest of a foundation coolies' gang engaged in the new premises of Messrs. Hall & Holtz who were last week ordered to be cangued for three days, had their sentences altered to a fine of $5.

  A native was charged with stealing some trifling articles the proprietor of which was unknown, but the property turned out to be his (prisoner's), and the detective making the arrest (Wing Ching-san, who was accused of effecting an illegal arrest on the 10th of last June) was recommended to the notice of the Captain Superintendent of Police.

  Lee Chau-dong, the notorious proprietor and editor of the Hai Shang Si Pao was again before the Court in default of the payment of the $50 fine and was given until last evening to pay, otherwise he would come before the Court for deportation.

  On Tuesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor), a man was given 500 blows and a month's cangue for stealing a box of clothing valued at $30 from the scene of the late fire in Fuhkien Road.

  Lee Chau-dong, proprietor of the Hai Shang Si Pao was again before the Court in default of payment of the $50 fine. Prisoner paid into Court $15 on account, but this sum was refused. The case was remanded until this morning.

  On Thursday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor), Inspector Kelly charged four ring-leaders of a gang of foundation coolies with singing and shouting and refusing to desist at No. 82, Bubbling Well Road. They were ordered to be cangued for two days.

  A man was charged with using a gambling board in the North Honan Road joss-house. The board was made on the roulette principle, but the rotary motion was ingeniously and entirely at the mercy of the operator, as was also his customers' money. He was given 100 blows on the hand.

  Three men were charged with breaking into and stealing articles of clothing from houses in the Woosung, Hanbury and Seward Roads; also with stealing a watch and chain from the Yienwu at the Hongkew wharves.  The spoil was valued at $60, and the depredations made between the 3rd and 6th instant. One of the men had often been deported, and another had a  reward of $100 offered at Ningpo for his recapture, being particularly wanted there to account for several visits and misusing property. These two men were each given 300 blows and a year's imprisonment, the third culprit was give 300 blows and six months.

  Two men were given 100 blows each for extorting $3 from the above burglars by means of threatening to split on their midnight visits.

  Four men were given 300 blows and six months for stealing 16 pieces of zinc valued at $60 from the s.s. [Lycemoon] at the Central Wharf on the 6th instant.

  On Friday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Myers (British Assessor), a house coolie in the employ of Mr. Gradwell of the Siu Chee Cotton Mill was charged on suspicion with stealing $450 in notes from a drawer in his master's bed-room between 6 and 11 a.m. on the 2nd instant. The case was dismissed owing to insufficient proof.

  A wheel-barrow man was given 50 blows for deliberately placing his wheel-barrow across the road which Mr. Carmichael was travelling over on a bicycle.

  A man was charged with bringing milk into the Settlement without a license   from a dairy off the Carter Road. The milk was conveyed in a locked Chinese basket to disarm suspicion. The case was remanded for the appearance of the proprietor.

  Five men were charged with stabbing another man about six weeks ago, when the case was then remanded for the recovery of the wounded man, who now appeared in Court, showed his wounds and identified the principal ruffian. The would-be assassin was given a year's imprisonment; the other four men were dismissed.

  Lee Chau-dong, the quondam proprietor and editor of the Hai Shang Si Pao was discharged, having fully paid the $50 fine imposed for blackmail and prurient literature.

   On Saturday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. Eminger (German assessor), a case was left to the Court in which a Shroff had embezzled the sum of $6,000 from his employers, a native firm, during the past four years. 

  A native was charged with allowing his dog to be at large on the Chekiang Road, on the 8th inst. He was given the option of paying the $10 for the release of the dig, or to pay $5 and have the dog confiscated. He accepted the latter.

 

North China Herald, 28 August, 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

  At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor),

  A coolie was charged with creating a disturbance, using abusive language and throwing water over Mrs. Heard at 24, Huangsi Road, on Saturday morning. He was given three days' imprisonment.

  An assistant compradore named Ying Kway-shing, in the employ of Messrs. Cushney and Smith, was before the Court having been arrested on a Mixed Court warrant for obtaining certain title deeds by fraud. Mr. J. C. Grant appeared for the accused who had claimed the protection of the firm, by whom he was employed. The assessor stated that this man had been before the Court about a year ago when he assaulted the magistrate, Mr. U. K. Sheng, by striking him on the face.  Accused had immediately been handed over to the Taotai to be dealt with in the native city, but had effected an escape to Macao, where he had endeavoured to become a Portuguese subject; failing this he had the imprudence to return to Shanghai.  Mr. Grant, in reply to the assessor, stated accused had been in his firm's employ for about one year, but only off and on, as he misbehaved himself occasionally. He desired the case to be remanded until the return of the chief compradore, who was accused's father. The Court decided to send him to the City.

  A mafoo was charged by the Police with illtreating a pony by working it whilst suffering from an open sore on the 19th instant. Mr. C. C. Bennett appeared in Court and stated that the carriage was his; the pony was in good condition and not overworked; the sore was probably caused by the collar being a little too large and chafing the animal; if he had known that the animal had that sore he would not have worked it. He thought the Police had been over-zealous in the matter and he called Dr. Pratt, M.R.C.V.S. who gave a certificate and said he had seen many ponied worse than this one, the sore might have been caused that morning. Mr. Bennett thought that action, if any, should have been taken against him. The case was dismissed.

  On Tuesday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor), a boatman was charged with collecting likin within the settlement, thus contravening a Municipal Council order passed on the 2nd of last June. He was given two months' imprisonment.

  An unemployed but well-dressed native was given 500 blows for molesting a respectable female on the Sinza Road, at 1.15 a.m. on the 22nd., causing her to lose a $5 ivory fan.

  For intentionally attempting to pass a counterfeit dollar, a hawker was fined $4, or a week.

  On Wednesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers, British Assessor, four men were charged with intimidating and obstructing Messrs. Schiller & Co.'s coolies whilst engaged in moving cargo on the Chaufoong Road.  Mr. W. Poignand, of Messrs. Schiller & Co. prosecuted. One man was given seven day's cangue and the other three, three days' cangue.

  On Thursday before Mr. Wang (magistrate), and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor), a punkah coolie was charged with stealing a watch and chain, worth $10, from No. 12 Yuhung Road on the 15th of July last, the property of Miss Johns. Mr. R. Johns prosecuted, and stated the watch belonged to his sister and had not been missed for some time. A detective caught the coolie taking it into a pawnshop on the Shansi Road. The magistrate desired to punish him with only 50 blows on the hand, but the assessor objected as being too little.  However, the sentence remained, 50 blows on the hand.

  A man was charged with stealing a pony valued at $160 from Hangchow and awarded 200 blows and one month's imprisonment.

  The native who was accused on the 15th instant of being in possession of two boxed of clothing, valued at $180, of which he could give no satisfactory account was again brought before the Court, having at last succeeded in obtaining the appearance of his guarantor. The articles were checked off in Court by the magistrate who found that more than half of them were missing. As there was not sufficient proof against the guarantor that he was involved in the prisoner's transactions he was let off with a fine of $100, prisoner receiving six months' imprisonment, the fine to be distributed in equal shares to the St. Luke's Hospital, Shantung Road Hospital, and the Seventh Day Baptist Mission Infirmary.

  On Friday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate), and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor), a Ningpo farmer who had lent money at that place to the amount of $1,000 and could not recover same, came to Shanghai to engage some foreigner to taker the matter in hand. He met a Chinese school-teacher in a tea-shop on the Nanking Road, who said he thought he could find a foreigner to manage the affair but was unable to do it himself, and introduced him to a native broker named Fung. Fung took him to the son of the watchman at the British gaol who was out at the time of the call. The three men then went to other office of Atkins & Co. and Mr. Atkins said he was quite agreeable to act in the matter for the sum of Tls. 150.  This the farmer thought too much, and consequently the teacher and the broker fearing he would escape them offered to take the matter in hand for Tls. 50, which sum was paid and a receipt given written in quaint English, and bearing a foreigner's signature. After waiting from the 14th of July to date, the farmer complained to the Police about the matter and detective Inspector Armstrong had the teacher arrested on a Mixed Court warrant. The teacher was fined Tls.  100 and ordered to repay the complainant the money disbursed, the fine to be paid within 7 days. A warrant has been issued for the arrest of Fung.

  Loh Yun-foh, manager of the Silk Filature at 132 Sinza Road, was charged under the new Municipal Regulations with blowing the steam whistle of the mill for a longer period than that permitted. A record had been kept by the Police from the 13th to the 23rd inst. and the longest blast was 75 seconds. He was fined $20, and at once paid it.

  Inspector Wilson handed the Court some correspondence re search warrants. The Council, since the Yangtsepoo case, had ordered that no house is to be searched without a warrant, but owing to the delay in obtaining these warrants separately from the Mixed Court magistrate, the Police desired that a general search warrant for each of the six police stations be granted to the Inspectors of each station. This the magistrate granted, with the injunction that the Inspectors exercise the greatest caution in their use. Inspector Wilson stated that they would only be used within the Settlement and warrants would be applied for in cases outside the Settlement.

 

North China Herald, 4 September 1899

MIXED COURT.

   At the Mixed Court in Monday (28th) morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate), and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), a likin man was charged with illegally detaining 60,400 wooden ring bobbins, vale $2,025, the property of the Ewo Cotton Mill thereby causing a loss to the Mill of $67.50 through the stoppage of the machinery. Mr. Kerfoot, Manager of the Mill, who made the charge did not appear, but the merchant at Pootung who was immediately concerned in having bought the stuff and was responsible to the Mill for the return of the bobbins prosecuted. It transpired in Court that the prisoner had paid Tls. 6,400 for the farming of likin. He was fined $100, the goods to be forwarded to their destination.

   Two men were charged with creating a disturbance in the Honan Road on Sunday. They were endeavouring to arrest a man on their own account who owed them a considerable sum of money, when the police stepped in and marched them off to the station. Upon being released the two men set upon complainant again and endeavoured to drag him into French town when the Police again had to interfere. They were each fined $5. 

   A native lad was charged with being concerned with a man not in custody in stealing 17 cane chairs and a table from Nos. 14, 40, 43, 52, 59, and 64 Bubbling Well Road between the 31st of July and the 26th of August. The case was remanded, pending the arrest of the other party.

   On Wednesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. Assessor), a 'ricksha coolie was charged with stealing a 200-franc gold piece from an Italian sailor on the evening of the28th ultimo in Hongkew. He was sentenced to 600 blows, three months' imprisonment, and to be expelled the Settlement.

   A native burglar was given 300 blows and deportation for breaking into and stealing property from Nos. 29 and 22, North Szechuen Road.

   Mr. James Tippin charged two men with intimidating and assaulting his servants and said he was unable to keep his servants for that reason. The two men were given 100 blows each.

   On Thursday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate), and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), the man whom the native lad charged the day before with being concerned in stealing cane chairs from seven houses on the Bubbling Well Road appeared before the Court and denied all knowledge of the affair. He had been arrested in French Town at the instigation of the Shanghai Municipal Police and as there was nothing against him he was remanded pending further enquiries. The lad received a sentence of a month's imprisonment.

   On Friday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), a native man named Yuan was summoned by Inspector Kelly of the Carter Road Police Station for ill-treating a child. Mr. S. Nelson appeared for the defendant and said his client was a respectable man, and he thought the girl was non compos mentis. The girl along with her sister had been purchased about 12 months ago from a beggar woman by Mr. Yuan, as servants to his household. Upon some occasion, not long since, when M. Yuan and his wives were to attend a festival in full regalia, his second wife missed some jewellery which she wished to wear and blamed the little girl who, after being coaxed, said she had given them to an uncle, but gave a fictitious address, for which she was then tied to a bed-post and beaten. Mr. Nelson admitted her wrists bore the marks of two nasty cuts which she had perhaps caused herself in endeavouring to free herself. 

   Inspector Kelly stated that a native P.C. found the child wandering in the Carter Road, and on arrival at the Police Station she seemed totally exhausted. The child when questioned by the Court said she was 21 years of age, whereas, in reality, she was only 14. The evidence as to who tied her up being so very conflicting, Mr. Nelson was asked to find out by Monday morning whether the Sicawei Refuge would take her in, and if so, the Court would make an order on Mr. Yuan for her support there for the next three years.

   Chang Yue-shing, proprietor of the Shanghai Dairy, in the Carter Road, was before the Court for adulterating milk. Inspector C. Champion prosecuted and said defendant kept a large dairy with 17 cows. This defendant denied saying he had only four. Mr. Champion called his native assistant who corroborated the Inspector. The prisoner then said he had only four milking cows. This Mr. Champion also denied, stating he was in possession of 12 milking cows. The dairyman was fined $50.

   Mr. D. van Reeth charged his former 'ricksha coolie with annoying and molesting him on the Bund, on the 31st ultimo. Mr. Reeth said he engaged the coolie on the 1st ultimo for the month and after 12 days or so he did not turn up, on that account Mr. Reeth refused to pay his wages, and consequently the coolie at the end of the month came to his office and demanded money. The Court ordered Mr. van Reeth to pay one third of the wages due.

   The burglary which occurred at No. 19, Nanking Road on the 19th of last June came to an issue yesterday morning then the perpetrator who had only been out of gaol for a few days previous to the theft was given two years' hard labour.  Prisoner seems to have had a lively time upon the proceeds of the robbery. He stated in Court that he had lost $700 in Hongkew in gambling. At Soochow he bought a carriage and pony for $150 and played the gay Lothario generally, presenting his lady acquaintances with ivory fans, etc. The value of the property stolen amounted to $1,880, $447 of which Detective Inspector Armstrong, who had charge of the case, said was recovered. The pony and carriage was ordered to be sold, the proceeds to be given to Mr. Maugnan, the victim of the robbery.

   On Saturday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. Eminger (German assessor), a man was accused of stealing a gold watch and chain, valued $50, from the person of Mr. H. Slack, on the 23rd of June last. Complainant did not appear as he had shipped on board the Pilgrim which vessel left on the 1st instant. Accused was given 100 blows, but upon Inspector Ramsay remarking upon the insufficiency of the sentence the magistrate added five days' imprisonment.

   A wheelbarrow coolie was fined $3 for cruelty to three sheep, by carrying them on the barrow with their leg tied, and upside down.

   A man in the employ of a native silk shop in the Kiangse Road was entrusted by his employer to take $200 to a bank, but absconded to Soochow, where he spent the money. His delinquency cost him 200 blows and two months' imprisonment.


 

North China Herald, 11 September 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

   At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. Carvill (British assessor), Inspector Matheson charged a native with begging from foreigners upon the Bund, thus being a source of great annoyance. Accused carried a large bamboo and slings for the purpose of deceiving the police. He was given a month with hard labour.

   A coolie was caught by Sergeant O'Keefe at the top of a ladder in an alley-way off the Honan Road with a hooked bamboo taking clothes through a window from a room. He was sentenced to 100 blows and a month.

   On Tuesday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate), and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor), Mr. J. Batty on behalf of the S.S.P.C.A.  prosecuted a man for carrying two goats on a wheelbarrow, in a cruel position. Detective O'Donnell stated he saw the affair and took the man to the Police Station. The goats were upside down with their heads hanging backwards, and when released at the station could barely stand upon their feet. The Court inflicted a fine of $1.  Mr. Barry said he thought so trifling a fine would hardly meet the case as the offence was the cause of great pain to the animals.

   Messrs. C. R. Bennett and L. Andersen prosecuted two Chinese for using the trade mark of the Pin Head brand cigarettes. Mr. Andersen said it was difficult to detect such cases, and pointed out that the cigarettes were even stamped with the Pin Head mark, probably done with a wooden die. The men said they had only been doing the business for a little while when they were caught and had sold only box a day. A full box was sold for 70 cents. The magistrate remarked through the Assessor that the men were very poor, and as they had only been at work a short time he would fine them $10 and $5 respectively.  Mr. Andersen said they might have sold only a few here but they sent away large quantities to the north. He would also like to know who manufactured the cigarettes. The men denied sending any away, and said the cigarettes were made by themselves. The Assessor pressed for a fine of $20 and $10 each but the magistrate still took into account their appearance and the original fine remained. The Court informed complainants that should any other parties come before the Court who did a larger business they would be punished severely.

   On Wednesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate), and Mr. Carvill (British assessor), the case which was remanded from Friday last by Mr. Mayers in which a little child was to be sent to the Sicawei Refuge, should the people there be willing to receive her, came before the Court, when Mr. Nelson (appearing for his client, the defendant in the case), said the Mother Superior at Sicawei had refused to take her in after hearing  about the child having been accused of theft at the Mixed Court. His client was perfectly willing to pay any refuge. Inspector Kelly suggested the Sinza Refuge and the assessor decided to visit that place in company with Inspector Kelly before ordering the child to be placed there. The case was remanded until Friday morning.

   Inspector Batty prosecuted a mafoo for driving a private carriage without a licence.  The mafoo was fined $10 and ordered to take out a licence.

   On Friday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate), and Mr. Carvill (British assessor), Mr. D. H. Hay, of the local P. & O. Service charged a former servant in his employ with stealing a number of articles from his house at No. 17 Boone Road. The articles stolen were valued at $10, and access to same was obtained by means of a back-door key which prisoner had said was lost before his services were dispensed with.  He was given 200 blows and a month.

   A man received 200 blows and 2 months' for impersonating a Municipal detective's assistant and arresting a man upon that pretence. 

   A man who was charged, with others not in custody, with murdering another man in the Morrison Road on the 16th November,1898, was handed over by the Court to the city magistrate. Prisoner was known by the Police as having served a year's imprisonment in connection with the notorious Chang Kuei-chung's gang of highwaymen who frequented Yangtsepoo Road some three years ago.


 

North China Herald, 18 September 1899

MIXED COURT.

   At the Mixed Court on Monday morning, before Mr. Cheng (deputy magistrate), and Mr. Carvill (British assessor, Inspector Batty, on behalf of the S.S.P.C.A. prosecuted a mafoo for using a pony suffering from sore withers and an open sore on its back. Dr. S. W. Pratt, M.R.C.V.S., certified the pony was in a very bad condition. Fined $20.

   A man was charged with carelessly running his 'ricksha on the Bund thereby causing the occupant, Mrs. James, to fall out and fracture her arm. 200 blows and two weeks' cangue.

   A mafoo was fined $10 for driving his carriage carelessly round a Corner without any lamps, on the Bubbling Well Road on Saturday night.

   The child who had accused her sister parents of cruelty to herself, and was in turn accused of stealing some articles of jewellery, was sent to the Sinza Refuge, her Guardian having paid over the sum of $162 for her maintenance there for the next three years.

   Two city tipaos were charged with conveying three prisoners in cangues through the streets of the Settlement without authority. Strange to say they passed the whole length of the French and English Bund and were only arrested in Hongkew. The tipaos were dismissed. The assessor remarked that the hsien would be made aware of the matter, as would also the British Consul-General.

   A mafoo charged by the S.S.P.C.A. Inspector with driving a very lame pony was fined $30.

   A native was charged with carrying a couple of fowls by the leg, head downwards, one of them dying as a result showed. The evidence showed that the fowls were stolen, and accused received 100 blows and a week's cangue. The native detective who handled the remaining bird before the Court, carried it in a similar manner to that for which the accused had been punished.

   On Tuesday morning, before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor), a Taoist priest charged a fellow bonze and a coolie with stealing priests' robes, cymbals, drums, gongs, and various other articles valued at $60. The coolie was discharged, but the other accused stated complainant owed him some money. This the latter denied. The case was eventually referred to the head priest to settle.

   A man was accused of assaulting a shroff in the employ of Messrs. Hall and Holtz, and other people, on Monday afternoon, on the North Shantung Road, complainant was set upon by accused and four others, who knocked him down and tried to steal an I.O.U. for some Tls. 300 from him, when Detective Johnson appeared upon the scene. The detective said he saw the man attempt to tear the document which was shown to the Court, and that it took some time to separate the combatants. Accused was let off with one day's imprisonment.

   On Wednesday, before Mr. Weng (magistrate), and Mr. Carvill (British assessor), a man was charged with stealing numerous small articles from a native house in the Laoukingmow village, Yangtsepoo. He was given 300 blows and a month's cangue.

   A man and woman were sent to the city to be tried for kidnapping a girl eight years old from the same district. The child had not been found and two witnesses in the case gave very conflicting evidence. 

   A summons was applied for by Inspector Wilson against the Jai Fung-lun silk filature, 134 Sinza Road, for blowing the steam-whistle for a longer period than that allowed by the Municipal Regulations.

   In the afternoon before Mr. Weng (magistrate), and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne, judgment was given in the case of HARVIE v. WEI LI-CHING. In this case Mr. J. A. Harvie claimed Tls. 2,800 on a promissory note. Mr. F. Nelson appeared for the plaintiff and said, a certain amount of money had been paid to the firm of J. A. Harvie in native bank orders, payment of part of which, for some reason, was stopped, and defendant had undertaken to obtain payment of Tls. 2,800 of same though his employers, Messrs. Collins and Sylva, who by some means or other had the notes cashed. But defendant said the money had not been given to him. Defendant had plenty of time to take action against Messrs. Collins and Sylva and all he (Mr. Nelson) wanted for his client was the money due which had been given in a native bank order to defendant. The magistrate ordered, on Mr. Nelson's application, that defendant be detained in Court pending enquiries into his personal property.

    Mr. C. Murray Adamson, on behalf of Messrs. Shewan, Tomes & Co. sued Jao Hsieh-tai for using Green Island cement labels on cement not of that brand, for which the firm are agents. Two men appeared in Court to take responsibility, but the Magistrate ordered the attendance, within ten days, of the real defendant, under penalty of having his shop closed.

   On Friday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate), and Mr. Carvill (British assessor), Inspector Mellows of the River Police, prosecuted a fisherman for anchoring his boat in the ship channel of the Huangpu River, near the Shanghai Engineering Co.'s new dock.  The Inspector stated that it was a common thing to do and proved a source of danger. Accused was let off with a caution.

   A sheriff's assistant at Pootung and a watchman of the International Cotton Mill at Pootung, were charged, the former with attempting to extort money from a junk laodah and the latter with attempting to arrest the laodah.  The watchman was discharged, but the other accused was given three days' imprisonment.

   Mr. E. A. Hewett charged a wheel-barrow coolie with cruelly handling pigs by carrying them by an ear and the tail from a wheelbarrow to a junk. Mr. Hewett said he saw them do this, and that the animals were tied on the barrow with their heads hanging down. Inspector Matheson said the pigs when brought to the station had lacerated wounds upon their legs. Four other men had been arrested for carrying the creatures in the manner referred to by Mr. Hewett. The five men were each given two weeks' imprisonment.

   Inspector Matheson charged a man at the instance of Mr. Ll. Ede Walker with cruelty to a beautiful golden oriel.  The bird was shown to the Court with its eyes sewn up with blue silk thread. Inspector Batty, who appeared on behalf of the S.S.P.C.A., said the idea was that as the bird was difficult to tame this was the way it could be done. Accused was given two weeks' cangue.

   A Ningpo man, a well-known thief, who had been deported some time ago, was given 500 blows and re-deportation for stealing various small articles from two native houses in the Yangtszepoo district.

   Three men were before the Court for having stolen 13 white jade ornaments, two gold and jade stone cigarette holders, and a large piece of gorgeous Japanese silk embroidery, from the residence of Liou Hsao-hsun, 82 Bubbling Well Road.  The leader in the robbery was known as having escaped from the Ningpo prison some time since. A woman was also charged with the men with receiving stolen property, knowing same to have been stolen. Inspector Ramsay asked for a remand to enable the detectives to enquire into about 60 pawn tickets which were found on the accused, and the case was remanded for a week.

   A native was accused of imposition with a Hongkong and Shanghai Bank cheque for Tls. 38. The cheque, which was made payable to "Nothing else," for $38, signed "I wrote this," and endorsed "Nothing else," was cashed by a native bank who presented it for payment, which led to the accused's arrest.

   Loh Sun-lah, manager of the silk filature, No. 132 Sinza Road, who was fined on the 25th ultimo for blowing his factory's whistle for a longer period than that allowed by the Municipal Regulations, again appeared before the Court on a similar charge. Inspector Wilson stated that all the other filatures had complied with the regulation. Accused was fined $50, and paid it on the spot.

 

North China Herald, 25 September 1899

MIXED COURT.

Shanghai, 18th September

Before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. Carvill (British assessor).

CRUELTY TO ANIMALS: HEAVY FINE.

   The most important case so far as regards cruelty to animals came before the Mixed Court when the S.S.PC.A., represented by Inspector Batty, Dr. Pratt, M.R.C.V.S., the Society's solicitor Mr. E. Nelson and Mr. Frank Maitland, the Honorary Secretary, prosecuted the livery stable keeper Yun Dah for starving and working ponies when in an unfit condition. Dr. Pratt visited the stables and found three ponies in a pitiable condition, starved, tied up to carriages. On one the sweat was not dry and the animal must have been at work two or three hours previously. It will be remembered that this same stable was prosecuted in July last for the same offence and fined one hundred dollars. Today the fine was $300 and the three ponies were handed over to the S.S.P.C.A.

   A few minutes after the case had been decided, Mr. F. Ellis, who said that he had just been instructed for the defence, came into Court and applied that the case might be re-opened on Wednesday next. He explained that he understood that the other side were aware that he had been instructed, and he relied upon the customary indulgence of the Court. He felt sure that if an opportunity were given him he would be able to put his client's case in a much better light.

   The Magistrate, however, said he was satisfied with the facts as given by the S.S.P.C.A. and declined to go into the case any more.

SUNDRY CASES.

   The manager of the Woo Ziing-chang cotton cloth mill on the Yangtsepoo Road was fined $10 for blowing the factory whistle for a longer period that that allowed (10 seconds) by the Municipal Council Regulations.

   A shroff who had formerly been in the employ of Messrs. Ricci & Co., was brought up on a remanded charge of fraudulently obtaining money by means of a Hongkong and Shanghai Bank cheque. Mr. Nelson appeared for defendant and asked that his client should be leniently dealt with as he was a respectable young man and had admitted writing the cheque, but had lately fallen in with bad companions. He asked that his client be fined. Of course he did not hold with his client's conduct. Mr. I. Turner, on behalf of the Bank, desired that the man should not be leniently dealt with, as the Bank was seriously inconvenienced by cheques of this description which tended to make the native banks doubtful of accepting their cheques. The Court ordered defendant two months' imprisonment.

   Two men were charged with stealing two bird cages from a man who they also stabbed severely in the left hand. The principal was given 500 blows and six months, and the other 200 blows and two months.

   Inspector Wilson charged two men with bringing 17 pheasants into the Settlement during the close season. The Inspector stated the prisoners were in the habit of doing this as was evidenced by the birds being carried in a basket and covered with green leaves. The men were caught between midnight and 1 a.m. on the 17th. Prisoners were each given a week's cangue.

   A man alleged to have stolen $450 in notes from a drawer in M. T. Gradwell's room at the Soy Chee Cotton Mill on the 2nd of August appeared before the Court. The case was not gone into as the Inspector asked for a week's remand.

20th September

Before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Chevalier E. GHISI (Italian assessor).

MOLINARI AND CABELLA v. LUN HWA SILK FILATURE.

   This was a case in which the Misses S. Molinari and C. Cabella claimed passage monies due them as per agreement made in 1896 with the Lun Hwa Filature. Mr. Nelson (Messrs. Stokes and Platt) appeared for the defendants, and Mr. E. Denegri, formerly manager of the Lun Hwa Mill, for the plaintiffs. Mr. Denegri said he claimed that the money due for the return home of the young ladies should be paid.

  Mr. Nelson stated that the two young ladies were engaged in Italy by Mr. Denegri, the then manager of the Lun Hwa Filature, under agreement. All agreements to come to China provided a clause to pay a return passage, the reason for this being obvious as people engaged in a foreign country on coming out to China might be left without any means of returning to their own country. The young ladies did their wok for two years according to their agreement. Some little trouble arose between the manager of the Filature and the ladies about working on a Sunday, and through that the Directors decided to terminate the agreement. In the meantime, one of the plaintiffs had been approached to go to another Filature at the termination of the agreement.  One of them went into a filature at the expiration of the agreement, of which Mr. Denegri had since become manager. Mr. Y. Chang Ching one of the directors of the Lun Hwa Filature had instructed him that he did not wish to pay their return passage unless they went home. But as they had chosen to remain out here he could not see why the money should be paid.

   Mr. Denegri pointed out that the Filatures had paid monies for return passages under circumstances in which the parties had not gone home. Mr. Nelson contended that this was only paid to save trouble. Mr. Denegri denied this. Mr. Nelson further said it had been done against his advice and did not see that it established any precedent.

   The assessor said it was in the agreement that the "cost of passage" would be paid at the expiration of the period served.

   Mr. Nelson said his clients were perfectly willing to take out the passage tickets, but not that any money should be given them, and suggested that arrangements be made with Messrs.  Melchers & o. for plaintiffs' passages when they desired to go home.

   Mr. M. Denegri said he was the manager of the Lu Hwa Filature when the agreement was made and plaintiffs were engaged in Italy by his father. Plaintiffs understood that at the expiration of the agreement they would have the passage money paid them.  In his own and another case it was paid by defendants, without the parties returning home.

   Sime discussion took place as to the work on Sundays. The assessor maintaining that it was not in the agreement that plaintiffs should work on Sundays and said he would never countenance any such clause. Mr. Nelson on the other hand said the agreement was so worded as to imply that work should be done on Sundays.

   Mr. Nelson suggested that the matter be left to arbitration by the Chamber of Commerce, but the assessor did not think it necessary, and desired that the money be deposited with him.

   The magistrate said security should be given to their lawyers or the Court by the defendants that the passages would be paid on the plaintiffs desiring to return home, but the assessor desired that the money be deposited with him as plaintiffs' Consul and, owing to this difference, judgment was reserved.

SUNDRY CASES.

   There was no sitting of the Mixed Court on Tuesday owing to the day being the Mid-Autumn Festival. 

   On Wednesday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), two men were charged with kidnapping a child, aged 6 years, from a house in Li Hongkew on the 17th instant. One was given a sentence of 500 blows and 3 months', the other 6 months'. 

   A building contractor was charged with a breach of the Municipal Regulations by failing to place protection boards in scaffolding, on the North Soochow Road, and in consequence injuring a woman by a brick falling on her head. He was fined $20, and $5 compensation.

   On Thursday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American assessor), a shroff was charged with embezzling about $400 from Messrs. Watson & Co., his employers. The case was remanded until next Tuesday for further investigation. Accused to be admitted to bail if his guarantor, a carpenter in the employ of the Municipal Council, appeared in Court.

   A man who had served a six months' sentence for stealing about $3,000 worth of clothing from Tibet Road, and who was released on Monday last, was before the Court for loitering with intent to steal in a road in West Hongkew on the 21st instant. He was given 300 blows and six months' imprisonment.

 

North China Herald, 4 October 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

Shanghai, 27th September.

Before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne, Esq., British Assessor.)

G. R. WINGROVE v. I. SHUN.

   This was a suit taken in respect of a guarantee given by I. Shun to the shroff of the Country Club.  Mr. Wingrove told the Court that the defendant had guaranteed a man named Sui Kui-yun to his (Mr. Wingrove's) compradore. This man had now decamped, and with $700, of which money they now sought recovery. He was asked for and produced the letter of guarantee, and went on to state that since he had run away this man had written a letter to his brother in Shanghai, telling him of his flight, and asking him to inform Mr. Wingrove of it.

   Mr. Browett (Messrs. Browett and Ellis) who appeared for the defence, urged that the letter of guarantee did not bear I. Sun's genuine chop. He produced a chop with which he said I Shun, would certainly have marked such a document as the letter of guarantee and added that the chip used was one that was lying about in the defendant's office at all times and might have been used by anybody. He asked Mr. Wingrove whether, on receiving the letter of guarantee he had made it his business to go to I. Shun and ask him whether it was all right.

   Mr. Wingrove said he did not.

   Mr. Browett, in further urging the non-genuineness of the document, said that if it had been all right it would have been made up by I. Sun's secretary. This, however, was not the case. He urged again that the chop used was for 

    receipting accounts, and the like.

   The Court decided that I. Shun must produce the runaway in seven days, or pay the money himself.

SHEWAN, TOMES & CO. v. JAO HUEH-T'AI.

   Mr. C. Murray Adamson on behalf of Messrs. Shewan, Tomes, & Co. sued Jao Hueh-t'ai for using Green Island cement labels on cement not of that brand. The firm are agents for Green Island cement. 

  At the previous hearing two men came forward to plead guilty, but Mr. Adamson said that they were not the men, and the case was adjourned in order that Jao Hueh-t'ai might appear, on pain of having his shop closed. He now came forward and was sentenced to a fortnight's cangue.

THE SHANGHAI AND HONGKONG BUILDING, LOAN AND INVESTMENT CO. LTD. v. HUANG SHAO-CHAI.

   This was a claim on a mortgage. Defendant was ordered to pay principal and interest in a month, or the property would pass to the plaintiff company.

 -  -  

On Monday morning (25thJuly.) the first sitting took place in the new Mixed Court premises although not in the Mixed Court itself as the carpenters, masons and painters have fully a month's work before them.

   The Court opened without ceremony. Mr. Wang occupied the magisterial chair with Mr. S. F. Mayers, the British Assessor, in consular uniform, on his right. To the right of the Assessor sat the Deputy Superintendent of Police, Capt. Donald McKenzie, while Chief Inspector Howard as also present.  Several important cases, including the theft of property to the value of $22,000 from Mr. Liu, one of the Empress Dowager's secret emissaries to Japan, were remanded; of the other numerous cases the most important were: Tsang Chih-lrh, a gas fitter, was charged with stealing fitting, value $100, from his employers, the Shanghai Gas Company, and was sentenced to 300 blows and six months'. 

   Inspector Batty, S.S.P.C.A. charged Keng Chew, livery stable proprietor on the Honan Road, with cruelty to a pony by working it at 11p.m. on Saturday in a lame condition. The Inspector informed the Court that the pony was drawing a vehicle containing four foreigners on the Bubbling Well Road, and that owing to the animal being lame in one of its hind legs the whip was incessantly used. A fine of $20 was imposed.

   Lee Siau-pau, unemployed, was brought up on remand charged with stealing from Mr. J. Gradwell, spinner, employed at the Soey Chee cotton mill, the sum of $450. There were two other cases against him of burglariously entering and stealing from the dwelling houses connected with the mill and he was given twelve months' imprisonment with hard labour. An unemployed man was sentenced to a month for receiving part of the things knowing them to have been stolen.

    Sing Wo-wo and Tsang Yung-zear, dairymen, were charged with keeping dairies for the sale of milk without a licence. The dairies were very dirty and altogether unfit. Both had been frequently warned and the latter had been twice convicted. They were ordered to remove their cattle outside of the Settlement.

   On Tuesday morning before M r. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American assessor), a farmer was sentenced to 200 blows and seven days' cangue for bringing his pheasants into the Settlement at 4.30 a.m. on the 24th instant for the purpose of selling them contrary to Municipal Regulations. 

   A Cantonese was charged with attempting to sell a hired bicycle value $90, also with selling the lamp and the bell of another hired machine. Prisoner went to the International Bicycle Store and hired a machine for 30 cents an hour. He then offered it for sale to a native for $25. The would-be purchaser took it on trial when the bicycle was seized by the proprietors.  Prisoner afterwards visited a shop on the North Szechuen Road and hired a machine valued at $18. He sold the bell and lamp belonging to it when he was arrested. A sentence of 300 blows and deportation to Canton was imposed.

   On Wednesday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), Mr. C. Hay of Messrs. Boyd & Co. Charged a laoda and a fireman of one of their steam-launches with using the launch for towing purposes without the knowledge of their employers. They were each given 200 blows and a month's cangue.

    A native butcher in the Pakhoi Road was charged with selling a pheasant during the close season and entering same on Mr. Geo. Sutherland's pass-book as "chicken."  Fined $10.

   The three men concerned in the robbery of jade stone ornaments and various other articles valued at $22,000 from No. 82, Bubbling Well Road, were sentenced to 12 months', six months; and three months' respectively. The woman in the affair was discharged.

   The proprietor of a brothel made complaint of illegal arrest and detention against a shroff in the employ of the British Consulate and two other men, one of whom was not in custody. Complainant stated he had borrowed the sum of $850 from a friend and had paid back $200, leaving a balance of $650 still owing. The man who had lent the money despairing of receiving the balance, had asked one of the accused to collect the money. This man not being able to do so himself, obtained the services of the shroff who in turn procured the assistance of a foreigner named Bannerman. By some means or other complainant was lured to the British Consulate and detained in the shroff's room there until he had signed a paper for the amount . Statements on both sides varied as to the exact period of detention from twelve to three hours.  A few days ago two Chinese, one of whom was before the Court, presented the I.O.U. for payment although not then due. Complainant then reported the matter at the police station and one of the men was arrested. The case came before the Court last Monday when the shroff appeared to defend the accused, but was immediately impeached and handed over to the Court. He stated the foreigner Bannerman was to have received $50 commission had the sum been collected. Complainant stated he was quite willing to refund the money, but not through the accused. The shroff was fined $100 and in default to be again brought before the Court next Friday; the other accused was given six months' imprisonment.

   A civil action was brought before the Court, plaintiff being one Ching Ching, an iron merchant, and defendant one Shun Ya-ming. Plaintiff stated that some three months ago defendant had come to him and offered to sell a piece of land at Pootung for Tls. 8,000 and showed plans for same. Complainant had paid defendant Tls. 700 as bargain money, but since then had seen neither the land nor the money. He had since found out the land did not belong to defendant, but was owned by a foreigner. Defendant was given ten days to refund the money and to give proper security before he would be released.

   A man named Chin Sing-wong was before the Court who had some time ago brought a charge against two native employees of Messrs. A. R. Burkill and Sons, accusing them of fraud. The case had been referred to the Canton Guild for arbitration. Meanwhile it transpired that some 400 private circulars had been distributed by Chin Sing-wong containing statements defamatory to Messrs. A. R. Burklill and Sons, stating that they were in the habit of harbouring and defending bad characters, etc. Mr. Browett (Messrs. Browett & Ellis) appeared on behalf of Messrs. Burkill & Sins and desired that all, if possible, of the circulars be recovered for the purpose of destruction or that a public apology be inserted in the Chinese papers. The case was remanded until last Friday for the purpose of drawing up an apology, which was to be submitted to the Court before publication.

   On Friday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British assessor), two men were charged with stealing some children's clothing from the house of Mr. A. P. Wood. Mr. Wood recognised one of the man as having formerly been in his employ. One man was given 200 blows and a month, the other to be expelled the Settlement.

   Three men were charged with throwing slacked lime at two complainants in Kiukiang Road. One of the complainants had his eyes injured and the case was remanded until a doctor had examined them.

   A man who was wanted by the Soochow authorities, and for whom a reward of $30 was offered for his arrest, was brought before the Court. The assessor remarked that the capture was a smart one as prisoner had been deported three years ago and it was difficult work to remember a criminal's face for so long. The reward was divided between the detective and a runner of the Court who had assisted him and prisoner was handed over to the Soochow authorities.

   The Court was interrupted during its sitting by Mr. A. W. George who brought a man before the magistrate whom he stated he had seen endeavour to drown a girl aged about seven years, in the pond near the Court, by holding her head under water. A Sikh constable corroborated. The case was ordered by the Court to be entered on the charge chest and tried on another day.

 

North China Herald, 9 October 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

Shanghai, 6th October

Before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. Matsumura (Acting Consul for Japan.)

WONG YUK-ZEE v. LING SHIH-LEE AND LING VAN-CHING.

   This was a case in which judgment had been delivered some months ago in favour of the plaintiff Sing Yuk-zee, and in which Mr. H. P. Wilkinson on behalf of the defendant now appealed. The hearing was fixed for Thursday next at 3 p.m., Mr. T. R. Jernigan representing the plaintiff.

SUNDRY CASES.

   At the Mixed Court on Tuesday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor), the remanded case of the shroff who was charged a short time ago with embezzling money from Messrs. A. S. Watson & Co. was brought before the Court, and Mr. Goyne Stevens, who prosecuted, stated that the amount missing was $637.83; part of this had been paid, and the balance was handed to Mr. Stevens in Court by accused's guarantor. Accused was at first sentenced to a month but this was reduced to 14 days.

   A man was charged with others not in custody with assaulting native P.C. 555 on the Sinza Road at 10 p.m. on the 2nd instant. The P.C. lost his uniform coat and whistle.  Accused gave the names of two of his accomplices and was sentenced to three months' imprisonment.

   An unemployed man with no less than ten charges of larceny against him, besides one of returning from deportation, was given six months' and re-deportation.

   Mr. Fiske, a representative of the American Tobacco Co. of New York, in company with Messrs. Anderson and Bennett, of Messrs. Mustard & Co., appeared in a civil action against a man accused of manufacturing cigarettes bearing the "Pin-Head" brand and using the bona fide manufacturer's packages for same. He was fined $100 and ordered to sign a bond that he would not again engage in this practice.

   On Thursday morning before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (U.S. assessor), a man was charged, with others not in custody, with an attempt to break into Inspector Kelly's premises on the Carter Road at 9.30 p.m. on the 4th. Tern days' imprisonment.

   A cook in the employ of Mr. C. Budd was charged with others not in custody with assaulting Sikh constable No. 158 by knocking him down, and causing the loss of his whistle. The constable said that he had seen a Cantonese woman soliciting on the Soochow Road, and upon ordering her away, accused with three other men committed the assault. Accused said that the woman, who was his wife, was a Shanghai woman and he produced her. The constable, however, denied having seen her, maintaining it was a Cantonese woman he had seen. Mr. Budd said there was evidently a mistake, as at the time mentioned, 9.30 p.m., on the 4th instant, he was having dinner, and accused was waiting upon him. Hearing screams accused ran out, thinking perhaps it was his wife, who was in the habit of coming to the house about that time. After the lapse of a few minutes he returned with a bad gash on his head which he stated had been inflicted by the constable. He (Mr. Budd), did not think it right that the constable should treat the man in such a manner even if accused was in the wrong. Inspector Matheson drew Mr. Budd's attention to the fact that the constable was fighting against four men and it would naturally be in self-defence that he struck out. The magistrate dismissed the case for want of sufficient proof and owing to the good character which Mr. Budd gave the accused.

   Mr. E. Nelson (Messrs. Stokes and Platt), appeared for a brother of Mr. Platt's cook, who keeps a native wine-shop in Hongkew, and who charged four men with entering his shop and breaking furniture to the extent of $30 or $40. Mr. Nelson said the men owed money to the shop and described themselves as barbers. This was not so, as two were mafoos and the other two were employed at the Aquarius Water Works. He asked that, besides being made to pay compensation, they should refund the money owing, about $35. The Assessor stated the money owing would be refunded, and they were ordered to pay $12 compensation between them. 

   Three men were remanded in connection with the alleged murder of a man named Dong Ah-ping on the 4th instant. It now transpires that although the deceased, who died at the Shantung Road Hospital, was struck by one of the number his death was due to heart failure.

   On Friday before Mr. Weng (magistrate) and Mr. Carvill (British assessor), the three men charged with assaulting Dong Ah-ping on the 4th instant, thereby causing his death, were sent to the City for further enquiries. Inspector Matheson said deceased was brought into the station at 4.20 on the 4th on a stretcher in an unconscious condition and removed to the Shantung Road Hospital where he expired. Deceased's wife brought the charge of assault against the accused. There were no bruises of any kind on the body, and the Hospital doctor had attributed death to heart disease.

   On Saturday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Dr. Eminger (German assessor), the shroff who was accused on the 24th of July last by the Shanghai Horse Bazaar of embezzling $893 and given three months, was released at the request of Mr. Symons, provided a doctor's certificate is given stating that he is suffering from beri-beri, and adequate security given for his re-appearance in the event of his recovery.

 

North China Herald, 23 October 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

Shanghai, 16th October

Before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. Matsumura, (Acting Consul for Japan).

WONG YUK-ZEE v. LING SHOH-LEE.

   These are the parties in a case heard some time back, and which since has been the basis of an appeal and considerable legal argument. The present issue however, was a charge of assault brought against Ling Shor-lee, who was represented by Mr. H. P. Wilkinson. The plaintiff's advocate in the other case was Mr. Jernigan, but he did not appear.

   Mr. Wilkinson pointed out that it was unusual to hear a criminal suit in the afternoon. The ordinary course was that the case should come before the Magistrate and whatever Assessor was sitting in the morning.  He wished to understand whether they were now to proceed.

   The decision given was that the case should proceed, and a runner of the Court who had seen the dispute in question gave evidence to the effect that no blows were struck.

   The defendant's case was in keeping with this evidence, though he admitted that there was a verbal dispute. He contended that he was a literary man and could not fight or strike a blow.

   Mr. Wilkinson urged that it was rather a pity that in the middle of what - if Mr. Jernigan had his way - threatened to be a big case, that small disputes should have been brought up. He maintained that it was rather below the dignity of the Court to hear the case under such conditions.

   The Japanese Assessor answered that this was a separate case.

   Mr. Wilkinson answered that it should have been heard in the morning, therefore. However there was no evidence to prove that the Chinese - his client -  had struck a man who for the moment was considered to be a Japanese subject, and the case should be dismissed. Also he claimed that they should know what part of Formosa the plaintiff came from, as in one part he might be a Japanese subject and in another part he might not.

   There followed much discussion of the case on the bench, interrupted by an occasional demand from Mr. Wilkinson that the case be dismissed. This was finally agreed to.

18th October

Before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. F. S. A. Bourne (British Assessor).

T. W. KINGSMILL v. CHIN LAN-CH'ING.

   This was a case in which Mr. Kingsmill wished to obtain rent for the use of a theatre. The plaintiff produced a contract and a running account. Chin Lan-ch'ing and others had sublet the premises to a man named Chow whose name was not in the contract as Mr. Jernigan who appeared for him pointed out, and further added that his client knew nothing about it. Mr. Kingsmill stated all he wanted was the rent, who paid it did not matter.  The Court decided that Chin Lan-ch'ing and the other three men concerned should jointly contribute the money due which would amount to $21 each. Mr. Jernigan's client was absolved from all responsibility.

HOLLIDAY, WISE & CO. v. YIN CHIN-YEH.

   In this case Mr. H. D. Hutchinson represented the plaintiff, and produced a couple of books containing chops, among which were those obtained by the defendant who was a broker, and paid a retaining fee and commission by plaintiff. Mr. Hutchinson desired that the two men Kung Chi and Ho Chi named on the chops should be found, but enquiries about them had been futile, no one knew these men, and his firm refused to deliver any more goods under that chop unless the money were paid first. The Court ordered that the money obtained from Kung Chi and Ho Chi be returned by plaintiffs and they came forward and took the goods away.

Re A. E. ALGAR v. FENG SHIH-CH'IN.

This was a case in which Mr. Algar desired to enforce a contract for the purchase of a certain piece of land. Mr. E. Nelson who appeared on his behalf said that a certain Fung Chuk-foo well-known in Shanghai had upon his decease left a certain plot of land and houses to one Feng Shih-ch'ing whom he had adopted, and Messrs. Dowdall and Hanson were the trustees of the land which was registered at the British Consulate as Lot 1395. The land had been sold by defendant to one The Kee, who in turn had sold it to Mr. Algar who had paid Tls. 5,000 as bargain money. A further sum of Tls. 5,000 was to be paid to the party who failed to carry out the contract and Mr. Nelson asked that defendant be made to pay the Tls. 10,000. This the Magistrate was not willing to do but proposed to sell the property, Tls. 20,000 to be left in the hands of the trustees to make a suitable investment. Mr. Ellis (Messrs. Browett and Ellis) said he was also interested in the matter as the property had been sold to a client of his for Tls. 41,000, which sum was paid to them, and if necessary documents could be produced to substantiate his statement. The case was remanded until next Wednesday.

19th October.

   Before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet, (American Assessor.)

AMERICAN TRADING CO. v. KING TU-TING.

   In this case the defendant was the guarantor of a man named Liu Tse-P'e, formerly in the employ of the American Trading Company at Newchwang  but who had absconded with about Tls. 7,800. Mr. H. J. Limby appeared on behalf of the Company, and said that their compradore who had arrived from Newchwang since the case could give the details necessary. The case was gone into at some length in the vernacular. Defendant stated he had made a verbal agreement for a security of only Tls. 2,000.  But in the written agreement produced no limit was fixed. The Court remarked upon defendant's stupidity and, considering that he was of known probity but at present impecunious, and that Tls. 3,000 had already been paid, ordered the remaining Tls. 4,800 to be paid on shares of a third (Tls. 1,600) each by the American Trading Company, Kong Fung-ting, and plaintiffs Newchwang compradore. This decision is to be submitted to the plaintiff Company, and for that purpose the Court adjourned until Tuesday next.

SUNDRY CASES.

   At the Mixed Court on Wednesday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor).

    A native doctor was charged with attempted arson. Inspector Wilson stated accused lived in an alley-way off the Honan Road and next door to an unoccupied house. Sergt. Madden made the discovery at 3.30 a.m.  on the 15th inst. through noticing a crowd of       excited natives about the alleyway, some of whom were carrying bundles and boxes away. Upon the sergeant entering the empty house the staircase was seen to be in flames but with assistance the fire was extinguished. A quantity of shavings and a bottle of kerosene oil were discovered on the premises and the staircase was saturated with kerosene oil. Accused had not paid his rent for the past three months, and his house next door was insured in the South British for Tls. 1,300, but the contents were barely worth $50. Accused and his family were all dressed ready to quit the house when seen by the sergeant. The Court decided to visit the spot and the case was remanded.

   On Friday morning a man was charged by the S.S.P.C.A. with cruelly ill-treating a deer by strangling it at 143, Foochow Road. Inspector Batty stated that the deer was hung by a cord by the neck and left to hang until it died. Mr. F. Maitland, Hon. Secretary of the Society, said the custom was a very old one. Sometimes an iron band was placed around the animal's head and gradually tightened until madness and death ensued. In this case the ceremony of killing the animal had been advertised, and the room in which it took place was hung with bunting, and the proceedings were largely attended. No doubt the defendant was only doing what had been done for generations, but that did not lessen the fact of the cruelty, and he only desired punishment sufficient to discourage the practice. If a drop had been given the animal, there would have been no cruelty, but instead the animal was allowed to struggle until death resulted; the idea was to keep the blood in the meat to render the latter more efficacious when used medicinally. Accused was fined $10 and cautioned.

   The police prosecuted a mafoo for driving a lame mule in a cart. Inspector Batty appeared on behalf of the S.S.P.C.A. Accused was fined $15, the mule to be sent to the King Yi hospital until cured.

   The native doctor accused of incendiarism was again before the Court, and a representative pf the South British Insurance Company handed in a press-copy of the policy issued which was for Tls. 1,300 on clothing and jewellery, and Tls. 20 on the furniture of accused. Questioned by the Assessor he said there were 22 or 23 boxes in the house when inspected by the company's native inspector, but he was not sure whether the boxes were full of clothing or not as they were sealed, but to all appearances there was about Tls. 1,500 worth. The assessor remarked that the scene had been visited by himself and the magistrate. The representative of the South British said that after the report of the fire the place had been visited and seven boxes were found full three partly and altogether worth about $133. The Court calculated that at that rate it would take considerably more than 50 boxes to make the amount necessary, and Mr. Mayers observed that in issuing these policies without first ascertaining their real worth, the Company was simply placing a premium upon arson. In this case there happened to be no doubt that it was pure arson. Accused was given eighteen months'. 

 

North China Herald, 30 October 1899

THE MIXED COURT.

   At the Mixed Court on Monday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Mr. S. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

   A well-known thief was charged with larceny from the Rev. W. Nelson Bitton's house No. 4 Shantung Road, Rev. Dr. Muirhead's house No. 3 Shantung Road, and Mr. Edkins' house No. 56 Broadway. His booty consisted of a gold presentation watch and chain valued at $200, two other watches, and various small articles amounting in all to about $282. The pawnbroker was charged with receiving stolen property and fined $60. The thief was given 200 blows and a year.

   An unlicensed dairyman named Ah Mow was charged with supplying milk to the Zee Butler Dairy, which the latter sold and for which he was also charged. Assistant Inspector of Dairies Mr. C. Champion said that Ah Mow's coolie had been caught with a basket containing seven bottles of milk and Zee Butler's card. Ah Mow owned about 11 cows and four calves, his dairy was not licensed and was not qualified to become so, as it was alongside a dirty creek the water of which might at any time be used. The Court ordered that the whole of Ah Mow's cattle be sold by auction and from the sum obtained $30 be deducted as a fine. Zee Butler was fined $50.


 

   A man was given 200 blows and a week for stealing $5 worth of tennis tape from No, 68 Bubbling Well Road.

   A respectable-looking native was charged with obtaining $50 by means of falsely representing himself to be Messrs. Collins and Sylva's compradore. He was given 200 blows, the Court undertaking to recover the debt.

   On Tuesday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor).

   A man was charged with attempting to pass two counterfeit dollars in a native shop on the North Honan Road. He was given three days' imprisonment. The money was confiscated.

   A loafer who had been convicted on the 8th of last August for extorting the sum of $170 was brought before the Court again. He was undergoing a period of twelve months' imprisonment and had received 1,000 blows; his relations now requested his release on the plea of sickness. The Court decided to release prisoner on reliable security owing to mitigating circumstances.

   The action on which the American Trading Company sued King Fu-tung for Tls. 4,800 and which had been adjourned since the 19th instant, occupied the attention of the Court for some time and the decision of the last hearing was upheld, viz. that Kung Fu-tung pay Tls. 1,600, the American Trading Company's Newchwang compradore Tls. 1,600 and the Company Tls. 1,600, the Court assuring the latter that the sum to be paid by defendant would be forthcoming before the end of this Chinese year.

   On Wednesday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. A. F. Mayers (British Assessor),

   The man who had formerly been charged with throwing vitriol over his quondam paramour was again remanded pending the arrest of another man. Prisoner said he did not throw the vitriol, but accused another man of so doing. The assessor asked if there was no regulation respecting the sale of such dangerous acids, and Inspector Wilson replied in the negative.

   On Thursday morning before Mr. Weng (Magistrate) and Dr. Barchet (American Assessor).

   A coolie was charged with stealing fowls. Accused's modus operandi, if not novel, was ingenious. The fowls were enticed by a live insect at the end of a piece of string about a yard long; when the fowl gobbled the insect, the man grabbed the fowl, the process being repeated ad libitum. He was given a week's cangue.

    A man was given 14 days' imprisonment for stealing a bicycle worth $50, the property of Mr. S. Mameto, who had left it outside a butcher's shop in the Boone Road.

   A native was fined $5 for unnecessarily beating a pony on the head and neck with a stick on the Bubbling Well Road.

   On Saturday morning before Mr. Chang (deputy magistrate) and Mr. Eminger (German Assessor).

   Two Chileans, Louis Reyes and Jose Verna, were charged with being drunk and disorderly on the Broadway on the 27th instant, and assaulting three Chinese by striking two of them with a sling shot and wounding the other in the abdomen with a knife. A native shroff was charged with complicity in the assault. Inspector Ramsay stated the shroff was in the employ of Messrs. Bissett & Co. and his duty was to collect rents from native houses. He had employed these two men to assist him in ejecting some defaulting tenants. The men had been drinking. Mr. J. Buchanan, of Messrs. Bissett & Co., said he could not recognise the shroff, but in all probability he was employed by them and wishing to nail up some houses the tenants of whi8ch had not paid their rent. Accused had, unknown to his employers, engaged these men to assist him and in all probability they had used the weapons then in Court. The shroff was solely responsible. Inspector Reed gave evidence of witnessing the assault and effecting the arrest of the accused. The Court ordered the shroff 1,000 blows and three months. The Chileans were sentenced to three months' imprisonment and deportation.

   A man who had been before the Court for larceny on about a dozen occasions was given 500 blows and six months.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School