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Colonial Cases

Reynolds v. Hay, 1892

[civil procedure]

Reynolds v. Hay

Supreme Court for China and Japan
Hannen CJ, 28 March 1892
Source: North China Herald, 1 April, 1892


LAW REPORTS.
H.B.M.'S SUPREME COURT.
Shanghai, 28th March.
Before Chief Justice Hannen.
REYNOLDS AND ANOTHER v. HAY.
  This was a friendly suit brought by James Reynolds and George Jury Pine against Charles William Hay, of Shanghai, and came up for directions from the Court, under the circumstances set out in the following petition:
[Not transcribed.]
  His Lordship said he thought an inquiry in chambers would be an unnecessary expense, but it would be better to adjourn the case in order that advertisements might be inserted in the San Francisco papers. If that were done, a sufficient time allowed for the paper to circulate, and an affidavit filed, as to the districts in which the paper circulated and certifying that such an advertisement had been inserted, the Court would be satisfied.
  As they were dealing with the case of a man who, if he was still alive, was unrepresented and had no one to look after his interests, they ought to take that precaution at any rate. The case would be adjourned for six months, and in the meantime the advertisements could be inserted and the affidavit filed.

 

Source: North China Herald, 30 September, 1892


LAW REPORTS.
H.B.M.'S SUPREME COURT .
Shanghai, 28th September.
Before George Jamieson, Esq., Acting Chief Justice.
REYNOLDS AND ANOTHER v. HAY.
This was a resumed hearing of a friendly suit brought by James Reynolds and George Jury against Charles William Hay, of Shanghai. The case was first heard on 28th March last, and was adjourned for the purpose of advertisements being issued, with the object of ascertaining, if possible, the whereabouts of William Alfred Reynolds, the beneficiary under the will of the late Edward Andrew Reynolds, formerly of Shanghai.
[not transcribed.]
  Mr. Charles William Hay formally gave evidence that he had had no communication from, or information of, the said William Alfred Reynolds.
  His Lordship then granted the application, and directed the Order to be drawn up.

 

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School