Skip to Content

Colonial Cases

R. v. McLoughlin 1888

[shipping]

R. v. McLoughlin

Source: North China Herald, 3 February 1888

BREACH OF THE MERCHANT SHIPPING ACT.

   Captain MACLOUGHLIN, Master of the British ship Minister of Marine, appeared to answer the charge that he on or about the 29th July, 1887, contrary to Sec. 160 of the Merchant Shipping Act of 1854, did engage and carry away two seamen, Max Bucholtz and Carl Petersen, from New York without the consent of the British Consulate, before whom the men should have been engaged.

.  .  .  

   His Worship said that he would have to impose of fine of $10 in each case, by which the attention of other shipmasters would be called to the Section.  It was no excuse to say that the rule had been repeatedly broken by others, in fact if I had been frequently broken, there was all the more necessity for enforcing it now, unless it was allowed to become a dead latter, as it was very desirable that it should not be, and also that men should be regularly shipped.

   The fine was paid.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School