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Colonial Cases

United States v. Morrice, 1864

[piracy]

United States v. Morrice

United States Consular Court, Shanghai
3 August 1864
Source: The North-China Herald, 6 August 1864

 

U.S.A. CONSULAR COURT.

August 3rd.

Before G. F. SEWARD, Esq., U.S. Consul General,

J. KEARNEY RODGERS, Esq., PLATT CONKLIN, Esq., THOMAS WILLIAMS, Esq., Associates.

In Re

U.S.A. versus BERNARD MORRICE.

The following was the Indictment.

Bernard Morrice, an American citizen, stands charged with the crime of piracy; for that he did at Shanghai, and within the admiralty and maritime jurisdiction of the United States of America, in company with divers other persons, on the night of the 7th or the morning of the 8th day of March, A.D. 1864, feloniously, piratically, and with force of arms, overpower the Captain, officers and crew of the steamer Tsatlee, then lying at Shanghai aforesaid, and did then and there piratically and feloniously with intent to convert the same to their own use,  seize and carry away the said steamer Tsatlee, against the peace of the people of said United States, and contrary to the acts of congress of said united States in such case made and provided - which was duly read to the prisoner, who pleaded GUILTY.

The Court retired for deliberation, and subsequently pronounced the following sentence:-

JUDGMENT.

The Court assesses upon Bernard Morrice the punishment of imprisonment in China or the United States for a term of ten years.  (Signed) GEO.  F. SEWARD, U.S.C.G Actg judicially.

We assent to the above, J. KEARNEY RODGERS, P. CONKLIN, THOS. WILLIAMS, Associates.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School