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Colonial Cases

Newspaper commentary Zanzibar

Star (NZ), 16 June 1884

Zanzibar and problems with local prison, Sir John Kirk.

 

The Times, 22 September 1886

IN the CONSULAR COURT of ZANZIBAR re Scharrer Tiede and Co. of Zanzibar and the East Coast of Africa.  Notice is hereby given that EUGEN SCHARRER and TIEDE trading as Scharrer Tiede and Co. at Zanzibar and the East Coast of Africa merchants were on or about the 15th day of March 1886   ADJUDICATED BANKRUPTS in the Consular Court of Zanzibar, and that ...

 

The Times, 3 December 1889

ZANZIBAR, DEC. 2.

   Mr. W. B. Cracknell, Judge of the Consular Court here, will to-morrow sail for Bagamoyo, on board Her Majesty's cruiser Turquoise, to meet Mr. Stanley and Emin Pasha in his official capacity and to bring the whole party to Zanzibar.

 

The Morning Post, 3 December 1889

Zanzibar, Dec. 2.

Mr. W. B. Cracknall, Judge of the Consular Court here, will sail to-morrow for Bagamoyo, on board her Majesty's cruiser Turquoise, to meet Mr. Stanley and Emin Pasha, in his official capacity, and to bring the whole party to Zanzibar.

 

Nottingham Evening Post, 3 June, 1892
THE FRENCH COLONIES.
[REUTER'S TELEGRAM.]
PARIS, Friday.
  The Republique Francaise today asserts that the island of Aldabra, as well as the Glorisa Islands, belong to France, whose possession of them has been recognised by every treaty, and notably by that of 1814, which restored to France all the colonies which she possessed in January, 1892.  Moreover, adds the journal, the Consular Court at Zanzibar, in a recently contested case, proclaimed our rights over these islands, and the British themselves recognised that the archipelago is French since they imposed upon all articles coming from the islands to the Seychelles the same duties as those levied on French products.

 

The Times, 4 June 1892

THE ALDABRA ISLANDS.

PARIS, JUNE 3.

The occupation by the British of certain islands in the Indian Ocean, including Aldabra, Assumption, and Cosmo Ledo, is to be the subject of an interpellation in the Chamber. - Our own Correspondent.

PARIS, JUNE 3.

The Republique Francaise to-day asserts that the island of Aldabra as well as the Gloriosa Islands belong to France, whose possession of them has been recognized by every treaty, and notable by that of 1814, which restored to France all the colonies which she possessed on January 1, 1792.  "Moreover," adds the journal, "the consular Court at Zanzibar, in a recently contested case, proclaimed our rights over these islands, and the British themselves recognize that the archipelago is French, since they impose upon all articles coming from the islands to the Seychelles the same duties as those levied on French products." - Reuter.

 

Manchester Courier, 8 August 1892.


BRITISH EAST AFRICA.
["STANDARD" TELEGRAM.]
Zanzibar, Sunday night.
  The cruiser Blanche, of her Majesty's Navy, having captured a dhow with 33 slaves on board, the case came before Mr. Cracknall, judge of the Consular Court, on Friday. He has condemned the captured vessel as a pirate, and has handed its Arab owners over to the Sultan's jurisdiction.

 

The Standard (London), 13 June 1894

EMIN PACHA'S WILL.

BERLIN, TUESDAY NIGHT.

The will of the late Emin Pacha was opened recently before the Consular Court at Zanzibar.  It is now on its way to Germany, where it will probably be referred to a Berlin Court by the Foreign Office.  Difficulties have arisen in the matter, as Emin's first wife - who has suddenly come to light - and his legitimate daughter, Frau Emina Schnitzer, the widow of Hakki Pacha, dispute the claim of his little daughter Ferida.  They intend, if necessary, to contest the validity of her adoption, on the ground that the Prussian law, which holds good in the colonies, does not recognize adoption when there is legitimate offspring.

 

British Chronicle (Bath), 14 June, 1894
FOREIGN AND COLONIAL INTELLIGENCE.
EMIN PACHA'S WILL.
The will of the late Emin Pacha was opened recently before the Consular Court at Zanzibar.  It is now on its way to Germany, where it will probably be referred to a Berlin Court by the Foreign Office.  Difficulties have arisen in this matter, as Emin's first wife - who has suddenly come to light - and his legitimate daughter Frau Emina Schnitzer, the widow of Hakki Pacha, disputes the claim of his little daughter. They intend, if necessary, to contest the validity of her adoption, on the ground that the Prussian law, which holds good in the Colonies, does not recognise adoption when there is legitimate offspring.

 

Evening Telegraph (Dundee), 8 August 1900
FRANCE, BRITAIN, AND ZANZIBAR.
Paris, Wednesday.
  The "Echo de Paris" says that active negotiations are proceeding between London and the Quai d'Orsay with a view to doing away with the French Consular Court at Zanzibar. The Sultan in 1894 agreed to all European countries holding Consular Courts at Zanzibar, and the British Foreign Office now wishes to supplant these Courts by a local tribunal under British control. M. Delcasse is said to be favourable to the proposal.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School