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Colonial Cases

Newspaper commentary and reports, Samoa

The Daily News (Perth, Australia), 26 March 1889

A NEWSPAPER CORRESPONDENT IN TROUBLE.

The German Government has resolved to take proceedings against Mr. Klein, the correspondent of the New York World, before the Consular Court at Apia, Samoa, for aiding Matafa, the Samoan chief, in his recent disputes with Germany.

 

The Mercury (Tasmania), 28 March 1889

GERMANY AND SAMOA.

Prince Von Bismark has sanctioned the prosecution in the Consular Court at Apia (Samoa) of Mr. Klein, who is charged with taking an active part in the recent disturbances between the natives at Samoa and the German forces.

 

Sausalito News, 22 April 1899

NOT ON GERMAN SOIL.

Berlin Advices on Attack on Americans and British.

FIGHT OCCURRED NEAR APIA HILL.

Great Britain Consents That Subjects of the Kaiser Shall be Tried Only By His Consular Court.

New York. - A Sun cable from Berlin says: Advices have been received from Auckland, New Zealand, showing that the ambuscade of Americans and British by Mataafans on April 1st, near Apia, Samoa, was not on the German Vallele plantation, but in the neighborhood of Falchima, three kilometers to the southward, near the old crater of Apia Hill, where Robert Louis Stevenson is buried.

It is stated that Mataafa retreated after the affairs to the hills beyond Falchima and thence to Tuanga Fai, where he is safe from the guns of the warships.  It was at this same place that Maletpoa took refuge from the Germans before he was captured.

It is stated that Great Britain has formally admitted that Germans accused of crimes in Samoa can only be prosecuted by a German court.  Huffnagel, the man who is accused of having incited the Mataafans to fight the British and Americans, will accordingly be tried by the German consular court after the Joint Samoan Commission arrives, unless he is previously discharged on evidence of his innocence.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School