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Colonial Cases

Newspaper commentary and minor cases, Palestine 1924

The Herald-Journal, 24 September 1924 [Google News Archive]

SPECIAL COURT FOR AMERICANS.

U.S. Consul in Palestine Holds His Own Court.

TRIES CITIZENS OF AMERICA.

(By The Associated Press)

   Jerusalem, Sept. 23. - Citizens of the United States living in Palestine are accorded privileges over and above those of citizens and subjects of the League of Nations.  This is true now pending American ratification of the British mandate for Palestine, but will probably cease to be the case after the United States government will have signed the convention recognizing the mandate.  The convention, it is believed, will secure for Americans in Palestine the same rights as fall to subjects of states who are League members, but no more.  The status of Americans in Palestine will then probably be the same as in Syria, to the French mandate for which the United States was reported recently to have agreed.

 

Milwaukee Journal, 12 December 1924, p. 30

Consular Court Still Is Held in Palestine

Jerusalem  - Citizens of the United States living in Palestine are accorded privileges over and above those of citizens and subjects of states who are members of the League of Nations. This is true now pending ratification of the British mandate for Palestine, but will probably cease to be the case after the United States government will have signed the convention recognizing the mandate.

The convention, it is believed, will secure for Americans in Palestine, the same rights as fall to subjects of states who are league members, but no more. The status of Americans in Palestine will then probably be the same as in Syria, to the French mandate for which the United States was reportedly recently to have agreed.

For the present Americans enjoy here the rights of capitulations which, before the dismemberment of the Turkish empire, all great powers insisted on maintaining for their citizens. America has not renounced its capitulatory rights in Palestine, and the American consul is the only one holding court and trying cases between American residents.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School