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Colonial Cases

Hanioum v. Carmelite Convent, 1932

[land law]

Hanioum v. Carmelite Convent

Land Court, Haifa
1932
Source: The Palestine Bulletin, 30 November 1932

 

TURKISH LADY SUES CARMELITE CONVENT

£P. 20,000 LAND DISPUTE.

Haifa, Monday. - An interesting land dispute was was revived before the Land Courts at Haifa, in which the complainant, a Turkish lady, Guide Hanioum, daughter of Hairi Bey, who was Kamaikam of Haifa 45 years ago, sues the Carmelite Convent on Mount Carmel.  The lady is now married to an Englishmen, Mr. Lermitt, who is employed by the Iraq Petroleum Company.

£P. 20,000 Property

   In 1931, the complainant brought suit against the Convent and 28 other persons, contending that the land on Carmel bequeathed to her late father including that on which the convent stood.  She claimed about 70 dunams, now worth £P. 20,000.  Proof of claim is a Turkish title-deed made out in her father's name to an area of 3 dunams.  The lady says that the land on which the Convent stands and the other land come within the scope of this deeded, since in Turkish times areas were registered for smaller sizes than they actually were owing to the desire to evade payment of tax.

29 Suits

   At the first sitting of the Court in early 1932, the Land Court decided that as each of the 29 respondents had separate title deeds, suits should be brought against each.  But the complainant abandoned the cases against the 28 others, and brought plaint against the French Convent only.

    The French Convent produced to the Court an earlier deed than that of complainant's, and for a larger area, namely, 750 dunams.

Evidence

   Testimony was heard on Thursday of the Land Registrar and a land registry official, and of the head of the German community, Wilhelm Duess and Wort, aged 75, who has lived 60 years in Haifa.

   Mr. Moghannam, Assisted by Mr. Reginald Silley, of Egypt, appeared for complainant, and Dr. Weinshall, of Haifa, for the Convent.

   The case has been postponed until December 21st.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School