Skip to Content

Colonial Cases

Monmouthshire

The Times, 5 February 1785
COUNTRY NEWS.
Bristol, Feb. 2.
About a fortnight ago, as two Bailiffs were taking a man, whom they had arrested for debt, from Usk to Monmouth, they abused him so much on the road that he died.  The Coroner's Inquest sat on the body, and brought in their verdict Wilful Murder, and the bailiffs were taken up in consequence, and committed to Monmouth gaol to take their trial for the same at the next assizes.

The Observer, 16 March 1800

   A young man named Panton a servant at Monmouth, last week drowned himself in the river Wye; a disappointment in love induced the horrid act.  - The Coroner's verdict has been - Lunacy.

 

Cambrian, 25 August 1804

An inquest was on Wednesday held on the body of William Smart, aged 58, a pauper in Alkington workhouse, near Newport, who hanged himself to a span-beam in his lodging-room. Verdict, Lunacy.

 

Cambrian, 12 January 1805

   An inquest was last week held on view of the body of John Weeks, the son of Mr. Weeks, a respectable farmer, near the New Passage, who was drowned by the ice giving way whilst sliding on a pool near his father's house.  Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 16 July 1808

Master Heath, son of Mr. Charles Heath, printer, of Monmouth, a very promising youth, was drowned while bathing in the River Wye, on Saturday last.

 

Cambrian, 16 September 1809

In Sunday last, while three men were employed in conveying a quantity of timber from Chepstow to Bristol, on a raft, one of them fell into the water, and unfortunately perished in sight of his companions.

   A few says since, a man named Thomas Morgan, of Abergavenny, was killed by the wheels of a waggon he was driving, passing over him, whilst going down a descent near Chepstow.

 

Cambrian, 25 November 1809

A few days ago, Mr. Wm. Jones, carpenter, of Risca, was killed by the falling in of part of the roof of a level belonging to a colliery near Newport.

 

Cambrian, 16 September 1809

In Sunday last, while three men were employed in conveying a quantity of timber from Chepstow to Bristol, on a raft, one of them fell into the water, and unfortunately perished in sight of his companions.

   A few says since, a man named Thomas Morgan, of Abergavenny, was killed by the wheels of a waggon he was driving, passing over him, whilst going down a descent near Chepstow.

 

Cambrian, 25 November 1809

A few days ago, Mr. Wm. Jones, carpenter, of Risca, was killed by the falling in of part of the roof of a level belonging to a colliery near Newport.

 

Cambrian, 23 June 1810

On Thursday, John Rees, of the parish of Llanlowall, near Usk, was fully committed to Monmouth gaol, by Thos. Jones, Esq. charged by the Coroner's Inquest with the wilful murder of his nephew, San. Rees.

 

Cambrian, 18 August 1810

The Assizes at Monmouth commenced on Monday last, when ... John Rees, charged by the coroner's inquest, with the murder of Samuel Rees, was ac quitted.

 

Cambrian, 27 April 1811

   On Tuesday, the son of Mr. Walter Hancock, of Monmouth, aged about seven years, went, as it is supposed, to fish in the River Monnow, at Chippenham, when his foot slipping, he fell into the stream, beyond his depth, and was drowned.  It was not till late in the evening that the child was missed; but, next morning, on searching near the place where he stood, his body was found a corpse!

 

Carmarthen Journal, 10 August 1811

Monmouthshire Assizes.

   Sarah Horton, aged thirty-two, late of the parish of Chepstow, in the said county, widow, committed March 28, 1811, by Zouch Turton, Esq. coroner, charged with the wilful murder of a male-infant.  Trial deferred till next Assizes.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 4 April 1812

Monmouth Assizes.

... The persons tried are the following:- Sarah Horton, aged 33, late of the parish of Chepstow, widow, charged with the wilful murder of a male infant., - two months' imprisonment; ...

 

Cambrian, 16 May 1812

   Last week, as a private of the East Monmouth Local Militia, was amusing himself by playing at ball, at Over-Monnow, Monmouth, he burst a blood-vessel, and died soon afterwards.  His remains were consigned to the grave on Wednesday afternoon, with military honours.

 

Cambrian, 19 December 1812

   Monday night, James Gardner, a drummer in the Newport Local Militia, was found dead near the Five Lines, between Chepstow and Newport.

 

Cambrian, 11 September 1813

Dreadful Murder. - On Friday morning, a man who resided with his father and mother, in a cottage within a short distance of Abergavenny, from some sudden and diabolical impulse, which he cannot account for himself, formed the horrible resolution of murdering both his parents, which he instantly carried into effect by beating their heads, arms, and other parts of their bodies, with a heavy bar of wood, so as to fracture the bones completely into pieces.  He then went to a brother-in-law, and told him "he had done the deed;" on his inquiring what, he stated the sanguinary tragedy he had just perpetrated, and said he was now come to murder his sister also.  The monster was instantly apprehended.  He is about forty years of age, a savage in intellect and totally unacquainted with the rudiments of religion.

 

Cambrian, 25 September 1813

   An inquest was taken at Chepstow, on the 8th inst. before Jas. Evans, Gent. Coroner, on view of the body of a new-born female child, found floating on the river Wye, a little above Chepstow Bridge, wrapped in a coarse flannel bed-gown, with a stone in the bundle.  The jury, under the direction of the coroner, having every reason to believe the child was born alive, returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown.  The body was in a putrid state when picked up, and must have been in the water at least ten or twelve days.  It is to be hoped the unnatural mother will be discovered, and brought to the fate she so richly reserves.

 

Cambrian, 9 October 1813

DIED.

[On Saturday last] - On the same night, owing to a fall from his horse in a fit, near Llangadock, Mr. Howell Jones, of [Glassilt.].

 

Cambrian, 9 October 1813

   In the last annual report of the Monmouth Dispensary, we noticed a donation of 50l. by the Duke of Beaufort, being a compensation accepted by his Grace in lieu of a deodand due to him as Lord of the Manor of Chepstow, from the owners of a vessel; the improper mooring of which caused the death of several persons in the river Wye in the summer of 1812.  That melancholy accident, we are informed from unquestionable authority, arose entirely from misconduct, and not from any danger in the navigation of the river; a circumstance to which we are induced to call the attention of the public, that parties of pleasure, wishing to take that much-admired excursion from Ross to Chepstow, from an erroneous idea of the cause of the unhappy event, be deterred from the enjoyment of so high a gratification.  The examples made of the persons offending, will be a sufficient warning to others, and will render the occurrence of a similar accident almost impossible.

 

Cambrian, 20 November 1813

   That miserable wretch, William Glover, who was lately committed to Monmouth Gaol, for the shocking murder of his father and mother, destroyed himself in that prison on Friday morning.  He was confined, during the day, in a room with two other prisoners, to whom the turnkey, as usual, delivered their portion of bread and cheese for breakfast, and gave one of them a knife to divide it, which had been done before, and returned after breakfast.  This man cut and gave Glover his portion, and afterwards sat on a bench before the fire, to toast his cheese upon the end of a stick; placing the knife under him, which he sat upon. Glover, seeing the knife, pushed the man forward upon the fire, snatching it up, and with a violent stroke cut his own throat.  The other prisoner immediately seized his hand which held the knife, when he raised the other to his neck, and tearing the wound with great violence, became most dreadfully agitated, and shortly after sunk from the loss of blood, and expired.  It is said, that he had thrice attempted his own life at distance periods before his imprisonment; but whether he was inflicted with occasional lunacy, or gave way only to violent gusts of passion, cannot now be ascertained.

   Horrible as his latter actions have been, his master, a most amiable and worthy man, upon the Hills, gave him a better character than is common in his sphere of life.  Within the last twelve months he has given his parents 100l. the whole earnings of his life, to set them up in a pottery; and on the day preceding the dreadful murder, had given his father a small horse, the last property he possessed, to sell and raise a few pounds; in which the father being disappointed at Brecon fair, returned, and proposed to sell a bed given by the son to his mother, which caused a quarrel that led to the sad consequence, as soon as his parents dropped asleep. 

   On Saturday last, an inquest was taken in the gaol before Hugh Parnell, Esq. Coroner, on view of the body of the above William Glover.  After a minute examination of witnesses, it appeared the the jury, that the miserable wretch had been guilty of suicide, and his body was therefore ordered to be buried in the King's highway.

 

Cambrian, 5 February 1814

   The Margaret, Felling, from Chepstow, was totally lost near Ramsay, and four people drowned.

 

Cambrian, 12 February 1814

   The following inquests have lately been taken before Hugh Parnell, Esq. one of the Coroners for the county of Monmouth; at Abergavenny and Ragland, on view of the bodies of two children burnt to death by their clothes taking fire. Verdict in each case, accidental death.  B-  And, in the parish of Llanfair-Discoed, on view of the body of Ann Thomas; when, after an investigation of three successive days, the jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against John Thomas, the husband of the deceased; and he has in consequence been committed to Monmouth gaol, for trial at the ensuing Assizes.

DIED.

   Miss Mary Jenkins, only daughter of Mr. Geo. Jenkins, or Moor-street, Chepstow.  Her death was awfully sudden, having retired to bed the preceding night in apparent health, was found dead in her bed.

 

Cambrian, 12 March 1814

      On Monday se'nnight an inquest was taken at Penalt, in the county of Monmouth, before Hugh Parnell, Esq. Coroner, on view of the body of Mary Calcroft,  suspicions being entertained that her death was occasioned by ill-treatment from a person in that neighbourhood.  However, after a minute investigation the jury returned a verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 19 March 1814

   A few days since, a man who had resided in Monmouthshire several years, having become seriously afflicted with illness, sent for a neighbouring magistrate, and confessed that about 27 years ago he had murdered a young woman in Herefordshire, who was pregnant by him.  The unhappy wretch appears easier in his mind since his acknowledgment of the deed, but very little hope is entertained of his recovery.

 

Cambrian, 2 April 1814

   Last week an inquest was taken at Llantilio Pertholy, Monmouthshire, before H. Parnell, Gent. Coroner, on view of the body of Job price, a child about four years of age, who, in the absence of his nurse, set fire to his clothes, and was found dead. Verdict - accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 20 August 1814

   The following inquests have been taken before H. Parnell, Esq. one of the coroners for the county of Monmouth. - On the 26th ult. in the parish of Llanishen, on view of the body of Wm. Davies, found dead in his bed.  Verdict, Died by the visitation of God. - And, on the 1st inst. at Chepstow, on the body of Jas. Waters, a youth of 15, who, whilst bathing in the river Wye, was unfortunately drowned by getting beyond his depth.  Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 27 August 1814

   Wednesday evening, about nine o'clock, Abraham Thomas, one of the men belonging to the Chepstow, of Chepstow, R. Harwood, master, fell from the quay-wall on the Back, Bristol, and was unfortunately drowned.  He was taken up almost immediately, and every means used to restore him, but without effect.  He has left a wife and seven children, four of whom are twins, and the eldest two more than nine years old.

 

The Cambrian, 11 March 1815

   A melancholy accident occurred at Brockwear, below Monmouth, last week.  A trow had just arrived from Chepstow, and the wives of the people employed on board her stood on the bank of the Wye, waiting to welcome home their husbands, when one of the men who was assisting in mooring the vessel, fell into the water, and notwithstanding every effort for his preservation, perished in the sight of his distracted wife. To whom he had only been married four months, and who is pregnant.  His body was found near the spot where he sunk.  It is singular that the unfortunate man, who bore an excellent character, had just before remarked to the master of the trow, that although they were so near home, some of them might never see it.

 

   On Friday, a person of the name of Jones, and a widow woman of the name of Blake, both living at Skenfrith, Monmouthshire, with whom he has for some time past cohabited, were committed to Monmouth gaol, charged with the murder of a new born male infant, who was found buried in Skenfrith church-yard.  On the discovery of the body, both absconded, but returning to their house on Monday, the neighbours surrounded and took them.

 

The Cambrian, 15 April 1815

   At Monmouth Assizes, ... Maria Jones, charged with murdering her bastard child; Wm. Jones and Eliza Blake, accused of a similar offence; and six others were acquitted.

 

Cambrian, 29 April 1815

   On Thursday a man of the name of Harwood, belonging to Librook, fell from a barge coming down the river Wye, about two miles above Chepstow, and was unfortunately drowned.

 

Cambrian, 16 September 1815

   A melancholy catastrophe occurred on Saturday last at Chepstow: a poor woman from the country, who attended the market for the sake of a little fruit, was suddenly met in the narrow road which leads from the square into Nelson-street, by a cart, which she endeavoured to avoid by placing herself against the wall; but shocking to relate, the end of the shaft penetrated her chest, and caused her death in a few minutes.

 

Cambrian, 30 March 1816

   On Wednesday, an inquest was taken before Jas. Evans, Gent. Coroner of his Grace the Duke of Beaufort's manor and liberty of Chepstow, alias Strigull, in the county of Monmouth, on view of the body of Samuel Selwyn, of the sloop Industry, trading between Chepstow and Newport, who died in consequence of drinking a quantity of raw spirits which he purloined from the master's cabin. - verdict, died from excessive drinking.

 

Cambrian, 15 June 1816

   THE CORONERS' BILL. Letter to the Editor from 'A Retired Coroner,' of Monmouthshire, re the Somersetshire Magistrates statements on Coroner's allowances.

 

 

Cambrian, 12 October 1816

   Tuesday evening last a man of the name of Charles Thomas attempting, when intoxicated, to pass over the gates of the dry-dock at Chepstow, fell therefrom to the bottom, and was so terribly bruised that he languished until the evening of the next day, and died. - He has left a wife and family to lament his loss.

 

Cambrian, 28 December 1816

   Last week the son of a respectable tradesman of Chepstow, while in the act of eating (which he was in the habit of doing very hastily) a portion of the food, either from a disposition to cough, or from other cause, slipt into the wind-pipe, and caused almost instant death.

 

Cambrian, 30 August 1817

   The assize for the bounty of Monmouth terminated on Friday. ... Thomas Newell, charged with the murder of Jane Roberts, at Castle Careinion, was acquitted of the murder, but found guilty of the manslaughter of the deceased (in an affray), and sentenced to be imprisoned one month;  ...

   James Harry, executed at Monmouth, for the wilful murder of his wife, made an ample confession of his crime, stating that, during a violent quarrel,  with the poor woman, he killed her at one blow with a stick or bar, in consequence of her having struck him on the hand with a rusty knife.  He left the body locked up in the house, and went to work next day as usual, returning at night, when he dug a grave in a ditch, and buried the corpse, covering it over with soil and grass. The prisoner would probably have escaped earthly punishment for this awful crime, but for his avarice in keeping his wife's clothes, which proved mainly instrumental in leading to his conviction.

 

Cambrian, 1 November 1817

   DIED. - At Little Woonastow, near Monmouth, Mrs. Prosser: her death was occasioned by the sting of a bee on her arm, which, from inattention, produced a mortification that carried her off in a few days.

 

Cambrian, 15 November 1817

   A few days since, a mariner of the name of Hopkin, when in the act of sculling a boat across the Wye near Llancaut, fell backwards into the river;' another boat was instantly pushed off from the shire to his assistance, but he had sunk to rise no more.

 

Cambrian, 24 January 1818

   Singular Occurrence. - A few days since, a gentleman, when walking in a field between Chepstow and St. Arvan's, in Monmouthshire, saw a hare enter some bushed not far distant.  He called to a labouring man, then passing, to come and assist him in starting the animal for his amusement; and on entering the interior of the brambles, they approached a small pool, on the surface of which lay the remains of a man, in such a state of decay as indicated that he must have been there several months.  An inquest has been held, but without anything having transpired to account for the cause of his death.  The pool has been drained, and a tin case found therein containing a soldier's discharge, by which it appears the person to whom it belonged had served in the Guards.  As to when, or in what way the poor man came by his death, is at present enveloped in mystery.

 

Cambrian, 28 March 1818

   On Sunday last, Joseph Barber, a sailor belonging to the sloop Surprise, of Chepstow, when proceeding up Newport river, had been out at the boom end to refit the guide rope which had slipped. On his lingering when about to return, he was urged by the master and his ship-mate (it blowing hard) to hasten on board, to this he paid no attention, but when he made the attempt to return, the boom broke under him, he dropt into the river and was drowned.  The brother of this man perished with the crew of the snow William, of Chepstow, off the coast of Ireland, in the year 1814.

 

Cambrian, 24 October 1818

   On Thursday an inquest was held at Pontypool, on the body of Richard Jenkins, a collier, before E. H. Phillips, Esq. one of the Coroners for the county of Monmouth.  It appeared that the deceased had met with his untimely fate in consequence of the falling of the roof of one of the levels belonging to ----- Birnaby, Esq. and the verdict was, of course, accidental death. - We are sorry to find that the deceased, who bore the character of an honest, worthy man, has left wife and six children to deplore and feel his loss.

 

Cambrian, 5 December 1818

   Charge of Murder! - Amongst the list of persons mentioned in our last as consigned to our county gaol, was included William Burton, charged on violent suspicion of being guilty of the murder of William Syms, late of Wollaston, near Chepstow.  The circumstances attending this mysterious case are as follows: - About three weeks ago, the deceased, who was a very industrious young man, and who, through his frugality, had realised a considerable sum for a person in his station of life, proceeded from Wollaston to Bristol, for the purpose of purchasing, conjointly with another person, a small vessel to be employed as a trader.  He was accompanied, as they went by water, by the prisoner Burton, a young man of idle habits, whose life had been principally spent at sea, and who was well acquainted with the object of Syms's mission. -Nothing further was heard of Syms, noir were any fears entertained for his safety, till about a fortnight afterwards, when Burton returned alone.  At the time of the departure of the latter, it was known that he was not in possession of any money; indeed, on the contrary, he was obliged to borrow from a friend wherewithal to carry him to Bristol: but on his return, it is ascertained that he changed several 5l. notes of the Chepstow Bank, and proceeded to pay off some debts he had incurred in the parish.  Enquiries were now made of him respecting his companion; but the answers he gave were so various and inconsistent, that suspicions that all was not right were generally excited against him, and he was subsequently taken into custody.  He underwent several examinations before the Right Hon. C. Bathurst, in the course of which it was proved, that the prisoner and Syms had been seen together at Bristol; and that, on the night preceding the former's re-appearance at Wollaston, they had slept together at Pill, when they stated their intention of returning to Wollaston with their boat early the following morning.  A woman who wanted a passage to the same place, requested permission to accompany them, which was peremptorily refused by the prisoner, although Syms repeatedly expressed his willingness to take her.  The prisoner and Syms accordingly left Pill together, and the latter has not since been heard of. 

   To account for the cash her had been squandering, the prisoner said that it was lent to him at Bristol, by a man who has gone for the West Indies, but who, it has since been ascertained, sailed for that destination some months ago, and was not possessed of money for his own purposes.  When asked where he last saw Syms, he stated three different places; and his story was altogether so vague, that it is generally believed he murdered and robbed his unfortunate companion in their passage up the river, and threw his body overboard!  Syms was a young man highly respected by his neighbours, and almost the sole support of his aged parents, who are dreadfully afflicted at his supposed wretched fate. - Gloucester Journal.

   We have much satisfaction in stating that, since writing the above account, we have learnt that the body of this unfortunate young man has been picked up and clearly identified.  It was  discovered floating in the Severn on Friday last, in the parish of Moreton Vallence, about seven miles below this city, and was landed at Epney.  An inquest was summoned before John Cooke, Esq. Coroner, which sat some hours on Saturday, and which was adjourned till this  day, to give time for the attendance of other witnesses.

   The nose has the appearance of having been entirely cut off the face, the head is otherwise shockingly disfigured, and the skull dreadfully fractured in several places; which injuries, in the opinion of the surgeon who was examined before the Coroner, were the undoubted cause of the death of the deceased.  No property [column not continued.]

 

Cambrian, 18 September 1819

   An inquest was held, on Wednesday, in the parish of Llangattock, in the county of Monmouth, by E. H. Phillips, Esq. one of the Coroners for the said county, on the body of Lieut. S. Cousins, of the Royal navy, who had been partridge-shooting, and in crossing a hedge his gun was by some accident discharged, and lodged the contents in his head, which caused instantaneous death. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 16 October 1819

   On Monday last inquests were held by H. Phillips, Esq. one if the Coroners for the county of Monmouth, at Ebbw vale Iron Works, near Abergavenny, on the bodies of Mary Rosser, Daniel Rosser, Elizabeth Rosser, Thomas Rosser, Edward Rosser, and John Davis.  Verdict in each case, Accidental Death. - The following are the particulars of this melancholy event. - The family of Edward Rosser, (a man employed in the works) not appearing at their usual hour, in the morning of Saturday last, the neighbours apprehending something unusual had happened went to the house, and after knocking at the door, and receiving no answer, forced it open, when to their great astonishment, they found the whole family consisting of Mary Rosser, and her four children lifeless, and the house filled with a suffocating vapour, which upon investigation was found to proceed from a heap of burning ashes lying at the end of the house, the smoke of which being driven by brisk wind towards the premises, entered through an aperture in the back part of the building.  Medical assistance was procured, and means for restoration persevered in for a length of time, - but the vital spark had fled, never by mortal means to be recalled.

 

Cambrian, 29 January 1820

    On Wednesday an inquest was held at Tewkesbury, before E. W. Jones, Esq. Coroner for the borough, on view of the body of Wm. Williams, a poor boy, about twelve years of age, a native of Abergavenny, who had been some time in the employ of a travelling chimney-sweep of the name of Davenport; it appeared that his death was occasioned from being exposed to the inclemency of the weather, whilst in a state of intoxication. - An erroneous report had been industriously propagated, that he died from the ill-treatment of his master, which the verdict of the jury completely disproved.

 

Cambrian, 8 July 1820

   Sudden Death. A poor man whilst labouring in a field last week, near Chepstow, suddenly died through the extreme heat.  Sudden deaths are frequently occasioned by the effect that intense heat has upon the brain, especially where there is baldness. ...

 

Cambrian, 13 January 1821

   On Monday morning, a man about 50 years of age, was taken out of the Float, dead, opposite Messrs. Hillhouse's dock-yard, Bristol.  He had been drinking the night before with the crew of a brig, and it is conjectured fell into the water in attempting to get on board the vessel.  It is understood that he is a native of Chepstow, and by trade a sail-maker.

 

Cambrian, 8 December 1821

   The bodies of two woman, passengers, drowned by the foundering of the Charlotte, Caerleon boat, (mentioned in our last) have been picked up near Redwich, one of whom had an infant clasped in  her arms.

 

The Manchester Guardian, 15 July 1822

MONMOUTHSHIRE

MURDER. - Last week Rachael Edwards was committed to Monmouth gaol, charged on the verdict of a coroner's inquest, on suspicion of the wilful murder of her husband, William Edwards, by giving him a quantity of arsenic.  The unfortunate deceased kept the Cross Keys public-house in Pont-y-pool, and once possessed a very good property but his wife was addicted to drinking, and had formed an acquaintance with another man, which, it is supposed, led her to form the horrid resolution of destroying her husband.  From the evidence given on the inquest, which sat two days, it appears that the servant, who is a relation, was employed to provide the arsenic from a shop, in the name of some other person; her mistress persuaded the husband to take a basin of milk, into which she had previously put a portion of the poison; and she is said to have administered more of the arsenic to him afterwards, from the effects of which he died in a few hours.  After the fullest investigation had taken place, the stomach having been examined by medical gentlemen, the jury gave a verdict of Wilful Murder against the wife, and she was fully committed for trial at the next assizes; the servant was also committed, as an accomplice.  The wretched woman appeared totally insensible to her awful situation.  The prisoners were sent from Pont-y-pool in a chaise in the custody of two constables, and it is said, that on the road, having plied the constables and the driver with liquor, they both effected their escape before they reach Monmouth.  Intelligence of this having arrived at Pont-y-pool, several gentlemen immediately went ion pursuit, by whose vigilance we understand both the women were taken  asleep in Trelleck-wood, about four miles from Monmouth.

 

Cambrian, 6 July 1822

   MONMOUTHSHIRE. - On Saturday last, an inquest was held before W. Brewer, Esq. one of the Coroners for the county of Monmouth, on the bodies of Thomas Miles, aged 52 years; Isaac Miles,, 21; Rebecca Miles,  5, and Mary Jones, servant,. Aged 24, residing in the parish of Romney, in the above county, who were found drowned in a creek near the mouth of the Romney, on Friday evening last.  It appears that the deceased, Thomas Miles, who was a farmer, residing near the channel, went out with his son, the child, and the servant, about nine o'clock in the morning, taking with them four horses employed on the farm, for the purpose of swimming them in the tide; that they proceeded to the place where they had been accustomed to do so at the time of high water, which place was about one mile distant from the dwelling-house.  Not returning at the time they were expected, the wife sent a lad to look for them, who, seeing the horses grazing on the wharf near, returned.  The poor woman concluded that they had gone to finish hoeing a piece of potatoe-ground near the village, and continued cheerfully at her work until the Rev. Mr. Davis, minister of the parish, in company with a neighbour, went to her with the melancholy tidings that all the party, which had left the house in the morning in health and gaity, were found drowned.  She was in the field milking at the time; but was obliged to be carried to the house by the minister and her neighbour, and at present continues very ill.  The bodies were found near each other, by Howell Rimbron, fisherman, who instantly went and informed the minister, and he, accompanied by some of the parishioners, proceeded immediately to the spot, but it appeared life had been extinct several hours, as the sun had completely dried the clothes on their bodies when they were found.  Verdict - Found Drowned.

   Two boys while bathing in the river Ebbw, near Risca, on Mon day evening last, got out of their depth and were drowned.

   An inquest was held at Mathern, on Tuesday week, by James Evans, Esq. Coroner for the Manor of Chepstow, alias Strigill, on the body of William Morgan, aged 15 years, who fell on a hay pike the preceding day, which entered into the cavity of the chest, and caused his death within half an hour.  Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 6 July 1822

DIED. June 21, at Chepstow, on his birth-day, aged 65, John Bowsher, Esq. of the firm of Bowsher and Watkins, timber-merchants.  His death was occasioned by falling from his horse on the preceding Monday, as noticed in our last.

 

Cambrian, 13 July 1822

MONMOUTHSHIRE.

MURDER. - Last week, Rachael Edwards was committed to Monmouth gaol, charged on the verdict of a coroner's inquest, on suspicion, of the wilful murder of her husband, William Edwards, by giving him a  quantity of arsenic.  The unfortunate deceased kept the Cross keys public-house in Pontypool, and once possessed a very good property, but his wife was addicted to drinking, and had formed an acquaintance with another man, which, it is supposed, led her to form the horrid resolution of destroying her husband.  From the evidence given on the inquest, which sat two days, it appears that the servant, who is a relative, was employed to procure the arsenic from a shop, in the name of some other person; her mistress persuaded the husband to take a basin of milk, into which she had previously put a portion of the poison, And she is said to have administered more of the arsenic to him afterwards, from the effects of which he died in a few hours.  After the fullest investigation had taken place, the stomach having been examined by medical gentlemen, the jury gave a verdict of wilful murder against the wife, and she was fully committed to take her trial at the next assizes; the servant was also committed as an accomplice. The wretched woman appeared totally insensible to her awful situation.  The prisoners were sent from Pontypool in a chaise in the custody of two constables, and it is stated that on the road, having plied the constables and the driver with liquors, they both effected their escape before they reached Monmouth.  Intelligence of this having arrived at Pontypool, several gentlemen immediately  went in pursuit, by whose vigilance we understand both the woman were taken asleep in Trelleck Wood, about four miles from Monmouth.

 

Cambrian, 24 August 1822

MONMOUTHSHIRE. - EXECUTION. - On Friday last, Rachael Edwards, found guilty of the murder of her husband, by administering poison to him (a report of whose trial at the Monmouth Assizes will be found on our fourth page), underwent the last dreadful sentence of the law at Monmouth, in the presence of an immense concourse of people. ...

 

Cambrian, 21 September 1822

MONMOUTHSHIRE. - PROVIDENTIAL ESCAPE. - On Monday last, a party of pleasure, proceeding from Tintern Abbey to Chepstow, in a boat, ...   It is somewhat remarkable, that it was the same boat which was employed when the fatal catastrophe happened to the Miss Shute and their friends, who were drowned on Sunday night, the 20th of Sept. 1822 [??] , in passing the bridge.

 

Cambrian, 16 November 1822

FATAL OCCURRENCE. - On Monday last, an Inquest was held before James Evans Esq. Coroner, at the Three Tuns, Chepstow, on the body of John Howel, the son of creditable parents in that town, who was found drowned on the banks of the Wye, opposite the Alcove, in Piercefield Walks.  After the examination of the body, sufficient reasons appearing to justify an adjournment, the enquiry was resumed on Wednesday morning; but after the strictest examination of several persons, the verdict of the Jury was delivered - Found Drowned. No grace whatever appeared in evidence, to prove that the deceased committed the rash act himself, as he was on the best of terms with his relatives and his employers; so that the cause leading to the awful event remains veiled in mystery.

 

Cambrian, 7 December 1822

MONMOUTHSHIRE. - FATAL ACCIDENT. - About ten o'clock on the night of Friday last, a boat, with one man, being in attendance at the public slip at Chepstow, for the master of the ship Benjamin Shaw, of London, sunk, and the poor fellow was drowned.  It is conjectured that the boat must have struck with violence against the slip, filled, and soon went down.  The cries of the unfortunate sufferer for help were very distressing; but there being a strong fresh in the river, and no boat at hand, assistance could not be rendered him.

DEATH BY A BULL! - An Inquest was held, on Thursday, by E. H. Phillips, Esq. one of the Coroners for the county of Monmouth, in the parish of Lanover, on view of the body of Wm. Hoiskin, who was killed by a bull.  The deceased, an aged man, observing his neighbour's bull break into his ground, went to the field to drive him out; when the vicious animal instantly made towards him, and with his horns inflicted a number of severe wounds, which produced almost instant death.  The infuriated beast would have attacked three young men, who ran to the assistance of the deceased, had he not been prevented by their fogs.  Verdict, Accidental Death. - The bull was immediately shot.

 

Cambrian, 18 January 1823

MONMOUTHSIRE.

Last week, a woman of the name of Price, an inhabitant of Chepstow, who retired to rest with her four children, was found the following morning lying between them a corpse.

   A poor aged man, whose support was  from selling matches, and the casual relief of the humane, was a few days past found dead in an out-house belonging to a farm near Chepstow.  His death is supposed to have been occasioned by the want of sustenance and extreme cold.

   An inquest was lately held by H. Hughes, Esq. Coroner for Monmouth, on the body of a child, about three years old, burnt to death by its clothes raking fire, whilst left in a room during the absence of its parents, who were gone to a neighbour's house to pass the day.  Its screams attracted the owner of the house (Over Monnow,) who ran up stairs, and found the flames proceeding up its face, having enveloped its body; but every effort was ineffectual to preserve life; the little sufferer died the next day. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 18 January 1823

DIED. - December 30, at Mounton, near Chepstow, Mrs. Birt, wife of Mr. James Birt, paper-maker.  Her death was awfully sudden: she was perfectly well on Sunday evening, except so far as a very advanced state of pregnancy would allow, but was attacked in the night with a most violent inflammation of the throat, extending to the windpipe and chest, which ended fatally about four o'clock in the afternoon, by suffocation, in spite of the most active efforts to counteract its effects.

 

The Cambrian, 21 June 1823

MONMOUTHSHIRE.

FATAL ACCIDENT. - On the night of Wednesday week, while a lad belonging to the Benjamin Shaw, of London, lying at anchor in Chepstow river, was proceeding in a boat from the shore, the boat came suddenly in contact with the hawser of the said vessel, by which the boat was instantly upset.  The man, who it is supposed caused the boat to approach the ship on the land side, and thereby instrumental to the accident, was saved by laying hold of the rope, till rescued from his perilous situation by the crew of a vessel moored contiguous thereto, but the poor lad was drowned.  The body was on Thursday found on the bank of the Wye, near Piercefield grounds, and an inquest taken on Wednesday. Verdict - Accidental Death, by Drowning.

 

The Cambrian, 13 September 1823

MONMOUTHSHIRE.

SUICIDE. - About seven o'clock on Friday morning last, a decent young woman, of the name of Ann Johnston, who kept a shop at Chepstow, was found suspended by a small cord in the apartment in which she lived.  By a paper found on the shop counter, written by herself, it appeared that a breach of promise of marriage was the cause that led to the desperate and awful act.  An inquest was held on the body, and the verdict was, - Destroyed herself under great depression and agitation of mind.

 

The Cambrian, 22 November 1823

MONMOUTHSHIRE.

   Last week, an inquest was held before Mr. Chas. Heath, Coroner for Monmouth and its Liberties, on view of the body of Anne Edwards, aged 60 years, who was drowned in the Monnow, near that town.  It appeared in evidence, that the deceased was subject to periodic fits of insanity; and in one of these paroxysms she threw herself into the river, having first taken off her bonnet, cloak, &c. and placed them together on the bank, near the spot where the body was found.  In her descent into the stream, her clothes got entangled in the roots or stump of a tree, in which position she was found about an hour and a half after the event happened.  Three witnesses were examined as to the above facts; after which h, the jury returned a verdict of Lunacy.  The deceased was a very industrious woman, residing at a neat cottage near the river, and obtained her livelihood as a laundress.

 

The Cambrian, 24 January 1824

SUICIDES.

   Mr. Richard Brown, son of Mrs. Brown, of the Brick-yard, Chepstow, hung himself on Saturday morning last in his mother's kitchen.  He had been for some time very depressed in his spirits.  Verdict - Lunacy.

 

The Cambrian, 10 July 1824

   On Thursday, William Owen, as carpenter, in the employ of Mr. David Lewis, fell from the roof of Mr. Powell's warehouse, near the Canal, Newport, and was killed on the spot.

 

The Cambrian, 23 October 1824

   On Tuesday night last, a young man belonging to a vessel from Archangel, lying in the river at Chepstow, proceeding alone with the ship's boat from the shore to go on board, fell over (from some cause unknown) and was drowned.

 

The Cambrian, 13 November 1824

   On Wednesday se'nnight, a person evidently a seafaring man, who found drowned in the canal near Newport, in the parish of St. Wool's.  His body was seen floating on the surface of the water, which led to its discovery, and it is evident he must have been in the eater some days.  The deceased proved to be Richard Parsons, and belonged to the Charlotte, of Framilode-on-the-Severn; Jackson, Master. - Coroner's verdict - Found Drowned.

 

Cambrian, 27 November 1824

   An inquest was held on Wednesday se'nnight, by Edward H. Phillips, Esq. one of the Coroners for the county of Monmouth, on the body of a new-born female child, found partly buried in a wheat field, in the parish of Woolves Newton.  There being no marks of violence, and a want of evidenced to prove in what manner it came there, the jury returned a verdict - That the said child was found in a wheat field, but by what means it came there no evidence doth appear to the said Jury. Every means are being used by the parish officers to discover the unnatural mother.

 

The Cambrian, 4 December 1824

THE WEATHER.

   In another part of our paper, we have given some particulars of the devastating effects of the tremendous gales among the shipping on the 22d and 23d ult. .  .  . 

   On Tuesday se'nnight, as seven persons were crossing the Wye with their asses, at Washings, near the Wear, the barge upset, and four persons were drowned.  One of them named Edward Billingham has left a large family. .  .  .  . 

 

The Cambrian, 11 December 1824

   On the night of Tuesday se'nnight, as Mr. William Powell, of Bacton, was returning from Abergavenny Market, he was drowned at Monnow Bridger, near Monmouth Cap.  What renders the accident more distressing is, that the cries of the unfortunate sufferer were heard during the space of two hours; but in consequence of the darkness of the night, it could not be ascertained to what spot to direct assistance: it is supposed, that finding himself in danger and passing under a tree, he forsook the back of his horse, and sought escape by catching hold of the branches; but exhausted nature sunk him into a watery grave.  On the Wednesday morning, the horse was found in an adjoining meadow.

 

The Cambrian, 29 January 1825

   On Thursday, an inquest was held at Ragland, Monmouthshire, ion the body of Jane Williams, who was burned to death, in the rope-walk of Mr. E. Griffiths.  During the time the men were at dinner, some hemp took fire, caught the clothes of the unfortunate girl, and burnt her so severely as to occasion her death. - Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

The Cambrian, 12 March 1825

   Last week an inquest was held before Charles Heath, sq. Coroner for the Borough of Monmouth, on the body of Stratford Evanson, who was found dead in the Ross Road, leading to Monnow Mills.  It appeared that the deceased was subject to fits, and was discovered by some boys lying with his face on the ground, quite dead.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God in the paroxysm of a fit, to which he had long been subject. - The deceased was a very industrious man, in the prime of life, and much stemmed for his honesty and sobriety of character.

 

The Cambrian, 30 April 1825

MURDER  IN MONMOUTHSHIRE ! On the 15th inst. an inquest was held at Llanvihangel-Crucorney, near Abergavenny, on view of the body of Thoms. Powell, whose death was the consequence of a ferocious attack made upon him the preceding day, by Rd. Christopher. The parties were neighbouring farmers; and it appeared in evidence, that the pigs of the latter were constant trespassers upon the clover of the deceased.  This occasioned frequent ineffectual remonstrances from Powell, who finally drove the pigs from his field, and locked them up in his fold, preparatory to their being taken to the pound.   Christopher, on hearing of their detention, instantly repaired to Powell's house, and, during a violent altercation which ensued between them, struck the deceased so violent a blow on the back part of the head with a stake, that the poor man was conveyed to the house, and died the following morning.  The jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder.  Christopher, the moment he heard of the death of his victim, absconded, and has hitherto eluded discovery.

 

The Cambrian, 4 June 1825

   The body of the female who was drowned whilst crossing the Wye, near the New Weir, during the high floods, in November last, was lately found near the spot where the accident occurred; owing to the period it had remained in the water, the body was in a state of utter decay.

 

The Cambrian, 30 July 1825

   The effects of the heat during the early part of last week, we regret to state, has proved fatal in a great many instances.

   The Rev . Mr. Thomas, of Llandilo, Monmouthshire, after walking to Abergavenny, to the Visitation, suddenly fell down and expired.

   Evan Jones, mason, of Newport, Monmouthshire, expired on Friday last, from the effects of drinking cold water after lying down exposed to the heat of the sun, on the Tuesday preceding.

   On Saturday last, Thomas Strowbridge, pump-maker, of Pwllgwenlly, Monmouthshire, died from the same cause.

 

The Cambrian, 3 June 1826

MELANCHOLY EFFECTS OF FURIOUS DRIVING. - On Tuesday last an inquest was held on the bodies of Mr. Roger Jenkins, of Malpas Pill, near Newport, farmer, and his nephew, a servant, who were both killed between Crosycylog and the New Inn, on the Pontypool road, that morning.  Mr. Jenkins and his servant were going to Pontypool with a waggon load of hay, having a young horse in the team; they met on their way a man seated in an empty waggon, driving at a furious rate, at which their horses took fright and ran away, and in endeavouring to stop them both fell down, and the wheels passing over their bodies, caused their death immediately. - The driver of the empty waggon, whose name has not been communicated to us, has been committed to Monmouth Gaol on the Coroner's warfront, to take his trial at the ensuing assizes.#

 

The Cambrian, 24 June 1826

FATAL ACCIDENTS.

   On Sunday evening last, as Samuel Brookman, son of Mr. Brookman, ropemaker of Chepstow, a promising youth, about fifteen years of age, while bathing in the river Wye, with several others,. lost his footing and was drowned.  The body was found on Wednesday by some fishermen.

 

The Cambrian, 7 April 1827

   On Friday se'nnight, as Thomas Hopkins, a boy about 12 years of age, was working with his brother in one of the coalpits belonging to Messrs. Bayly, of Nantyglo, Monmouthshire, a stone fell upon his head, and killed him on the spot. - An inquest was held on the body, and the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

   On Thursday, the 29th ult. the body of a poor man was  found lifeless on the hills in the parish of Aberystruth, Monmouthshire, supposed to have fallen a sacrifice to the inclemency of the preceding evening.  An inquest was held upon the body, by E. H. Phillips, Esq. and the Jury brought in a verdict as above stated.  The poor sufferer, in conversation with some persons the preceding day, said he was from Bristol, and they supposed he was a shoe-maker, having a basket, containing about thirteen pairs of shoes for sale.  The deceased apparently was from 50 to 60 years of age, dark complexion, and dressed in a black coat and waistcoat, and dark grey trowsers.

 

The Cambrian, 14 July 1827

FATAL OCCURRENCE. - On Tuesday last, three lads, the sons of a man of the name of Basker, a joiner, went to bathe in the river Wye at Chepstow.  As neither of them could swim, it was agreed that one of them should have a rope put round his waist, the other end to be held by his brothers on shore, and who, in the apprehension of any danger, were to draw him ashore;  but the poor lads on shore were so terrified, that they let go the rope, and their unfortunate brother sunk to rise no more.  The body, after considerable search, was found the same evening not far distant from the fatal spot.

 

The Cambrian, 20 October 1827

MELANCHOLY OCCURRENCE. - At an early hour on Monday morning last. Mr. Smith, of Sudbrook farm, in the county of Monmouth, had been giving instructions to some of his servants, from his chamber window; on the instant of his retiring therefrom, he burst a blood-vessel, and some noise that he made caused a female servant to enter the room, when she saw her master supporting himself by the bed-post; he did not speak, but waved his hand, which was considered by the girl to call for assistance.  The servant greatly alarmed, ran down stairs to apprize the family, when she heard something fall heavily on the floor, and on Mr. Smith's father entering the room, he saw his son a corpse.

 

The Cambrian, 5 January 1828

  We have been informed, from unquestionable authority, that it is strongly suspected the mangled remains found in the wood, at Machen, in the county of Monmouth, as mentioned in our last paper, were those of a foreigner - that, from all that it at present known, not the slightest suspicion attaches to any person resident in, or belonging to that part of the country, as having been concerned in, or privy to, the supposed murder, - and that unremitting, though secret exertions, are making to explain the mysterious and horrible affair, in the expectation of being able to trace the presumed delinquent, who, it is believed, was also not a native of this county.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 3 October 1828

MURDER. - Saturday night q most atrocious murder was committed at Monmouth; a poor woman named Esther Stephens, was found in her lodgings, with her throat cut; a fellow named Edward Barnett, a wood-cutter in the Forest of Dean, is supposed to have perpetrated the crime, and a reward of 40 guineas is offered for his apprehension.  It appears he escaped without either hat, coat, or shoes. We have heard a man answering his description, was seen at the Callow, near Hereford, and that he passed over the ferry at Sugas.

 

The Spectator, 4 October 1828 (4)

   At Monmouth, on Sunday, Esther Stephens, the wife of a bargeman, was found murdered in her own house.  The body was lying on one side, with the knees drawn up, a deep cut through the larynx and half through the oesophagus, the external carotids and the superior Skyriod artery divided.  A clasp-knife, such as rustics generally carry in their pockets, was found in the blood which surrounded the body.  The room was literally deluged with blood, and traces of blood were left, as if made with the fingers, on both sides of the staircase, and on the lock of the door.  The motive for the perpetration of the crime is at present unknown; and it is equally uncertain at whose hands the unfortunate woman's blood is to be requited; though strong suspicion attached to a young man named Edward Barnett, with whom she was in habits of intimacy, and who is known to have been in her house on the previous evening.  He has not been found.

 

The Spectator, 11 October 1828

Barnett, the suspected murderer of the woman at Monmouth, has been apprehended.  He is said to have confessed the crime.

 

The Cambrian, 11 October 1828

MURDER AT MONMOUTH. - On Subway evening, Edw. Barnett, the murderer of Esther Stephens, arrived in Hereford by the Shrewsbury mail, in the custody of an officer from Monmouth, who bad pursued him to Liverpool, where he was apprehended.  [Details of escape route and capture.] A verdict of Wilful Murder has been returned at a Coroner's inquest against Edward Barnett, for the murder of Esther Stephens.

 

The Cambrian, 18 October 1828

MURDER AT MONMOUTH. - (Further Particulars).

 

Carmarthen Journal, 21 November 1828

BIRTHS.

On Tuesday se'nnight, at Bryn-Gomer, near Newport, Monmouthshire, the wife of the Rev. D. D. Evans, Baptist Minister, of a still-born child.

 

The Cambrian, 24 January 1829

   At half past one, P.M., on Monday the 5th instant, the brig Benton, Capt. Friend, from Archangel, with a cargo of deals for Messrs. Price and Washbourne, of Gloucester, weighed anchor from King-road, with a strong wind, at N.E. to beat her way up the Severn, to Sharpness Point; but at twenty minutes past four, owing to her being too early jupon the tide, she struck upon the point of Slimeroad Sands, nearly opposite the Lyde Rock, at Beachley, and instantly fell upon her beam ends, her top-gallant yards touching the sand. The captain and crew immediately took to their boat; but before the pilot, E. Sanderby, could avail himself of the same means, he was swept away by the tide and drowned, although the ship's company used every possible effort to save him.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 10 April 1829

EXECUTION AT MONMOUTH. - On Thursday morning, Edw. Barnett, convicted of the wilful murder of Esther Stevens, at Monmouth, was executed pursuant to his sentence.  At half-past eleven o'clock, he mounted the scaffold with a firm step, and appeared quite as imperturbable as during the whole period of his trial.  He was launched into eternity, without any appearance of remorse, or a sense of his awful situation.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin,  23 May 1829

   An awful instance of the uncertainty of life occurred on Saturday last in Usk.  Mr. Wm. Jones, late of Artibilla Farm, while conversing with Mr. Hawkins, fell back in a chair, and instantly expired without uttering a word.  An inquest was held on the same evening, by E. H. Phillips, Esq. one of the coroners for the county, when the jury returned a verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

 

The Monmouthshire Merlin, 30 May 1829

CHEPSTOW. - On Saturday last an inquest was held before Jas. Evans, Esq. on the body of Robert Waters, son if Mr. George Waters, coal-merchant of this town, when a verdict of accidental death was returned by the jury. The above young man, was nearly three weeks since unfortunately struck in his forehead by the winch while winding up the windlass on board his own vessel the Sisters of Chepstow, which caused him to fall overboard, and he was lost in the dangerous sands at a place called the English Grounds.  The most persevering efforts have for the last fortnight been used by his disconsolate family to recover the body, but it was not found until Friday last, when some Boatmen picked it up near the Holmes, about 40 miles distant from the place where it was lost.  The funeral was attended by two clubs to which the deceased belonged, and a numerous train of relatives and friends.

 

The Monmouthshire Merlin, 13 June 1829

NEWPORT. - On Tuesday last an inquest was held before Wm. Brewer, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Henry Vowles, aged 35, who had been found drowned the day before in the river Usk, at Newport.  It appeared by the evidence, that the deceased was one of the crew of the Lady Rodney steam-packet; that on the preceding Thursday he had remained in town with a shipmate till midnight, when they returned together, intending to sleep on board the vessel, which was then at some distance from the shore.  Bring unable to get on board, they both lay down upon the steam-packet stage, and fell asleep.  In this state deceased rolled into the river.  His companion, alarmed by the noise, almost immediately procured a small boat, and used every effort in his power to save the deceased, but without effect.  Verdict - Accidental Death. We are sorry to hear that the unfortunate man has left a widow and five small chidden.

NEW-BORN INFANTS.

We have been informed that it is a usual practice for the lower orders in the neighbourhood to bury their new-born children in the church-yard at night, without the knowledge of assistance of sexton or clerk; and that an instance of this occurred some few weeks ago at Newport, when a body was found and examined by the coroner.  It bore no marks of violence, and had evidently been brought into the world by surgical means.  There was no suspicion, therefore, of its having been murdered.  Poor people, however, ought to be cautious how they adopt this plan, economical as it may seem, for if discovered they will incur the suspicion of having made await with their infants, and be exposed to the most serious consequences.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 19 June 1829

NEWPORT. - On Tuesday se'nnight an inquest was held before W. Brewer, Esq. coroner, on the body of Henry Vowles, aged 35, who had been found drowned the day before in the river Usk, at Newport.  It appeared by the evidence, that the deceased was one of the crew of the Lady Rodley steam-packet; that on the preceding Thursday h had remained in the town with a shipmate till midnight, when they returned together, intending to sleep on board the vessel, which was then at some distance from the shore.  Being unable to get on board, they both laid down upon the steam-packet stage, and fell asleep.  In this state the deceased rolled into the river.  His companion, alarmed by the noise, almost immediately procured a small boat and used every effort in his power to save the deceased, but without effect.  Verdict, -Accidental Death.  We are sorry to hear that the unfortunate man has left a widow and five small children.

 

The Monmouthshire Merlin, 20 June 1829

   On Wednesday last, as a poor man named Thomas Moses, was mowing in a field in the parish of Lansey, in this county, he suddenly fell down and expired.  Assistance was promptly afforded, but the vital spark had fled.  We are sorry to add, that he has left a wife and five children to deplore his loss.

PONTYPOOL.

On the 10th inst. an inquest was held before E. H. Phillips, Esq. coroner, on the body of Abel Trafford, q boy, six years old, whose death was occasioned by the wheel of a tram waggon passing over his arms and body. Verdict - Accidental Death.          

INQUESTS.

On the 14th inst. two several inquests were held at Newport, before W. Brewer, Esq. coroner, on the bodies of Ann Jones and David Thomas.  The former drowned herself in the fishpond at Tredegar, while labouring under a fit of mental derangement.  The latter, a boy of ten years old, was accidentally drowned by falling off a horse into the Monmouthshire Canal, at a place called Pillgwenlly.

 

Monmoutshire Merlin, 18 July 1829

   An inquest was taken before \W. Brewer, Esq. coroner, on Saturday, the 11th instant, at the parish of Goldclift, on the body of a person unknown, left by the ide on the shore of the Bristol Channel.  He had on a balck waistcoat with sleeves, a striped underwaistcoat, with sleeves, a striped linen under-waistcoat, blue trowsers, black stockings, shoes with leather ties, a linen shirt, abd coloured neckcloth, black hair, about five feet seven inches high, and appeared about thirty years of age - supposed to be one of the seven lost in a pleasure boat, of Bristol, about a fortnight since, as the body was discovered in the same pill that the boat drifted into.  Nothing was found in his pockets.  [See Cambrian, 18 July: C. Coles.]

 

The Cambrian, 1 August 1829

   The body of the boy that was drowned in Carmarthen river last week, by the sinking of an overlodaded boat, was found on Tuesday last, and in the evening of that day an inquest was held on the same before J. Bowen, Esq. Mayor.  Verdict, Accidentally drowned, by the boat being overloaded. Deodand on the boat, one pound.

   On Tuesday last, as a lad about 14 years of age, was driving a cart with hay, at Waincorgan, Carmarthenshire, he unfortunately fell off the shafts, when one of the wheels passed over his head and killed him on the spot.  Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

The Cambrian, 29 August 1829

   On the 17th inst. A coroner's inquest was held at Newport, Monmouthshire, on the body of Michael Flanagan, a sailor of the schooner Valiant, of Dublin.;  He had been missing from Saturday, the 8th inst, and was suppose to have fallen between the quay and the vessel in attempting to get on board at midnight.  Verdict, found dead in the river Usk.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 5 September 1829

DIED.

   An inquet was taken on the 29th ult. before William Brewer, Esq. coroner, on the body of Henry Edwards, aged 75, at the parish of Goldcliff, in this county, who it was supposed had been blown by a gust of wind into a ditch, where he was found.  Verdict, found dead.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 12 September 1829

   An inquest was taken on the 3d inst. At Newport, before William Brewer, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Thomas Francis, master of the sloop Jane, of Aberystwyth, who was killed by a tram wagon passing over his body in the dark.  Verdict - Accidental Death.  [At St. Woolas.]

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 7 November 1829

INQUESTS.

   On the 26th ult. An inquest was held before Wm. Brewer, Esq. coroner, at Coedkernew, in this county, on the body of a man unknown, about 50 or 60 years old.  It appears he called at a house near the road begging, asked for lodgings, and said he was from Swansea going to London to a brother.  He was given some bread and cheese and water, the person not having any beer, and was told he could get lodgings at Casstletown, when he left, it is supposed he went into a beast-house. Several Irishmen called the next night at the same house for lodgings, and on being told they could not have any, they were insolent, and spoke of the man in the beast-house.  The person going to look, found the deceased, who then complained of being very ill; it appears the person covered him with a blanket, gave him some nourishment, and left him for the night; that morning he was found dead. There was nothing about his person by which to identify him.

   An inquest was held before the same coroner, on Monday last, at Redwick, in the parish of Langston, on the body of John Roberts, of Magor, aged about 36, who in a state of intoxication fell, and the wheels of a wagon passing over him, he died in a few minutes.  He has left a widow and eight small children.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 11 December 1829

DREADFUL ACCIDENT. - On Friday, the 26th ult. A mine burner belonging to the Sirhowy iron works, named Wm. Walker, whilst in the act of emptying his burrow of mine into the colliery kiln fell into it, and although his fellow workman were on the spot hey could afford him no kind of assistance, as the clinker broke that was on the surface where he fell, when he was completely hidden by the burning materials.  On Saturday some of the calcined bones were taken out of the kiln.  An enquiry was instituted before W. Brewer, Esq. Coroner, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 12 December 1829

   A poor wandering Irish female was found dead in a shed belonging o a farmer, at the village of Crick, near Chepstow, on Wednesday morning last, having lost her life from the intensity of the cold of the preceding night.  There were three children with her, the eldest about eight, and the youngest about two and a half years old, from whom it is found hat their father died lately in London, and that they were going back to their native place in the neighbourhood of Cork.  The body is taken to the White Hart, in Crick, for the coroner's inquest, and the children taken to the parish of Mathern workhouse.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 26 December 1829

INQUESTS.

   On Money last an inquest was held in the parish of Llanover, in his county, before THOMAS HUGHES, Esq. Coroner, on view of the body of Mr. John Phillips, of Cwm Hendry Glyn, in that parish.  It appeared that on Saturday last, about seven o'clock in the evening, the wife and servants of he deceased went to meeting, leaving Mr. Phillips at home by himself I n perfect health.  On their return, a little after nine o'clock, they found the door locked on the inside, but at this they were not much surprised, because the deceased usual locked the door when left alone in the house at night; and this was often the case, as Mr.  Phillips was not in the habit of attending the evening service.  They, however, began to be alarmed, when, after repeatedly calling to the deceased, and knocking loudly at the door, they received no reply. 

   One of the servants then entered the house though a back window, and was horror struck at finding his master a corpse on the kitchen floor.  There were no marks of valence upon the body, and upon he evidence there was no doubt that the de cased had died in a fit of apoplexy; and the jury, after a patient investigation of the case, returned a verdict to that effect.

   On Wednesday last another inquest was held before the same Coroner, at Llanthewy Rytherch, in this county, upon the body o a poor man, named Walter Davies, aged 79 years and upwards, who on Tuesday, during the absence of his sister at Abergavenny market, was found dead in the house by some of his neighbours. Verdict - Died by he visitation o God.

   On the 10th inst. An inquest was held before WILLIAM BREWER, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Joseph Gimblet, of Bassaleg, aged three years, accidentally bunt to death by his clothes taking fire in a house where there as only an idiot present. - Verdict accordingly.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 1 January 1830

SUDDEN DEATH. - On Saturday morning last, a servant of Brookend, in the parish of Woolaston, Gloucestershire, came as usual to Chepstow with his master's team for hides and skins.  Feeling himself very cold, he went to a public-house where he was known.  The civil hostess observing that he was unwell, gave him a glass of spirits and water, which he drank, and was put to bed.  Medical advice was also immediately obtained, but to no purpose for life in a short time became extinct.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 9 January 1830

   An inquest was held on Monday last before Wm. Prosser, Esq.,   coroner of this Borough, on the body of an old woman, named Peggy Griffith, 80 years of age, who, as it was believed, was accidentally drowned in the river Wye on the night of the preceding Tuesday.  It appeared that she had been seen about 7 o'clock that evening going towards her home on the Quay, and it is supposed, mistaking her way near the bridge, walked over the ice and snow into the water.  A candlestick she was carrying at the time was found in the Wye on Thursday, and the body was picked up on Sunday; the jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

SUDDEN DEATHS.

   Two awful instances of the uncertainty of life occurred last week. 

   On the 1st of January, William Jones, a labourer at Radyr Farm, near Usk, while employed in threshing corn fell down and instantly expired.

   On the 2d instant, William Harris, of the town of Usk, was found dead in his bed having retoured to rest on the receding night in good health.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 9 January 1830

INQUESTS. - Before Wm. Brewer, Esq. Coroner.

   December 30, in the parish of Bedwellty, on the body of James Meredith, a miner at Sirhowy Works, who was killed by the sudden falling of a part of a work while he was employed in a mine patch. Verdict - Accidental Death.

    December 31, in the parish of Monythusloyne, on the body of Robert Somerhill, who was killed by the accidental falling of part of the top of the level at Trynant Colliery. Verdict, Accidental Death.

   January 2 in the parish of Shirenewton, on the body of John Reece, aged 24, who destroyed himself while his mother and brother were absent, by putting the muzzle of a gun into his mouth and discharging it.  The contents of the gain passed out at the back part of the head.  He had been indisposed and in a low desponding state for several years. Verdict - Lunacy.

   On Saturday last an inquest was held at the parish of Llanbaddock, near Usk, before Thomas Hughes, Esq., coroner, upon the body of William Jones, a labourer in the employ of Mr. David Williams, of the Radyr Farm, who, whilst in the act of thrashing corn with another servant of Mr. Williams',  dropped down in a fit and died. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

   On the 4th instant another inquest was held at Pontypool, before the same coroner, touching the death of William Miles.  It appeared that the deceased was employed, with two other men, to erect an arch in one of the coal levels of Messrs. Leigh and George, which was so nearly completed that the poor man was engaged on the top of it securing the key-stone, when unfortunately a large mass of coal fell upon him and crushed him to death. Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 16 January 1830

INQUESTS.

   On Monday an inquest was held before Thomas Hughes, Esq. Coroner, in the parish of Llanvihangel Pont-y-noile, in this county, upon the body of Wm. Williams, aged sixteen years, a labourer in the employ of Mr. John Edwards, of Cwm Dowlas, in the parish of Llangibby.  The deceased had been at Pontypool market, on the previous Saturday, with his master's horse and cart, and on his return got into the cart, and drove into a small pool by the road side, to give the horse some water.  The pool being partially covered with ice, the horse took fright at the noise made in passing through it, and ran with great violence against a post; the cart was thrown over by the shock, and fell upon the head of the unfortunate young man, who was killed on the spot. Verdict - Accidental Death.

   On Thursday an inquest was also held, by the same Coroner, at Taylor's Hall, near Usk, touching the death of James Williams, aged about sixty, who was found dead in a field, in that neighbourhood. Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 23 January 1830

SUDDEN DEATH. - William Jones, residing on the Kymin Hill near this town, as he was sitting on Thursday morning, at his own fire-side, suddenly fell forward and instantly expired.  He had for some days complained of being unwell but had been into town on the day before his death.  The deceased was an industrious labouring man and a pensioner, and was for many years he ostler at the Queen's head, in this town.

INQUESTS.

   On Friday the 15th inst. an inquest was held before Thomas Hughes, Esq. coroner, at Blane-dare iron Works, near Pontypool, upon the body of William Williams, aged 19 years, a collier in the employ of Messrs. Leigh and George.  It appeared, that on Thursday the 12th instant, the deceased was at work with his uncle in one of the coal levels which h supply the above works, when a large quantity of marl, earth, and stone, from the top of the level, fell in upon him, and fractured his under jaw-bone in a dreadful manner, and otherwise seriously injured him, particularly in the spine.  He was carried home and lingered till the next say, when he died from the effects of the accident.  A few minutes before the accident happened the uncle had retired a short distance from the spot to repair a tool with  which he had been working, otherwise hw would in all probability, have shared a similar fate. - Verdict - accidental death.

   On Saturday the 16th instant, another inquest was held by the same coroner, at Llanthewy Rydderch, in this county, upon the body of James Charles, a poor old man, who had  for some time lived in a cottage by himself, and on Friday was found dead in his bed by one of the neighbours. Verdict - died by the visitation of God.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 6 February 1830

DISTRESSING ACCIDENTS.

   It is melancholy to have to place on record the two fatal accidents here detailed, which occurred so near together.  They warn us of the awful truth, that "in the midst of life we are in death."

   Mr. John Smith, one of he sheriff's officers for this county, was returning home to Usk, in he evening of Saturday last, and as within two miles of that town, when his horse stumbled and threw him off upon his head.  A friend, who was riding in company, immediately dismounted and raised Mr. Smith from the ground.  A gentleman hereupon coming up, and seeing the alarming and apparently lifeless state of Mr. Smith, immediately returned to Usk to procure medical aid.  In a very short time Mr. Davies, the surgeon, was upon the spot; but professional skill was of no avail - the vital spark had fled.  A wife and family are thus bereft of an affectionate husband and an indulgent father, upon whom they depended for support. .  .  .  An inquest was held upon the body, on Monday, before Thos. Hughes, Esq. coroner; and a verdict of accidental death returned.  It appeared that Mr. Smith and his friend were perfectly sober, and that the accident was attributable to the slippery state of the road.

   On Monday last, Mr. John Pritchard, of Ty-dee, in the parish of Llanarth, went out with his dogs and gun, and in his way called at the farm of his bother-in-law, Mr. Holmes, of Loyn-y-gare, near Hagland.  A man being in the barn thrashing, Mr. Pritchard walked there, and entered into conversation with him, standing the while upon the edge of a board which was placed across the entrance to keep the con from wasting out at the doorway, and holding the gun by the muzzle, with the butt resting upon he board; melancholy to relate, while he was leaning against the door, and jocularly observing to the man at work, that he would inform against him for thrashing with his coat on (which the cold weather had induced the man, contrary to custom, to wear), the gun slipped, and the lock striking he edge of the board, discharged the gain, the contents of which entered the groin, and came out at the opposite side of Mr. Pritchard's body, under the arm, carrying a piece of his flannel waistcoat through with it.  Such an accident, it is almost needless to add, he did not survive many minutes.  The deceased resided with his aged parents, whose affliction at the sudden and melancholy loss of an only son may be well imagined.  He was a most respectable and amiable man, and his death is the subject of since regret with all who knew him. An inquest was held upon the body on Tuesday, before Thos. Hughes, Esq. coroner, an account of which came too late to supersede the above narrative, which in the main points are correct. M. Pritchard, it appears was remarkable for being particularly careful with his gun, and a cool and steady sportsman. From the evidence given before the Coroner, it appears he slipped off himself in turning round to go into the house o see his sister, Mrs. Holmes; John Jones, who was thrashing, heard the butt-end of the gun strike with violence against the ground, and the gun go off, upon which he ran out and saw what had happened to Mr. Pritchard, who exclaimed, "the Lord have mercy upon my soul !" and instantly expired.  A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

   An Inquest was held on the 28th ult. In he parish of Risca, before Wm. Brewer, Esq. Coroner, on the body of John Evans, eight years old, son of Morgan Evans.  This little boy had been sent on an errand, but not returning, apprehension was excited, and search made in the Canal, near a bridge he had to cross, where his body was found. Verdict, Accidentally drowned.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 13 February 1830

INQUESTS.

   On Wednesday last an inquest was held before Thos. Hughes, Esq. Coroner, at Nanty Glo, in this county, upon the body of William Davies, aged nine years, who, while at work with his father in one of Messrs. Bailey's coal levels, was accidentally killed by a large some falling upon him. - Verdict accordingly.

   On Thursday an inquest was held by the same Coroner at our County Gaol, touching the death of Hester Braine, aged 70 years and upwards.  Our readers may recollect that this old woman was committed on the 15th of November last, upon the capital charge of setting fire to a barn and stable, in the parish of Tregare, the property of Mr. Perrin.  It appeared upon the examination before the Coroner, that she as very infirm, and had been under the care of Mr. Prosser, the surgeon of the Gaol, up to the time of her death, which happened on Monday nigh about eleven o'clock.  She received the greatest kindness and attention during the whole of her imprisonment from Mr. Ford, the Gaoler, and his wife, as well as from Mr. Prosser the surgeon, who ordered her every necessary, and more comforts than a person in her unhappy situation could expect to receive.  Her death was occasioned by a disease of the heart and water on the chest. - Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

INQUESTS before Wm. Brewer, Esq. Coroner. - On he 5th inst. On the body of David Williams, of Llanvrechva, who was accidentally killed by his slipping upon the ice while moving a wagon loaded with coal; he wheels passing over his head and crushing it, he died instantly. Verdict - Accidental death.

   On the 6th nst. On his body of Hannah Rowland, at the parish of St. Melons, a single woman, who died on the third day after being delivered of a six months' child. Verdict - Died by the visitation of God, of an inflammation of the stomach.

 

The Cambrian, 13 February 1830

DIED.

   On Wednesday se'nnight, at Abergavenny, aged 76, C. Hanbury Williams,. Esq. soon after taking his breakfast in his usual good health, he was suddenly seized with an epileptic fit, and expired almost immediately.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 20 February 1830

INQUESTS.

   On Saturday last an inquest was held at our County Gaol, before Thomas Hughes, Esq. Corner, upon view of the body of John Waters, a prisoner for debt, aged about 58 years.  It appeared that the deceased was in bad health at the time he entered the prison, in September last, and was soon put under the care of the surgeon and ordered into the prison infirmary, where he received every kind and humane attention from those whose duty it was to administer to his wants.  The disease with which he was afflicted, and which terminated his life on the 12th instant, was a violent inflammatory affection of the lungs.  Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God.

   On Monday an inquest was held before the same Coroner, at Lanvihangel Pont-y-Moile, in his county, touching the death of homes Lewis, aged 67 years.  This poor man, on Saturday, he 30th ult., on his return from  Pont-y-Moile, in charge of a wagon laden with coals, had the misfortune in descending the hill at Llanvihangel Pont-y-Moile, to slip down, and the two rear wheels of the wagon (one of which was chained) passed over and dreadfully  fractured both his legs.  In the opinion of he surgeon who attended him amputation of one leg was absolutely necessary for the safety of his life, but he would not allow the operation to be performed.  He lingered till the 12th instant, when death put an end to his sufferings.  Verdict - Accidental Death, and a deodand of two shillings on the wheels.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 13 March 1830

INQUESTS.

   On Wednesday, the 3d instant, an inquest was held before Thomas Hughes, Es. Coroner, at the Parsonage house, at Llangattock Juxta Usk, in this county, upon the body of Mr. John Meredith, aged 50, who unfortunately lost his life on the previous Tuesday evening, on his return home from Abergavenny market with his horse and cart.  Mr. Meredith was riding in the cart, and when within about half a mile of his own house, the horse took fright at something on the road and ran away; having no command over the animal, he became alarmed at his situation, and very impudently jumped out over the side of the cart, and in doing so fell upon his head with such violence as to fracture the base of his skull, which occasioned his immediate death on the spot.  Verdict - Accidental Death.  Deodand on the cart two shillings and sixpence, and upon the horse one shilling.

   On Tuesday last an inquest was held before the same coroner, in he parish of Treleck, upon the body of Timothy Bevan, a little boy five years old, who, together with another little boy of the same age and a little girl of he age of seven, had been left in a cottage by themselves, on Sunday morning by an old woman who had he care of the, whilst she went to a place of worship.  Soon after she left, the children began to amuse themselves with an iron pot which they found in the house, and in the attempt to put it on the ire the pinafore of the deceased caught, and in an instant t he poor little fellow was enveloped in flames; his cries brought a neighbour to his assistance, who extinguished the fire as soon as possible, but the child was so dreadfully burnt that he expired on Monday morning, having lingered in the greatest agony of a period of seventeen hours. 

   It appearing that the deceased was an illegitimate child maintained by the parish, and that the overseer upon hearing of the accident had not obtained proper surgical aid, but had trusted to the efforts of an uneducated person in the neighbourhood, who was supposed to be clever in such cases, the Coroner felt it his duty to admonish him severely on the impropriety of such conduct, and to caution him against a repetition of it, lest he might mea himself criminally amenable to the law for such a gross dereliction of his duty.  Verdict -Accidental Death.

   An inquest was held before William Brewer, Esq. Coroner, on the 4th instant, at Risca, on the body of William Campbell, aged 88, found dead in is bed.  Verdict - Died by the Visitation of God of an apoplexy.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 20 March 1830

Distressing accident. - On Friday last, a little girl, between five and six years of age, the daughter of a labouring man named Davis, residing at the Buckhold, near his town, as left in a cottage alone, while the mother, who is careful and fond of her children, went to a well not far distant to fetch some water.  But a short time elapsed before the little girl was seen running out of the house, enveloped in flames, and before they could be extinguished, he poor child was so dreadfully injured, that, notwithstanding surgical aid as promptly rendered by Mr. Woollet, death put an end to her sufferings the same evening.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 3 April 1830

INQUESTS.

   An inquest was taken before Wm. Brewer, Esq., coroner, on the 30th ult., on view of the body of Herbert Thomas, at the parish of Christ Church, who was accidentally killed owing to the slipper of his timber-carriage breaking as he was driving it loaded down Christchuch Hill; by which accident he was struck with the shaft in the left temple, and he fell to the ground, when the wheels went over and fractured both his thighs, of which he died in a few minutes. Verdict - Accidentally killed.

   On Monday morning, before Wm. Prosser., Esq., coroner for this borough, on the body of Joseph Dugmore, aged 68, who, on Sunday afternoon, suddenly fell down in the street, and expired in about three minutes.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.  The deceased had worked for a great many years at the malting business in this town.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 17 April 1830

INQUEST,

On Friday, the 2d inst., an inquest was held before Thomas Hughes, Esq. coroner, at the Pit, in the parish of Llanarth, in this county, upon the body of John Pritchard, aged 45, who had died suddenly on the day before.  It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased had been for some time past subject to a pulmonary disorder, which had so reduced and weakened him as to render him incapable of much exertion, and hat in asking up stairs after dinner, for the purpose of taking an hour's rest on the bed, which he was accustomed to do, he burst a blood vessel, dropped down, and instantly expired.  Verdict - died by the visitation of God.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 24 April 1830

   An inquest was taken on the 20th instant before Wm. Brewer, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Rachael Williams, aged 69, at his parish of Bettws, in this county, who was suddenly attacked upon the road, and died before she could be taken into any house.  Verdict, died by the visitation of God, of apoplexy.

 

Monmouthshire Melina, 1 May 1830

ACCIDENT. - On Thursday evening, Andrew Watkins, a lad about 6 years of age, went into the Wye, a little above the bridge, in company with a boy rather older than himself, for the purpose of bathing, and unhappily, owing to the coldness of the water, or his inexperience in swimming, he sunk in sight of two or three persons who could afford him no assistance.  We are sorry to add, that the companion of the unfortunate boy neglected to afford him that aid which he might have done, and which would probably have been the means of preventing this distressing accident. .  .  .   The body at a late hour last night had not been found.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 8 May 1830

   An inquest was held on Friday, on the body of Francis Smith, an unfortunate man, who put an end to his existence by cutting his throat.  He was the father of a child who had been indecently abused a few days ago by a married man named Robson, and, from the discovery of that fact until the time of the fatal act on Wednesday morning, he had been in a state of great mental distraction.  Verdict - That the deceased committed suicide while in a state of menial derangement, occasioned by the infamous misconduct of Robson.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 8 May 1830

PILOT DROWNED. - On Monday, the 30th ult. as John Warwell, one of the Newport pilots was going down the river, the small boat he was in was run foul of near the Powder-house by the schooner Mary and Frances, of Wexford, by which unfortunate accident he lost his life.  An Inquest was held upon the body the same evening, before Wm. Brewer, Esq. Coroner, and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.  Warwell being a young man much beloved, the vessels in the port hoisted their colours half-mast high, in testimony of respect to is memory.  We understand he is the second brother in the family who has met a watery grave.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 15 May 1830

   An inquest was taken on the 4th inst. By Wm. Brewer, Esq. Coroner, at the parish of Bedwellty, on the body of John Price, aged  three years, whose clothes accidentally took fire, by which he was severely burnt, and died in eight hours after the accident. Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 22 May 1830

   An inquest was held before Wm. Brewer, Esq. coroner, on Saturday last, on the body of John Cocker, of the parish of Risca, who went to bed on Friday night, and when called in the morning, being later in bed than usual, as found dead.  He has left eight children without father or mother, his wife having died twelve months before. Verdict, Died by the visitation of God of apoplexy.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 5 June 1830

AN INQUEST was taken at the parish of Monyhusloyne, in this county, on the 26th ultimo, before William Brewer, Esq. coroner, on the body of a man unknown, found in a wood, and who appeared to have been dead two or three days.  There were no marks of violence about him.  Verdi ct - Found dead.

   In his pockets were found three shillings and sixpence, in silver, and a letter from "Ann Harris" beginning "Dear husband," dated Kedwelly, 29th April, 1830.   His dress was a velveteen jacket, a yoilinet waistcoat, blue cloth trowsers, blue woolen stockings, Wellington boots, and hat - maker's name, Harris and Son, waterproof, London, sold by appointment by W. and D. Jones, Swansea.  His complexion fair, marked with small pox, hair sandy, about five feet in height, and apparently about thirty years of age.

   On Friday, the 28th ult. an accident befell a poor woman, named Mary Lewis, of Chepstow, who, while carrying a bundle of chips down the stairs of a house where she was charing, slipped, and pitching upon her head, was so injured, that although she survived until seven o'clock on Sunday morning, she never spoke a word, and appeared quite senseless.  An inquest was held on the body on Tuesday, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 12 June 1830

DIED.

   On Sunday last, awfully sudden, Mr. Wm. Rumsety, of Michel Troy, near this town.  He left his home about eleven o'clock in the day, and was seen about half-past twelve on the turnpike-road; before one he was discovered a copse, lying on his side in a field adjoining the road.  The deceased was an honest and industrious man, and had filled the office of parish clerk at Wonastow, upwards of thirty years.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 26 June 1830

   An Inquest was held in the Town-hall, Abergavenny, on Wednesday last, before T. Hughes, Esq. coroner, on the body of William Price, of Llantilio-Pertholey, labourer, who was killed on Tuesday the 22d by the carriage of John Wilkins, Esq. of Brecon, going over him.  He was picked up immediately, and carried into the Swan public house, but although a surgeon was directly in attendance, the poor man died in about half an hour after the distressing accident happened, leaving a widow and five young children.  After a patient investigation of eight hours, the jury brought in a verdict of accidental death, a deodand of 25 Pounds upon the carriage. A gentleman and two ladies were in the carriage.

   The deodand on the carriage was considerably more than it would have been, Had not one of the ladies, as appeared in evidence, after having been informed of what had occurred, ordered the driver to go on, and expressed herself in a manner we are unwilling to repeat.  The jury adopted this mode of expressing their disapprobation of such conduct.  It does not appear that any blame whatever was attributable to the driver.

   The coroner's introductory address to the jury was one of the most excellent hat any of them had ever heard on a similar occasion - when he touched upon the distress of the widow and her five fatherless children, his feelings quite overcame him, and his charge to the jury, after the witnesses were examined, was not less impressive than the address. We cannot help warmly congratulating the county on the election of such a man as Mr. Hughes to the important situation of coroner. [Letter from Wilkins, The Monmouthshire Merlin, 10 July.]

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 10 July 1830

INQUESTS, before William Brewer, Esq. coroner:-

   On a boy unknown, who was killed by the bursting of the boiler o a locomotive steam-engine, belonging to the Tredegar Iron Company, on the 30th day of June, as it was bringing down to Newport trams loaded with iron.  Verdict - Accidental Death.

   On the body of Ann Williams, at the parish of Marshfield, on the 1st of July, who suddenly died of apoplexy.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God of apoplexy.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 24 July 1830

   Sarah Parry was yesterday committed to our County Gaol by T. Hughes, Esq. coroner, for the manslaughter of Henry Lewis, of Bryngwyn, on the 21st day of July instant.  A most patient investigation of the circumstances attending this case took place on the inquest, and the result of the calm and impartial deliberations of the jury was as shewn above, and is a refutation of the exaggerated reports which were current in the neighbourhood.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 21 August 1830

INQUEST. - August 5th, an inquest was taken by Wm. Brewer, Esq. upon Charles Garland, who accidentally fell over a wall in the town of Newport, by which he fractured the spine, and died in consequence in 24 hours. Verdict, Accidental death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 21 August 1830

MONMOUTH  SUMMER ASSIZES, [M. Justice Park.]

.  .  .    I mean the case of Sarah Parry, charged with manslaughter, for having destroyed a youth 8 years of age.  If the death happened by what she did, it is impossible hat the crime can amount to anything more tan manslaughter.  If he depositions have been correctly taken, or they seem to have been by the coroner, it appears to me, from the surgeon's examination, which is very important and very minute, rather a doubtful matter whether his death can be so scribed to the act done by the woman as to warrant you in finding a bill.

.  .  . 

  Sarah Parry, aged 27, a very respectable looking woman, was indicted for the manslaughter of Henry Lewis, on the 21st of July last, at the parish of Bryngwyn, in this county.  Mr. Justice conducted the prosecution, and Mr. C. Phillips the defence.

   Elizabeth Crockett examined by Mr. Justice. - I am a married woman.  I know Thomas Jeffries, who lives in the parish of Bryngwyn, in this county.  I knew Henry Lewis, the deceased; he was about 19 years old.  He was living with Jeffries.  I loaded at John Price's.  Henry Lewis was sometimes in the habit of coming to Price's, which is about a quarter of a mile from Jeffries's.  About the 20th of July I was at John Price's house; the prisoner came in while I was there.  She asked me where the deceased was; I told her he was gone.  She desired me to send and let her know when he came again.  On the next day he came again, and I went to the prisoner, and told her that the deceased was at Price's house.  She said she did not think she should come down, because she was afraid she could not hold her hands off him.  I told her to come down for the money that was in his pocket; she replied, "Pooh! Perhaps it is gone."  She then came down to Price's with me.

   On our arrival the deceased was there, sitting on a stool near the fire, eating some bread and butter.  She asked him several times where he had the money to get his victuals.  Deceased made no answer, but rose up, and took his hat in his hand to go out.  Prisoner went before him, and shut the door.  She asked him for the money which was in his pocket - he said, :"Money?" I then went out.  The prisoner did not appear in a passion.  The little girl, Margaret Price, was in the house hen I went out, and her mother was up stairs in bed.  I returned in about two or three minutes; the deceased was then lying on the ground; the prisoner was kneeling down close to him, but I cannot say whether she was kneeling on the ground or on his side.  She struck him on the shoulders and the side.  I do no know whether her hands were closed or open. - She was in a dreadful passion.  She continued three or four minutes beating him.  She said, "God damn his eyes, God damn his blood, soul, and body." I did not mention those expressions to the coroner.  Mr. Jeffries raised him from the ground, and pushed the prisoner off with the other arm.

   By Mr. Justice Park. - Then it was old Mr. Jeffries who made her cease to beat him.

   The Witness. - Yes, my Lord.  The prisoner told him he was always taking the part of the deceased, and encouraging him in doing more mischief.  The deceased, at hat time, was lying on the ground, having slipped down out of his uncle's hands.  The deceased was afterwards raised from the ground and sate up.  The periods then struck him a blow on the left side of his face, which made his nose bleed.  The younger Jefferies came in afterwards, caught the deceased by the heels, and hauled him along the ground about half a yard.  It was a stone floor.  Henry Lewis cried out "Oh, God! Be quiet," and appeared to me to be in a very bad state.  The elder Mr. Jeffries told the younger to go to his work, and he went away.  I then went out.  The last time I saw the deceased he was leaning on his side.  He had not used any bad language or struck any blow.

   Cross-examined by Mr. Phillips. - When I asked the prisoner to go down to the house, she said she was afraid to come down, because she did not think she could keep her hands off the deceased.  I did not press her o go down, but I asked her a second timer.  I did no mention before the coroner the fact fog the prisoner having used the oaths I have mentioned, because I was asked not to tell it.  I was sworn to tell the whole truth, and that was part of the truth.  I do not know that the younger Jeffries was there when the prisoner began to beat the deceased.  The room was a very small room, but he might have been there without my seeing him.  Old M. Jeffries was there the whole time.  I did not hear the prisoner say to the deceased "Are you going to bite me."  I know I am sworn to speak the whole truth, and I mean to speak nothing but the truth.

   Mr. Justice PARK. - Do not prate, woman, about your own integrity, after you have admitted yourself to be perjured.

   Cross0-examination resumed. -  I cannot tell whether the de cased was lying on the ground or standing when young Jeffries came in.  He was lying on his back when young Jeffries dragged him.  I did not her young Jeffries say "Uncle, you know how it is."  I was not there when the prisoner first began to beat the deceased.  It was when young Jeffries was dragging him that I heard the deceased complain.  I cannot tell why he dragged him.  His uncle desired him to lift the deceased up, instead pf which he dragged him along the stone floor.

   R-examined by Mr. Justice. - There is a settle in the room about the height of a man.

   By M. Justice Pak. - I have known the deceased about a twelvemonth.  When he was asked for money, they said it was money of which he had robbed his uncle.  The prisoner did not say in my hearing "You have robbed your uncle, and I shall get all the blame of it."  I did not tell the coroner the prisoner was either kneeling on the ground or on the body of the deceased.  When she struck him on the face he was lying on the ground.  I stated before the coroner that she did not hit him on the face while he was on the ground; and I also sat that he did not fall down with much force, but that he appeared to go down quietly and gently.  I have stated today that old Jeffries pushed the prisoner off with one hand, and raised the deceased.  Before the coroner I swore the prisoner ceased to beat him of her own accord.

   Margaret Price. - I am the daughter of John Price.  I remember Henry Lewis coming to my father's house on the day in question.  Mr. Jeffries the elder came to my father's house.  H came down before the prisoner; the last witness came directly after the prisoner.  The deceased was then sitting down on a three-legged stool.  Prisoner asked him where the money was he took out of her mother's pocket - he made no reply.  The called him a damned thief, and sent me to look for Tom Jeffries to take him up to the house.  Tom Jeffries then came in, and took deceased by he collar. Before I went for Tom Jeffries, after she had called him a thief, she gave him a smack with the back of her hand on the mouth; she asked him two or three times if he would hit her? He said no, if you will let me alone.  I went for Tom Jeffries, and found him in the meadow; he returned to the house with me, and took deceased by the collar.  Mr. Jeffries the elder told Tom Jeffries to let him alone.  The deceased  took hold of the settle and slipped down by the side.  Prisoner said, take him up to the house, and I will lock him up in one of the rooms until I go and get Price. - When Henry Lewis was on the floor Tom Jeffries dragged him along the ground, and then Sarah Parry beat him with her fists while she was kneeling  down in his stomach.  She was doing that between four and five miners.

   The last witness went out two or three times to her children; she came in before Tom Jeffries.  While the deceased was on the ground, old Mr. Jeffries raised the deceased up with one hand and pushed the prisoner off with the other.  Deceased was then lying on his back.  After that the prisoner gave him a kick in the side.  The deceased screamed out Oh Lord two or three times.  He then walked a little way, and leaned against a little cot close to the house; he then went to the stable and lay down on the straw.

   Cross-examined by Mr. Phillips. Old Mr. Jeffries was there all the time.  Young Jeffries came in before the prisoner struck the deceased at all.  Elizabeth Crockett was not there at the time the prisoner struck the deceased.  At the time Tom Jeffries was dragging deceased about, deceased cried out as though he was hurt.  Tom Jeffries took deceased by the collar the moment he came in.  When prisoner asked deceased if he meant to hit her, the deceased had his fist clenched.  I heard the prisoner asked the deceased if he meant to hit her.

   Thomas Jeffries. - The deceased was the son of a nephew of mine.  He had lived with me about three years and a half.  He was weak, owing to a paralytic attack when he was young.  Prisoner lived in my service.  On the 19th of July the deceased left my house without my leave.  I had missed seven shillings.  When I went to Price's I only saw the prisoner and the deceased there.  Prisoner accused deceased of buying bread with my money, to which deceased made no reply. When Tom Jeffries came in prisoner said "Take him to the upper house, and keep him under lock and key till wee send for Price."  Tom Jeffries said to the deceased "Walk, or else I will drag you," and dragged him along the ground.  The deceased slipped down by the side of the settle.  I told Tom Jeffries to let him loose, and he did.  Prisoner then knell down, but I can't say whether on the ground or on his body, and struck him two or three blows on the side and face with her clenched fist.  She was in a very great passion.  When she was beating him I pushed her away, and told her to leave him alone.  I lifted the deceased up, and she gave him a kick in the side or hip, and he cried "Oh, God! Oh, God!"  As I held him up she gave him a blow on the nose with her fist, which made it bleed. Deceased then went to the cot, which is in the entry of the house.  I heard him complain of his side; he went  from there to the stable.  I did not think he was much hurt.

   M. Justice Park here suggested that if the deceased had died in consequence of the treatment he had received from the prisoner, it would amount to manslaughter; as after the evidence that had been given there could be no doubt of the fact of the prisoner having beaten him in the manner described; but the doubt his Lordship entertained was, and he felt it very strongly, as he had intimated to the Grand Jury, whether the death of the deceased had been occasioned by that beating inflicted upon him by the prisoner.  That question would turn upon the testimony given by the4 surgeon.  There was no doubt that the prisoner had been worked up into a great passion, and hat she was a violent and ungovernable Welsh woman.

   Thomas Jeffries cross-examined by Mr. C. Phillips. - No blow had been struck before Tom Jeffries came in.  When Tom Jeffries was dragging the deceased about, I did not hear him cry out as if he was hurt.  The deceased had very little strength on one side.  He confessed to me that he had taken the money which I had lost.  When the deceased was ill at my house the prisoner attended him very carefully.  He was ill in his bed on the Thursday, Friday, and Saturday before his death.  He was unable to shave himself, or to tie his handkerchief, which the prisoner did for him.

   M. Wm. Steel, a surgeon, at Abergavenny, stated, that he was called in to examine the body of the deceased.  He found under the scalp of the head several swellings and bruises, and also that a blood vessel had been ruptured on the brain.  He examined the body on the morning after death.

   Mr. Justice Park. - Do you think a woman's hand if it was doubled likely to cause the rupture you have described on the brain?

   Witness. - No; I do not, my Lord.  Witness did not feel satisfied with the first examination, and therefore subsequently opened the cavity of the breast.  The left lungs were peculiarly healthy, but the right shewed symptoms of old disease.  He found a large quantity of coagulated blood in the abdomen, but could no discover from what ruptured vessel that blood came from; but has no doubt it came from some ruptured vessel or another, which might have been caused by pressure on the abdomen.

   Mr. Justice Park. - Should you think the kick you have heard described today sufficient to cause the rupture of the vessel, and produce death?

   Wines. - I should not, my Lord.

   Cross-examined by Mr. C. Phillips. - The deceased was a very weak young man. The spleen was remarkably  delicate; the blood vessels naturally partook of the general weakness.  The rupture of the vessel on the brain might have caused death, but probably not immediately.  The coagulated blood on the abdomen must have produced death almost immediately.

   The prisoner, on being called on for her defence, merely said, "I did not mean to hurt him."

   Mr. Justice Park. - I dare say you did not; but, unfortunately, death ensued.\

   Mr. Phillips was about to call witnesses to character, when the learned judge said, he thought it unnecessary, as the prisoner had received a sufficiently good one from the old gentleman with whom she lived..

   The Jury, after a few minutes consultation, returned a verdict of Guilty.

   Mr. Justice Park. Prisoner at the bar, - after a full and anxious inquiry, the investigation of which produced a painful interest in all those present, - after you have had the benefit of the ablest professional assistance, a jury of your country have pronounced you guilty of causing the death of a fellow creature. You probably may have been the innocent cause, but your violence has sent to his final account a poor weak creature, without an opportunity being afforded him of a moment's reflection. - If you have other feelings than those of warmth and fury, fall on your bended knees and solicit forgiveness of God, - beg of him for oar don for depriving a fellow creature of life.

   You appear to be a young woman of violent passions; it is my duty to tell you, and all others like yourself, that nothing is more destructive to happiness, or more certain to bring misery and punishment, than giving way to passion.  It appears, however that you are also in possession of better feelings, and that you attended to the deceased in many respects with great kindness and affection, which is a reason for lessening the punishment the Court would otherwise have felt bound to adjudge. The sentence I am about to pronounce is not so much in the way of punishment to you, as an example to this numerous audience, and I hope it will operate as a warning to all the world, and shew the necessity of keeping the temper and passions in  moderation.

   The sentence of the Court is, that you be imprisoned in the house of correction and kept to hard labour for the term of six months.

.  .  . 

James Snead was indicted for stealing a horse, .  .  .   Another person was apprehended on suspicion of being concerned with the prisoner in the robbery; but as the constable was conveying him to a magistrate, he jumped over a bridge on the road, and was drowned.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 28 August 1830

IN QUESTS.

   On Saturday last, an inquest was held before Thomas Hughes, Esq. coroner, in the parish of Ragland, upon the body of William Morgan, labourer, who left his home about 11 o'clock on that day, with the intention of going to the residence of a farmer in the neighbourhood, with whom he was engaged for the harvest; and on his way there he had to pass through a field belonging to Henry Hollier, Esq. were some labourers were employed in mowing barley.  He entered into conversation with Mr. Hollier's men and whilst in the act of mowing a swathe with them he suddenly fell down and expired.  It appeared that about a month or six weeks ago, this poor man had suffered a severe fit of illness, from which he had but recently recovered; and that for two night s previous to his death he had returned homer from his labour in a stat of great intoxication, which produced some of the alarming symptom he had before experienced in his illness; and it is much to be feared that his death was attributable in a great measure to the quantity of liquor he had taken upon those occasions. Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

   On the same day, another inquest was held by the same Coroner, at Abersychan, near Pontypool, touching the death of William Williams, aged 21, a person employed to cut coal at the pits of the British Iron Company.  From some mismanagement on the part of the unfortunate young man whilst engaged in that dangerous occupation, a large mass of coal, (above a ton weight) fell upon his body and crushed him to death.  Verdict - Accidental death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 4 September 1830

INQUESTS taken by W. Brewer, Esq. Coroner.

   On the 27th of August, at the parish of Tredunock, on the body o James Edwards, aged twenty-three years, who on the 26th, late in the evening, while carrying his scythe upon his shoulder returning from mowing, slipped his foot, and fell with his arm on the scythe, whereby he nearly severed it at the elbow, which rendered amputation necessary.  The operation was performed about three o'clock next morning, but the young man having lost a great deal of blood from the division of the blood-vessel before the surgeon could arrive, he died in two hours after the operation.  Verdict - Accidental death.

   On the same day, at the parish of Lantrissant, on the body of John Watkins, aged fourteen years, a servant to Thomas Parry, at White Hall, who go entangled in the traces of a horse, and was dragged a considerable distance, by which he was much bruised and the scalp lacerated, but the skull not fractured.  The deceased lived about ten hours after the accident. Verdict - Accidental death.

   Also, on the same day, at the parish of St. Woollas, on the body of John De Marquand, aged thirty-five years, master of the sloop Nether, of Jersey, who was struck overboard the day before by the boom, as the vessel was tacking near the mouth of the Newport river, and was drowned. Verdict - Accidental death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 18 September 1830

   An inquest was taken on the 3d instant, by W. Brewer, Esq. coroner, in the parish of Bassalleg, on the body of Henry Bunkal, butcher at Sir Chas. Morgan's, Bart. Tredegar. - The deceased went to bed well on Wednesday night, and was found dead in his bed on Thursday morning. - Verdict, Died by the visitation of God, of apoplexy.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 25 September 1830

AN INQUEST was taken on the 13th inst. At the parish of Landagan, by W. Brewer., Esq. Coroner, on Jane Vaughan, aged seven years, who was burnt to death by her clothes taking fire while she was alone in the house.  Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 9 October 1830

[EDITORIAL.] The dangerous practice, too prevalent in this neighbourhood, of those who are entrusted with the care o teams, riding on the shafts or in the body of the cart or waggon, cannot, we submit, be too strongly reprobated, or too generally visited by the punishment of the offenders. .  .  . 

   On Monday last, about four o'clock, a tea, which had been to Mr. Swift's  wharf, in this town, to fetch iron of a blacksmith, at Grosmont, was descending the hill behind Hillstone, the driver being seated on his load, when something giving way, the weigh pressing too heavily on the horses, and there as no one to sop them.  The poor fellow, whose name was Thomas Bowen, in endeavouring to prevent the evil to which his imprudence had exposed him, jumped off the wagon, when he fell between the wheels.  His leg was dreadfully wounded, and he wheel going over his body, he was taken up with little hopes of recovery.   .  . 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 9 October 1830

   A melancholy accident happened just after the Coroner had entered upon his office.  Th cart of Mr. Hughes, he miller, was standing at the door of a house over Monnow bridge, and while th man was carrying I n a bag of mal the horse, from some cause or other, took fright, and galloped off towards its home, on Monnow-street.  It instinctively turned  short down the narrow lane leading to the mill, where some children were playing, when a little boy, only 17 months old, the son of John Vaughan, hallier, insensible of its danger and unable to get away, was killed by one of the wheels of the cart passing over part of the poor little fellow's head.  An inquest was held the same evening before O. Thomas, Esq. and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned, with a deodand of one shilling.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 16 October 1830

INQUESTS taken before W. Brewer, Esq., Coroner.

   On the 2d inst. At St. Woolas, on the body of a man unknown, who was discovered floating in the tide.  He appeared o have been dead about a fortnight.  Verdict - Found dead.

   Oct. 9, at the parish of Redwick, on Th body of James Bassst, a child seven weeks old, - whilst sucking a piece of bread, part of it was taken into the windpipe, which caused his death immediately.

   And on the same day, at Newport. On the body of John Hoskins, aged five years, whose clothes accidentally took fire whilst he was playing with straw about the fire with a younger brother.  Verdict in both cases - Accidental Death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 23 October 1830

INQUESTS taken before William Brewer, Esq. Coroner. -

   On the 14th instant , in the parish of Bedwelty, on Thomas Jones, aged 25 years, a fire-man, in the employ of the Tredegar Iron Company, who was several scalded and bruised by the bursting of a boiler of a locomotive steam engine.  He died in five hours after the accident. Verdict - Accidental Death.

   On the 16th instant, at the parish of Christ Church, on John Clark, aged 14 years, who, with Thomas Pulling, a fellow servant, was driving a waggon, belonging to Mr. Young, a farmer, on which was placed some loose planks, which slipped forward on the back of he shaft horse, and frightened him, upon which he ran on furiously. John Clark holding and endeavouring to quit the first horse, fell down, and the wagon went over his head and extensively injured the eye and scalp, of which he died in about a week after.  Verdict - Accidental Death.

   On the 19th instant, at the parish of Monythusloyne, on Hannah, the wife of Henry Lewis, tiler and plasterer, who hung herself while the family was absent, in her chamber, with a harness  fixed to the rafter of he house.  She had been in a low desponding stat for some months previous. Verdict - Hanged herself in a fit of insanity.

 

The Cambrian, 6 November 1830

ACCIDENT. - On Tuesday last, as Mr. Buge, one of the agents of Sir Charles Morgan, Bart. was inspecting some improvements in Tredegar Park, his foot slipped from the edge of a bank on which he was walking, and he fell to the bottom, where he was shortly afterwards found dead. Verdict, accidental death.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 12 November 1830

   On the 30th ult., an inquest was held at he parish of St. Woolas, Monmouthshire, on the body of Wm. Eynon, aged 16 years, a mariner on board the brig Hope, of Fishguard, who, whilst he was securing he sail on the top-gallant mast-yard, fell on the deck and fractured his skull, of which he intently died. Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 20 November 1830

ACCIDENAL DEATH. - There is but too much reason to conclude that Benjamin Yeats, shoemaker, of his town, who resided near Wye bridge, a married man with five children, fell into the Wye on Sunday night last and was drowned.  He had been at the house of Mr. Davis, a butcher, living near Chippenham gate, and left with the interior of returning home, about eight o'clock at night, since which time he has not been seen o heard of, but his hat was picked up in the Wye the next morning. The inmates f a house, near the river which he must have passed on is sway home, recollect hearing the noise of some heavy body falling into the water about hat hour, but they had hen no suspicion of its being a human creature.

   The poor widow is greatly to be pitied.  About fifteen years ago one of her little girls was run over by a wagon and killed, and here years afterwards another, a fine girl of fifteen years of age, fell into the Wye, while filling a tea-kettle with water, and was drowned, leaving the kettle floating on the water to tell the melancholy tale.

MELANCHOLY EVENT.

   Early on Tuesday morning last, Mrs. Cole, formerly of the Buckholt, near this town, and of late years living at the Darren Mills, on the new road leading from Ross to Abergavenny, left home in a light market cart, accompanied by a lad, to attend Abergavenny market.  In her way there they crossed he Monnow, over a bridge, where the water often overflowed the road.  The Monnow that day, swollen by the mountain torrents, rose so rapidly, and to such an alarming height, that her son became fearful for his mother's safe return; and after removing some cattle from the spreading waters to a place o safety, he rode over to the Skenfrith side of the river to await her arrival.

   Mr. Cole had not been long at the public house, where he put up his horse, before the cart came along the road.  The son, aware of the danger of proceeding, wished his mother not to attempt to cross the bridge again, by, unhappily, her anxiety to be at home overcame all fear, and she went on, desiring her son to get his horse and follow her home.  In two or three minutes the son was mounted for that purpose, and he saw the cart reach he crown of he bridge in safety.

   What must have been is horror and alarm when he got to that point himself and could see nothing of it ! but a little further along the road was the poor boy in him most perilous situation, upon a hedge surrounded by roaring currents.  The water for some distance from him was of such a depth that his rescue could not be effected; and the poor lad, after remaining in that truly appalling situation for morĂ© than an hour, was carried away by the devouring element.

   The melancholy fate of Mrs. Cole was but too certain.  On the following morning, when the water had in some degree subsided, a handkerchief and an apron hat belonged to her were found at some little distance down the river.  Th horse and cart, hurried along by the impetuous current, were discovered near Monmouth Forge, a distance, we suppose, reckoning the sinuosity of the team, of more than ten miles.  We have not heard hat the bodies of either Mrs. Cole or the boy have been found.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 27 November 1830

   On Monday evening last, a little girl, between six and seven years o age, daughter of a workman named Scott, at the Monmouth Forge, was so severely burnt, from her clothes taking fire while in the act of lifting on a tea-kettle, that she lingered in great agony till Tuesday night, when death released he poor little creature from her sufferings.

   AN INQUEST was held on the 23d instant, before Wm. Brewer, Esq. Coroner, at the parish of Bassaleg, on the body of a newly born bastard child.  Some suspicion was entertained that means had been used to cause its death; but, on examination, no marks of violence appeared to have taken place, and by the evidence of the witnesses it was proved that the child died in a fit, and a verdict was returned to that effect..

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 4 December 1830

   An Inquest was held on Saturday last, before T. Hughes, Esq. Coroner, at the Crown Inn, in the village of Trelleck, on the body of William Beach, about 60 years o age, who was found dead on Friday morning, in the garden of Lucy Lewis, a widow of 80 years of age, residing at Cleddan, in the parish of Trelleck.  It appeared that the deceased, who was a cripple, and had been receiving parochial relief from the parish of Newland, in the county of Gloucester, had been employed by the contractor for farming the poor of that parish, to convey a family of paupers in a cart from thence to the parish of New Church, in his county; that he was on his return, and being benighted, knocked repeatedly at the door of the old widow's cottage, wanting to be lodged for the night; she refused him admission, thinking he was intoxicated, but directed him to a shed at the end of her cottage, where he would find some straw to be upon.  From bruises which were found on the body, and blood on a ladder in the garden, the jury were of opinion, that h had tempted to find an entrance into the cottage by the thatched roof, or some other way; that he and the ladder fell together, and that he died in consequence of the bruises; their verdict was given accordingly.

   The Coronor animadverted strongly on the conduct of the contractor, for employing, on such an occasion, an aged man and a cripple, which he suspected to be from mercenary motives.  The expenses attending the inquest and funeral were defrayed by the parish officers of Trelleck; and he poor man was decently interred in the churchyard of hat parish on Sunday evening.

   An Inquest was taken by W. Brewer, Esq. Coroner, on Saturday last, in the parish of St. Woolas, on the body of John Davis, aged 45, mariner on board the brig Friends, of Bideford, who being suddenly seized with an apoplectic fit, fell upon the deck, and expired instantly. Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

   At a place called Low Hill, Pontypool, on Friday, the 26th ult. Two little children were left alone in the house while their mother went out for an hour.  On opening the door on her return, he awful spectacle presented to her was the elder (a boy about four years and a half old) lying on the floor, having been burnt to death with the hook or links, placed over the fire to hold the tea-kettle under his back. It was supposed, that his clothes caught fire while reaching those links.  On Monday, the 29th ult. an inquest was held before Thomas Hughes, Esq. Coroner, who severely reprimanded the mother for her  conduct.

   On Wednesday morning last, a person of the name of William Williams, belonging to the Newport gas works, fell down, and almost instantly expired.  He had just before eaten a hearty breakfast, and appeared in pod health.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 15 January 1831

INQUESTS TAKEN BEFORE WM. BREWER, ESQ.

   Jn. 10, at St. Woolas, on David Owen, aged 20, who was drowned on the night of the 19h December, in attempting to go on board his vessel, the schooner Rose, of Plymouth.  He was found in the rover on the 10th inst, nearly covered with sand.  Verdict, Accidental Death.

   Jan. 11, at Chapel-hill, on Mary Brevet, age 14, who accidentally in the dark fell into the aqueduct lading to Tintern Abbey Works, Verdict, Accidental Death.

   Jan. 12, at Machen, on David Beachem, aged 41, who fell down  at the mouth of a coal level, and instantly expired.  He has left three children and a wife who is near her confinement.  Verdict, Died by the visitation n of God

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 22 January 1831

AN INQUEST was taken on the 18th inst, at the parish of Shirenewton, by William Brewer, Esq. coroner, on the body of William Stockolen, aged 79, who had been in ill health for a long time before.  His wife, who had been put at work all day, returned about five o'clock in the afternoon, and found him dead upon the hearth some.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 26 February 1831

   On Thursday, the 17th inst. The son fog Mr. Elizur Thomas, schoolmaster, of Pontypool, a child about five years old. By some accident set fire to his clothes' the mother, with great presence of mind, immediately wrapped him in a flannel apron, and extinguished the flame, but the child died soon afterwards, of fright, as I is supposed, for he did not appear to have sustained any injury from the fire.

SUDDEN DEATH.

   Early on Sunday morning last, Mr. Daniel Jones, one of the proprietors of the Rock Colliery, being taken very suddenly with a shivering fit, rose from his bed for the purpose of taking some warm tea, and while in the act of dressing himself,. He fell back and expired.

AWFUL ACCIDENTS.

   As a young man of the name of Davies, son to Mr. J. Davies, one of the Monmouthshire anal Company's agents, accompanied by another person, both in a state of intoxication, were coming in a coal train along the rail-road at Cwm Aberbyg, he fell out of the tram, and the wheels passed over his arms and both legs; owing to the loss of blood he survived the accident but a few hours.

   In Trinant Colliery, a stone weighing two tons and a half fell upon one of the workmen, and occasioned instantaneous death.

FATAL  ACCIDENT.

   On Wednesday se'nnight, a young man of the name of West, employed with others in raising stone near the summit of Hardwick Cliff, near Chepstow, when in the act of descending to fetch the frock of a fellow workman, unfortunately lost his footing, and fell to the bottom, by which his skull was so dreadfully injured, that he died instantaneously.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 26 March 1831

ACCIDENTS. - On the 17th inst.  John Hopkins, miner, was killed in a mine level at Tredegar Works, by the fall of a piece of the roof.  He bore a most respectable character.

   On the 21st inst. A child of Thomas Richards, of Tredegar Works, was killed by falling under the trams.  The father of this unfortunate child had his leg bone fractured in the works about six months ago, and was thereby disabled from following his employment until about a week before the accident happened.

INQUESTS taken by W. Brewer, Esq. coroner; -

   On the 22nd inst., at the parish of St. Woolas, on Elizabeth Pembridge, aged four years, whose clothes, being linen, caught fire while the child was drying her apron, by which she was so much burnt that survived but a few hours.  Verdict, accidental death.

   An inquest was held at the Three Tuns, in Abergavenny, on Friday se'nnight, before Thomas Hughes, Esq. coroner, on he body of John Hayley, who came to his death by falling from the Llanvihangel tram road bridge, upon the Abergavenny bridge.  It appeared that the de cased, an Irish labouter, was working with other men, for Robert Wheelly, Esq. at Llanfoist, during the week; that he, and four of his fellow workmen, left their work at about half-pasty six o'clock on Thursday morning, and went into a retail brewery, where they drank six quarts of beer between them.  They left the house at half-past ten. The deceased lodged in Abergavenny.  In coming over the bridge, it is supposed he miscalculated his distance, and instead of turning round at the end of it, fell over the side, upon the old badge, there being no railings nor parapet wall to prevent passengers from falling over the tram road bridge. He was seen  by a clergyman within half an hour after the accident happened, who, supposing him to be drunk, very humanely removed him out of the road way, and placed him against the wall.  About three o'/clock in the morning, Mr. B. A. Williams, surgeon, passed by; with the assistance of two men, he had him conveyed to an adjoining house, whence he was removed to the workhouse, where he died at three in the afternoon of Friday. Verdict, accidental death.

   The Jury requested the coroner to convey their wishes to the proprietors of

he tram road, that some kind of fence may be placed on their bridge.  There is no doubt that a strong parapet wall will be built, or secure iron railings fixed, in the course of a few weeks.

  

Monmouthshire Merlin, 9 April 1831

INQUEST held by Wm. Brewer, Esq. - March 31, 1831, on the body of James Thomas, aged five years, at the parish of Bedwas, who was killed by falling under a tram wagon and the wheels passing over is neck. Verdict, - Accidental Death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 23 April 1831

   An Inquest was taken at Newport, on the 13th inst ant, by Wm. Brewer, sq. coroner, on the body of James Williams, who was found on the sand, near Newport bridge - he had been missing for a WEEK.  Verdict, found drowned.

ACIDENTS BY FIRE,

   On Monday evening, March 31, the daughter f Walter Price, of Beaufort, aged six years, who had been entrusted to the care of Thomas Adams, Peny Vwedw, Llangattock parish, was left in the house by herself, when her clothes caught fire, and she was so severely burnt that she expired at four o'clock the next morning.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 30 April 1831

   An inquest was taken on the 26th April, at the parish of Magor, by Wm. Brewer, sq. coroner, on the body of Elizabeth Edmonds, aged eight years, who as burnt to death in consequence of her clothes catching fire in attempting to take a tea kettle off the fire, no one being in the house at the time. - Verdict, accidental death.

   On Tuesday last, the clothes o a little boy, about five years of age, named Griffiths, whose parents reside in the parish of Newton, caught fire during the absence of his mother, and the poor child was so dreadfully burnt that he died yesterday morning, after lingering, during the intermediate time, in the greatest imaginable torture.

 

The Cambrian, 2 July 1831

DREADFUL ACCIDENT AT PONTYPOOL. - On Saturday se'nnight the iron roofs of the new forge belonging to Capel Hanbury Leigh, Esq. were thrown down by a tremendous hurricane.  Part of the iron work fell upon the son of Mr. John Griffiths, manager of the forges, who happened to be inspecting the works, and injured him in a most horrible manner.  The left side of the skull was so completely smashed that the brains and fractured bones were intermixed; on the opposite side of the head there was a large contusion, and his jaw-bone was broken and two teeth knocked out.  Surgical relief was promptly afforded, but, after lingering in great agony, he died on Sunday last.   . 

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 16 July 1831#

   On Tuesday se'nnight, whilst two children of Thomas Williams, of Blaenycwm in Cwmdu, the one aged 12, and the other 10, were playing about in thei father's house, the youngest, a little girl, having approached too near the fire, was so severely burnt as to occasion her death.

 

The Cambrian, 6 August 1831

   A young man of the name of Benjamin Jones went, on the evening of t28th ult. To bathe in one of the ponds at Tredegar Works, and missing his depth, was drowned before he could be taken out.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 16 July 1831

INQUEST. - On the 6th inst. On the body of Joseph Lewis, aged 19, who was accidentally killed by a mass of earth suddenly falling upon him whist working in a quarry in the parish of Henllis. Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 16 July 1831

CHEPSTOW, JULY 13TH. - An inquest was this day taken before James Evans, Esq. Coroner of this Manor, on view of the body of Mr. Wm. Morris, grocer of this town, who was found drowned in the river Severn the previous day.  It appeared in evidence that the deceased breakfasted as usual about half-past eight o'clock on the morning of the 12th inst., and upon leaving the house informed the shopman that he was going into the country, and should return about ten o'clock.  The gamekeeper to Col. Lewis of St. Pierre, stated that about half-past ten o'clock in the forenoon he perceived on the bank of the Severn adjoining St. Pierre Pill, (between three and four miles from Chepstow), some clothes as if belonging to a person bathing, but upon walking up to it, he could not see any one; after a short time, on looking down the Pill towards Severn, he saw the body of the deceased on the bank of the Pill, apparently dead, the tide having ebbed out, and left it exposed.  Upon searching the clothes he found two towels in the pocket, as though intended to be used after bathing.  The jury immediately returned a verdict, - Accidentally drowned whilst bathing in the Severn. The deceased was universally respected and beloved.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 26 August 1831

CHEPSTOW. - MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. - On Wednesday morning the 17th inst. as the fishermen were returning up the river they discovered the body of a man lying dead in the mud, on the banks of the Wye, near a place called Warren Slad, in this parish, upon their brining the body to the town it was soon recognized to be the remains of Capt. John Farish, master of the brig Sybil, belonging to, and loading in this port.  As the deceased was a native of this place, and very mach beloved by an extensive circle of friends and acquaintances the grief felt by many was very great, and the chief enquiry was, how the painful and distressing event had happened/

   The coroner of the Manor Jas. Evans, Esq. having issued his warrant to summon a jury to inquire into the cause of the death of the deceased, it appeared in evidence, that the deceased had spent the evening of Thursday with some friends at the Lord Nelson inn, and was very cheerful in himself.  Soon after eleven o'clock he shook hands with the landlord, who stated that he was not intoxicated, and, wishing the company good night, proceeded towards his ship, having refused to take a bed at the inn.  He was not seen or heard of afterwards until found by the fishermen as stated above.  The jury returned a verdict of Found Drowned.

   As there appeared on the left cheek and shoulder of the deceased a slight bruise, it is believed that, as he had to walk along a narrow plank from the shore to the side of the ship, his foot slipped, and, falling from the plank, he struck the vessel's side, and fell stunned into the water, and, as he was surrounded by the tide, drifted down with the current to the place where the body was found, which was about a mile from the shop.  The watch the deceased had in his pocket was stopped by the eater getting into it at six minutes before twelve o'clock.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 26 August 1831

   Last week a man, who was working in a field between Usk and Pontypool, drank hastily from a jug of beer, and swallowed a wasp, which stung him internally and inflicted such horrible pain, that the poor man expired in a few hours afterwards.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 3 September 1831

   Garrat Wolsh, master and owner of the schooner Disptach, of Dungarvon, was found drowned on the sea shore, at Redwick, on Saturday, the 27th ult.  He left his vessel at Newport on the 19th, about four o'clock in the morning, in a state of derangement, and was seen at Goldclift, six miles from Newport. About eight or nine at night, by two boys, walking down the clay at low water to the tide.  The boys, it appears, went after him for half a mile, and asked him where he was going, and if he was not coming back; he gave no answer - the boys watching him for some time, when it became so dark that he was lost sight of.  An inquest has been held on the body; verdict - Drowned himself in a fit of derangement.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 24 September 1831

   On Thursday morning last, Morgan Thomas, aged nearly 80, got up between two and three o'clock in the morning, and walked out by the side of the Canal, Newport, into which he accidentally fell, and was drowned.  The deceased had been long infirm, and lately at times light headed.  He was seen to fall in, and assistance being rendered immediately, he was not in the water above two or three minutes.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 24 September 1831

   About five weeks ago, as some of the workmen were digging stones, for the supply of the lime-kiln, in the wood at Backcliff, near the 4th mile stone on the Wynncliff and Tintern Abbey new road, they discovered the greater part of the skeleton of a male child, of about eight years old, on a  ledge of rock covered with earth and moss, about a foot for the surface and which appears, on examining the bones, to have lain there for any years, and it is not recollected by any of the oldest inhabitants of the village that any one of that age was missing during their time.  There is little doubt but that the child was murdered, for it cannot be otherwise conjectured why it should be placed in such a sequestered situation as this was before the new road was made. .  .  . 

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 24 September 1831

HYDRPHOBIA. - Another melancholy instance of the fatal consequences attending this horrible malady occurred this week at Abbey.  About two months ago, a dog belonging to William Jones shewed symptoms of hydrophobia, and bi several of the family.  The mother, a poor woman nearly 80 years of age, was bitten by the animal; about three weeks ago she complained of being unwell, and on Sunday se'nnight the disorder manifested itself in the most appalling form.  She lingered in a distressing state till Tuesday, when death terminated her sufferings.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 15 October 1831

   On Friday se'nnight, James Gun, master of the sloop Turtle, of Bristol, was found dead in his bed on board that vessel, then lying at the quays, at Newport.  At dinner he appeared in good health, but was not seen afterwards till he was discovered dead, about eleven o'clock at night.  On the next day an inquest was held on the body, by William Brewer, Esq. when a verdict was returned, Died by the visitation of God of apoplexy.

   On the same day another inquest was held by the same coroner, on the body of John Cooke, a boy of eleven years of age, who was missed on the evening of the preceding day from the schooner Laurel, of Dartmouth, lying at the Quays, Newport.  An ineffectual search was made immediately, but on the following morning the body was found in the mud, about a quarter of a mile from the vessel.  Verdict, Accidentally drowned.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 22 October 1831

 A FOUNDLING. - On Friday morning last, between the hours of four and five, Christopher Morgan, a blacksmith, in the parish of Llanbaddock, about a mile from Usk, thought he heard the cries of a young child.  On opening the door, he discovered a bundle, in which was a male child apparently a few hours old, and very much deformed.  The poor babe was immediately put under the care of Mr. Davis, surgeon, of Usk, who at first entertained great hopes that it would live, but notwithstanding every care and attention, it died on Tuesday morning.  On a post mortem examination of the body, it appeared that there as a deficiency of one rib, and a malformation of the vertebrae, prejudicial; to vitality. Every inquiry has been made for the mother, but hitherto without success.

INQUEST. - held on the body of Thomas Lewis, a child aged one year and nine months, whose parents live at Monythusloyne.  It appeared by the evidence that on the 15th instant the child was missing from the louse, when a search was made for him; in about two hours he was discovered dead in the Monmouthshire canal, about 20 yards from the house, floating on the surface of the water; his clothes having kept him up.  It is supposed he had gone in search of his father, who worked near the place where he was found; but the father must have been at home at his dinner when the accident happened. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 2 December 1831

   On the 16th inst. An inquest was held on the body of Jeremiah Williams, an aged inform man, who met with his death in attempting to get on to the iron trams drawn by a locomotive steam-engine belonging to the Tredegar Iron Company, while passing Risca-bridge.  The old man, who could not walk without the support of crutches, had been into a public-house, and drank a pint of beer.  When he came out the trams were passing, and in endeavouring to lay hold of them, he fell under the wheels, by which both legs and thighs are crushed to pieces.  He died in about two hours afterwards, before surgical aid could be procured.  Verdict, Accidental death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 12 November 1831

   An inquest was held on the 27th of October, at Tredegar Ion works, on Jane Griffiths, aged 19.  It appeared that about noon of Tuesday, the 25th March, the deceased purchased arsenic of the druggist., for the purpose, as she said, of destroying rates for her master, Mr. Allen.  About five o'clock on the same day she was absent for half an hour; her mistress went to look for her, and discovered her in bend; she appeared in much pain, and complained of great thirst and sickness; a medical gentleman was sent for, but she died before he arrived.  The contents of the stomach were analysed, when arsenic was discovered by the usual tests; and upon a post mortem examination. Arsenic was found adhering to the coats of the stomach, which were much inflamed, and corroded.  No reason could be assigned for the rash act.  The deceased had shewn no symptoms of deranged mind, and her character was very correct.  Verdict, Felo de se.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 19 November 1831

   On Monday last a poor man named Steed, about eighty years of age, residing in one of Jones's Almshouses in this town, was crossing the street from his dwelling, when a horse and gig passed at a rapid rate; the horse knocked down the poor old man and the wheels of the gig went over him.  He is so much bruised by the accident, that his life, we understand, is despaired of.

   On Wednesday last an inquest was held at the public house, in the parish of Lanellen, before Thomas Hughes, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Mrs. Elizabeth Edmunds, aged 59, who expired suddenly the day before, on returning from Abergavenny market. Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 25 November 1831

   On Wednesday last an inquest was held at the public-house, in the parish of Lanelian, before Thos. Hughes, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Mrs. Elizabeth Edmonds, aged 59, who expired suddenly the day before, on returning from Abergavenny market.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 26 November 1831

ACCIDENT. - On Saturday last, Charles Meek, a little boy about four years of age, the son of George Meek, a labourer residing in Penalt, was so severly burnt that he died on Monmday.. [Further story.]

 

Carmarthen Journal, 2 December 1831

CHEPSTOW. - HYDROPHOBIA. -  most distressing and fatal case of this kind has occurred at this place during the present week.  A fine young man, upwards of twenty years of age, the son of Mr. Wm. Jenkins, blacksmith, on Tuesday morning last complained of illness, which he stated to arise from cold.  He grew worse, and a surgeon was called in, when string symptoms of hydrophobia manifested themselves.  On Wednesday the case was very distressing; water was applied to his mouth, which he rejected with signs of agony.  The surgeon who attended the young man called in a brother practitioner to witness the painful case, and they together tried various experiments to satisfy themselves and the public of its nature.  A basin of water was offered the patient; he attempted to reach it, and then in the greatest agony repeatedly sprung from his bed.  He continued thus to suffer until eight o'clock on Wednesday evening, when death closed the heart-rending scene.   About three months since the deceased was bitten in the thumb by a whelp belonging to his next-door neighbour, which doubtless led to his melancholy end.

   Mr. King, who attended the young man, has furnished us with the following account of the symptoms in this case: - On Saturday the patient was seized with a pain in the bitten thumb which extended itself up the arm.  He complained of thirst and great restlessness, sighed frequently, and a constant disposition to expectorate.  To these symptoms, which gradually increased, were adduced at last violent spasms in the throat, and total inability to s wallow liquids.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 3 December 1831

DIED.

On Monday last, suddenly of apoplexy, Mr. John Wittenberry, maser of the National School, in this town, aged 53.

MELANCHOLY OCCURRENCE. - As brothers, named James, were fishing n Saturday night, near Newbridge, on the Usk, the boat they were in unfortunately capsized, and, melancholy to relate, both of them met with a watery grave.

FURTHER PARTICULARS. - In  the dark night of Saturday last, between the hours of eleven and twelve o'clock, two brothers named Morgan Walters and James Walters, left their houses, in Usk, for the purpose of catching salmon, and not returning at the usual hour, a little uneasiness was felt by their friends as to their fate.  About ten 'clock on the following morning, the hat and coracle of James was found a little below Usk bridge.  Search was immediately made for his body; and on Sunday evening, about five o'clock, it was taken out of the river opposite  the Prioress Mill, about a mile above the town.  His watch had stopped at half-past two, the time, it was supposed, at which the accident happened, as water had got into the works.  An inquest was held on the body, on Monday evening, before Wm. Brewer, Esq. - Verdict, accidental death,

   The body of Morgan was not found until Thursday afternoon, although search was incessantly made after it, with nets, drags, and hooks.  [Editorial comment on possible causes.]

 

The Cambrian, 3 December 1831

HYDROPHOBIA. - A most distressing and fatal case of this kind occurred at Chepstow last week.  A fine young man upwards of tenant years of age, the son of Wm. Jenkins, blacksmith, on Tuesday morning complained of illness, which he stated to arise from cold.  He grew worse, and a surgeon was called in, when high symptoms of hydrophobia manifested themselves.  On Wednesday the case was very distressing; water was applied to his mouth, which he rejected with signs of great agony.  He continued to suffer until eight o'clock on Wednesday evening, when death closed the heart-rending scene.  About three months since the deceased was bitten by a whelp belonging  to the next-door neighbour, which doubtless led to his melancholy end.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 10 December 1841

   An Inquest was held by Wm. Brewer, on Tuesday, 29th Nov. in the Parish of Basalleg, near Newport, upon the body of John Richard, who died by taking poison.  The circumstances of this case were as follow:- John Richards was a servant in the employ of Mr. Philip Reece, farmer.  About a fortnight before the accident, Reece laid some bread and butter strewed with poison in different parts of his granary, for the purpose of destroying rats; and informed his men of what he had done, in order that no mischief might occur.  To make assurance, however, doubly sure, he kept the key in his pocket for the time above mentioned.  When the door was opened, for the purpose of putting in some logs, Richards then took ad eat some of the bread and butter; and proceeding into the yard, told his fellow workmates of what he had done.  They immediately exclaimed "surely you did not eat the bread and butter with the poison on;" and were horror struck and finding that he had forgotten the caution given by is master.  A medical gentleman was immediately sent for, and every endeavour was made to remove the poison and counteract its effects, but in vain.  The poor man lingered until Tuesday, when he expired.  Verdict - Accidental Death.

   Another inquest was held by Wm. Brewer, Esq. on 3d December, upon Joseph Stuckey, who on the night before had fallen into the river at Newport, and was drowned while going ashore from the sloop Taunton, lying at the Quay, where he had been at work. Verdict - Accidental Death.

   On Monday morning last a person was found dead in the bottom of one of the balance pits belonging to the Abersychan Iron Works.  It is no yet ascertained how he fell in, but report says he met with the accident while fighting with a fellow workman, with whom he was seen quarreling on Saturday night, since which time he had been missing.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 17 December 1831

COMMITMENTS TO MONMOUTH GAOL. - Dec,. 16, Thos. Rees. by the coroner's warrant, charged with the willful murder of David Davis, in the parish of Aberstruth, on the 13th instant.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 17 December 1831

MRDER NEAT NANTYGLO. - The postman, in coming from Tredegar to Nantyglo, turned into a hut near the road, where he met his death, as it appears, for no other provocation than by refusing a bit of tobacco to a person who frequently slept there.  The man was found dead next morning on the spot, and the person who killed him was apprehended at Ebbw-vale.  A full confession of the crime is said to have been extorted from the prisoner, who has been long known in the neighbourhood as a person of deranged intellect.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 23 December 1831

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT - O n Friday last, about five o'clock in the evening, as one of the boatmen at the New Passage, of the name of Philip Davies, who had been in the service of the Passage for nearly 30 years, was running the l boat from the Monmouthshire side in order to return and fetch the quay, and take in a passenger, it blowing very fresh, while in the act of  wearing the boat, the sail suddenly gibed, and the boom knocked him overboard, when he immediately sunk without uttering a word, and without his companion being able to render him any assistance.  The unfortunate man has left a wife and two children to deplore his loss.

 

The Cambrian, 24 December 1831

MUDER NEAR NANTYGLO. - While the postman, David Griffiths, was on his way from Tredegar to Nanyglo, Monmouthshire, he was overtaken by a shower of rain, which induced him to take shelter in a hut, where he saw an individual long known in the neighbourhood as a person of deranged intellect.  The former and latter were seldom seen without pipes I their mouths.  On the postman lighting his pipe, the other asked him for tobacco, which he said he could not afford; when the wretch struck him a violent blow with his fist, and proceeded to murder him with what they cal a spanner, an instrument used for forcing a nut or screw.  The unfortunate victim was immediately rendered insensible; but showing symptoms of life, the maniac again seized the same weapon, and actually beat his brains out.  He then left the hut, took off his shoes and hat, placed them on the edge of a road at a short distance, smeared himself over with clay, and ran off.  He was apprehended at Nantyglo.

   On being  asked if he knew anything of he murder, he answered "no;" but, when shewn the body, he said, "O yes (taking hold of the nose of he corpse), that's the fellow who refused to give me some tobacco!" The postman has left a wife and seven children to deplore her loss

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 23 December 1831

INQUESTS.

   On the body of Edw. Evans, who came by his death as follows:- On the 23d day of November, three boys, in the employ of M. Edward Griffiths, of Marshfield, farmer, were at work in the farm-yard, turning muck with pikes, they went playfully to throw the muck at the other, when, accidentally, the pike of William Bevan, aged eleven years, struck and penetrated the temple of Edward Evans, aged 13 years, of which he complained but little till the first of December, when he was seized with a fit - a surgeon was sent for, who attended him till his death, which took place on the 17th December.  Upon a post mortem examination it was discovered that the pike had pierced the skull, and entered the brain; in the substance of which three or four ounces of matter were found.  The deceased retained the perfect possession of his senses to the last.  Verdict, accidental death.

   On Joel Hazle, who was crossing Ebbw river, on the 19th inst., with a boy behind him, when there was a great fresh in the river.  The horse stumbled, and Joel Hazle and the boy fell off into the water.  The boy was soon carried by the stream against a part of the bank, of which he laid hold and saved himself; but Hazle was carried down the river nearly half a mile, followed by two men in a boat, who could not, however, render him any assistance in con sequence of the great flood.  At last he was brought to land by one of the men who followed him by the help of a long pole.  Life, however, was then extinct.  Verdict, accidental death

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 24 December 1831

   Yesterday morning, an awful instance of sudden death occurred in the family of Captain Isaacson, of this town.  The housemaid got up early and went down stairs, leaving her fellow servant, whom she expected soon to follow her, in bed.  The latter, however, not making her appearance after a short time, the housemaid returned, and found that the companion of her slumber had slept to wake no more.  The bed contained a corpse !

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 6 February 1830

DISTRESSING ACCIDENTS.

   It is melancholy to have to place on record the two fatal accidents here detailed, which occurred so near together.  They warn us of the awful truth, that "in the midst of life we are in death."

   Mr. John Smith, one of he sheriff's officers for this county, was returning home to Usk, in he evening of Saturday last, and as within two miles of that town, when his horse stumbled and threw him off upon his head.  A friend, who was riding in company, immediately dismounted and raised Mr. Smith from the ground.  A gentleman hereupon coming up, and seeing the alarming and apparently lifeless state of Mr. Smith, immediately returned to Usk to procure medical aid.  In a very short time Mr. Davies, the surgeon, was upon the spot; but professional skill was of no avail - the vital spark had fled.  A wife and family are thus bereft of an affectionate husband and an indulgent father, upon whom they depended for support. .  .  .  An inquest was held upon the body, on Monday, before Thos. Hughes, Esq. coroner; and a verdict of accidental death returned.  It appeared that Mr. Smith and his friend were perfectly sober, and that the accident was attributable to the slippery state of the road.

   On Monday last, Mr. John Pritchard, of Ty-dee, in the parish of Llanarth, went out with his dogs and gun, and in his way called at the farm of his bother-in-law, Mr. Holmes, of Loyn-y-gare, near Hagland.  A man being in the barn thrashing, Mr. Pritchard walked there, and entered into conversation with him, standing the while upon the edge of a board which was placed across the entrance to keep the con from wasting out at the doorway, and holding the gun by the muzzle, with the butt resting upon the board; melancholy to relate, while he was leaning against the door, and jocularly observing to the man at work, that he would inform against him for thrashing with his coat on (which the cold weather had induced the man, contrary to custom, to wear), the gun slipped, and the lock striking he edge of the board, discharged the gun, the contents of which entered the groin, and came out at the opposite side of Mr. Pritchard's body, under the arm, carrying a piece of his flannel waistcoat through with it.  Such an accident, it is almost needless to add, he did not survive many minutes.  The deceased resided with his aged parents, whose affliction at the sudden and melancholy loss of an only son may be well imagined.  He was a most respectable and amiable man, and his death is the subject of since regret with all who knew him. An inquest was held upon the body on Tuesday, before Thos. Hughes, Esq. coroner, an account of which came too late to supersede the above narrative, which in the main points are correct. M. Pritchard, it appears was remarkable for being particularly careful with his gun, and a cool and steady sportsman.  From the evidence given before the Coroner, it appears he slipped off himself in turning round to go into the house o see his sister, Mrs. Holmes; John Jones, who was thrashing, heard the butt-end of the gun strike with violence against the ground, and the gun go off, upon which he ran out and saw what had happened to Mr. Pritchard, who exclaimed, "the Lord have mercy upon my soul !" and instantly expired.  A verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

   An Inquest was held on the 28th ult. In he parish of Risca, before Wm. Brewer, Esq. Coroner, on the body of John Evans, eight years old, son of Morgan Evans.  This little boy had been sent on an errand, but not returning, apprehension was excited, and search made in the Canal, near a bridge he had to cross, where his body was found. Verdict, Accidentally drowned.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 14 January 1832
  An inquest was held on the body of William Davies, who was killed on the the instant, at Penmain colliery, in the parish of Monythusloyne, in this county, by part of the roof falling upon him.  Verdict - accidental death.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 18 February 1832
SUDDEN DEATH. - NO INQUEST. - Cornelius Willetts, a youth , between 18 and 19 years of age, in the employ of Mr. John Palmer, agent for the Gas Works Company in this town, died suddenly on the night of Friday, the 10th instant.  The deceased had been evidently unwell for the week preceding, but, being of a reserved disposition, he would not acknowledge it.  On Friday morning he complained of an oppression in his chest and a headache.  Mr. Palmer, thinking that he was labouring under a temporary indigestion, told him to leave his work and go into town for a dose of salts.  The deceased seemed very reluctant to take any medicine, and neglected to get the salts until after dinner, when, getting worse, he procured an ounce at the shop of Mr. Cossens, in Church-street.  The young man thn returned home, took the salts, and went to bed.  About six o'clock Mrs. Palmer made him some hot tea, and urged him to take a little, but he would not touch it.  As he seemed inclined to sleep, he was left alone until about eight o'clock, when a lad also employed at the works, went into his room, and found him foaming at the mouth and nostrils.  He immediately summoned Mr. and Mrs. Palmer.  The former took the poor youth in his arms, and endeavoured to revive him, but in vain; he was then in the throes of death, - and, after a few heavy gasps, expired.  A surgeon was instantly called in, but he pronounced that life was irrecoverably extinct.  Mr. Palmer then sent to the Coroner, and apprised him of the circumstances.  The Coroner said at first that he should hold an inquest, but on the following day he changed his mind; and the deceased was committed to his "Last long home" without any inquiry having been made as to the cause of so suddn a departure. We will do the Coroner the justice to declare our belief, that in coming to the determination of not holding an inquest, he had satisfied himself, by an inspection of the body, that the deceased had been deprived of life by one of those inscrutable visitations of providence which set at defiance all human investigation.  Still hr was not justified in the neglect of this necessary duty.   A thousand idle runours are in circulation respecting the death of the poor youth, who appears to have been a stranger to the town - friendless and forlorn.  Mr. Cossens also ought to have had an opportunity of proving, as he is able to do, that the article sold to the deceased was not one of those poisonous drugs which are sometimes given in mistake for salts.  Secret hints of this kind have been whispered, and, if uncontradicted, they are enough to ruin the business of any tradesman.  We think it right, therefore, in vindication of Mr. Cossens, to state that there is not the slightest foundation for them.  It can be proved that the medicine taken had that natural effect, which would not have resulted from any of those drugs which resemble salts.  In this age of Burking, it is an imperative duty upon all coroners to make the strictest inquiries into the deaths of the poor and the destitute who die under circumstances attended with the slightest suspicion; and we trust that a similar omission will never again occur in this town.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 25 February 1832
DIED.
On Monday last, aged 59, Mr. James Miles, Senior, Abergavenny,  in returning home on the evening of the preceding Friday, the deceased was thrown out of his gig by coming in contact with a heap of rubbish which had that day been carried into the street.  A coroner's inquest was held on the body on Wednesday last, and a verdict returned of Accidental Death.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 3 March 1832
DIED.
At Caerleon village, on Tuesday last, in his 46th year, Mr. Wm. Gould, leaving a widow and 7 children totally unprovided for.  His death was occasioned by an accident he met with on Christchurch hill, as mentioned in the Merlin some months ago.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 3 March 1832
CHEPSTOW. - A most shocking case of self-destruction took place here on Thursday evening last. A man named John Reunin, a carpenter, residing in Nelson-street, having been missed by his family for several hours, his daughter, after searching the town for him in vain, went to his bed-room where she discovered her parent lying on the floor, which was covered with blood.  The distressed and frightened child rushed into the street crying for help.  Mr. Daniel Mason, a near neighbour, proceeded in the bedroom, where he found the deceased lying on his face in a pool of blood, quite dead and cold.  On turning over the body, Mr. Mason discovered the deceased had cut his throat from ear to ear, with a case knife which was still grasped in his hand.  The scene was horrifying in the extreme.  The blood, which was in great quantity, formed a stream along the room for several feet.  It is reported and believed that the deceased has, occasionally, for some time past been laboring under great weakness of mind..

Monmouthshire Merlin, 10 March 1832
  On the 2d instant, an inquest was taken before Thomas Hughes, Esq. Coroner, at the House of Correction, Usk, on the body of John Parry, a prisoner.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 31 March 1832
MONMOUTH ASSIZES.
The learned Judge, Sir J. Littleale,  .  .  .   did not feel it was necessary for him to call the attention of the gentlemen of the grand jury to more than three of the charges.  The first that he would allude to was a charge of murder; and from the depositions which had been laid before him, he was led to infer that the individual accused of the perpetration of the crime was labouring under insanity.
MURDER.
Thomas Rees, age 25, was charged upon the coroner's inquest with the willful murder of David Davies, at the parish of Aberstruth, in this county.  The prisoner appeared to understand but little English, and he was accordingly accommodated with a Welsh interpreter; the Rev., Mr. Morgan officiating in that capacity. The indictment having been explained to him, he was called upon the plead.  He replied guilty. It was then pointed out to him that by making such pleas, he made hmself liable to the punishment of death, and he was directed to say not guilty, which he did; adding in broken English, "If I not kill him, he will kill me." Mr. Justice in an impressive speech stated the case for the prosecution.  He should be able, he said, clearly to prove that the prisoner committed the murder, but at the same time, the evidence he should bring forward would certainly suggest very strong doubts as to the sanity of the unfortunate prisoner.
  Wentllian Thomas examined: I am servant to Mr. West, at the Beaufort Iron Works; I know the deceased, David Davies.  He was the letter-man; he used to bring letters to our house from Tredegar.  About nine o'clock on the night of the 12th December last, he came to our house, staid there a quarter of an hour, and then went away.  He had a letter bag with him.  It was a very wet and dark night.
  Thos. Lewis examined: I work at the Balance Pit, at Nantyglo.  I left work at six o'clock on the evening of Monday the 12th of December last.  I went to the cabin, which is near the Balance Pit.  A fire was always kept in the cabin.  I left a spanner there.  A spanner has been shewn me, by Samuel, the constable; it is the same I left in the cabin.
  David Reynolds examined: I am a collier, and work for Mr. Bailey, at the Balance Pit.  I have frequently seen the prisoner in the cabin.  Between six and seven o'clock on the night of the 12th of December last, I went to the cabin, and saw the prisoner there.  He was lying down.  We always keep a fire in the cabin.  I asked prisoner if he was going to stay there all night.  He said he was.   John Orman came in, and prisoner asked him for some bread and cheese.  Orman left the cabin before I did, and I left the prisoner there,
  Edward Edwards examined: I work at the forge at Nantyglo.  I live at Beaufort.  I started from home to go to work at about half-past nine o'clock on the night of the 12th December.  About three quarters of a mile from the Balance Pit, I met Thomas Rees; he was barefooted, and was running.  There was a light from some coke burning, which enabled me to distinguish the prisoner.  
  William Llewellyn examined: I am a collier, and work at the Balance Pit.  A fire is always kept in the cabin there, for the purpose of the men warming themselves and lighting their candles.  I went into the cabin to light my candle, about half past four on the morning of the 13th December.  The fire was then very low.  A man named Absolem also came in to light his candle, which he effected with a match.  On turning round to go out, I saw a man lying on the ground; his hands appeared to have been catching hold of a bench for support; his left knee was doubled under him, and his head was resting upon the wheel of a tram.  There was a large wound on the back of his head, and a great pool of blood on the floor.  He was dead and cold.  It frightened me very much.  Between the dead man and the door was an iron-spanner, on which was clotted blood and hair.  I did not know the deceased.  We immediately gave an alarm.  The dead body had two letter bags strapped around him; the bags were locked.
  John Orman examined: I recollect seeing the prisoner and the boy of the machine in the cabin about a quarter to seven on the night of the 12th December.  I have seen the prisoner about the cabin many times during the last six months; he lived upon charity; he did not appear to me to be much out of the way.  About five o'clock next morning I went to the cabin, when I saw the dead body. His right hand glove was in his left hand.  I did not know the murdered man. I saw the spanner reared up in the corner.  We took the body to Mr. Robins's, the Bush Inn, and then I went in search of Thos. Rees.  I met with him at Mr. Harford's office, at Ebbw Vale, which is about a quarter of a mile from the cabin.  When I went up to the prisoner he struck me in the left eye; I returned the blow.  I asked him did he recollect seeing me in the cabin last night.  He said, no.  I took him to the Bush Inn, Nantyglo, and delivered him to the constable, Henry Samuel.  The prisoner was present when the surgeon examined the body.  I asked him did he know who the man was?  He said, "Yes; it is the man who carries letters from Tredegar."   Asked him did he kill him?  He said, "I did."  I asked. For what? He answered - "He came in the cabin, and said bwrwglo (it rains hard.)  He pulled off his glove, put his hand in his pocket, and lighted his pipe.  I asked him for half a pipe of tobacco?  He said to me, d-n you; he struck me here (pointing to forehead) with his fist; I then struck him; the postman slipped off the bench; I catch up the spanner, and strike him right here," (pointing to the back part of the head. Witness asked if the postman kept any noise? The prisoner  replied, "No; he did not say Keck."
  Henry Samuel, constable, examined: In consequence of what I had heard I went to the cabnin about six o'clock in the morning of 13th December.  I saw the dead body, and the place all over blood.  When I looked at the face, I knew it was the postman, David Davies.  I examined his pockets and found part of a pipe and some tobacco.  I saw a large spanner in the shed; it is a piece of iron to turn a screw; blood and hair was upon it.  It had been a very rough night; the cabin is about twenty or thirty yards from roadside.  Prisoner was, till within the last five years, a very tidy man.; kept a watch in his pocket, and a good coat to his back; since then he has let himself go like a "rodney," and went about begging, quite ragged.  I consider him not in his right senses.
  [The spanner was here produced, and a general shudder ran through the court.  It was a most formidable weapon, capable of killing an ox; it was about two feet long, five or six inches in circumference, and weighed sixteen pounds.[
  David White examined: on the morning of the 13th December I found a pair of shoes about nine or ten yards from the cabin.  I knew them to be Thos. Rees's.  When I took them to him he said, "What made you bring my old shoes down; I shan't wear them again." Witness asked him why did he throw them away?  He said, "It rained so hard that night I wanted to go quick to Ebbw Vale. When I did strike him the second time I did see the blood, and then I did run away, and throw away my shoes."
  Abraham Rowland, surgeon, of Nantyglo, was the next witness.  He stated that he examined the body; death was occasioned by blows on the head.  The whole of the back part of the skull was beaten in, and the brain was protruding.  Witness had seen the spanner, and had no doubt that was the instrument by which the murder was inflicted.
  Three witnesses were next examined as to the mental qualities of the prisoner.  They all described him to have been, previous to the death of his mother, which occurred about five or six years since, a man of sober, tidy, and industrious habits.  He was very fond of his mother, and when she was ill, he sat by her bedside, in almost constant prayer.  After her death, he completely altered, refused to remain at home, stayed out all night, frequently praying aloud, and alternately laughing in the mist violent manner.  About a year and a half since he was taken to a surgeon at Carmarthen, but he received no benefit.  He had a brother who was "just violent in the same manner."
  Thomas Hughes, Esq., the coroner who held the inquest on the murdered postman, described the behaviour of the prisoner on that occasion.  The inquest lasted two days, during which time the prisoner sat in a state of stupor, regardless of everything that was going on around him; but at the conclusion of the second day, he tobacco box was produced,.  He immediately sprang up, darted across he room, and it was with the utmost difficulty he was prevented wresting the box out of the constable's possession.
  The prisoner was now called upon for his defence, but he declined making any.
  The learned judge then summed up.  His lordship said, this was an indictment for willful murder, and it was unnecessary for him to remind he jury that their most serious consideration was required to the case; for upon their verdict depended the life of a human being.  He apprehended there could be but little doubt that the deceased came to his death by the hands of the prisoner; but they would have to consider, after hearing him read over the evidence, whether the crime amounted to willful murder, or whether it was attenuated down to manslaughter, -  or even that a crime of great magnitude.  It appeared from the confession of the prisoner, that he was struck by the deceased first; he returned the blow; and it was for the jury to consider whether that aggravation was sufficient to do away with the charge of murder.  If the jury thought so, then their verdict wpuld be manslaughter.     But there was another important feature in this case, and that was the state of the mind of the prisoner at the time the deed was committed.  If the jury thought that he was labouring under insanity at that time, then they would return a verdict to that effect; but his lordship said it was his duty to inform them that if they returned a verdict of insanity, the consequence to the prisoner would be that he would be kept under confinement during the remainder of his life; for by an act of parliament passed a few years since, it was decreed that all persons who should be acquitted of crimes on such ground, should be taken care of and placed in an asylum provided for that purpose; lest, by being left at large, hey would perhaps have other opportunities of repeating their offences. The learned Judge then read over the evidence at length, and left the points above described to the jury.
  After consulting together for some time, they returned a verdict of Manslaughter; they were asked did they throw aside the idea that the prisoner was insane; the jury consulted together again for a few minutes, and repeated their verdict of manslaughter. His lordship then said that the sentence of the court was, that Thomas Rees be transported beyond the seas for the term of his life.
  We suspect that the jury misunderstood the tenor of the learned Judge's observations, and their verdict would certainly have been that the prisoner was insane; for his conduct during the whole of the trial, which lasted a considerable time, was conclusive evidence as to the wandering state of his intellects.  At times the wretched man would appear to pay some little attention to the proceedings, but would almost immediately relapse into a state of the most sullen apathy; and every now and then he would appear to be struggling with fits of uncontrollable laughter.  He heard his sentence without apparently paying the smallest attention to it.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 28 April 1832   
  On Sunday evening,   .  .  .   The same evening, the mother and father of some children left their house at Mitcheltroy, near this town, for the purpose of attending chapel.  During their absence, one of the little ones, aged about three years, put his mouth to the spout of a tea-kettle of water, which was boiling over the fire, and drank some of the contents.  The melancholy consequence was, that the poor child was so horribly scalded as to occasion its death in about two hours.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 12 May 1832
  On Tuesday last, an inquest was held at the workhouse, Pontypool, by T. Hughes, Esq., coroner, on view of the body of John Williams, alias Absolem, who had been in a declining state of health for a long time, and having received a blow from his grandson on last Sunday afternoon, of which he complained, he was removed from his own dwelling on the same evening to  the workhouse, where medical assistance was procured; but notwithstanding every attention was paid to him, he died the following morning.  A post mortem examination took place, when nothing appearing to  corroborate the general opinion that he died from the effects of the blow, the jury returned a verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

The Cambrian, 12 May 1832
DIED.
On the 21st lt. Mr. Samuel James, landlord of the White Hart, Caldicot, Monmouthshire, without any previous complaint of illness.  After the business of the night, he lighted his pipe, and went into the court-yard of the inn his services being required, in a few minutes he was called; no answer being given, a light was procured, and he was found at his length on the ground quite dead.  Mr. James was in his 60th year, and much respected in the neighbourhood.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 26 May 1832
MELANCHOLY AND FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Sunday night last, at Chepstow, the crew of a barge from this place, with bark, retired in sleep.  In the course of the night John Shellard left the cabin and proceeded on deck, and it is supposed accidentally fell overboard and was drowned.  He was not missed till the morning, when all efforts to recover the body were unavailing.  The unfortunate man has left a widow and several children, residing in Wyebridge-lane, in this town, fit objects for the commiseration of the humane and benevolent.
NOVEL AND DREADFUL ACT OF SELF-DESTRUCTION. - On Saturday night last a wretched creature terminated his existence at a lodging-house in Trosnasnt, near Pontypool, by deliberately cutting two inches off his tongue.   When the poor fellow was discovered, which was about ten minutes after the act was committed, he was sitting on the side of the bed, and he floor of his rom was absolutely saturated with blood.  Medical assistance was immediately procured, when every means were resorted to to arrest the extensive hemorrhage, which brought on such exhaustion, that on the following morning death put an end to his sufferings.  An Inquest was held by T. Hughes, Esq. Coroner, on the body, when a verdict was returned of Temporary Derangement.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 26 May 1832
COUNTRY NEWS. -
  Our readers will doubtless recollect an account of an accident which happened on the 16th of December last, to one of the ferrymen at the New Passage, named Philip Davis, who was knocked overboard by the boom of the boat, on the Welsh side, and was lost notwithstanding every endeavour was made to save him.  His body was not found till Wednesday morning week, when it was discovered on the beach, close to the New Passage House, on the Gloucestershire side, and very near the residence of his widow and family.  His mutilated remains presented a shocking spectacle.  An inquest has been held before W. J. Ellis, Esq., and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 2 June 1832
SUICIDE. - A little before eleven o'clock on Monday morning, Mr. Salisbury, a respectable coach lamp manufacturer, who has for many years carried on business in Long Acre, committed suicide by throwing himself from a window on the third floor.  He breakfasted with his family, and afterwards retired up stairs as was supposed to arrange some accounts, and in about an hour after he was seen by persons passing to precipitate himself into the street.  His head and shoulders came in contact with the pavement; the spine was dislocated, and the brain so much injured that he died in a few minute.  The deceased was suffering under mental aberration about two years ago, but recovered.  Within the last few days his bodily health had been indifferent, but no apprehension was entertained that his former malady was turning upon him.  He has left a widow and eight children to bewail the dreadful catastrophe.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 2 June 1832
  The body of John Shellard, the unfortunate man who was drowned by falling, in the night of Sunday se'nnight, from a barge at Chepstow, as stated in our last paper, was picked up on Monday last, in the river Wye, near Abbey Tintern.  An inquest was held on his body before Mr. Ellis, coroner; the evidence adduced left no doubt that the poor fellow came to his premature end accidentally, and a verdict to that effect was accordingly returned.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 9 June 1832
  A coroner's inquest was held at Caerleon workhouse, a short time since, on view of the body of Betty Morgan an old woman upwards of 90, who, in a fit, as it is supposed, fell down stairs and suddenly expired.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.
FATAL EFFECTS OF BAD COMPANY.
  A man of the name of William Charles, a hallier, residing at Caerleon, was lately engaged in a drunken quarrel, when he received several blows, which, the following night, produced an attack of erisypelas.  The third night he was unable to go out, and on the fourth night typhus fever took hold of him, which in a little while terminated his mortal career.
  A poor little creature, only two years old, was burnt to death at Caerleon last week. The parents were out at work, and the little  children were left in the charge of a girl, about twelve years of age, who went to fetch a pitcher of water, leaving her two younger brothers with the unfortunate deceased; and they going out to see an extraordinary fish which was being exhibited, the pinafore of the child, as is supposed, caught fire and produced this melancholy accident.
  A deplorable accident occurred at Caerleon Iron Works on Tuesday se'nnight.  As two men were exhibiting a fish to the workmen, a boy, about twelve years of age, went in to peep through one of the wheels in order to see the sight and save the charge, which, being suddenly set in motion, caught a portion of his clothes, by which means he was dreadfully crushed and dashed into the fall below, which occasioned his almost instantaneous death.
SUDDEN DEATH.
  A young man of the parish of Christ Church, who had been engaged in the worse than beastly practice of dinking for three days successively, was found dead in his bed a few days since. His companions, who slept in the same room with him, rose early and went out, leaving the deceased in tolerable health, but when seen a short time afterwards he was a clay-cold corpse.

The Cambrian, 9 June 1832
DIED.
On the 30th ult. At the Red Lon in. Newport, the Rev. Edward O. Hollwell, Rector of Plympton, Devon, and formerly Major in the North Gloucester.  He was found dead in his bed.  Verdict at the inquest, - Sudden Death by Visitation of God.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 23 June 1832
INQUESTS.
  On Monday last, an inquest was held at the town jury room, before Edmund Bond Prosser, Esq. coroner, on view of the body of Thomas Serby, the poor fellow who was drowned on Wednesday se'nnigh by falling from a barge, as stated in our last.  The body was picked up near Redbrook, on Monday morning.  The evidence adduced left no doubt hat the deceased cam by his death accidentally, and a verdict to that effect was accordingly returned.
  On Wednesday last another inquest was held by the same coroner, at the jury room, ion the body of William Edmunds, a little boy about six years old, whose body was discovered on Tuesday last, in the river Wye, near Whitebook.  Wm. Edmunds, he father, stated that on the morning of Wednesday week he got up and went to work, leaving his son in bed, since which time he never again saw him alive.  A younger brother of the deceased said that he was with his brother playing near the water, and the deceased, in attempting to go across some planks that form a communication between Mr. Hughes' and Mr. Biss's quays, tumbled off and fell into the river, which was very high at the time.  James Pearse, master of a barge, proved that he picked up the body from the river, near Whitebrook, and brought it to Monmouth. Verdict - accidental death.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 30 June 1832
DREADFUL AND FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Wednesday morning last, an inquest was held before Edmund Bond Prosser, Esq., at the Jury Room, in this town, on the body of William Lewis,  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, who was in the employ of Mr. Edwards, maltster, of this town, was, on Tuesday night, about ten o'clock, in company with Mr. Edwards's waggoner, proceeding down Monnow-street, on their way to Abergavenny, with a wagon loaded with barley, drawn by three horses.  When about half way down the street, the harness of the thiller horse became unhooked and the rattling made by it frightened the horses, they started off at full seed.  The deceased caught hold of the middle horse, and the waggoner seized the hind one, and attempted to restrain their course.  Finding it of no avail, the waggoner loosed his hold, but the deceased continued his endeavours till the wagon arrived nearly at the bottom of the street, when he fell, probably from exhaustion, and, horrible to relate, one of the wheels passed over the back part of his head, fracturing the skull in the most frightful manner.
  George Wilson, Esq., promptly attended, and caused the unfortunate man to be removed to the Worcester Lodge Inn.  The injuries, however, were of too extensive a nature to admit of human aid.  He died almost immediately. The deceased, who resided in Ashford's Buildings, Over Monnow, has left a wife and two small children to lament the sudden and dreadful end of an industrious husband and father. After the catastrophe the waggons proceeded a few yards, when the thiller-horse fell, and was severely injured.  The coroner's jury, after a patient investigation, returned a verdict of Accidental Death - deodand on the wheel one shilling.
FATAL ACCIDENT.
  On Monday last, Sarah Thomas, of Llanbadock, near Usk, met with her death on her return from Pontypool, by falling under one of the wheels of her cart, which passed over her right cheek, and almost instantly deprived her of life. C. H. Leigh, Esq. was passing at the time, and caused every attention to be afforded, and hastened to Usk to dispatch a surgeon.  These humane exertions were, however, of no avail, as the poor woman breathed her last before the arrival of the medical gentleman.

The Cambrian, 30 June 1832
BIRTHS.
On the 17th inst., at Glen Usk, the lady of Major Mackworth, of a daughter, which only survived a few hours.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 21 July 1832
CHEPSTOW. - Considerable excitement was occasioned here at the latter end of the last, and commencement of the present week, by alarming reports concerning the death of Mrs. Ann Davis, wife of Mr. David Davis, of the Steam packet public house, which occurred on Thursday se'nnigth, and was said to have been occasioned by violence.  In consequence of he reports it was considered necessary that the parish authorities should institute a judicial inquiry as to the foundation for them,.  The body was accordingly examined by John Evans., Esq., surgeon, and upon his report a coroner's warrant was issued to summon a jury for the purpose of ascertaining the cause of the death of Mrs. Davis.  The jury assembled on Saturday, and was adjourned till Monday, when, after a patient examination of several witnesses (particularly of the servant maid, who has lived in the family four years, and who gave her evidence in such a clear manner as to call forth he approbation of the Coroner and jury) the following verdict was returned:-
  The jury upon their oaths say, that the said Ann Davis, on the 12th day of July instant, and for some time previous thereto, did labour under a grievous disease of body, to wit, inflammation; and on the twelfth day of July instant, the said Ann Davis departed this life by the visitation of God, in a natural way, of the disease and distemper aforesaid, and not by any hurt or injury received from David Davis, her husband, or any other persons or persons whomsoever, to the knowledge of the  said jurors.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 18 August 1832
 An inquest was held on Wednesday morning, at Redbrook, near this town, on the body of Charlotte Lewis, aged 15, who expired suddenly on Sunday last, immediately after returning from attending divine service at the chapel.  She had previously apparently enjoyed a tolerable state of health; but it appeared from the evidence of Mr. Hulbert, surgeon, that her death was occasioned by disease of the heart, and a verdict was accordingly returned - Died by the visitation of God.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 8 September 1832
SUDDEN DEATH. - On Monday morning, John Dunscombe, gardener, was working in the garden of C. Tyler, Esq., in this town.  One of the servants, hearing indistinct cried for assistance, hastened to the spot from whence they proceeded, when she discovered the unfortunate man, leaning with his hands upon the ground, and bleeding at the mouth.  He requested to be conveyed into the house, which was done, and medical advice and every assistance afforded him, but without avail: he shortly expired.  Upon a post mortem examination, a most singular cavity was discovered in the heart, and the medical gentleman expressed their astonishment that Dunscombe had not died in his infancy, as it was evident that the functions of the heart must have been very defective from the time of birth,  It appears that he was subject to sudden cessations of the vital powers; and on the morning of his death, after taking breakfast at Mr. Tyler's, he put his hand upon his beast, and said, "I have it here again."  He was a very respectable man for his station in life, and was esteemed by all who knew him.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 17 November 1832
ABERGAVENNY, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14. - Ann Jones, servant with Capt. O'Neal, was brought before the Rev. W. Powell,, Rev. Thomas Williams, and F. H. Williams, Esq., charged, upon the coroner's warrant, with concealing the birth of a male infant.  She had been poorly for some weeks past, and was suspected by Mrs. Powell (the woman with whom Captain O'Neal lodges) to be pregnant; but, upon being questioned, she denied it.  At length, on the 14th of October last, she being very ill, and confined to her bed, Mrs. Powell went  from her room to make a little broth for her; and, on her return, she met Ann Jones coming out of her room, but looking very languid.  Upon examining the room, she found a newly-born male infant, warm.   Ann Jones said she had a miscarriage.  An inquest was held at the time, and a verdict returned of Guilty of concealing the birth. She is a very genteel-looking young woman, about 22 or 23, and seemed greatly affected.  She is held to bail for her appearance at the Sessions.
  At the same time, Mary Vaughan, a washerwoman, was also brought up for a similar offence.  She lodges in Tudor-street, in this town.  As it was suspected that she as pregnant, Roger Price, the reputed father, said that about eight or nine weeks ago he told her, if she were with child by him, only "give it fair play, and he would do his part towards maintaining it."  Jane Pritchard, the woman who lodges in the next room, supposed Mary Vaughan's confinement to be at hand, and as she had no none with her but her brother, she conceived it right that the parish officers should know of the affair.  Accordingly they were sent for on Tuesday, Oct. 211st, and a search made; the Doctor was also sent for, and he was of opinion that a child had been born, but no infant was to be found.  The brother had absconded, and it is strongly suspected took with him the body of he child.  A warrant was issued for his apprehension, but he evaded the constables.  
  Roger Price had been repeatedly sent for by the brother previous to her confinement, but did not go to her until she had been confined.  She then told him it was a "dead birth."  She has until tomorrow night to find bail.  The prisoner appears a callous individual.  She has been strongly suspected of doing similar things before now.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 8 December 1932
SUDDEN DEATH. - Whilst Mary Williams, at Clydach iron Works, on Tuesday morning last, was engaged in washing, she fell down, and instantly expired.  An inquest was held before T. Davies, Esq., Coroner, and a verdict returned - Died by the visitation of God.

Glamorgan Gazette, 29 December 1832
  At Ynys Cardedovg, near Newbridge, on the 17th instant, a fine little girl, aged 18 months, in the temporary absence of her mother, accidentally threw over herself a pot of boiling coffee, by which the unfortunate child was so dreadfully scalded, as occasioned her death two days after.

The Spectator, 2 June 1832 (9)

On Saturday night, a wretched creature terminated his existence at a lodging-house on Llantrisant, near Pontypool by deliberately cutting two inches off his tongue.  Every means were resorted to to arrest the excessive haemorrhage, but in vain; it brought on such exhaustion that on the following morning death put an end to his sufferings. - Monmouthshire Merlin.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 26 January 1833
COMMITMENTS TO MONMOUTH COUNTY GAOL. - Jan. 19, John Edwards, committed upon the coroner's warrant, charged with the wilful murder of William Rosser, of the Hamlet of Clytha.  On the 11th December last, the said John Edwards was committed for two months (in default of paying 2. 11s. 6d. fine and cists) to the House of Correction at Usk for an assault in this case.  Mr. Rosser, in whose employ the prisoner was, having since died, a coroner's inquest was held upon the body on the 19th inst., when the Jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against John Edwards, who has been in consequence removed from the House of Correction at Usk, to the county gaol at Monmouth, to await his trial on the capital charge. [Coroner, Thomas Hughes.]

Glamorgan Gazette, 26 January 1833
  On Wednesday afternoon, a poor woman, of Monmouth, named Griffiths, called in at the White Swan, in Church-street, and while there was taken ill and died in less than two hours, and before she could be removed.

Glamorgan Gazette, 2 February 1833
Pontypool. - Coroner's inquest. - On Wednesday se'nnight, an inquest was held at the Old Furnace, near this town, on view of the body of a man named John Price, aged 31 years.  The deceased has been missing since the night of the 5th inst., and on Tuesday se'nnight, his body was found in a large pond adjoining his residence, in to which it is supposed he had accidentally fallen.  After a careful investigation for two hours, by Thomas Hughes, Esq., coroner and a respectable jury from Pontypool, a verdict of Found drowned was returned.

Cambrian, 9 February 1833
DREADFUL EVENT. - An inquest was held on Monday se'nnight, by J. Hughes, Esq., Coroner, and a respectable jury, at the house of Mr. Francis George, Ponty Moil Inn, near Pontypool, upon a lad about 14 years of age.  It appeared by the evidence that the deceased accompanied by a boy with a cart from Llangwm with vats, which were unloaded at the Company's stores, where a Machine was in motion, cutting hay and straw, propelled by one horse; curiosity led the poor fellow to pout his head through an opening in the wall, when, melancholy to relate, the end of the beam attached to the machine jammed his head against the wall, and literally crushed it to atoms.  Verdict, Accidental death.

Cambrian, 9 February 1833
DIED. - Friday, suddenly, Mr. J. Embrey, of Monnow-street, Monmouth, aged 75.  He was walking in the street five minutes before he expired.

Glamorgan Gazette, 6 April 1833
  CALAMITOUS EVENT. - As Mr. Zorobabel Jenkins, son of Mr. Wm. Jenkins, New Park, Llanttrissent, was  going from Sirhowy to Newport on Friday, the 229th ult., by the Ebbw Vale locomotive engine, his foot slipped, and falling under the tram laden with iron, the wheel passed over his chest and arms, and caused instantaneous death.  An inquest was held on the following day, when the coroner expressed great disapprobation at steam carriages being allowed to convey passengers without being licensed so to do.  The deceased had been in the employ of Messrs. Harford & Co. for several years, as shopman at Ebbw Vale and Sirhowy works, he was a young man of good address, amiable manners, and very much respected.

Glamorgan Gazette, 11 May 1833
  CHEPSTOW. - His Grace, the Duke of Beaufort has been pleaded to appoint Mr. John Evans, Surgeon, of Chepstow, to be his Grace's Coroner for the Manor and Liberty of Chepstow, vacant by the death of James Evans, Esq.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 25 May 1833
  On Monday last, an inquest was held in Chepstow, before John Evans, Esq., coroner, on the body of James Merry.  It appeared in evidence that the deceased, who had been in the employ of Thomas Lewis, lime-burner, on the Wednesday preceding his death, complained of something rising from his chest to his throat; he lay down for about an hour, but was unable to resume his work, and in the evening he borrowed a few pence from his master to procure some medicine.  He continued to feel the same sensation until the following Saturday, complaining of the rising in his stomach, which almost choked him when he moved about, but when he remained quiet he felt nothing of it.  About twenty minutes before nine in the evening he took a little tea, and before the hour had elapsed, he fell a lifeless corpse.  The deceased was a remarkably strong and muscular man, and had previously been in a good state of health.  The jury returned their verdict - Died by the visitation of God.
HYDROPHOBIA. - A case of death from this distressing malady occurred at Penalt, near this town, on Monday last.  The unfortunate sufferer, a little girl about twelve years of age, of the name of England, had, with some other persons in the same neighbourhood, been bitten about three months since by a dog in a rabid state.  Happily the consequence has only proved fatal in this one case.
CORRESPONDENCE.
To the Editor of the Monmouthshire Merlin.
  SIR, - The recent occurrence of a fatal case of hydrophobia in this neighbourhood having given rise to several contradictory reports, I consider it my duty, as the medical attendant in the said case, to present the following facts to the notice of your readers.
  On Saturday evening last, about eleven o'clock, I was called upon by a parish officer of Penalt to visit a girl, of the name of Ellen England, about 13 years of age, who was an inmate of the poor-house in the said parish; upon my arrival, I found her in great agitation of mind and body, looking very wild, and evidently in a state of great excitement.  In answer to my inquiries, I was informed by her mother, as well as by herself, who at intervals could converse with calmness, that she had been bitten by a mad dog, about two months since, the mark on her finger being still visible; and that she had been taken to the sea and dipped, according to a prevailing custom, the fallacy of which as a remedy has been repeatedly proved.  She had continued tolerably well from the time of the bite until Friday last, when she began to experience much pain in the stomach, with difficulty of swallowing, especially fluids, the sight of which would occasion great agitation and distress. I offered her a small quantity of liquid in a tea-cup, which she laid hold of with eagerness, and attempted to convey it quickly to her mouth, then with a look of the greatest wildness, she dashed it suddenly from her, and threw her arms around her mother, uttering two or three loud screams, which were succeeded by violent convulsions.  In a short time she became calm, when I tried the effect of pouring water from one vessel to another, the sight and hearing of which occasioned similar distress, and was the cause of her being again strongly convulsed.  I proposed bleeding, which was strongly opposed by the women who were present, without their assigning any reason for their refusal, but they were evidently influenced by an absurd notion, as will appear before the close of my letter.  I directed the employment of other remedies which I considered calculated to mitigate the symptoms, if not prevent the paroxysms, and left the house.  
  The following morning on my way to my patient, I was informed she had been much worse since my visiting her - that she was, in fact, raving mad, foaming at the mouth, struggling in such a manner as to require two or three persons to hold her, and screaming, as if in the greatest agony.  When I arrived, she was leaning on the arm of her mother, breathing in a hurried and laborious manner, the expression of her countenance being ferociously wild, her speech of an incoherent description, and a great discharge of frothy saliva from her mouth.  Her pulse was at this period full and rapid, so that judging from the high degree of excitement, it would be proper to lessen the action of the heart and arteries, I again proposed bleeding, which was, as before, obstinately refused.  I was, however, called aside, and asked if it was my intention to bleed her to death, or to cause her to be smothered!  I replied, "it is the duty of a surgeon to endeavour to save or to prolong life, and not to shorten or destroy it; and that if he adopted, or sanctioned the adoption of a different plan, he would most assuredly deserve being hanged for wilful murder!"
  This idea of medical men being authorised to destroy life, in such melancholy cases, I am sorry to say, too generally prevails, though it cannot be too strongly repudiated.  It appears to have had its influence on the women, as before stated, and upon the poor sufferer herself, who earnestly besought me not to bleed her.  During my stay, I tried the administration of some medicine, but without success; upon handing her some milk, it was quickly conveyed to her mouth, but more quickly ejected therefrom, without the smallest portion passing to the stomach.
  Soon after my leaving the house, a state of exhaustion succeeded, and she became more tranquil, at which time a person who resided near (the shoemaker!) bled her, and she almost immediately afterwards expired.  To many, unacquainted with such a disease as the one in question, it may appear strange, that I had urged the adoption of a measure, so shortly before, which, upon its being carried into effect, was apparently the means of hastening her death; but to those who are acquainted with the peculiarities of many diseases, it will appear different; for the transition from excitement to exhaustion is sometimes so rapid as to occasion surprise in the beholders.  Of this, in the course of my practice as a surgeon for above twenty years, I have witnessed several examples, some of which would strikingly illustrate the fact I have recorded, but I withhold their insertion on account of the length to which my letter has extended.
  The following day I was called upon by my friend, Mr. Marsh, surgeon, of Coleford, (to whom the case had been mentioned, but who had not heard of its termination,) to request visiting the patient with me.  Thinking an examination of the body might afford some insight into the character of the disease, we proceeded to the house, and made a delicate inquiry into the appearances, so far as it could be done without dissection, which we found would be strongly resisted.  The appearance of vesiculation under the tongue, which are considered characteristic of hydrophobia, coincided with other circumstances in proving most decidedly that the patient had been the subject of that most distressing malady, which had been occasioned by the previous bite of a dog, whilst in a rabid state.  I am, Sir, &c.,
J. F. HULBERT, Surgeon.
Redbrook, near Monmouth.
May 23, 1833
  On the 11th instant, an inquest was taken on the body of John Walford, a prisoner in the House of Correction, Usk. - From the evidence, it appeared that the boy had been suffering for twelve months previous to his confinement, with a complaint of the chest.  It is gratifying to know, that he received every attention his case

Monmouthshire Merlin, 1 June 1833
  FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Wednesday last, an inquest was taken before John Evans, Esq., Coroner, on view of the body of Mr. Oliver Chapman, who was thrown from a horse on the previous evening, when returning from Chepstow to Undy, by which accident he met his death.  From evidence, it was shewn that the deceased dined with his father-in-law, and left his house perfectly sober, about six o'clock, and in about 40 minutes afterwards he heard of the accident.  - D. Rees was in the Poolmeyric-road, and saw a horse running furiously without a rider; he went up the road, and found a person lying on the foot-path near a wall; his head was hanging down.  With the assistance of a gentleman, who was in sight, he lifted the deceased up; found he was entirely senseless; his right eye was very badly cut.  Other persons came up, and deceased was removed. - Dr. Morris deposed that he was called in between eight and nine o'clock; saw the deceased at the house of Mr. Rosser; he was perfectly insensible, and continued so until six o'clock on Wednesday morning, when he expired.  The cause of his death Dr. M. considered to arise from concussion of the brain, and extravasation of blood.  - The Coroner observed that this was the second life that had been lost owing to the same vicious animal.  The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, with a deodand of 40s. on the mare, and a strong recommendation to the owner that she should be destroyed.  
  The death of Mr. Thomas, a medical gentleman in the neighbourhood of Caldicot, was occasioned by a fall from this animal, a few months since.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 15 June 1833
  (Yesterday se'nnight, while the crew of the brig Mary, of Hull, were discharging ballast in Newport river, the platform on which Henry Matthews (the mate) and another man were standing, suddenly gave way, and both were precipitated into the hold.  Matthews was unfortunately killed on the spot, but his companion escaped with slight injury.  A coroner's inquest has been held on the body, and a verdict returned - Accidental Death.
  On Tuesday last, in consequence of the very rough state of the weather, the steam packets between Newport and Bristol, were compelled, after two ineffectual attempts to proceed, to return to port.  The same day, between twelve and two o'clock, the sloop Edward, of Bristol, bound to that place from Newport, with 50 tons of coal, during a violent gale of wind, ran ashore on the eastern point of Newport river, and became a total wreck.  Three men named Weeks (brothers) and a passenger were drowned.  The body of one of the unfortunate men, Henry Weeks, was picked up the following day, near Goldcliff, a short distance from the wreck.  Upon the coroner's inquest nothing was elicited, as to the immediate cause of the melancholy catastrophe.  The steam packet on Wednesday experienced a very boisterous passage.
  We deem it right to notice the following circumstance, which appears to us (without explanation) as disgraceful.  A correspondent alleges that, on Thursday last, a poor man, 78 years of age, was found lying in a road in the parish of Ragland, evidently labouring under severe illness.  He was immediately put into a cart, and without any order of removal, taken to Mitchel Troy, and from thence brought to this town, though he belongs to a distant county.  The poor old man, when he arrived at the overseers, was in such a lamentable state, that it was not expected he would survive many hours, and on Sunday morning he died!  This is not the first time that such a disgraceful trick has been played upon this parish by the parish authorities of Ragland; and we understand it is the intention of our parish officers to take legal proceedings, and if the above statement be correct, we think they will be fully justified in doing so, as, independently of the expense this parish has been put to, the parish officers of Ragland should be taught that they cannot hazard the lives of their fellow-creatures with impunity.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 22 June 1833
PONTYPOOL. - On Wednesday last an inquest was held at Pontypool, on the body of a newly born infant, which had been interred under suspicious circumstances a few days previously, in Trevethin churchyard. It appeared in evidence, that a woman named Mary Harris, who had been for upwards of a twelve month separated from her husband, had become enceinte, and was noticed to be in that state till Wednesday se'nnight, but on the following day a marked difference was observed in her shape, which excited suspicions, and it being subsequently discovered that an infant had been buried on the Thursday evening, the body was disinterred, and a respectable jury summoned to inquire into the circumstances, before Thomas Hughes, Esq., Coroner.  The evidence of the mother of Mary Harris was to the effect, that she (Mary Harris), delivered herself on the previous Wednesday, and that the child was still-born.  The testimony of Messrs. James Essex, Jabez Thomas, and John Sloper, surgeons, also corroborated the fact that the child was not born alive, and the jury returned a verdict to that effect.  
  From the examination of the grave-digger, it transpired that it was a custom to inter still-born infants without any inquiries as to the parents, and that eight times out of ten he did not know who the parents of such infants were.  The Coroner strongly reprobated such a practice, and recommended that the clergyman of the parish should always be made acquainted with such burials.  He complimented the medical gentlemen, and delivered a suitable remonstrance to woman, who was then discharged, and the investigation, which hasted four hours, terminated.

Cambrian, 3 August 1833
  On Friday, a melancholy accident happened at Mr. Roberts's brick-yard, near Abergavenny.  Two men were employed in sinking a well, and on the morning of the accident, one descended into it, and the other not hearing anything of him when down, also descended to ascertain the cause; the first man who went down was taken up quite dead, having been suffocated by carbonic acid gas, and the other in such a state of stupor, that a long time elapsed before life was restored.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 17 August 1833
An inquest was taken at Newport, on the 6th inst., on Michael Ganthony, a fisherman, who was found floating in the river Usk.  No evidence being adduced as to the cause of death, a verdict was returned accordingly.  It was supposed that in getting to his boat he fell into the water and was drowned. [Glamorgan Gazette, 17 August: Found Drowned.]
DISTRESSING VISITATION. - On Thursday evening were buried at Penalt Church-yard, in the same grave - two children, one six years, the other four years of age, who died of the smallpox; they were the offspring of a labouring man, named Richard Holder.  While the funeral party were preparing to carry the two coffins out of the poor man's house, another child, an infant in arms, expired on the lap of her mother, in the presence of the mournful party.  There is another child in the family still suffering the same sad disease.

Glamorgan Gazette, 17 August 1833
MONMOUTH ASSIZES. - John Edmunds, charged with the wilful murder of William Rosser, of Clytha, was convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to transportation for life.  Prisoner had been in the employ of deceased, who was a miller.  On the night of thru 9th of December, prisoner came home about 12 o'clock, when some angry words took place between him and his master, whose service, according to notice given, he was to quit on the following day.  The next morning, about four o'clock, a quarrel took place between the deceased and the prisoner, in the mill-room, in which Edmunds violently assaulted his master.  Rosser never recovered from the injuries he received in this scuffle, and died about five weeks after. It appeared very doubtful whether a certain injury which deceased had received on his head had or had not been inflicted with an iron instrument, called a mill pick.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 14 September 1833
  AWFULLY SUDDEN DCEATH. - A great sensation has been created in the town of Abergavenny by the awfully sudden death of Mr. James Jones, master of the free school, while performing his official duties on Monday last.  He had left the school-room in his usual good health, for a minute or two; on his return, he fell prostrate on the floor, and almost instantly expired.  [Biography.] An inquest has been held on the body before Thomas Hughes, Esq., coroner, and a verdict returned - Died by the visitation of God. Mr. Jones was 22 years of age.
  An inquest was held before J. Hughes, Esq., at the Bell Public-house, Pontypool, on Tuesday last, on view of the body of John Jones, aged 12 years, who met his death from the kick of a horse, which occasioned as rupture of abdominal viscera.  Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 21 September 1833   
DIED.
.  .  .  We last week announced the awfully sudden death on the 9th inst. of Mr. James Jones, master of the Free Grammar School at Abergavenny, in the 23d year of his age.  The unexpected event created a very great sensation on the town of Abergavenny.  Mr. Jones had left the school room in his usual good health, for a minute or two; on his return, he fell prostrate on the floor, and almost instantly expired.  . .  .  An inquest was held on the body before Thomas Hughes, Esq., coroner, and a verdict returned - Died by the visitation of God.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 28 September 1833    
DREADFUL OCCURRENCE. - On Saturday last, as the waggoner of Mr. Hallen, farmer of Ragland, was returning from Pontypool with a load of coal, when near Berthllandery, about two miles from Ragland, buy some accident, the wretched man fell near the shaft, two of the wheels passed over his body, and crushed him to death.  He has left a wife and large family.
SERIOUS ACCIDENT. - On Thursday evening last, as Mr. Williams, a respectable farmer of Grosmont, who last year occupied the Merthere Mills and farm, from which he has the offgoing crops, was engaged in unloading wheat from Mr. Howel's barge, of Pedrthgorard, he unfortunately fell through the loft door, and received so severe a concussion of the spine as to place his life in imminent danger.  The sufferer, (who is about 55 years of ager), is under the care of Mr. Wilson.Cambrian, 23 November 1833
  NEWPORT. - A man of the name of Davis, a butcher in this town, was found floating on the surface of the canal on Thursday, the 14th inst.  The unfortunate man was seen walking near the canal the previous evening as late as eight o'clock.  Whether his death was occasioned by accident or otherwise has not been ascertained.

 

Cambrian, 7 December 1833
MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. - On Friday week last, Mr. Coles, a respectable farmer, residing at the Court Farm, Llanvihangel, near Pontypool, visited his son, who keeps a provision shop near the Reform Brewery, Abersychan, and upon retiring to bed, when he had reached the summit of the stairs, either from a sudden attack of apoplexy, or some other cause, lost his equilibrium, and fell to the bottom, by which he sustained such serious injury of the spine, that, notwithstanding prompt surgical assistance, he died on the following morning.

Cambrian, 28 December 1833
SUICIDE. - On Friday, the 13th inst., a very aged man, named Thomas Davis, residing at Llanbadock, near Usk, committed suicide, by suspending himself by the neck from the bed-post.  It appears that Mrs. Davis was employed during the day at a gentleman's house in the neighbourhood, leaving her husband and a son at home; about five o'clock in the afternoon, the deceased requested his son to proceed to the well and fetch water for tea, which he did; and on his return missed his father from the kitchen, but having no suspicion of what had occurred, he did not at the moment make any search for him; shortly afterwards, however, observing the pad of his father's neckerchief upon a chair, he proceeded up stairs, where a dreadful sight presented itself.  The wretched old man had attached the neckerchief to the top of the bed-post, and with a portion of it tied round his neck, had effectually strangled himself, life being quite extinct.  From the bedstead being rather low, the knees of the deceased nearly touched the ground.  Surgical assistance was immediately procured from Usk, but every effort to restore animation was unavailing.  About a twelvemonth since, two of his sons, depraved characters, robbed him of a large sum of money, and absconded; it is supposed their behavior, with the prospect of want thus occasioned, affected his understanding, and induced him to commit the horrid act of self-destruction.  It is to be hoped that the awful consequence of their crime will operate to effect a salutary reform in the future conduct of these misguided young men.  An inquest was held upon the body on Monday last, before T. Hughes, Esq., coroner, and a verdict returned - Temporary Insanity.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 22 February 1840

CHEPSTOW. - FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Saturday evening last, about five o'clock, as a man named Edward Jones was walking on the gunwale of a trow, lying alongside the quay, he unfortunately fell overboard, and, although assistance was promptly at hand, the poor fellow sunk to rise no more.  The body was found the same evening, within a hundred yards where it fell in.  An inquest was held at the hole in the Wall, before B. M. Bradford, Esq. Coroner, when a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 21 March 1840

LOCAL NEWS.

CORONERS' INQUESTS.

   It often occurs that inquests are held in cases of sudden death, which are quite unnecessary, and not required by law; and it is very important that the duty of coroners on this point should be clearly defined.  An instance of this kind occurred at Chepstow during the past week.

   Mr. S. Ball, a respectable innkeeper, who had been suffering many months from dropsy in the chest, died suddenly on Monday se'nnight, in his own house, when his wife and family were around him.  This sad event had been expected for some time, as his medical attendant - under whose care he had been during the whole of his illness - had prepared the family for the worst, by informing them that it would probably occur suddenly.  This was certainly a case in which the family might have been spared the painful feelings, which the presence of the coroner, jury, and constables invariably occasions; as there could not have been the slightest suspicion of the death arising from violence, neglect, or any other than a natural cause.

   A person may died a natural though sudden death; and in Umfreville's office of Coroner, p. 208, and also in Imprey's Treatise on the Duties, p. 135, it is stated that it is unnecessary to hold inquests in cases of fever, apoplexy, or other visitations of God; for if it was the practu8ce, the coroner might be sent for in every case. It was solemnly decoded by the Court of King's Bench, in the case of The King against the Justices of Kent, which is reported in East's reports, vol. II, p. 229, that the coroner was not entitled to any fees in such cases and Lord Chief Justice Ellenborough in giving the decision of the Court, observed,

There were many instances of coroners having exercised their office in the most vexatious and oppressive manner, by intruding themselves into private families, to their great annoyance and discomfort, without any pretence of the deceased having died otherwise than a natural death; which was highly illegal.

The circumstances of the case in which the Court decided against the coroner, were these.  A person who had lately come to reside in the town of Wye, in Kent, went into a shop to purchase furniture, apparently in good health, and complaining of a pain in the hip, sat down on a chair in the shop, and suddenly died.  It was argued by the counsel, that the death had been, in fact, sudden, and that the coroner had been called on by respectable inhabitants of the place, to execute his office, before he interfered. The Court, however, exculpated the coroner from the imputation of any improper practice in the particular instance, but decided against him  as to the claim for his fees.

   The case at Chepstow was somewhat similar, but the inquest more unnecessary, as the deceased died in the arms of his family, after a long illness, of a complaint which death occurs suddenly, and the facts of which were well known to all the neighbourhood.

   The jury returned a verdict of "Died by the visitation of God, in consequence of an attack of dropsy on the chest," after hearing the evidence of the surgeon, who stated he attended the deceased three or four times a week, latterly, and previously, daily, and saw him soon after his death; the cause of which, in his opinion, was water on the chest; and the evidence of a gentleman who was present when the event happened, and of two constables, who appear almost to have run a race for the coroner's warrant.  The coroner in this case acted under an error of judgment; but unnecessary inquests would be avoided in all cases, if the medical attendants were consulted by the coroners previously to issuing their warrants.

 

Glamorgan Gazette, 21 March 1840

[Abergavenny?] - An inquest was held at the new Work House, on Monday last, on the body of Thomas Prosser an aged man, residing in the house, and a verdict of natural death returned.  There is no doubt he died of old age, being quite worn out.

   On Wednesday last, as Mr. John Morgan, Haberdasher, was fishing in the parish of Llangattock Juxta Usk, he discovered a new born infant in the water; he immediately gave information to the proper officer, and it is supposed they have a clue to the mother.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 11 April 1840

INQUEST. - On Wednesday evening last an inquest was held at Pillgwenlly, on the body of a child named Thomas Williams, which had been run over by a tram, whilst playing.  The head of the unfortunate infant was most frightfully mangled, and its brains were scattered over the road. It expired immediately.  Verdict, Accidental death.

TRIAL OF PRISONERS.

    Charlotte Hoskins was charged with having, on the 10th of March, at the parish of Llangattock, endeavoured to conceal the birth of her female child, by throwing the body into the river Usk. - Pleaded Guilty. - The Chairman told the prisoner she had been guilty of a most unnatural and heartless crime; and perhaps it was only known to God and herself, whether she had not been guilty of a much more serious offence - that of murder.  As she had only been indicted for concealing the birth, the Court would sentence her to twelve months imprisonment in the House of Correction, with such labour as befitted her. - The prisoner appeared deeply affected.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 25 April 1840

SUPPOSED INFANTICIDE. - On Tuesday, the 21st instant, a s Benjamin Skirme was working in a field near St. Woolos church, he discovered near the hedge and just below the surface of the ground, a frail basket; on ope4ning it he discovered a male child, lately born, wrapped up in a cloth, which seemed, by appearances, to have been in that state a few days.  A notice was given to the proper authorities, and to the Vicar of St. Woolos, who, we understand, ordered the child to be buried; and no further notice has been taken of the circumstances. - A correspondent enquires why a coroner's inquest was not held on the body found under such suspicious circumstances.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 2 May 1840

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held at the Bridge Inn this week, on the body of James Wilkins, a plumber and brazier, from Bristol.  From the evidence it was shown that the unfortunate man had been visiting a relative at Pillgwenlly, and on Monday was waiting at the bridge Inn for the time of the packet's starting.  Whilst there he ordered a pint of beer, but before it was brought, he died suddenly in the chair he sat upon. - Verdict: Died of Apoplexy.

   On Tuesday last, a most distressing and fatal accident occurred to a man named William Davies, oastler at the White Swan Inn, Monmouth.  The deceased, on the above day, was employed brewing for his master, and between five and six o'clock in the evening, the inmates of the inn were attracted to the brew house by the most heart rending  groans; upon approaching which, Davis was found laying on the ground in an agonising condition, having been scalded from head to foot.  He was immediately conveyed to bed, and his clothes were cut from off him - large portions of flesh actually adhering to the garments.  Medical assistance was promptly secured, and unremitting attention was paid to the poor sufferer; during the whole of the night, but the shock to the nervous system was so extensive as to defy all attempts to produce reactions, and the unfortunate creature after enduring the most excruciating torture was released from his sufferings about three o'clock on the following morning.  From the statement of the unhappy man, it appears that he was standing on the top of the boiler, and missing his footing,  he was precipitated into the copper of bollixing wort.  A remarkable circumstance, and one evincing the almost super-human efforts of which man is capable, in dangerous extremities, is, that the deceased, after being immersed in the boiler, recovered sufficient strength to leap out of it on to the ground. A height of nearly six feet, where he was discovered prostrate, as already described.  An inquest was held on the body on Thursday, which presented a fearful spectacle, and a verdict of accidental death was returned. - The landlord of the Swan, in the presence of the neighbours, threw away all the contents of the boiler.

   On Thursday, an inquest was held on the body of a man named Morris, at Penallt, who died suddenly a fortnight since and had been buried.  Circumstances subsequently were communicated to the coroner, which induced him to cause the body to be exhumed; a jury were summoned to inquire into his death, who after a lengthened investigation, returned a verdict of Died by the visitation of God.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 9 May 1840

CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday evening last an inquest was held at the Lion Inn, Abergaveny, on the body of Mr. Thomas Lewis, aged 37, second son of Mr. Lewis, Ironmonger, of this town.  It appeared in evidence that on Friday the 1st instant, when on his return from the seat of Alexander Jones, Esq., near Usk, he overtook some of his townsmen, and, while riding at rather a rapid rate, his horse being exceedingly spirited, came in contact with a cart horse on the road, near the Horse and Jockey, about two miles from Abergavenny, and was thrown with such force to the ground, as to occasion a violent concussion of the brain.  He was put into a gig that was passing by, and conveyed to his father's house., where he lingered till Sunday morning. .  .  .  .  The Jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 9 May 1840

MELANCHOLY AND FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Tuesday se'nnight, as William Davies, ostler, at the White Swan Inn, Monmouth, was engaged in brewing, he accidentally fell into the copper of boiling wort, and was scalded in the mist frightful manner it is possible to describe - not a free place about him but the skin rolled off, and yet the poor fellow got out of the copper himself, and fell to the ground.  Assistance was immediately procured, and a surgeon  sent for, and he lingered in the most excruciating agony until three o'clock next morning, when death put a period to his sufferings.  A coroner's inquest was held on the body by T. Hughes, Esq., when the jury returned a verdict of accidental death - and Mr. Evans in the presence of several neighbours threw away the whole of the brewing of beer, upwards of 100 gallons.  Deceased was 25 years of age, and was a native of Pembroke. {Also Glamorgan Gazette, 9 May.]

 

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 16 May 1840

SUDDEN DEATH. - Yesterday, an awful instance of sudden dissolution took place at Pontypool., - a fine young girl, aged 16, daughter to a carpenter, was seen to totter and fall; she was immediately taken up, and carried for medical aid, but the vital spark had fled.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 23 May 1840

   On the 21st instant, an inquest was held at the House of Correction, Usk, by Thomas Hughes, Esq., coroner, and a respectable jury, on the body of Henry Williams, a convict, who died of consumption.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 6 June 1840

   On Sunday last, a child, son of a man named Watkins, living in Clifford's Court, Monmouth, between the age of three and four, whilst playing alone on a pathway, leading from some gardens behind the above to the river Monnow, fell into the water and was drowned.  The child's parents were from home at the time, and the deceased was left to the charge of an elder brother, who must have neglected his duty, as upon a medical examination of the body, Dr. Holbrook pronounced it must have been in the water an hour before it was discovered.  The melancholy tidings which awaited the parents return, produced a most painful scene.  A coroner's inquest was held on the body on Tuesday, and a verdict of Accidental Death was returned.  We deem it our duty to state that the avenue to the river is exceedingly dangerous and we hope that the above fatal occurrence will cause the parries interested, to devise some means for its improvement.

SUDDEN DEATH. - On Tuesday last, a labouring man, in the employ of Mr. Gosling, maltster, &c., of Monmouth, who was subject to occasional spasmodic  attacks, whilst in the act of driving some pigs to his master's farm, was seized with a fatal paroxysm, from the effects of which he suddenly fell in the road and almost instantly expired.  He had a few minutes previously told a lad who accompanied him, that he had had a painful spasm whilst taking the pigs out of a meadow.  The deceased was about 50 years of age, and had an aged mother entirely decedent upon him for support.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 20 June 1840

SUIICIDE. - CORONER'S INQUEST. - Some time since, a man named Thomas Jones, a miner at the Rhymney Works, being at the time labouring under a nervous attack, came to Nantyglo for the benefit of his health, on a visit to his daughter.  He remained there until the 9th inst., without any amelioration in his health, when at an early hour in the morning of that day, his daughter, who slept in an adjoining room to that where Jones lay, thought she heard an unusual noise in her father's apartment, and on going into the room she was horror struck at beholding her father lying on the floor, bleeding from a gash in his throat.  Assistance was immediately procured, and everything was done for the unfortunate man that medic al skill could devise, but un happily without avail., as he lingered in great pain until the 16th inst., when he expired.  On the following day an inquest was held on the body before Wm. Brewer, Esq., coroner, when the foregoing facts were deposed to.  The jury returned a verdict of Temporary Insanity.

 

Glamorgan Gazette, 4 July 1840

NEWPORT. - On Tuesday evening last, as three boys were in a boat on the mill pond near this town, Ebenezer Edmonds, a boy about eleven years old, fell out of the boat and was drowned.  The other two boys being younger could not render him any assistance.  The boy's father, James Edmonds, is a labourer, but respected in his station, with a large family.  An inquest has been held and a verdict of Accidental Death returned.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 18 July 1840

MELANCHOLY DEATH. - We regret to announce this week the loss sustained by a large and respectable family, and an extended circle of friends, in the lamented death of Mr. Hopkins, aged 60, late landlord of the Salutation, in this town, who expired suddenly on Tuesday evening last.  From the evidence produced on the inquest, held on Thursday, it appeared that the unfortunate man went to the Ebbw river to fish on the evening of his death, and that, after fishing for some time, he bound up his tackle, and was apparently about to return to Newport, when he was suddenly observed by Mr. Bartlett, of Charles-street, who was fishing on the opposite side of the river, to be kneeling amongst some fern on the river's bank, calling out to him to run as quickly as possible and get a conveyance to take him to Newport, for he felt himself dying.  Mr. Bartlett speedily procured a carriage, but on his return, Mr. Hopkins had expired, and was lying on the verge of the river, with his head overhanging the bank.  The cause of his death was a second fit of apoplexy; and after the body had been examined, and an inquest held before Wm. Brewer, Esq., the jury returned a verdict of Died by the visitation of God, in a fit of apoplexy.

 

Cambrian, 18 July 1840

   On Tuesday last, as Mr. Nicholas Hopkins, of the Salutation Inn, Newport, was fishing in the Ebbw river, he was seized with a fit, and died before any assistance could be afforded him.  No inquest has yet been held.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 25 July 1840

C ORONER'S INQUESTS.

   On Thursday evening last, an inquest was held by W. Brewer, Esq., coroner, and an intelligent jury, Mr. Bebell, agent, foreman, on the body of James Dowle, aged thirteen years and three months, son of Mr. Dowle, of the Canal Office.  The deceased, it appeared from the evidence of Edward Jones, was last Sun day on board a new schooner called the Monmouth, that had been launched on the previous day, and was then lying off the yard of the builder, Mr. John Young.  He was standing on the edge of one of the hatches, that had been incautiously thrown partly across the hatchway, observing the progress of a Bristol tug-boat then passing down the river; when by a sudden movement he caused the hatch to tilt over, and he was immediately precipitated to the bottom of the hold. The poor little fellow was taken up, and conveyed in a state of in sensibility to his house, where Mr. William Henry Brewer, surgeon, promptly attended, and found an extensive contusion on the back of the head.  He did all in his power for the deceased, and attended him throughout the night; but all aid was ineffectual, as he died about six or seven o'clock on the following morning, in about twelve hours after the accident occurred, from a concussion of the brain.  Verdict, accidental death.

   The same jury was re-sworn, and proceeded to hold an inquest on the body of Ann Brien, aged 19, who met her death by falling beneath a tram of three tons sixteen hundredweight of coal, near the Waterloo, on Tuesday evening last.  Verdict, accidental death.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 15 August 1840

ABERGAVENNY. - On Sunday afternoon last, while several boys were bathing just backflow the bridge, one of them, about sixteen years of age, proposed to another, many years his junior, to take him on his back, and swim to the opposite shore.  The little fellow got on his companion's back, who commenced swimming with him across the turnpool.  It is probable that when they got into deep water the younger lad became alarmed, and c lung fast round the elder's neck, when they both sunk.  They remained under water about twenty minutes, and were ultimately got out by the exertions of Mr. William Williams.  Everything which art could do to restore what was hoped to be suspended animation, was had recourse to by Mr. M'Coy, surgeon, but unhappily without effect, for life was quite extinct before the bodies were taken up. A  coroner's inquest was held on the bodies and a verdict of Accidentally Drowned was returned.  A vast deal of credit is due to Mr. Williams for his indefatigable perseverance .  .  .  . 

 

The Cambrian, 5 September 1840

SELF-DESTRUCTION. - Considerable sensation was created at Blaina Works, Monmouthshire, on Tuesday se'nnight, it having been discovered that Mr. James Rogers, a master carpenter, employed by the Blaina and Cwmcelin Iron Company, had committed suicide by hanging himself.  The unhappy man had perpetrated the act in the carpenter's shop, having  first taken the precaution to lock the door; when discovered, he was found suspended and quite dead, evidently being so from all appearances, several hours; he was immediately cut down and removed.  An inquest was held on the body on Wednesday, before T. Hughes, Esq., coroner, but nothing transpired during the investigation, to account for Rogers committing  self-destruction; his spirits, it was said, were rather depressed for about three weeks pasty, but his wife who saw him alive for the last time on Monday night, did not observe him unusually so on that occasion.  He was not embarrassed in circumstances, and the nature of his situation which he had only held a few months, had been performed to the satisfaction of the Company.  The deceased who lived at Warminster, prior to his residence in Monmouthshire, was of a quiet and inoffensive disposition; he has no family, but his wife is plunged by the melancholy event, into a state of grief almost impossible to imagine.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 3 October 1840

DEATH FROM EATING TOBACCO.

   On Tuesday morning last, information was received by the Superintendent of Police, that a man was lying dead on board a trow called the Rival, of Gloucester, then lying at Pillgwenlly.  On proceeding thither, he ascertained that the information was correct; and, on enquiring into the circumstances, he received the following account, which was confirmed by the evidence subsequently at the coroner's inquest.  On Monday evening the deceased, whose name was Charles Long went on shore to a beer-house, called the Company's Arms, at Pill.  He was there joined by the captain of the trow, whose name is James Cooke, and his brother Wm. Cooke.  They drank together for some time, when the deceased offered to eat two ounces of tobacco, if any one would bet him half-a-crown.  This the captain accepted, when Wm. Cooke, Jesse Franklin (the landlord of the house), and the deceased, went out, and purchased two ounces of tobacco.  On their return, deceased took a knife and cut up the tobacco into pieces, about an inch in length, and swallowed the whole in two minutes, observing at the same time he would swallow two more in three minutes.  He then drank four or  five glasses of beer, and went on board about seven o'clock.  At eleven o'clock he complained of weakness, but appeared to get better; at three o'clock the crew left him, and  went to bed, and at six o'clock the man was a  corpse.  On Tuesday an inquest was held on the body by W. Brewer, Esq., coroner, when the foregoing facts were deposed to, and the following verdict was returned:- Died from the effects of eating tobacco, taken voluntarily by himself.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 21 November 1840

DEATH CAUSED BY EXCESSIVE DRINKING.

   On Saturday night last a considerable sensation was caused at Monmouth by a rumour that a man, named William Brown, had died at the station-house, where he had been confined with a companion, from having been found in the road in a state of beastly intoxication.  The statement proved too true, and an examination into the circumstances was taken by the mayor, upon being apprised of the awful result.  An inquest was held on the body of the deceased at the Union Workhouse, on Tuesday, when the following facts were deposed to:-

   William Mitchell Mathiason stated that he was a journey-man tailor, and had accompanied the deceased from St. Weonards, in Herefordshire, on Saturday last to Monmouth.  He had lived with the deceased for the last month, who was a healthy man, and about thirty years of age.  He and Brown called, on the road, at different public-houses, and between them drank four pints of ale.  Upon their arrival at Monmouth they dined at the Nag's Head, public-house, and had five pints of ale.  They then went to the Market-house tavern, and had three or four quarters of rum.  The deceased mixed water with his, but the witness drank his share neat.  They partook of biscuits with the rum.  They afterwards procured half-a-pint more rum, with the intention of drinking it on the road home, but this was left untouched.  The witness did not  remember whether they went to any other public-house afterwards. 

(Before the mayor on Saturday night the wiriness, who was then intoxicated, but who gave his evidence with considerable precision, stated that he and his ill-fated companion went to another public-house, the name of which he did not know, and to use his own words, "drank ale in abundance." As the quantity above mentioned would not have produced such awful consequences, as befel the deceased, to a person habituated to drinking, the witness's evidence, on Saturday night, was no doubt correct.) he had seven shillings with him in the morning of that day, but at night he had only three half-pence left.  His belief was, that they went into another public-house in Monmouth after they left the Market Tavern.  The witness recapitulated the circumstances attending his conveyance to the station-house, as far as his memory served him, but which were more  accurately given by other persons.

   Mr. Winter stated that he saw the last witness and the deceased together on Saturday afternoon last about four o'clock, and the latter fell down; his companion helped him up, and after reeling a few paces the deceased again fell, and in attempting to raise him a second time, the last witness fell upon him.  Jones, a constable who was passing, and the witness, with others, assisted to put the deceased in a cart for the purpose of being taken to the station-house.  No violence was used, and he was placed in a sitting posture; he heard him moan at first.

   Mr. Wilson deposed to his having been called to see the deceased about eight o'clock on Saturday night, who was quite dead, and, in witness's opinion, had been so for half an hour previously.  There were no marks of violence on his person, and the room he was placed in was airy, and not calculated to have impaired him, though of course in this, as in all similar cases, he would have been better in the open air.  In witness's opinion deceased died from excessive drinking. (On Saturday night Mr. Wilson also stated that his neck-cloth and shirt-collar were quite loose).

   The Mayor deposed to his having been apprised of the confinement of the two individuals, who were reported to him as being  drunk, and he told the police that upon their getting sober, he would discharge them.

   The constables, Evans and Jones, deposed to their removing the deceased and his companion to the station-house.  The deceased was removed gently from the cart and placed on a stool, when he became sick.  They then placed him on a shutter, when he again vomited.  They loosed his collar and neckerchief and then left him, and reported the circumstance to the Mayor.  Evans again saw the deceased at seven o'clock, whom he found dead.  When he left the deceased he was lying on the shutter, with his head higher than his body, but on witness's return, he was partly off the shutter, with his head inclining downwards.  The witness, after seeing the Mayor, had gone to his dinner, and was detained at the further end of the town by a fight, which he attempted to put down.  Other witnesses corroborated the former part of the evidence, and after the Coroner had minutely summed up the evidence, the jury returned a verdict of "Died from excessive drinking."  The jury inspected the station-house and were of opinion that it was a proper place for the reception of prisoners. [Editorial comment on police follows, partly obscured by tear in the newspaper.]

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 28 November 1840

   On Saturday last a man named William Roberts, living at Penclawdd, near Monmouth, was drowned under the following distressing circumstances:- The deceased, who was a butcher, when returning from Monmouth in company with his wife, on the evening of the above day, overtook a horse unattended, which he recognised to be his brother's.  He accordingly took it back towards Monmouth, expecting to meet his brother, but seeing two neighbours on his way, he was assured by them that his brother was not on the road.  He then retraced his steps towards his brother's house, leading the horse.  His wife, who had gone home, remained anxiously awaiting her husband's arrival until a late hour in the night, when becoming alarmed, she repaired to the house of her brother-in-law, who was in bed, and the horse was found on the grounds adjoining.  Search was immediately commenced for the deceased, whose dead body was ultimately found floating in the Trothy, near a small bridge, in the direction of his brother's  house.  It appears that the owner of the horse had got intoxicated, and had gone home without it, which accounts for its straying on the road; and as the part was inundated near the bridge, which is about a foo9r from the road, it is supposed that they unfortunate man attempted to mount the animal which he had been previously leading, and by some accident lost his balance, and was precipitated into the water.  The deceased was perfectly sober, but unhappily fell a victim to his brother's intemperance.  An inquest was held on the body on Wednesday last, when a verdict of "found drowned" was returned.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 5 December 1840

   On Tuesday last, an inquest was held at the Vine tree, Monmouth, by Thos. Hughes, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a child, about two years and a half old, the daughter of a poor woman named Lawrence, living in Chippenham-mead, and which was burnt to death on the previous Friday.  It appeared from the evidence, that the mother was from home washing, on the above mentioned day, and left the deceased to the care of another child, about ten years of age.  About five o'clock in the evening, the eldest girl went to beg some coal, and left the little one b y itself.  She remained half an hour away, and on her return, the deceased was found dreadfully burnt, and quite dead.  It is strange that poor parents will not avail themselves of the advantaged of infant schools, where they are in existence.  Had the above infant sufferer been placed in the excellent institution of this nature in Monmouth,  the deplorable result which we have recorded, would not have happened.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 12 December 1840

AWFULLY SUDDEN DEATH OF MR. SIDNEY VENNOR, ELDEST SON OF - VENNOR, RSQ., OF PENY-Y-POUND. [Or PENNOR.]

   On Wednesday morning last, the above gentleman left his father's house in usual health, in company with his brother, Mr. Henry Vennor, intending to drive in his single-horse chaise as far as Pontypool.  The two brothers conversed freely together, and had ridden about half a mile from Abergavenny, when the younger heard his brother make a gurgling noise in his throat.  He immediately addressed him, but the unfortunate gentleman was only able to articulate a few words indistinctly, when he dropped the reins, and fell lifeless to the back of the gig.  Although speedily conveyed to the nearest dwelling, that of Mr. Evans, as Pen-y-Causeway, and as promptly attended by Mr. Ball, the surgeon, all exertions of the latter were unavailing to restore animation, that gentleman giving it as his decided opinion, that death, arising from enlargement of the heart, had been instantaneous.  The body was shortly afterwards removed to the residence of his disconsolate family; and on the following morning, an inquest was held before Mr. Hughes, and a respectable jury, at the George Inn, when the above facts were deposed to, and a verdict of Natural death returned.  The deceased, who was in his 40th year, was about to be united to the daughter of a gentleman with whom he was connected in business.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School