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Colonial Cases

1800-1819CI

Glamorgan Calendar Rolls, 1800-30

1801

Coroner's Inquest taken at Cardiff Guildhall before the Bailiffs, William Prichard and Henry Hollier, on a view of the body of William Hopkin, found that he met his death through injuries received at the hands of Morgan Hopkin, of Cardiff, labourer, who threw a twopenny wheaten loaf at the deceased and thereby inflicted a mortal blow upon his private parts, resulting in death a few days after such assault.

This Bundle contains copious Depositions respecting the death of Rees Rees, late of Neath; which show that the deceased was shot by Allen Macdonald, of Bristol, the guard of the mail coach, as the said coach was being driven through the town of Neath. Rees was running after the coach, and the guard (who appears to have been drunk) took his blunderbuss and fired at him, killing him on the spot.

 

Cambrian, 28 January 1804

SWANSEA, FRIDAY, Jan. 27.

On Saturday evening last, as two servants of Mr. Rowland Hopkins, of Sully, were teaching each other the manual exercise with a fowling-piece, which unfortunately happened to be loaded with duck shot (though totally unknown to either), the one who gave the word of command "Present! Fire!" received the contents of the piece, and the shot entering his left ear, took it off, scalped a part of the skull, and came out at the back part of the head. - The man is living, and, much to the credit of Mr. Vaughan, surgeon, of Cardiff, is likely to do well.

 

Cambrian, 4 February 1804

Swansea, FRIDAY, Feb. 3.

Wednesday morning, the body of Robert Dangor, servant to Mr. Arthur, of Highway, was found on the sea-shire, near Black Pill.  He had left this town on the preceding evening, and being in a state of inebriety, it is conjectured he laid down to sleep, and was drowned by the flowing in of the tide.

...

The lamentable accident which happened to the servant of Mr. R. Hopkins, of Sully, (related in our last) has occasioned his death. - Hopes were at first entertained that he would survive his wound, but they unfortunately proved too sanguine. [See 27th January.]

 

Cambrian, 3 March 1804

SWANSEA, FRIDAY, March 2.

Monday last an inquest was held on view of the body of a labouring man, who died suddenly on the preceding Saturday night at Forest Mill, near this town.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

 

The Cambrian, 31 March 1804

SWANSEA, FRIDAY, MARCH 30

A discovery, at which humanity revolts with horror, was made at Neath on Sunday morning last: The cries of a new-born infant being heard to proceed from the privy of the Castle Inn, and no other means offering to rescue from destruction the innocent victim of maternal barbarity, a hole was broken in the wall, and a fine boy taken out, who had been prevented from falling to the bottom by a projecting stone.  One side of the child's head was bruised and bled much, but bit is expected to live, and has been christened by the name of Fortunatus.

 

The Cambrian, 31 March 1804

SWANSEA, FRIDAY, MARCH 30

We are sorry to state, that the son of Capt. Bowen, of the industry, a fine promising youth, fell from the yard of the vessel into the sea soon after she left Cardiff last week, and ultimately disappeared before the boat could reach him, although instantly hoisted out.  The feelings of the unhappy parent at this agonising spectacle, will be more easily conceived than descried.

...

Friday last, a boy about three years old, whose mother resides in this town, strayed unnoticed into the house of a neighbour, where, by some unknown means, he set his clothes in a blaze, and was so shockingly burnt, that he expired on the following morning.  It is worthy of remark, that this child's father was killed about two years since by a fall from an upper part of a house where he was at work.

 

Cambrian, 9 June 1804

Last week a respectable farmer at Castle Caregcenan, in Carmarthenshire, put an end to his existence by hanging himself in his bed-chamber, to which he had retired under the pretence of indisposition, and locked the door. - On the inquest it appeared that the unfortunate man had become uneasy in his mind respecting some family circumstances, and the Jury accordingly returned a verdict of Lunacy.

 

Cambrian, 23 June 1804

Friday last the wife of a small farmer at Ystrad Gantliss, a few miles from hence, put an end to her existence by hanging herself in the hay-loft.  The unfortunate woman had been ill for some time, which, it is supposed, caused derangement; and a verdict of Lunacy was consequently returned by the inquest.

 

Cambrian, 15 December 1804

An inquest was held a few days since, by E. Snead, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a woman, who, with a child in her arms, was attempting to pilfer a lump of coal from a waggon (a practice we are sorry to say, but too frequent) at Clydach, near this town, but, her foot slipping, she fell under the wheel, which passing over one of her legs, shattered it so dreadfully, that mortification ensued, and terminated her existence.

   Another inquest was held by the same Coroner this week, on the body of Samuel Matthews, as young man belonging to the William and Jane, Roberts, master, who fell from the shrouds on Sunday last, as the vessel was entering our river, and was unfortunately drowned.  Verdicts in both cases, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 29 December 1804

Yesterday an inquest was held by E. Snead, Esq. Coroner, ob view of the body of John Paul, driver of the mail-coach between Swansea and Carmarthen, which on Sunday night last was unfortunately overturned about two miles from hence whilst proceeding with great rapidity down a hill, it being supposed the coachman's hands were so benumbed with cold that he could not restrain the horses' speed; the unhappy consequence of which was, that he was so much bruised as to occasion his death on Wednesday night.  The guard was slightly hurt, but the passengers escaped uninjured.  Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 12 January 1805

 An inquest was held last week, by E. Snead, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Mary Bevan, an infirm old woman, who was burnt to death at White Rock, near this town, in consequence of falling on the fire in the absence of her daughter, with whom she resided.  Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 2 March 1805

Monday morning last the body of Robert Bullen, one of the tide-waiters belonging to this port, was found near the entrance of the harbour.  The unfortunate man, it is supposed, fell from a vessel into the river, in attempting to come ashore late on Sunday night; and from a wound on the back of his head, he is thought to have received a violent blow in his fall, which prevented his struggling or calling for assistance.  An inquest was held on the body, on Tuesday, and the jury returned a verdict - found drowned.

 

Cambrian, 16 March 1805

A most distressing circumstance happened, on Friday night last, in the house of a gentleman in this neighbourhood; a gun which had been used in the course of the day, and much wetted by the rain, was placed by the kitchen fire-side to dry, preparatory to its being cleaned; but, unhappily, the servants were not apprised that it was loaded.  Late in the evening the maid was desired to take the gun to her master, when at the moment she was quitting the kitchen, it went off, and the whole charged lodged in the stomach of an unfortunate man-servant, then churning'; he instantly dropped, and survived only long enough to acquit the distracted girl of any blame.  The poor fellow's brother, who is employed in the house, witnessed the dreadful catastrophe; his feelings on the occasion, and those of every individual of the family, may indeed be conceived, but cannot be described.  An inquest was held on the body of the deceased, on Saturday, by C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, and after a minute investigation, the jury returned a verdict, Accidental Death.

   The frequent occurrence of these shocking accidents is painful to humanity, and ought to induce the most rigid caution on the part of every person possessed of fire-arms, to place them beyond the possibility of doing mischief.

   Another inquest was held by the same Coroner, on Monday, on the body of a boy found dead on Saturday night, on the sands near Oystermouth church. - It was at first supposed he had been drowned, but upon examination it was ascertained that he must either have perished through the inclemency of the weather, or died suddenly.

 

Cambrian, 28 June 1805

An inquest was held on Saturday last, by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Thomas Phillips, master of the sloop Olive, who died suddenly on board his own vessel lying here.  Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 6 July 1805

An inquest was held on Monday last, by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Wm. Phillips, who was killed on Saturday while at work in a quarry at Pwlduy, by a piece of rock of twelve tons weight falling on him. Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 3 August 1805

   On Monday, an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of John David, whose death took place in consequence of the overturning of a cart upon him, as mentioned in our last.  No danger was at first apprehended, but a mortification ensuing, terminated his existence.  Verdict, Accident Death.

 

Cambrian, 10 August 1805

Tuesday, an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of David Evan, a young man who belonged to a vessel in our harbour, and was drowned in the river, it is supposed, in endeavouring to get on board after dark on Saturday night. Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 7 September 1805

Two shocking accidents have happened this week, in the neighbourhood of Neath.  Late on Tuesday night, a young man, returning home from thence, strayed off the road, and fell into a coal-pit, where he was found dead on Wednesday morning.

   Same morning, as a  collier was descending a coal-pit, the rope broke, and the poor fellow was precipitated from near the surface to the bottom, and instantly killed, leaving a widow and seven children to bewail his unhappy fate, and their own loss.

...

Yesterday evening an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on view of the body of David Grey, who was killed early the same morning by falling into a coal-pit 77 fathom deep, near this town.  Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 7 September 1805

At the Assizes at Haverfordwest, Jane Davies, charged with the murder of her bastard child, was acquitted of the murder bur found guilty of the concealment, and sentenced to two years imprisonment; Richard Gibby, William Gibby, and Isaac Griffiths, for manslaughter, in killing John Merchant, were sentenced to a year's imprisonment, after a trial of considerable length.

 

Cambrian, 5 October 1805

Monday last an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Ann John, a poor woman who was travelling from Carmarthen to Morriston, and was seized with a paralytic affection on her way, of which she died.  Verdict, Died by the visitation of God.

 

LLAIS LLAFUR, 27 December 1919

INQUEST ON SCREENSMAN.

The Swansea Coroner held an inquest on Saturday on Morgan Davies (46), screensman, of Abernant Road, Cwmgorse, who succumbed to injuries sustained by being crushed between Wagons at New Cwmgorse colliery.  Myfanwy Davies, daughter, said that when her father was brought home her remarked that it was lucky how he had escaped.

   Albert George Swainson, who was working not far off on the surface, was told by a boy that a man had hurt himself, and he then noticed deceased coming towards him walking slowly.  When hen (Davies) came near witness he dropped on his knees and help was fetched.

   Coroner: Did you go near him at all? - No, Sir.

   Why? Were you nervous? - Yes, Sir.

   Dr. Vanderverder said that when deceased was brought to the hospital he was in great pain from internal injuries. When operated upon he was found to have general peritonitis, due to complete rupture of the small intestines.  This caused the death.

   John Jones, slag-picker, said he saw deceased fall near the trucks.  Deceased thought, he had been hurt between the buffers.

   Morgan Jones, mechanic, said deceased told him he had been crushed whilst coupling.

   The Coroner said deceased may have misjudged the coupling or slipped.   A verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned. [See also Merthyr Pioneer, 27 December 1919 (4)]

 

Merthyr Pioneer, 27 December 1919

Mr. Griffith Llewellyn, deputy coroner, held an inquest on Saturday at the Belle Vue, Merthyr, touching the death of John Roach, 6, Tramroadside North, a tipper in the employment of Hill's Plymouth.  Evidence showed deceased had finished his night's work and expired whilst waiting in the weighing shed for a train.  Dr. Rowland Lee said the deceased's heart was in a very bad state, two of the three valves being absolutely useless.  It was stated that an Army doctor "turned him down" when he wished to join.  Verdict of "Death from natural causes" was recorded.

 

Cambrian, 21 December 1805

Monday last, an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of David Williams, of the parish of Llanguge, a lad of 14, who on Friday morning last fell into the Swansea Canal, near the 16th lock, and was unfortunately downed.  - Verdict, Accidental Death.

   Although this melancholy occurrence took place early on Friday morning, yet the Coroner was not informed of it till late on Saturday; overlooking this irregularity, he immediately issued his warrant for summoning an inquest to attend early on Monday, but on his arrival found that the boy had been buried on Sunday, in the yard of the meeting-house at Gelleynon, in the parish of Langevelach; the body was of course ordered to be taken up, for the purpose of holding an inquest on view thereof. 

   We would seriously caution parish officers against permitting hasty interment in these cases, as it is in the power of a Coroner severely to amerce a parish for such conduct in their officers.

 

Cambrian, 28 December 1805

The sloop Rose, of this port, Samuel Davies, master, wrecked off Portinon, a fishing place about fifteen miles west of Swansea, in the night between Wednesday and Thursday last.  She had sailed from Hayle, in Cornwall, on the Wednesday morning.  The master, his son, and two men were drowned, and only one was saved.  The bodies of the unfortunate sufferers have since come on shore.  The master was a man much respected by all who knew him, and has left a widow and several children in the deepest distress for his melancholy fate.

   This morning an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Wm. Williams, who fell into the canal, near Morriston, on Wednesday night last, and perished. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

   Friday evening, Mary Morris, a poor woman who had been in the habit of selling gingerbread, &c., at Bridgend, unfortunately fell into the river Ogmore, near that town;  her body was not found till Sunday morning, and, when discovered, a basket was under each arm, and a quarter of a bushel of wheat on her back.

 

Cambrian, 8 February 1806

Saturday last, an inquest was held before C. Collins, Esq. on the body of David Thomas, a collier, who was killed in the Lansamlet colliery, by a large piece of rock falling on him.  Verdict - Accident Death/

 

Cambrian, 15 February 1806

Tuesday, an inquest was held before C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Lewis Harris, a child four years old, who was burnt to death in Castle Bailey-street ,in this town.  He had been left with another child in a room, and, while endeavouring to get some soot from the chimney, his clothes caught fire, and he was so severely scorched, that after languishing eleven hours in great agony, he expired.  Verdict,  Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 5 April 1806

CARDIFF ASSIZES.

There was only one prisoner tried at these assizes, viz., Morgan Williams, charged with the wilful murder of Margaret Williams, his servant; the prisoner's son had been committed on the same charge, but the grand jury did not find the bill against him. ...

   In support of the prosecution it appeared by the examination of the evidence, that one evening in October last, the prisoner on returning home to supper, desired the deceased to get him some bread and butter, but that not being satisfied as to the quantity, some words arose; and the deceased observing that the ghost of his brother had appeared to her, and that she had been informed by other persons that they had seen the same, he got up and laid hold of her, ands shook her violently, stuck her with his fist on the side, threw her on the ground, and dragged her about, and gave her some blows with his hands and knees on the thighs and lower part of the belly. ...

   The woman who laid out the body deposed, that she observed several black and blue marks on the hips and thighs of the deceased, all round the lower part of the belly, and one under the breast; and enquiring of the prisoner how these marks came, was informed by him that she had died on a chair in a fit. ...

   Richard Griffiths, Esq. the Coroner, deposed, that about ten days after the death an inquest was demanded, and that he had directed the body to be taken up.  Upon examination there appeared many marks of violence on the thighs and lower part of the belly, evidently made by an obtuse instrument, and which he was convinced would not be the effect of natural corruption, nor the marks of an previous eruptive disease; that being satisfied as to the cause of the death, he did not open the body.  He admitted, however, that there might be some causes of sudden death which could only be discovered by a dissection  of the parts.  Upon being asked by the court what was his belief of the cause of the death of the deceased, coupling together the appearances of the body with the evidence he had just heard, he was decidedly of opinion that she died in consequence of the bruises she had received.

[Details report of charge to Jury and sentencing on Manslaughter.}  "Your sentence therefore is, that you be imprisoned for one year in the county gaol, that you pay £50 as a fine, and that you be imprisoned until that fine is paid."

 

Cambrian, 19 April 1806

Wednesday last an inquest was held by Charles Collins, Esq. on the body of Wm. Richards, a boy about 16 years of age, who was killed by falling from the bucket while ascending in a pit belonging to the coal-works of R. M. Phillips,. Esq., at Landwr, near Swansea.  -  Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 19 April 1806

Wednesday last an inquest was held by Charles Collins, Esq. on the body of Wm. Richards, a boy about 16 years of age, who was killed by falling from the bucket while ascending in a pit belonging to the coal-works of R. M. Phillips,. Esq., at Landwr, near Swansea.  -  Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 19 April 1806

Saturday last, late in the evening, Mr. Havard, farmer, of Carbwla, in the parish of Talachddu, left Brecon, on his return home; but is supposed to have fallen from his horse, as he was found upon the road nearly lifeless; and died almost immediately after. - Coroner's verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 10 May 1806

Monday last an inquest was held at Oystermouth, by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of William Locke, master of the sloop Delight, of Bridgewater, who, during a violent gale on Saturday, ascended the shrouds to disengage the sails, and falling  down on the deck, broke his arm in two pieces, and fractured his upper jaw.  He languished till 2 o'clock on Sunday, and then expired. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

   The unfortunate man had only one boy on board his vessel, except himself, who, on the unhappy accident happening, ran her ashore at Oystermnouth.  The master was taken to the Nag's-head-house there, kept by one Jenkin Jenkin, who most inhumanely refused to receive him; but on being conveyed to the house of Mr. Wintle he was instantaneously taken in, and every possible attention was observed towards him till he died.

 

Cambrian, 14 June 1806

We have received an account of an affray which occurred St. Bride's Major, in Glamorganshire, on Sunday se'nnight, between some masons and carpenters which terminated, we are informed, in the brutal mode of Welsh fighting, wherein a man received a blow on the side of his head from a stone, of which he lingered till the Thursday following, and then expired.  An inquest, it is added, was held on the body, and a verdict, "Died by the Visitation of God!" turned.  Will be universally admitted, that the business imperiously calls for further and more serious investigation.

 

Cambrian, 14 June 1806

Sudden Deaths

Last week, a poor man at Langonoyd, whilst employed in his  daily labour, fell down, and expired immediately.

   At Newcastle, Bridgend, W. Hugh, gardener, whilst receiving orders from the Rev. Mr., Hancorne, by whom he was employed, fell down, and expired in a few minutes.

 

Cambrian, 12 July 1806

Monday last an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of John Evan, who fell into the river, near the White Rock Copper-works, late on Sunday evening, and was unfortunately drowned. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 19 July 1806

Yesterday an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Bassett Thomas, a fine boy of 11, who on Wednesday fell into a reservoir called the rapping pool, at the White Rock copper-works, near this town, and was instantly scalded to death.  Verdict, Accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 30 August 1806

Extraordinary Occurrence.

An inquest was held on Tuesday, by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of David George, of Swansea, a poor industrious fisherman, who list his life on the preceding night in the following singular manner: Some unexpected success in the morning induced him to go out to fish off our pier-head late on Monday evening, accompanied by his son and two men; they had drawn the net on shore, and whilst George was clearing it, observing a small sole in the meshes of the net, he put the head of the fish teeth to draw it #through (a common practice, we understand, with fishermen); but whether in so  doing, or in going to open his mouth afterwards, cannot be ascertained, the fish slipped into his throat, and choked him in a few minutes.  Medic al assistance was obtained with all possible speed; bur every effort to extract the sole proved unavailing while a chance of saving the man's life remained; nor was it until the operation of opening the wind-pipe had been performed that the whole of the fish could be removed.  The jury of course returned a verdict of Accidental Death. The poor fellow has left a pregnant widow, with five small children, to deplore his loss; ...

   The same Coroner held an inquest last week on the body of Rees Thomas, farmer, of Languge, Glamorganshire, who hung himself by a hair rope fastened to a hook in the chimney of his own house, on the 16th instant.  He had previously shewn symptoms of insanity, and the jury returned a verdict of Lunacy.

 

Cambrian, 6 September 1806

Monday last an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on a child about fifteen months old, who had strayed from its home, and a few minutes afterwards was found drowned in the river Clydach, near Swansea. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 4 October 1806

Saturday last an inquest was held by C. Collins, Esq. on the body of David Rosser, a boy 10 years of age, who was killed in a colliery at Lansamlet, near Swansea, the preceding day; and this morning another inquest was held by the same Coroner, on the body of William Phillip, who was killed at Loughor Colliery, by the falling of a piece of rock. - Verdicts, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 15 December 1804

An inquest was held a few days since, by E. Snead, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a woman, who, with a child in her arms, was attempting to pilfer a lump of coal from a waggon (a practice we are sorry to say, but too frequent) at Clydach, near this town, but, her foot slipping, she fell under the wheel, which passing over one of her legs, shattered it so dreadfully, that mortification ensued, and terminated her existence.

   Another inquest was held by the same Coroner this week, on the body of Samuel Matthews, as young man belonging to the William and Jane, Roberts, master, who fell from the shrouds on Sunday last, as the vessel was entering our river, and was unfortunately drowned.  Verdicts in both cases, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 14 March 1807

Committed to Cardiff gaol, Sarah Allsop, charged on the coroner's inquest with the wilful murder of her female bastard child.  The prisoner was cook at the Cardiff-Arms-inn, in the privy of which the child's body was found, whither it was traced by some blood on the stairs.

 

Cambrian, 23 May 1807

An inquest was held on Friday last, by J. C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Thomas James, a boy who was employed in Lansamlet colliery, near Swansea, and after returning home from his work in good health, on the preceding Wednesday night, was found dead in his bed on Thursday morning.  His death is supposed to have been occasioned by a very large worm passing from the oesophagus into the mouth of the trachea, and which, with another of equal size, were found in the bed after the boy's death.  - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 26 October 1807

An inquest was held on Monday last, by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on the body of James Austin, a labouring-man who worked in the stone-quarry at Greenhill, Swansea.  While engaged in his employ on Saturday last, a large piece of rock suddenly fell upon him, broke both his legs, severed great part of his right hand, and otherwise injured him so much, that he languished till Monday, and then expired. - Verdict - Accidental Death.

   Another inquest was held this week, by the same Coroner, on the body of a child whose parents live in the parish of Lansamlet, and who lost its life through its clothes taking fire when left alone.  The child had been interred before information of the accident reached the Coroner, but he very properly had the body taken up, for the purpose of ascertaining the cause of the child's death. - Verdict as in the preceding case.

 

Cambrian, 10 October 1807

Murder.

A most cruel murder was committed, on Sunday night last, at Lansamlet, near Swansea, upon Susan Nicholas, a very aged woman, who resided there.  A young girl going out to milk early on Monday morning, observed the front door of the deceased's cottage open, which appearing to her rather extraordinary, she called to the deceased by name, but receiving no answer, the girl became alarmed, and having obtained the assistance of her brother, they both entered the cottage.  Here a shocking scene was presented to their view: the unfortunate woman was discovered stretched upon the lower part of her bed, with her head inclining over the side, and a pair of bellows placed on her face; several of her fingers were much cut, and she had received a violent blow upon the upper lip, which had forced out some of the teeth, and broke the jaw; but from the marks upon her throat and neck, she appeared to have been strangled, or throttled, as it is more commonly termed.  A rusty scythe-blade was found outside the door, and blood was discovered in several places.  An inquest was held upon the body, by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, and after a most laborious investigation of several hours, the Jury returned their verdict - Wilful Murder by some person or persons unknown. [Editorial comment follows.]

 

Cambrian, 17 October 1807

The sloop Hope, of Fishguard, from Dublin to Swansea, with copper ore,   sprang a-leak on Monday the 28th ult. and immediately went down.  One man was drowned, but the remaining four were picked up, on Thursday, in a small boat, by the Cotton Planter, and put on board a sloop bound to Greenock.

   An inquest was held on Saturday last by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Benjamin Morgan, a child of two years old, who fell into a tub of boiling water, and was scalded to death.

   The same Coroner held another inquest yesterday on the body of Ann Howell, who got entangled in the machinery of the grist-mill at Cheriton, and was crushed so shockingly that she soon after expired. - Verdict in both cases, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 31 October 1807

Saturday last an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on the body of John Davies, a labouring man who was employed at our eastern pier, and who died suddenly on the preceding day.  It appeared that the deceased was passing by at the time a boy was engaged in clearing out the water from the foundation, and received a scoop-full on his head and shoulders, but unintentionally on the part of the lad; being heated with his work, and rather unwell, it is supposed the sudden chill occasioned by the water, brought on a fit soon afterwards, in which he expired.  -  Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 14 November 1807

   Mr. Jenkin Jones, of Hennywild, unfortunately lost his life, last week, by falling into the Swansea Canal, when returning home from the Lamb and Flag, Ystradgunlais.

   Tuesday an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Johanna Lewis, a pauper, who died suddenly in Penderry poor-house, in the parish of Llangevelach, near Swansea.  - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 14 November 1807

A Portuguese brig of about 100 tons, bound from Oporto to Sligo, and laden with wines, oranges and cork, was driven by the storm of Wednesday se'nnight upon the rocks near Portreath, on the north-western coast of Cornwall.   Captain Bidder, of Swansea, whose vessel was lying in the pier, pushed off in his boat with five men to the assistance of the ship-wrecked foreigners; but the violence of the surf upset his boat, when three of the brave fellows were drowned. ... The three men, who lost their lives in their humane exertions to save the Portuguese from the wreck, were inhabitants of Portreath.  One of them, John Crowthers, has left a widow and several children.

...

During the rejoicings at Bristol on the evening of the 5th inst. (the anniversary of the Gunpowder Plot), Sarah Osborne, a fine girl about 14, was shot through the head by a musket-ball discharged from the opposite wide of the way.  It did not appear, on the inquest, that the act was intentional; the Jury therefore returned a verdict, Manslaughter by some person or persons unknown.  - [Editorial comment.]

 

Glamorgan Calendar Rolls, 1800-30-

Spring 1808

Inquest taken at Llantrissent, before Richard Griffiths, Coroner, on view of the body of David William, found that the deceased was murdered by William Williams, of Llantrissent. The murderer (who was only 19 years of age) had stabbed his victim, a boy, and thrown the body into a ditch.

   John Jones, otherwise John, aged 22, was committed by James Capper and Thomas Morgan, esquires (Bailiffs and) Coroners of the Town of Cardiff, charged with having given Henry Wheeler, of the said town, divers mortal bruises, in the parish of Saint John the Baptist in the said town. Such is the brief record contained in the Calendar presented to the Court by Thomas Morgan, Gaoler. From the written Depositions in the case we get a few interesting particulars. Thus, at the Coroners Inquest:

Mary Davies sworn saith that abot 20th January last John Jones came into the house of Henry Wheeler to some recruits of the Glamorgan Militia who are now gone to join the regt and there was a great Noise in the room where he was; that Witness heard Wheeler go into the room and told them to keep the Peace . . . . . . upon which John Jones got up and struck him down with his fist. . . . . . . Witness then went out of the room and when she returned in abt 10 Mins or a quarter of an Hour some persons present were then helping Henry Wheeler off the Ground, and John Jones was in the custody of some of the persons then also present . . . . .

Hannah Wheeler the Widow of the deceased, sworn, says that on the 20th of January last she was in the Kitchen when John Jones of Lantrissent came into the Parlour of her husband's House to look for Mr Jacobs his Master, that he soon after came into the Kitchen with some Man unknown to Witness, that he sat down a few Minutes and then got up and told one of the recruits of the Glamorgan Militia that he had wronged him of 3s. in the Tennis Court & the recruit denied any knowledge of him. John Jones then wanted to fight the recruit and Witness said he shod not beat the boy in her House & she wod call the Constables to him to which he replied he did not care for any Constables at all . . . . . . Her Husband came in & said he would have no noise in his House and he was a Constable. Jones said he did not care and gave deceased a Blow on his left Cheek & he fell; deceased then got up and attempted to lay hold of him in a peaceable manner but Jones struck him down a second time and kicked him in his side, when dece'd cried out Oh Stibbs my ribs are broke . . . . . . Some of the persons present detained the man till the Constables came and took him into Custody . . . . .

 

Cambrian, 2 January 1808

This morning a barge laden with copper ore sunk in our river, and one of the men was drowned.

   An inquest was held on Wednesday last, by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Mary Ann Griffiths, a child about seven years old, who was so dreadfully burnt through her clothes taking fire, that she survived but a very few hours.  The body having been prematurely interred, was afterwards taken up, under the Coroner's warrant, for the purpose of holding the inquest. - Verdict, Accidental Dearth.

   On Wednesday se'nnight, in a heavy gale of wind, the Antelope transport, Mallanty master, with 250 men of the 90th regiment on board, was wrecked on Muslec Sands, in St. Brides's Bay, Pembrokeshire, and seven of the poor fellows was unfortunately drowned.  The remainder marched into Haverfordwest on the following day. [See Cambrian 9 January for a detailed report.]

 

Cambrian, 9 January 1808

Saturday last an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on Evan Richards, the unfortunate man who was drowned in Swansea river, the preceding day, by the sinking of a barge, as mentioned in our last paper. - It appeared in evidence that the barge struck upon a quantity of limestone which had been very imprudently discharged from a vessel in to the bed of the river, and almost instantly sunk, four other men in her narrowly escaping with their lives. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 27 February 1808

Last week an inquest was held at Cardiff, on the body of Henry Wheeler, victualler, of that town, who died in coin sequence of kicks and bruises in various parts of his body, inflicted by John Jones, of Llantrisant, yeoman.  - A reward is offered for the apprehension of the latter. - (See Advertisement.) [page 1 a - JONES JONES, otherwise JOHN, is five feet three inches high, has brown hair, a broad face, ruddy complexion, dark eyes, is stout made, with a very thick neck, and speaks broken English.]

 

Cambrian, 5 March 1808

In addition to the calamities of the dreadful storm on Thursday, the 11th ult. we have to add the following:-

                     The brig Fortitude, John Skelton master, was found early on the Friday morning a complete wreck, in a small creek within three miles of Amlwch, known by the name of Porth y Gwychailod.  She was the property of a Liverpool merchant, bound from Gibraltar with wine, figs, raisins, and nuts. - What could be saved was protected and sold by Mr. Thomas Jones, an officer of the Customs, in Anlwch.  All the persons on board, supposed to consist if seven men and one of the pilots, unhappily perished.  Two of the bodies were found, and an inquest was held over them on the Monday following.  This is the fifth melancholy accident of the kind that has happened in this neighbourhood since November last, and from which only three lives were saved.

 

Cambrian, 30 April 1808

Tuesday last an inquest was held on the body of John Parry, who left his home, in the parish of Llangevelach, on Sunday se'nnight, and was found dead among the snow on the hills, last Monday. - Verdict, Died by the visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 21 May 1808

On Thursday a melancholy circumstance occurred at Mr. Pemberton's colliery, near Llanelly. Mr. Francis Richards, engineer, attempted to go down the engine-pit, about 36 fathoms deep, by the rope, but which he neglected to fasten round him, and it being wet, he could not retain his hold, but fell to the bottom, and was killed on the spot; in his descent he struck against a man of the name of Brown, who was standing on a piece of timber in the pit, but fortunately he was not carried down with the unfortunate sufferer.  The Coroner's Inquest sat, on the body, and of course returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 11 June 1808

Two inquests were held last week, by J. C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Wm. Rees, collier, who suddenly dropped dead while at work; and the other on the body of Rachael Rees, of Sketty, who put an end to her existence by hanging herself: she fastened the cord to a beam, and when found her knees were on the floor. - verdict, in the former case, Died by the Visitation of God - and in the latter, Lunacy.

   Another inquest was held by the same Coroner yesterday, on the body of Thomas Phillips, labourer, who had been missing since the 5th inst. and is supposed to have fallen into the sea when returning from his work near Pwlldye, in Gower. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 18 June 1808

A promising youth, about 15, lost his life, last week, at Ynyskedwin, in a most melancholy manner: whilst amusing himself with fishing, a large piece of rock fell on him, shattered one leg dreadfully, and so tore and lacerated the other, that he expired next day in great agony.

 

Cambrian, 25 June 1808

An inquest was held yesterday, by J. C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Wm. Thomas, who suddenly dropped down dead, at his work, in a colliery, near Swansea. - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

Cambrian, 2 July `808

Wednesday an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Dd. Davies, who fell from the barge while loading a vessel with coals on Swansea river, and fractured his skull so dreadfully that he died in a few hours. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 16 July 1808

Monday last an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on the body of John Prescott, hatter, who was unfortunately drowned while bathing in the sea, on the Saturday evening preceding.  Verdict - Accidental Death. - He is supposed to have sunk in a fit; and although the body was speedily taken up, and every means used to restore animation, yet all proved ineffectual.

 

Cambrian, 20 August 1808

Died, on the 13th inst. of a fit of apoplexy, at the Star-inn, Merthyr-Tydvil, on her journey to the Mineral Wells, in the county of Brecon, Mrs. Popkin, wife of John Popkin, Esq. of Tal-y-Garn, Glamorganshire.

...

An inquest was held this week by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a child who was so dreadfully scalded by a pot of boiling water falling upon him from the fire, as to occasion his dissolution soon after. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 12 November 1808

The dead body of a man, quite naked, and a shocking spectacle, was found last week on the sea-coast in a rather un frequented part of Gower, which had been thrown on shore by the tide.  After an inquest had been held by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, the remains of the unfortunate unknown were buried.

 

Cambrian, 19 November 1808

A father and son, of the name of Manwaring, unfortunately lost their lives in the early part of the present week, by the upsetting of their boat on Neath Bar.  An unhappy widow and numerous family are left to deplore their loss.

 

Cambrian, 26 November 1808

An inquest was held yesterday on the body of Wm. Evan, a pauper, who was found hanging in a hovel, in the parish of Langevelach, the same morning.  The deceased having for some time exhibited symptoms of derangement, the jury without hesitation returned a verdict of Lunacy.

 

Cambrian, 7 January 1809

On Friday last an inquest was held in Langevelach by J. C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Wm. Samuel, a boy about nine years of age, who lost his life in consequence of an explosion of gun-powder, which his mother was sifting for the use of her husband, a ,labouring miner.  The poor Wolman was also severely scorched, but a child in her arms escaped unhurt. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 7 January 1809

The body of a drowned man was found upon the beach at Braystones, in the parish of Beckermont, near Whitehaven, on the 19th of last month.  It was about 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high, and had on a black coat and breeches, boots, and his shirt was marked T. K. In his pockets were found upwards of 10l. in cash and notes; one of the latter was a Swansea 20s. bill; and also an asses-skin b memorandum-book, with some writing therein, amongst which can be distinguished the words "Swansea" - "Increase, Capt." It would seem that the unfortunate man  had ,latterly been in this neighbourhood, an d we hope our mention of the circumstance will be the means of making known his melancholy fate to his friends.

 

Cambrian, 6 May 1809

On Tuesday last, as a man was very imprudently riding on his cart into Llaugharne, Carmarthenshire, it upset, and he was killed on the spot.

...

On Monday an inquest was held on the body of Mr. William Morgan, late steward to Robert Jenner, Esq. of Wenvoe Castle, who was killed by falling from his horse in going home from Cardiff on Sunday evening. - Verdict, accidental death.  Mr. M<organ was generally stemmed by all who knew him.

   On the following day an inquest was held on the body of a sailor who was drowned in the canal at Cardiff several days before. P- Same verdict.

 

Cambrian, 13 May 1809

Wednesday last an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. on the body of William Lewis, who, on his return home from Swansea on Monday evening, being intoxicated, fell into the canal, and was drowned.  The body was found on the following morning.

   Another inquest was held the same day by Mr. Collins, at the Mumbles, on the body of William Pender, a seaman belonging to the Endeavour armed brig, who, with the mate of the vessel, by some mismanagement, were overset in a boat on Thursday evening, and Pender perished; the mate was with great difficulty saved. - verdicts, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 24 June 1809

Wednesday an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. On the body of Wm. Samuel, one of the four unfortunate men   who were severely hurt by the inundation of the colliery, as stated in our last paper.  The deceased had an iron borer forced completely through one of his thighs, of which he died in a few days. - verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 15 July 1809

On Saturday and Sunday last inquests were held by Mr. Collins, on the bodies of Edmund Thomas and David Harry, both of whom were drowned by the sudden inundation of a colliery near Swansea on the 15th ult.  Although the bodies had lain in the water three weeks, they were not in that state of putrecenscy which might have been expected.  Verdicts, accidental death.

   Another inquest was held in Swansea, on Wednesday, on the body of Matthew Thomas, who died in consequence of drinking a great quantity of spirits.  Verdict, died by excessive drinking.

   A fourth inquest was held this evening, on the body of John David Harry, a child about two years and a half old, who on Wednesday last crept unperceived behind his father while mowing hay in a field at Languke, and the scythe entering his belly, occasioned his death the same night.  The feelings of the unhappy parent can be better conceived than described.  Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 29 July 1809

On Friday evening last an inquest was held b y J. C. Collins, Esq. on an elderly man who died in consequence of being crushed against a wall by a waggon on the Strand, in Swansea.  Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 28 August 1809

On Monday morning last, the body of David Davies, the man belonging to the North Wales vessel, who fell in to our river while heaving the anchor on Sun day se'nnight, (as mentioned in our last paper) was found close to the spot where he fell in; and in the evening an inquest was held thereon b y J. C. Collins, Esq. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 16 December 1809

On Saturday an inquest was held by J. C. Collin s, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a man who fell into a colliery at Lansamlet, and was killed. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 27 January 1810

On Monday last an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a new-born fine female child, found in the Swansea canal on Saturday.  The body was taken out of the Canal by three men who were baling a barge, in consequence of one of them having observed that he thought a bundle at the bottom; the child had been first wrapped in a woman's apron, next strongly sewn in a piece of sail-cloth, and then tied up in a pocket handkerchief, in which were also incised two stones, weighing about six pounds.  The inquest was adjourned for a fortnight, in order that an active search h may be made after the in human perpetrator of this foul deed. [See 10 February.]

   On Tuesday last, while a young man was loading a cart with straw, at Sketty, near Swansea, he fell from the wheel, and pitching on a gate, was so much hurt in the side, that he expired in a few minutes. - Verdict, Accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 10 February 1810

The election of a Coroner for the county of Glamorgan, in the room of Richard Griffiths, Esq. is fixed for Wednesday next, at Cowbridge. - See Advertisement.

   Early on Monday morning last, as Mrs. Catherine Roberts, gardener, of Cardiff, was on her way to Merthyr, the cart overturned, and falling on her, she was killed on the spot.  Owing to the darkness of the morning she got too near the edge of the road, and was hulked dawn a precipice; fortunately the shafts broke, or the horses must have shared the same fate.  Mrs. R. had attended the Merthyr markets for several years, and had many times told her friends they would some day hear of her being killed on that road. - Verdict, accidental death.

   On Saturday last an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. on the body of John Lucas, who, while employed in a mill at Reynoldstone, received a blow from part of the machinery, which forced a ram-rod he had in his hand into his eye, and fractured his skull. - Verdict, accidental death.

   On Monday, the inquest on the new-born female child found in the Swansea canal, (as stated in our paper of the week before last) assembled pursuant to adjournment; and after further investigation of the business, returned a verdict of Wilful Murder by some person or persons unknown.

 

Cambrian, 24 February 1810

An inquest was held on Wednesday last by J. C. Collins, Esq. on the body of a labouring man killed by a quantity of gravel falling upon him in a pit in which he was digging. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 17 November 1810

On Tuesday last an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. Coroner, on the body of a well-dressed seaman, found on Llanmadock Sands. - Verdict, found drowned.

 

Cambrian, 17 November 1810

Thursday se'nnight the body of Mr. Robert Wilson, late owner of the Queen (wrecked on Pembrey sands on the 22s ult.) was found, having lain in the water since the fatal event happened, and was interred on Saturday evening in Pembrey church-yard with becoming decency and decorum.

 

 

Cambrian, 8 December 1810

Last week, a boy about nine years old, third son of Mr. D. Hooper, of Cardiff, playing in a boat on the Glamorganshire Canal, unfortunately fell overboard unperceived by anyone, and was drowned.

 

Cambrian, 5 January 1811

On Wednesday last an inquest was held by J. C. Collins, Esq. on the body of Sarah Evans, found in the Swansea Canal on the preceding day.  The unfortunate woman was subject to lowness of spirits, and on Tuesday morning she arose from her husband, gave her children their breakfast, and afterwards, as it is supposed, threw herself into the canal. - Verdict, Lunacy.

   Another inquest was held yesterday by the same Coroner at Pennclawdd, on the body of a man thrown ashore there, supposed to be one of those who perished when the two vessels were wrecked at Pembrey, as lately mentioned in our paper. - Verdict, Found drowned.

   On Tuesday last an inquest was held at Llanelly, on the body of Mary the wife of David Thomas, clothier, of that town.  The corpse had been interred several days, but suspicions being entertained that the deceased died in consequence of a severe beating she received from her husband, the body was taken up, and examined by Mr. J. C. Collins, surgeon, of Swansea, who discovered several marks of violence thereon, but no appearances sufficiently to account for the woman's sudden death from any single blow inflicted on her.  The Jury sat two days, and at twelve o'clock on Wednesday night returned a verdict of Manslaughter against David Thomas, the husband of the deceased, who was yesterday committed to Carmarthen gaol, for trial at the next assizes.

 

Cambrian, 4 May 1811

   Yesterday an inquest was held by Dr. Collins on the body of Thomas Rees, who was killed by a quantity of rubbish falling on him while at work in a colliery near Swansea. - verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 25 May 1811

  On Sunday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins on the body of John Owen, who was drowned in Swansea River, by a fresh upsetting the boat in which the deceased was conveying some persons to the opposite side. - Verdict, accidental death.

   On Saturday night last, a woman and child came to the parish of Languke, Glamorganshire, and were accommodated with a bed; but to the surprise and alarm of the neighbourhood, it was next morning  discovered that the woman had decamped, leaving the child dead in bed.

 

Cambrian, 29 June 1811

   On Sunday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins on the body of a child who, while playing with another infant at Llansamlet, fell into a pool, and was drowned. - Verdict, accidental death.

   Yesterday an inquest was held by the same Coroner on the body of Thomas Lewis, who was on Tuesday evening found dead in a well belonging to the Elephant and Castle public-house in Swansea.  It appeared that the deceased had been drinking in the above house for some hours on Saturday night last, and became inebriated; and it is supposed that on returning by a back-way, he fell into the well. - Verdict, accidental death.

   On Wednesday the 19th inst. A shocking accident happened at Blaenlynvell, in the county of Carmarthen, to three men engaged in taking lime out of a kiln; while thus employed, the kiln fell in, and the upper part falling over the mouth of the arch, incliosed the poor sufferers within among the red-hot lime and coal.  By an instantaneous impulse they made a desperate effort to force their way through the burning mass, and effected their escape in a dreadfully scorched condition.  Wm. Isaac, a farmer of Languick, and Wm. Michael, of the same parish, ran to their homes in a state of frenzy, the former with such swiftness that a horse failed in keeping up with him, and he died in about 30 hours; the latter had nearly seven miles to go, and he now lies in a very hopeless state as to the future use of his hands and feet.  The other unfortunate man ran between three and four miles to his house, and his recovery is extremely doubtful.  A lime-stone of three or four tons weight had fallen on the platform, which is supposed to have loosened the masonry of the kiln, and thus occasioned this melancholy occurrence.

 

Cambrian, 13 July 1811

Melancholy Effects of Drinking.

On Friday morning last a quarrel arose between John Griffith and John Taylor, both of Gower, Glamorganshire, who had been drinking too freely the preceding night, and a battler ensuing, Griffith received a violent blow on the head, which terminated his existence on Saturday evening. - An inquest was held on the body of the deceased, and a respectable jury, and after a strict investigation of all the circumstances, which occupied nearly seven hours, the Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter.  Taylor must consequently take his trial for the offence.

 [See also Carmarthen Journal, same date: A melancholy accident happened in Gower, near Swansea, on Friday last:- Two men in consequence of some aggravating words that dropped in the course of a debate, proceeded to blows, and one of them in the struggle, feeling himself unable to cope with his antagonist, took up a stone, and struck him so severely, that it occasioned his death on the Monday following.  A coroner's jury sat upon the body of the deceased, when they found a verdict of manslaughter. - The survivor has been sent to Cardiff gaol, to await his trial.][And Cambrian 17 August, re false newspaper accounts of the incident.]

 

Glamorgan Calendar Rolls, 1800-30

Autumn 1811.

A True Bill was found against Richard Bevan, J.P., of Neath (see last year's File), for unlawfully accepting a fee of one guinea in the exercise of his magisterial office. (fn. 2)

A Gower man named John Taylor having been arrested on a charge of murder, a Mr John Lucas, J.P., resident in that neighbourhood, wrote a letter to the Judge, bitterly inveighing against the prisoner and his family. The letter, after being read in open Court, was ordered to be filed, and the Judge strongly censured the writer. The accused was convicted of manslaughter.

   Two men are confined in Warwick gaol, charged with murdering a man at Kenilworth nearly 22 years ago.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 13 July 1811

   On Saturday evening, three soldiers belonging to the Oxford Militia who had just come into Carmarthen, went to bathe a little above the Bridge; one of them immediately sunk and was downed in the presence of his comrades, who were unable to render him any assistance.  It is supposed that being over-heated by a long march in the middle of the day, the cold of the water checked profuse perspiration and caused a violent cramp.  The body did not appear again nor was found until the next morning.  A Coroner's Inquest sat on Mon day in the Vestry-Room of St. Peter's Church. - Verdict - Found drowned.  ... On Monday evening the body was decently interred in St. Peter's Church-yard, followed by his comrades and the Local Permanent Serjeants, who performed military honors over his grave.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 10 August 1811

   On Tuesday evening, between 7 and 8 o'clock, a fine boy, about five years of age, son of Mr. David Jones, master of the Peace and Plenty, a Bristol Trader, was drowned in Carmarthen river, near the Porthouse quay.  He had not been out of the house a quarter of an hour before he was missed.  He was found on the spot he fell in, with his face downwards, apparently fixed in the mid, out of which he was unable to extricate himself.  The means recommended by the Humane Society were adopted, but it is to be lamented without success.  Yesterday, an Inquest was held on the body, at the Three Mariners, who brought in their Verdict - Found drowned.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 31 August 1811

   As Mr. Walter Williams, of Glynn, near Llanelly, was returning home from Lwydcoed, on Saturday last, in company with one of his neighbours, he was suddenly seized with a fit of apoplexy, fell off his horse, and instantly expired, a coroner's inquest was held on the body, verdict, died by the visitation of God.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 28 September 1811

   Mr. Lewis Griffiths, former attorney at Llangaddock, who was mal-treated by a party of Llanddoysant men at the sign of the Square and Compass, at Llangaddock fair, died of his wounds on Thursday week. - An inquest sat on the body of the deceased on the Saturday following, when a verdict of man-slaughter was brought in against John Rees and Erasmus Williams.  The former has absconded; the latter, as also David Rees, of Gelly-gron, farmer, for an assault on the deceased, were brought to our county gaol on Wednesday last.

   Last week a person from the neighbourhood of Llandyfaen, near Llandilo, was killed and deplorably burnt by the lightning, when on the road going to meet his son, whom he had that morning sent to coal.  A man in company with him had a very providential escape with his life, the lightning having passed so near his head, that for a few seconds he was stunned; but on recovering from the shock, and looking round for his companion, beheld him a corpse at his side.

Sudden Deaths.

   On Friday morning the man who played the cymbals in the first regiment of Royal Carmarthen Local militia, dell down suddenly and died. - The cause of his death is attributed to the bursting of a blood vessel, and not to the lightning, as reported.

   The same week Mr. John Davies, of Fach-loyan, died suddenly from the same cause.

   On Wednesday evening, Catherine Jones, of Glanrhyd-yr-Hafod, near Allygog, in the parish of Abergwilly, fell into the river Towy, and was drowned.  The floods being much out, all effort to find the body had hitherto proved ineffectual.

 

Cambrian, 19 October 1811

   On Saturday morning last, a poor woman at Cardiff rose from her bed, in a state of mental derangement, and getting out of the house unperceived by her husband, threw herself into the river, and was drowned.

   On Friday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of a respectable-looking man which had been washed on shore near Pennard, Glamorgan.  This unfortunate stranger was about five feet five inches in height, but so much disfigured by laying in the water as to defy description.  He was dressed in a corbeau jacket, fine flannel waistcoat, blue trowsers, and fine yarn stockings. It is supposed that he belonged to some vessel that has been list at sea. - Verdict, Found Drowned. - His remains were decently interred by order of the coroner.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 30 November 1811

    The body of a female was found floating in the sea, close to the shore on Thursday morning last, near to Dinas Dinlle, in the neighbourhood of Carnarvon.  She appeared to be about 23 years of age, a short lusty woman with black hair, had ear-rings, in her ears, and a ring on her wedding finger, and is supposed to be the wife of the master of the galliot, Mary Ellen, of Liverpool, which foundered in Carnarvon Bay in the gale of Monday night, when all on board (except the mate) perished.  The body was decently interred on Friday last, in Llandurog Church-yard.

 

Cambrian, 7 December 1811

   On Monday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins on the body of Wm. Temberleak, master of the Bridgewater vessel lost about a month since on Pembrey sands.  The body was been driven by the tide up the Burry rover nearly to Llandilo Talybont church, where it was thrown ashore, and in one of the pockets were found the ship's register, various other papers, and a small sum of money, which, to the credit of the country people, were all delivered to the Coroner.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 28 December 1811

   On Saturday last, an Inquest was taken at Milford, before Henry Stokes, Esq. Coroner for the county of Pembroke, on the body of Richard Allen, Milford, shipwright, who was found dead the preceding morning, suspended from a beam in his own house, by his neck-handkerchief. - It appeared upon evidence, that the deceased had been observed for several days before to manifest symptoms of derangement. - The Jury returned a verdict of - Lunacy.

 

Cambrian 4 January 1812

   An inquest was held on Monday last, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Florence M'Carty, a young man who on Saturday evening owing to the slippery state of the ground, fell down while carrying a peeve of timber on the western pier at Swansea, and dislocated his neck. - verdict, accidental death.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 4 January 1812

   A poor man met with an untimely end on the Quay, Swansea, on Saturday last: - as he was walking with a log of wood on his shoulder over a spot completely frozen, his foot slipped, the wood fell upon and dislocated his neck, and he died almost instantaneously.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 4 April 1812

   On Tuesday last, an Inquest was held at Swansea on the body of Mr. W. Davies, formerly of the Ship-and-Castle, in that town, who fell over the Quay in a fit. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

   Also, on the body of a child, about five years of age, who was killed in consequence of being crushed by a truck on the Strand, in the said town. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 11 April 1812

   Saturday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins on the body of a boy who fell from the mast-head upon the deck of a vessel at the Mumbles. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 26 April 1812

   On Monday last an Inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, Coroner, on the body of John Wilkins, of Llanrhidian, who put an end to his existence by hanging himself; - and on Wednesday another inquest was held by the same Coroner, on a poor woman in Swansea, who died suddenly. - Verdict, in the former instance, Lunacy; and in the latter, Died by the visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 16 May 1812

   A very melancholy accident happened on Saturday last in a Colliery at Brinmorgan, near the head of the Swansea Canal; by an explosion of fire-damp, four men were almost instantaneously deprived of life; a fifth survived only till the next day; and two others were severely bunt, but are doing well.  An inquest was held on the five bodies, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on Monday. - Verdict, Accidental Death. - The unfortunate sufferers, we understand, were warned of the danger, but being anxious to finish their work to attend a bidding, their caution was unhappily disregarded.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 16 May 1812

A melancholy accident happed on Saturday last, in a colliery at Brinmorgan, near Swansea, occasioned by the explosion of electric matter.  Four men were killed on the spot, another died soon after, and four more sustained considerable injury.  An inquest was held on the bodies of the deceased by Dr. John Collins, of Swansea. - Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 30 May 1812

An inquest was held on Wednesday at Oystermouth, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of a female child, who fell into a well and was drowned. Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 15 August 1812

   On Tuesday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of a child drowned at Lansamlet. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 29 August 1812

   An inquest was held this morning in Swansea, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of a child found drowned. - Verdict, accident death.

 

Cambrian, 19 September 1812

   An inquest was held yesterday by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of John Dineley, a boy about 13 years of age, who was scalded to death at Hafod Upper Works, near Swansea. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 17 October 1812

   On Monday last an inquest was held at Llangavelach, on the body of Thomas Harris, upwards of 70 years of age, who was killed by a kick from a horse a few days before. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 14 November 1812

   On Saturday last an inquest was held by Griffith Llewellyn, Esq. on the body of a poor old man who was unfortunately killed on the preceding Thursday evening by being rode over on the road near Neath.  The occurrence was proved to be perfectly accidental, and a verdict to that effect was returned by the Jury.

 

Cambrian, 12 June 1813

   An inquest was held yesterday by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Wm. Collins, who was killed by a cart passing over him.  - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 10 July 1813

   In our last obituary we mentioned the sudden death of M. Thomas Morgan, of the Red-lion, Ferry-side, at Swansea, and we are sorry to have to state, that in consequence of an inquest held upon the body, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on Saturday last, and a laborious investigation of the case by our magistrates during the two succeeding days, the widow of the deceased, Ann Morgan, was on Monday night committed to Cardiff gaol, charged with suspicion of killing and slaying her husband.

 

Cambrian, 12 August 1813

   On Thursday an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the bodies of two men who were killed in a colliery at Ynyskedwin, by a quantity of rubbish falling on them. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 28 August 1813

   An inquest was last week held at Llandilo, by Thomas Evans, Esq. on the body of David Parry, skinner, who was found dead in a tan-pit. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 25 September 1813

   The Minors, Brent, with copper ore from Cornwall to Aberavon, is lost, and all on board perished.

   On Wednesday morning, the 8th inst. the sloop Ann and Mary, of Ilfracombe (James Irwin, Master), loaded with coals, in coming out from Llanelly sprang a leak in Rossily Bay, when the crew (the master, one man, and a boy) endeavoured to run her on shore, but she sunk at some distance outside of low-water.  The man and boy, who had previously got into the boat, endeavoured to gain the shore, but the heavy sea soon upset the boat, and the boy was unfortunately drowned: the man succeeded in getting to land, with the assistance of an oar; the master, who had climbed up the rigging, remained there nine hours, expecting every moment to be washed off; but three men, Moses Gibb, John Thomas, and William harry, although there was a tremendous sea, ventured with their boat to rescue him from his perilous situation, in which they happily succeeded when he was nearly exhausted.  The boy was taken up two days afterwards.

 

Cambrian, 9 October 1813

   On Monday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, of Swansea, on the body of a working man who was thrown from a horse on the preceding Saturday, in consequence of the animal having been frightened by the firing of a gun on board a vessel in the harbour, and died the following day. - Verdict, accidental death.

   A Coroner's Inquest was held at Merthyr on Monday last, on the body of a poor woman who had cut her throat, and the jury returned a verdict of Lunacy.

 

Cambrian, 20 November 1813

   Last week a melancholy accident happened in a colliery in the vicinity of Swansea; in consequence of an explosion of fire-damp, four of the labourers were so seriously injured that two of them (a man and boy) have since expired.

 

1814

Cambrian, 1 January 1814

   On Monday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Walter Evan, who, on Friday night last, fell over the western pier at Swansea, and was drowned. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 8 January 1814

   On Wednesday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of a man who was killed in the neighbourhood of Swansea by a piece of timber falling on him. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 5 February 1814

      On Saturday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Evan John, who, on the preceding day, fell from a barge into Swansea river, supposed in a fit, and was drowned. - verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 12 February 1814

   On Tuesday last the body of a new-born male child was found in a field near Neath, supposed to have been left there by a woman who lived in service at Laleston; she has since been apprehended, and remains in custody until the decision of a coroner's inquest, which assembled on Wednesday, and after sitting several hours adjourned till yesterday evening.

 

Cambrian, 12 March 1814

DIED.

On Saturday last, at Briton-ferry, near Swansea, in child-birth of twins, Mrs. Bowzer, wife of D. W. Bowzer, Esq.

 

Cambrian, 19 March 1814

   A poor child was burnt to death at Newcastle, near Bridgend, through its clothes taking fire while struggling with other children for some flowers.

 

Cambrian, 30 April 1814

   On Saturday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Ann Job, who kept a public-house in Swansea, and who was found dead in a well on the preceding morning. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

   On Sunday last, while going to church, George Harries, of Merthyr mawr, psalmist at Newcastle Church, and singing-teacher to the children of the free school at Bridgend.

 

Cambrian, 9 July 1814

   On Wednesday last an inquest was taken by Thomas Morgan, Esq. one of the Coroners for the borough of Cardiff, on the body of Thomas Griffiths, labourer, who fell from a cart loaded with hay, in a fit, and instantly expired. Verdict, Died by the visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 6 August 1814

   A shocking circumstance occurred last week in the eastern part of Glamorganshire: an unfortunate man who had long laboured under derangement of intellect, in one of his paroxysms of Phrenzy, struck his sister-in-law a violent blow with a spade, which deprived her of life, and nine children of a mother.  The wretched maniac shortly afterwards drowned himself in the river Ely.  An inquest was held on the body, and the Jury returned a verdict of Lunacy.

 

Cambrian, 27 August 1814

   A most melancholy catastrophe occurred on Wednesday last, in a colliery in the neighbourhood of Swansea: while the people were busily engaged in their work, a sudden exposition of fire-damp took place, which instantaneously deprived four poor men of life, and injured smoke others, but the latter are all doing well. Inquests have been held on the unfortunate sufferers, and a verdict of "accidental death" returned.

   Yesterday morning an inquest was held at Portinon Glamorganshire, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Thomas Cox, a labouring man who, while on his passage from Appledore to the above place, with three others, on their way to Kidwelly, where they were engaged to work on the dock, was supposed to have fallen asleep, but was found lifeless. - Verdict, Died by the visitation of God.  The deceased had his wife and child with him, who came from the neighbourhood of Gloucester.

 

Cambrian, 21 January 1815

DIED. - On Christmas Day, the Rev. Noah Jones, Dissenting Minister at Bethlehem, near Llanharran, and Tanbirion, near Llantrisant; in both which he had faithfully discharged his duties for upwards of thirty years, and at the latter place he departed this life in the sixty seventh year of his age, in the midst of his hearers, a few minutes previous to his mounting the pulpit to preach as usual.

 

Cambrian, 4 March 1815

   On Monday evening last, the son of Mr. John Jenkin, farmer, of Marcross, near Bridgend, a young man 23 years of age, took his gun out with the intention of shooting rabbits; in discharging which it burst, and the breech entering the frontal sinuses of the head, drove in the bones upon the brain, and caused it to flow out through the aperture.  Medical assistance was called, but the nature of the case was such that nothing could be done; he languished until nine o'clock yesterday morning, when he expired.  It was but two months before that that a gun burst with him when in the act of discharging it; he then escaped with only a slight laceration of the hand.

 

The Cambrian, 11 March 1815

   On Monday last an inquest was held at Pontardawe, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of James Bowen, who fell into the canal, and was drowned. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 18 March 1815

   An inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on Monday last, at Languke, on the body of Wm. Richard, found dead in a field in that parish, supposed to have perished through the inclemency of the weather. - verdict, Found dead.

 

Cambrian, 29 April 1815

   On Monday last, an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Catherine Benjamin, a young woman, who lost her life on the preceding Friday, while crossing the Swansea river at Ynispenllwch, by a body of water suddenly rushing down and overwhelming her. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 29 April 1815

   We are extremely sorry to state, that the Concord, Capt. Buse, and the Friends Goodwill, Capt. Bryant, both of Swansea, were lost in Friday last in a gale of wind on the coat of Cornwall, and, we fear, all on board perished, except one man and a boy who belonged to the latter.  The body of poor Bryant was thrown on shore near Padstow the same day.

 

Cambrian, 20 May 1815

   On Friday last the body of a respectably-dressed man was found floating in the sea near Oystermouth, and was conveyed to that village, where an inquest w as held by Dr. J. C. Collins, but nothing was found on the person of the unfortunate man by which his name or connexions could be discovered; and the jury delivered a verdict, "Picked up floating at sea."

 

Cambrian, 1 July 1815

   A melancholy accident happened on Sunday evening last,: while the Milford and Bristol Mail as in its road to Swansea, about six miles from thence, the driver, George Masters, fell from the box, it is supposed in a fit, and was taken up dead.  Fortunately no accident occurred by the temporary freedom which the horses obtained.  An inquest was held on the deceased on Monday morning by Dr. J. C. Collins. - Verdict, accidental death.

   On Sunday afternoon a young man of the name of Henry Lewis was drowned in the river Gwendraeth, near Kidwelly, while bathing.

   On Monday the ostler at the White Lion, Llandilo, while loading a cart with hay, fell therefrom, and was killed on the spot.

BIRTHS. - On Wednesday, the 21st inst. the lady of John Jones, Quebec, Esq. of a daughter - since dead.

 

Cambrian, 16 September 1815

   Last week an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Molly Williams, who fell over the ricks at the Mumbles, near Swansea, and was killed. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 30 September 1815

An inquest was held on Saturday last by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Mary Jones, which was found on the sands, near Swansea, early the same morning.  No evidence appeared by which her death could be accounted for; and the Jury returned their verdict - Found drowned.

   On Wednesday, the same Coroner held an inquest on John Griffiths, of Swansea, found dead in his bed. - Verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 28 October 1815

   An inquest was held at the Crown Inn, Merthyr Tydfil, on Tuesday last, before Nicholl Wood, Esq. Coroner, on the body of Thomas Edwards, who was killed by a Bull that was undergoing the cruel practice of baiting: Verdict, - Died in consequence of being gored by the Bull; - deodand 20s.  The Coroner in his address to the jury, very forcibly expatiated on the inhumanity of bull-baiting, and expressed an ardent hope that the jury would exert themselves to prevent the repetition of such cruelties within their parish in future.

   At the same time and place, another inquest was held on the body of Evan Evans, who had been found drowned in the water-course belonging to the Plymouth iron Works.  Verdict, found drowned, supposed to have fallen into the water in a fit, - (deceased having been subject to fits.).

 

Cambrian, 9 December 1815

As Evan Thomas, of the King's Head, Oldcastle, Bridgend, was returning home from Cowbridge on Monday week last, he fell from a precipice at Corntown, in the parish of Ewenny, and was found dead about half past ten o'clock.

 

Cambrian, 16 December 1815

   The Jury's verdict on Mr. Evan Thomas, of Oldcastle, mentioned in our last, was - Died in consequence of the bad road at Corntown, in the parish of Ewenny.

   Tuesday an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Edward Jenkin, who was killed by the beam of a colliery engine at Lansamlet crushing his head. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Glamorgan Calendar Rolls, 1800-30

Autumn 1815.

Coroner's Inquest taken at Cardiff, before Thomas Morgan, esq., on view of the body of a female child which was found dead on the New Bank of the river Taff in the said town, by the pine-end of Mr Davies' house. The persons who found it were Thomas Stibbs and Elizabeth Millward. "One Molly Powell was going up to the Pump at the time."

 

Cambrian, 2 March 1816

   Tuesday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, in Swansea, on the body of a child who, in the absence of its mother, was accidentally burnt to death. - Verdict to that effect.

 

Cambrian, 9 March 1816

DIED. - Early yesterday morning, (after retiring to rest the previous night in his usual h=good health) Edward Hawkins, Esq. of Court Herbert, Glamorganshire: ...

   Yesterday an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of John Williams, (a deaf and dumb man) who was drowned in attempting to swim through the ford at Swansea. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 30 March 1816

   On Wednesday evening, as the driver of a cart loaded with stones was passing through Neath, he attempted to get on the shaft, but fell under the wheel, which passed over him, and killed him on the spot.

 

Cambrian, 13 April 1816

   The Commission for holding the Glamorganshire Great Sessions was opened at Cardiff on Tuesday evening last ... The bills against two woman charged with murdering their bastard children, had been thrown out by the Grand Jury.

 

Cambrian, 20 April 1816

   On Monday last an inquest was held at Loughor, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of a poor girl who was accidentally drowned. - Verdict to that effect.

 

Cambrian, 8 June 1816

Inquests. - On Monday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, in the neighbourhood of Gellygron, on the body of John Evan, about 15 years of age, son of T. Evan, labourer, at Llanairon, Cardiganshire, who lost his life by falling over a steep precipice into a pool of water on Sunday.  Verdict, accidental death. 

   On Tuesday another inquest was held by the same Coroner, on the body of John Johns, who was killed by an explosion of fire-damp in the Pentre colliery, near Swansea, and a similar verdict was returned; ...

   And on Wednesday Dr. Collins held an inquest at Nelson, in Gower, on the bodies of John and William Hoskin, of the ages of 17 and 19, who died suddenly on the preceding day.  The Jury, after a long investigation, delivered verdicts of "Died in consequence of taking a medicine bin which arsenic had been accidentally mixed."

 

Cambrian, 15 June 1816

   On Saturday an inquest was held at Loughor by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Margaret Harry, who died suddenly on her return home from Llanelly market. - Verdict, died by the visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 29 June 1816

   On Monday last an inquest was held by N. Wood, Esq. on the body of Thomas Hugh, a boy of about 13 years of age, who was drowned in the Cardiff canal, on Saturday, while bathing. Verdict, accidental death.  - A younger brother of the deceased was killed in the woollen factory, near Cardiff, about four months since, by getting in contact with the wheel of the machinery.

 

Cambrian, 6 July 1816

   An inquest was on Wednesday taken at the Guildhall, Cardiff, before Thomas Morgan, Esq. one of the coroners of the said town, on the body of Jenkin Morgan, mason, found drowned in the river Taff. - Verdict, Accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 27 July 1816

   Last week an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of George Williams, a sailor, who leaped from his vessel into Swansea river, intending to swim to the opposite shore, but failed, and was drowned. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 3 August 1816

   On Wednesday evening an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, at Morriston, near Swansea, on the body of a boy named John Powell, who was killed by a stone falling on his head. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 12 October 1816

   A melancholy discovery was made in Swansea yesterday.  A most respectable looking female arrived at the Mackworth Arms inn on Wednesday night by the Cambrian coach from Bristol; ... Much agitation was created in the house by her non-appearance yesterday morning, and on forcing her chamber-door, she was found a corpse, with the remains of a bottle of laudanum on the table, and a note of which the following is a copy: - ... [Also description (23 years of age), clothing and possessions.]

   On Thursday evening the body of an unfortunate boy, who was drowned near Neath some time since, was washed ashore at Black-pill, and conveyed to his friends.

 

The Cambrian, 19 October 1816

   Yesterday morning, as Samuel Stevens, one of the Swansea pilots, was throwing out of his trawl off the Mumbles, to dredge for oysters, he fell over with it, and notwithstanding every exertion on the part of his son and another boy who accompanied him in his boat, he unfortunately perished.  He has left a widow and eleven children in great distress.

 

Cambrian, 30 November 1816

Oh Wednesday the 20th inst. was committed to Cardiff gaol, by William Forman, and J. B. Bruce, Esqrs. William Lewis, of Plymouth Works, Merthyr Tydfil, charged with the murder of Ann, the wife of Wm. Morris, of Cyfarthfa, by throwing a stone at her on the 18th August last, of which blow she died. - He had absconded, and was taken at Wolverhampton.

 

Cambrian, 14 December 1816

   Yesterday an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins on the body of Jeffrey Vallet, upwards of 80 years of age, formerly a master of a vessel, who was found hanging in his own house in Swansea on the preceding evening.  After a minute investigation, the jury returned a verdict - felo de se.  So determined was this hoary wretch on his own destruction, that he actually greased the rope by which he suspended himself to a hook in the ceiling, and when discovered his feet were resting on the floor.  His body was buried in a cross-road at an early hour this morning.

 

Cambrian, 28 December 1816

   On Tuesday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins on the bodies of John Lewis, and Wm. Richards, who were drowned on the preceding day at the Pentre Colliery, near Swansea. - Verdict, accidental death.  Each of the unfortunate men has left a widow and seven children.

 

Cambrian, 2 August 1817

   On Saturday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of John Gill, who was drowned in Swansea harbour on the preceding evening; he was mooring a pilot-boat, and in the act of throwing out the anchor from his shoulder, one of the flukes caught his neck, dragged him overboard, and the poor fellow perished.  The most prompt search for the body was instantly commenced by a great number of persons, but the receding tide had carried it out some distance from the piers, and it was not found until two hours had expired, when the vital spark was wholly extinct.  It was mentioned at the inquest that the deceased's father had been drowned on the same day in July 20 years ago.

 

Cambrian, 2 August 1817

   A Coroner's inquest was held on Tuesday, at Cardiff, on view of the body of Thomas Meldridge, a poor sailor lad, belonging to the Juno, of Kirkaldy, who, in endeavouring to disengage some ropes at the Lock-gates, on the preceding Friday, unfortunately fell out of the boat, and sunk immediately.  Every exertion to recover the body, by dragging the canal, &c. was instantly made, but ineffectually, until the day on which the inquest was held.  The Jury after a short consultation, returned a verdict - Accidentally Drowned.

 

Cambrian, 25 October 1817

   On Monday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of David Lloyd, a quarryman, who lost his life by falling into a well at the Black Horse public-house, in Swansea, when in a state of inebriety. - Verdict, accidental death.

Cambrian, 8 November 1817

On Wednesday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of a seaman washed ashore at Oxwich; he was about six feet two inches high, had an old knife and threehalfpence in his pockets, but was so much mutilated as to prevent further description.

 

Cambrian, 15 November 1817

On Saturday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins on the body of a poor man who died suddenly while sitting in a public-house in Swansea; and on Tuesday two other inquests were held by the same Coroner. One on a child in the parish of Llangafelach, who had pulled a pail of boiling wort over him, and was so severely scalded that he died shortly afterwards; - the other on the body of a sailor which came on shore in the parish of Oystermouth, of whom no trace whatever could be discovered.

 

Cambrian, 22 November 1817

Yesterday morning an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, at the Talbot-arms, Swansea, on the body of a newly-born male infant, of which a female who had been about two months in the house, had delivered herself early on Thursday morning, and had concealed. - Verdict, found dead.

 

Cambrian, 24 January 1818

On Monday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of John Martyn, aged 77, who died on Saturday of a concussion of the brain, from a fall down a flight of stone steps at Woolland castle the preceding Thursday, after which he shewed no sign of animation. - he had lived at Woolland castle from the laying of the foundation by Mr. Phillips, under whose will he enjoyed an annuity for his long and faithful services, and since whose death he has lived at the same place nearly 20 years under Gen. Wade, fully maintaining his character for inflexible honesty, and retaining the love of his neighbours.

 

Cambrian, 21 February 1818

   On Saturday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Thomas Richards, of Kilvey-hill, who lost his life by the contents of a gun being accidentally discharged into his chest. - Verdict to that effect.

 

Cambrian, 28 February 1818

   On Wednesday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Wm. Meyrick, a ship-carpenter, who was found suffocated on a lime-kiln, in Swansea, the same morning.  Verdict - Suffocated by accident.

   An inquest was held on Thursday last, at the Town-hall, Cardiff, before Thomas Charles, Esq. one of his Majesty's Coroners for the said town, on view of the body of Maria James, who on the preceding evening was blown, by the violence of the wind, into the canal, at the Sea Lock.  The Jury, after a patient investigation of the circumstances, concurred in opinion that she had met her death accidentally, and returned a verdict to that effect.

 

Cambrian, 28 March 1818

   An inquest was held in Wednesday last by Dr. J. C. Collins, at Lansamlet, near Swansea, on the body of Thos. Abraham, an infant, who was burnt to death in the absence of his mother, in consequence of his clothes accidentally taking fire. - Verdict to the same effect.

   On Sunday morning last, John Thomas and Lewis Sherbon, Neath pilots, while going to a vessel approaching the river, we unfortunately upset in a squall, and both perished.  The former has left a widow and five children, and the latter a widow and two children.

   Yesterday se'nnight, the mate of a vessel lying at Neath, who was assisting in raising the coal at a colliery near Duffryn, fell into the pit, from which he as shortly afterwards extricated, but life was extinct.

 

Cambrian, 11 April 1818

   An inquest was held on Monday, in Swansea, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on a poor man who broke two of his ribs, by falling on a stone, through weakness, and died soon afterwards. - Verdict, Died by the visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 2 May 1818

   An inquest was held this week on the body of Wm. Bevan, found dead in a corn-mill, near Yniskedwyn. - Verdict, Died by the visitation of God.

 

Cambrian, 16 May 1818

   On Tuesday last, an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, at Llanrhidian, on the body of Wm. Morgan, an old harper, who was found dead in his garden on Sunday morning; and yesterday another inquest was held by the same Coroner, on the parish of Llangevelach, on the body of Thomas Rees, who was drowned in the Swansea canal, supposed to have fallen into it in a fit.  Verdict in the first case, Died by the Visitation of God; and in the other, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 4 July 1818

   An inquest was held in Swansea this week, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of a girl who was thrown out of a cart in a hay-field, in consequence of the horse taking fright, and was so much injured as to cause her death a few days after the accident.

   On Monday last, Thomas Fowler, a labouring man, of Swansea, fell from his horse, near Taybach, supposed in a fit, and expired immediately.

 

Cambrian, 1 August 1818

   On Friday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of an unfortunate man who lost his life by an explosion of fire-damp in a neighbouring colliery. - Verdict, accident death.

 

Cambrian, 15 August 1818

   An inquest was held on Friday, by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Wm. Edwards, who, in returning home from Neath, fell into the canal, and was unfortunately drowned. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 28 September 1818

   The Charles, Bankes master, came into Swansea harbour on Monday morning last, during a heavy gale; when within the piers, the boat was lowered, and the mate and another man got into it, but not being completely disengaged from the vessel, it was instantly swamped, and the mate perished; the other saved himself with difficulty by swimming.  The deceased's name was John Whetter, a man of good character, and the chief support of his aged parents, who reside at Mounts-bay.

 

Cambrian, 28 September 1818

      On Thursday, William Evans, one of the labourers employed at the New Stone Quarry, at welsh Pool, was unfortunately killed by the falling of a quantity of loose earth.

 

Cambrian, 24 October 1818

   The following melancholy accident befel two boatmen of the names of Morris Morris and Benj. Jenkins, both of Llanstephan, on Sunday se'nnight.  While on their passage from Kidwelly to the above mentioned place, the wind blowing hard at the time, the boat was filled with water, and instantly went down, within sight of the place of its destination.  The poor men, we lament to state, were drowned; one of them leaving a wife and child to deplore the sad event.  The bodies have since been found.

 

Cambrian, 28 November 1818

   On Saturday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Lucy Harris, an infant under twelve months, who lost her life by putting a marble in her mouth while playing with other children, which getting into her throat choaked her almost immediately. - On Monday another inquest was held by the same Coroner on the body of David Williams, who was so severely injured by part of the machinery in a mill wherein he was employed, as to cause his death in a few hours. - verdict in both cases, accidental death.

   On Thursday, a boy about 14 or 15 years of age, fell into the Neath Canal, and was unfortunately drowned.

   On Monday se'nnight, a man employed in one of the copper-works at Neath, was found hanging in a small wood near Lantwit church.  He had been missing since the preceding Thursday night.

 

Cambrian, 23 January 1819

During a storm on Saturday se'nnight, a flash of lightning entered the house of Mr. Edwards, solicitor, of Merthyr Tydfil, and instantaneously killed his son, a fine boy six years of age, in the absence of his agonised parents.

   On Friday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins at Rhyd-y-pandy, on the body of William Jones, who fell from his horse in returning home from Neath market, and dislocated his neck. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 13 February 1819

On Monday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of David Lewis, an aged man, who accidentally slipped into the Swansea canal, at Landore, on Friday night, and was drowned. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 20 February 1819

   On Saturday last, as two men and two boys were ascending a coal-pit in  a bucket, at Lansamlet, near Swansea, when they had been drawn up almost twenty fathoms, a stone fell from above, and struck both of the poor men out of the basket, one of whom fell to the bottom of the pit; the other was suspended by one leg only, which the boys, though very young, firmly held, until the basket was lowered, by which means the man's life was preserved.  The other was taken up quite dead. - An inquest was held on the body on Monday by Dr. J. C. Collins, and the Jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 12 June 1819

   On Wednesday an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of a labouring man who was unfortunately killed while at work in a colliery near Swansea, by a part of the roof falling on him. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

  Cambrian, 10 July 1819

   The week which has elapsed since our last publication, we are concerned to state, had proved prolific indeed in crime, in this town and neighbourhood; no less than six women having been apprehended on very serious charges. ... The other two women are Ann and Sarah Lloyd, mother and daughter, the former charged with the wilful murder of her male bastard child, and the latter the mother) as an accessary.  The parties lived in the parish of Lansamlet, and the body of the infant was found in the garden, covered only with a few inches of earth.  Both mother and daughter have been fully committed to the county gaol for trial.  The Coroner's Jury found that the child was born alive, but had died through the wilful neglect of its mother.

 

Cambrian, 24 July 1819

   On Noonday last, an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of John Griffiths, who was killed by a mass of coal falling on him in a colliery at Ynysvorgan. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 11 September 1819

   On Monday last an inquest was held in Swansea by Dr. J. C. Collins, on the body of Thos. Edwards, a boy, who was supposed to have died through ill treatment; but the contrary proved to be the fact, and the jury returned a verdict, Died by the Visitation of God.

   Another inquest was held by the same Coroner on Tuesday, on a female infant who was drowned by falling into the Swansea canal.  - Verdict Accidental death.

   The business of the Glamorganshire Great Sessions terminated on Saturday last.  The following sentences were passed, ... Ann Lloyd, for concealing the birth of her bastard child, to be imprisoned two months; the bill against her mother (Sarah Lloyd) was not found; ...

 

Cambrian, 16 October 1819

   On Wednesday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins on the body of Samuel Stone, a young man belonging to the Bedford, Capt. Nicholls, of Swansea, and who was drowned on the preceding evening, while endeavouring to get on board his vessel with the assistance of a rope. - Verdict, accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 11 December 1819

   On Tuesday last an inquest was held by Dr. J. C. Collins, at Pontardawe, on the body of a child, who was burnt to death in consequence of being left alone in a house where there was a fire. - Verdict, accidental death.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School