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Colonial Cases

Caernarfonshire

Cambrian, 5 January 1811

[The Late Gales]

   The sloop William and Betty, of Bangor, from Liverpool, Jones, master, after riding out the gale for nearly two days, was driven on Lavan sands, and immediately sunk; the hands all perished, together with a female passenger; the master was found, lifeless in the shrouds, he w as a native of Bangor, a young man, and universally respected; he has left a wife and infant family, thus suddenly deprived of their sole means of support!

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 15 October 1811

   On the 29th ultimo, as a man, named Thomas Prichard, accompanied by a lad, were fishing for sea-tench, (in Welsh gwrachod,) at Rhiw, in Lleyn, the waves running very high up the rocks where they were, at length swept the man from is stand.  When he found himself going, he seized hold of the lad, and both were precipitated into the sea.  The lad was saved by catching old of a rod held out to him by another fisherman, but the unfortunate man, after making many ineffectual attempts to regain the rocks, was downed.  His body has not yet been found.

 

Cambrian, 4 July 1812

    An inquest was last week held before T. Jones, Esq. Coroner for Carnarvonshire, on the body of John Williams, of Rhyd y Gwystyl, near Pwllheli, who was killed in taking down an old barn, by a large beam falling upon his head and back. 

   A few days ago, an inquest was also held on the body of John Davies, a miner, of Llandudno, near Conway, who, descending into a copper mine by a rope which was not properly secured, the poor man was precipitated a depth of fifty yards, and was literally dashed to pieces.

 

The Observer, 18 August 1823

HORRID MURDER IN CAERNARVONSHIRE

A horrid circumstance occurred near Bangor, Caernarvonshire, last week, which has created a strong sensation there, that of a woman having cut her husband's throat!  It appeared that the man and his wife were usually on very bad terms, and lived alone in a cottage in the Bangor Ferry-road.  On the morning Thursday last, about two o'clock, the people e of the adjoining houses were awoke by a noise as of two persons struggling.  This they disregarded, as such things were not unusual.  Upon entering the house, which was done by force, the man was discovered with his throat dreadfully cut; there were also cuts on his face and hands, and upon the woman's arms.  The latter she affirms to have been occasioned by her endeavouring to prevent him murdering himself.  Upon examination before the Coroner's Inquest, she was proved to have remained in the house some four hours after the perpetration of the deed; had washed his shirt, and her own shift; had lifted the body from the floor, closed the eyes, bound up the wound, and wiped the razor, not omitting to mop the floor.  Fifteen of the Coroner's Jury were for returning a verdict of wilful murder against the wife, but the one finally given was "wilful murder against some person or persons unknown, with strong suspicion against the wife."  The professional gentlemen examined were divided in opinion; the majority thought he could not have cut his throat.  The woman is committed in prison, and will be tried on Thursday or Friday next, at Caernarvon. - Chester paper.

 

Cambrian, 5 December 1812

   On Monday, an inquest was held on the body of William Elias, butcher of Carnarvon.  It appeared that the deceased had gone to Angelsea to purchase cattle, and on his return had missed his way to the boat and fallen into the water; when found life was extinct.  He was an industrious, honest man, and has left a disconsolate aged widow to lament his irreparable loss.

 

Cambrian, 13 November 1813

   Last week a Coroner's Inquest was held at the Penrhyn Arms, near Bangor, on the body of John Davis, ostler at that inn.  It appeared in evidence, that he had incautiously taken a quantity of corrosive sublimate infused in rum, which has been recommended to him, and purchased for him by J. M'Kenzie, a gentleman's servant, then at the inn, to cure some inward complaint.  Nothing transpired to shew that there was the smallest evil intention on the part of M'Kenzie; it rather appeared the deceased had exceeded the quantity he was advised to take. - Verdict, Homicide by mischance.

 

Cambrian, 25 December 1813

   Last week an inquest was taken by the Coroner of Carnarvon, on the body of a man found floating in the sea, about 30 miles south-west of Carnarvon.  It is supposed to be the body of Capt. Morris Griffith, of Barmouth, who, with three others, was lost off that port some weeks ago by the upsetting of a boat, in which they humanely attempted, during a gale of wind, to relieve a vessel in distress. -

   On Tuesday week, the same Coroner also held an inquisition in the parish of Llanberis, on the body of Thos. Williams, a miner, who, in attempting to reach a copper miner at Glogwyn Coch (one of the highest rocks of Snowdonia), along a narrow path covered with ice, fell down a precipice of 800 feet and was dashed to pieces.

 

Cambrian, 19 March 1814

   On Tuesday se'nnight an Inquest was held before T. Jones, Esq. Coroner for Carnarvonshire, on the body of Catherine Thomas, widow, found drowned in the river Ogwen; it clearly appeared that she had been in an insane state for some years, and that this was not her first attempt to put an end to her existence.  Verdict - Insanity.

 

Cambrian, 4 March 1815

   On Saturday morning, as John Jones, a chaise-driver at Mr. Jackson's, Bangor Ferry, was driving the Shrewsbury coach, he unfortunately fell from the box on the bridge opposite Lime grove, and the wheels going over his neck, killed him on the spot.

 

Cambrian, 18 March 1815

   An Inquisition was taken at Waen fawr, near Carnarvon, by the Coroner of that county, on Friday, on the body of a man who was supposed to have come to his death in consequence of having been severely beat by a gang of merciless ruffians, on his way home from Carnarvon, on Saturday the 18th ult.  It did not however appear to the jury, that his death was occasioned by this circumstance, and a verdict of having "Died by the visitation of God," was accordingly entered.  We understand some other persons were much beat by this desperate gang, but as the matter is likely to undergo a legal investigation, we forbear saying any more.

 

Cambrian, 29 April 1815

      Four Inquisitions have been held before the Coroner of Carnarvonshire, in the course of the last fortnight:- One at Pwllheli, on the body of a female infant, about two years of age, who was drowned in a small well in a garden near to the house of her parents; and another at Llanllyfni mountain, on a girl of about the same age, who was also found drowned in a very small stream close to her father's door, the water whereof was not six inches in depth.

   The third inquest was taken near to Aber Ogwen, in the parish of Llanllechid, on the body of a man unknown, who was found floating in the sea, near to Aber Ogwen aforesaid; he had on a blue sailor's jacket, with a thickset waistcoat underneath, blue pantaloons and boots, and in his fob there was a large silver watch, maker's name, Thomas Gorman, Dublin, No. 5127.

   The last body was found under Treborth, about two miles from Bangor, which appeared to have been long in the sea, being much disfigured, and nearly in a putrid state.

 

Cambrian, 28 August 1813

   An inquest was last week held at Llandilo, by Thomas Evans, Esq. on the body of David Parrry, skinner, who was found dead in a tan-pit. - Verdict, Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 16 December 1815

   A Coroner's inquest was held last week, by T. Jones, Esq. Coroner for Carnarvonshire, at Llanystyndwy, on the body of a poor woman who was found drowned in a well in that neighbourhood. - It appeared that she was a lunatic, and had been several years subject to epileptic fits, and it is supposed that she had fallen on her face, during one of these fits into the well, which was very shallow, and was suffocated before any assistance could reach her. Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Cambrian, 27 February 1819

   A melancholy accident occurred at Bangor, last week.  As a boy of the name of Pritchard, whose father is a tailor in that town, was proceeding on board the brig Louisa, J. Evans, master, to whom he was an apprentice, having stayed rather late with his friends, and the crew on board retired to rest, he imprudently pushed off in a small boat, but the tide running strong, he was carried into the deep, and unfortunately perished.  Verdict of Coroner's inquest - Found drowned.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 25 December 1819

   Edward Williams, for several years guard to one of the Holyhead coaches, was killed on Thursday between Curwen and Llangollen.  The unfortunate man was descending from his seat to the coach-door, whilst the coach was traveling rapidly, and missing his step, he fell to the ground, and the wheel passing over his body, caused such internal injury, that he died next morning.  Mr. Williams was much respected in his situation; and received great attention at Llangollen during the interval between the accident and his death.  He has left a wife and family.

 

Cambrian, 20 May 1820

  Shocking Accident. - At Carnarvon theatre, last week, one of the actors personating Grindoff, in the Miller and his Men, while in the act of throwing off his disguise, in which he wrestles, the pistol in his belt got entangled in some part of the clothing, and discharged its wadding into his body, below his ribs: he fell instantly.  Surgeons were called in, and his wounds dressed; the unfortunate man was in a state of great agony, but we are informed he is likely to recover.

 

Cambrian, 24 June 1820

Mysterious Circumstance. - On Thursday evening, the body of a man was found on the shore, near Colwyn, Carnarvonshire, in a state of nakedness, except having a small serge wrapper rolled round his middle, and a pair of nearly-nailed shoes, and short socks on; the head and both hands appeared having been  dissevered.  We since learn that the body was taken to Llandrillo church-yard, where it was buried, without a Coroner's inquest having sat upon it.

 

Cambrian, 19 August 1820

   Melancholy Accident. - Extract of a letter from Carnarvon, Aug. 8 - "On Saturday last, a most melancholy catastrophe happened near Carnarvon: the ferry boat, which plies across to Angelsea, was swamped; and of twenty-two passengers on board (chiefly females, going to Carnarvon market,) only one was saved.  The boat was turned keel upwards, and a most distressing sight presented itself, some of the unfortunate victims clinging, in vain, to the mast and boat; this melancholy accident has deprived at one time ten children of the same family, of father and mother.  Seven of the bodies have been found!

 

 

Cambrian, 27 July 1822

CARNARVONSHIRE. - A melancholy accident occurred at the Iron Foundry near Bangor, on Saturday last.  In swinging a heavy mould the crane unfortunately gave way, and falling on the back of Richard Jones, a youth, and son of Mrs. Sarah Jones, Shop-keeper, he was killed almost instantaneously.  - Coroner's verdict. - Accidental death.

 

Cambrian, 4 January 1823

CARNARVONSHIRE. - MURDER. - The dreadful murder and robbery of Jane Owens (not Williams), widow, of Llanbedr, on Monday night, the 16th December, was noticed in our last Cambrian.  On Saturday, the 21st ult. an Inquest was taken by Dr. Carreg, the Coroner for the County, when the Jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown. ...

 

North Wales Gazette, 27 February 1823

   On Tuesday, the 18th instant, an Inquest was held before John Carreg, Esq. the Coroner, on the body of John Ellis, of Gorcuor, in the parish of Llanrug, who came by his death in a barbarous conflict with another man, in which his thumb was nearly bit off, the inflammation and fever brought on  in consequence, terminated his existence. - verdict, manslaughter, and the brute was committed to the county Gaol for trial at the approaching Assizes.

   On this occasion the Coroner very pathetically pointed out to a numerous assemblage, the melancholy consequences of suffering their passions to hurl them into such cruel and cowardly excesses; he stated that this was the third time it has been his painful duty to attend on a similar occasion; and he requested that this circumstance might be made public, and he further entreated all present (and heads of families in particular) to caution young men against this inhuman and savage practice of biting and gnawing each other; the fatal and melancholy consequences of which they then beheld in a most mournful and lamentable instance.  A sober, quiet, inoffensive young man, and the only son of his parents, cut off at the early age of nineteen.  A correspondent has kindly furnished us with the subjoined latter on the subject, written in the language of the country. [Not transcribed.]

   An Inquest was also taken on Monday, the 24th instant, ob view of the body of Hugh Williams, of Ty-coch, in the parish of Llauddeniolen, in this county, who came to his death by a portion of slate falling upon his body, verdict - Accidental  Death.

   And yesterday another was held, on the body of a man unknown, whose body was cast on the sea-shore near Clynnog, in this county.

 

North Wales Gazette, 27 February 1823

   On Tuesday, the 18th instant, an Inquest was held before John Carreg, Esq. the Coroner, on the body of John Ellis, of Gorcuor, in the parish of Llanrug, who came by his death in a barbarous conflict with another man, in which his thumb was nearly bit off, the inflammation and fever brought on  in consequence, terminated his existence. - verdict, manslaughter, and the brute was committed to the county Gaol for trial at the approaching Assizes.

   On this occasion the Coroner very pathetically pointed out to a numerous assemblage, the melancholy consequences of suffering their passions to hurl them into such cruel and cowardly excesses; he stated that this was the third time it has been his painful duty to attend on a similar occasion; and he requested that this circumstance might be made public, and he further entreated all present (and heads of families in particular) to caution young men against this inhuman and savage practice of biting and gnawing each other; the fatal and melancholy consequences of which they then beheld in a most mournful and lamentable instance.  A sober, quiet, inoffensive young man, and the only son of his parents, cut off at the early age of nineteen.  A correspondent has kindly furnished us with the subjoined latter on the subject, written in the language of the country. [Not transcribed.]

   An Inquest was also taken on Monday, the 24th instant, ob view of the body of Hugh Williams, of Ty-coch, in the parish of Llauddeniolen, in this county, who came to his death by a portion of slate falling upon his body, verdict - Accidental  Death.

   And yesterday another was held, on the body of a man unknown, whose body was cast on the sea-shore near Clynnog, in this county.

 

North Wales Gazette (Bangor), 3 April 1823

CARNARVONSHIRE GREAT SESSIONS.

On Wednesdays the following prisoners were tried, viz: Henry Jones, and Margaret his wife, for stealing from the dwelling-house of Jane Owen, of Llanbedr, (who our readers will recollect was most barbarously murdered a short time ago),  .  .  .  . 

   Edward Williams was indicted for manslaughter, in having in a battle with John Ellis of the parish of Llsnrug, cruelly bit his thumb, of which wound a mortification ensuing, the said John Ellis died.  It however could not be satisfactorily proved that the prisoner committed the crime charged.  Judge Kenrick reprobated the brutal acts which frequently took place in these rencontres, .  .  .  .    In this case, under the direction of the Learned Judge, the Jury acquitted the prisoner.

 

North Wales Gazette (Bangor), 14 August 1823

CHARGE OF MURDER !

On Tuesday se'nnight, the whole of this neighbourhood was thrown into considerable agitation by the report of a person, named Manning, who had been some time residing in a small cottage near Bangor Ferry, being found in his own dwelling, with his throat cut.  An Inquest was held on Wednesday on the spot, which adjourned till the following day to the Liverpool Arms, in this city - when after a painful investigation, the following was the verdict - Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown, but we express our unanimous suspicions against the wife of the deceased.

   The wife was then, after another investigation by the Magistrates, fully committed. .  .  .  . 

 

North Wales Gazette (Bangor), 4 September 1823

CAUTION TO CARTERS. - An inquest was held on Tuesday se'nnight, before W. Hughes, Esq. Coroner, at the Town Hall, Carnarvon, on the body of Ann Thomas, who was thrown over the battlements of  [Penhie] Bridge, by the careless  driving of slate carts, and killed on the spot. - It appeared in evidence, that several empty slate carts were return ding near and upon the bridge at the time in question, and the driver of two of were riding upon one cart, and a little boy in the other next to it, (not its driver) and all of a sudden, the one with the two lads in it jostled against the battlement with such violence, (as appears still unaccountable) so that the shaft horse broke the chain from the fore one, and instantly plunged over the battlement, carrying a great part of it, together with the deceased, along with them.  She fell on her head upon a stone, and died immediately from the concussion.  After a long deliberation, the Jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against the two lads in the cart; viz:- Thomas Roberts, and John Michael, upon which the Coroner issued his warrant, and they are now confined in the county Gaol.

 

The Cambrian, 1 November 1823

CARNARVONSHIRE. - An inquest was held in Bangor, on Thursday last, before E. Carreg, Esq. the Crooner, on the body of David Jones, an infant, of the age of four years, who was unfortunately killed by the wheel of a gentleman's carriage passing over his head, whilst running across the road.  It appeared, however, in evidence at the inquest, that great blame was attached to the driver, and the jury after a mature deliberation of half an hour, brought in a verdict of Manslaughter against Thomas Thomas, the driver. - Deodand on the horses 7l. and on the carriage 18l.

 

North Wales Gazette (Bangor) 6 November 1823

   On Wednesday morning, the 8th ult. as a young man, about two and twenty years of age, and son of Jeremiah Williams, Agent to the Copper Mine in the parish of Llanberis, in this county, was at work and preparing a blast in a rock near the mouth of a deep old shaft nearly full of water, the projecting praecipe where he stood suddenly gave way, and he was precipitated into the horrid abyss, where his body is likely to remain, as the expense of drawing up the water and clearing the shaft, would amount (it is calculated) to about £60 or £70, it being about 40 yards deep.

 

North Wales Gazette (Banger), 20 November 1823

   On Saturday last, after attending the Market as Carnarvon, Mr. Hugh Lewis, formerly of Trewynne, in the county of Anglesey, farmer. - After crossing the ferry and proceeding to the house of his brother, he unthinkingly attempted to cross the Maltaeth sands, when the tide flowing in at the time, he unfortunately perished.  The horse gained the opposite shore, with the saddle hanging loose behind.  Coroner's Inquest, verdict - Accidental Drowned.

 

North Wales Gazette, 10 June 1824

   A melancholy accident occurred yesterday morning, at the Fish-weir, called Gorad Gad, near this city; as Robert Williams, (the person who looks after the weir) was proceeding with his boat, loaded with timber cuttings, to make some repairs, she suddenly filled with water, when the unfortunate man was washed out and drowned, leaving a wife and six small children, who were totally dependent upon him for their support.

 

North Wales Gazette (Bangor) 16 September 1824

   A melancholy accident occurred on Thursday last, in working a stone quarry, on the mountain parallel with this City.  In rolling a large stone from the summit, it unfortunately split in its passage, and one part deviating from the line of descent, nearly 40 yards, came in contact with a little boy, about seven years old, who, seated in the steps of a stile, was nursing an infant - the latter was killed upon the spot - the former was dreadfully cut across the abdomen, but is likely to recover. - What adds to this severe calamity, the distracted mother, about 12 weeks since witnessed the premature loss of her husband, an industrious man, who was drowned, whilst in the act of repairing the fish weir at Gorad Gyt, near this City. - Thus having two inquests in her house in the short space of three months !

 

The Cambrian, 23 October 1824

   Three workmen at Conway Suspension bridge were crushed to death last week by the falling of earth upon them.

 

North Wales Gazette (Bangor), 11 November 1824

MELANCHOLY OCCURRENCE. - On Friday last an inquest was held on the body of David Jones, many years Mail Coachman from Corwen to Bangor-ferry, a sober and industrious man; some dispute rose between the deceased and W. Jones, of Ty-coch, Esq. respecting the delivery of a parcel, on the arrival of the Mail at Bangor-ferry.  Mr. Jones was in his carriage, and had possession of the parcel or parcels, and ordered his coachman to drive on, which the deceased resisted, by seizing the horses heads. - Mr. Jones's driver went off, and in consequence, we are sorry to say, the unfortunate man was thrown down,  the wheels passing over his head, killed him on the spot. - After an adjourned inquest to the following day, the Jury returned a verdict of manslaughter.

 

The Cambrian, 4 December 1824

   At Bangor Ferry, on the 17th ult. a melancholy accident happened.  In getting the Amlwch Mail, with the horse, into the boat, blowing hard at the time, a heavy wave struck the large oar of the Ferry-boat, and swinging off, forced Robert Jones, an assistant ferryman over the side, and being dark at the time, 5 a.m. no assistance could be rendered, and he unfortunately perished.

   A melancholy catastrophe occurred on Monday week, on Carnarvon Bar.  The pilot boat, manned by two brothers, named Hughes, and two sons of these brothers, left Carnarvon at day break, with the intention of boarding a ship, which had anchored off Llanddwye; they were observed from the shore to pass the perch, and shortly after the boat was seen tossed among the breakers, without any person on board; about 12 o'clock, she was driven on shore near Belan, together with a hat and other articles, which but too clearly indicated the untimely fate of her unfortunate crew. - W. Hughes has left a widow with seven children.

 

North Wales Gazette (Bangor), 17 February 1825

LAMENTABLE DEATH OF JOHN HUMPHREYS PARRY, ESQ.

   It is our painful duty this week to record the premature and violent death of the above gentleman, for many years a resident, and we believe a native of Mold.  Mr. Parry was well known as the Editor of the CAMBRO BRITON, and has on many occasions distinguished himself as an ardent admirer, and zealous promoter of the literature of his native country.

   THE family of this unfortunate gentleman, who reside at No. 6, Burton-street, Burton Crescent, have been thrown into the greatest distress by his untimely death, and which has not been alleviated by a knowledge of the manner in which he lost his life.  On Saturday evening, Mr. Parry called at the house of Mr. Pearce, the Prince of Wales Tavern, in North-street, to inquire after the health of Mrs. Pearce; he went to the bar where stood a man of the name of William Bennett, a bricklayer, smoking his pipe, and made the inquiry.  He had not got off the threshold of the door, before he was followed by Bennett, and, in five minutes after, the unfortunate Mr. Parry was brought back to the house without any signs of life; he was bleeding profusely from the nose and mouth.  He was allowed to remain in the passage without any medical assistance, and in a quarter of an hour after being left there he expired.

   Several persons then came running in, and declared that the deceased had been murdered by the man Bennett, who was not to be found.  Several individuals entered the house, amongst whom was the Reverend Jean Baptiste Hubert, and affirmed that they saw Bennett attack Mr. Parry in a lonely part of the street, and give him a blow, which felled him to the ground.  They also distinctly heard Mr. Parry say, "For God's sake, don't kill me !" and observed him hold his hand up to avoid the blow.

   The landlord of the house refused to listen to them, and said he would be answerable to any amount for Bennett.  Some time after the vital spark had fled, Pearce, the landlord, went to Dr. Lyon, who resides in the neighbourhood, and stated that a man had died in a fit of apoplexy, and was at his house, and requested the Doctor to come and see the body.  Dr. Lyon went, accompanied by Mr. Symes, another medical gentleman, and not doubting the landlord's story, as to his death being occasioned by apoplexy, they did not (finding him dead and cold) minutely examine him.  The following day (Sunday) the landlord went to church, and related the same story to Mr. Lovell, the churchwarden, carefully concealing any thing that would criminate Bennett, and requesting that an inquest might be held on the body immediately, if it was possible.

   The report of Mr. Parry having been slain by Bennett soon spread in the neighbourhood, and the fact of Pearce, the landlord, endeavouring to conceal the actual cause of his death, excited great indignation.  A private communication of the affair was made to a Mr. Green, a relative of the deceased, and other friends.  Nine sovereigns were found in his pocket, but his watch and seals had disappeared.  On Thursday evening, the Coroner, and TTJury resembled at the Prince of Wales Tavern, in North-street, to inquire into the shocking affair.  The Jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter," against W. Bennett, who has been apprehended and conveyed to Newgate.  The unfortunate Mr. Parry had, within a few days before his death, come into possession of a very large property. - Mrs. Parry is in an advanced state of pregnancy.

 

North Wales Gazette  (Bangor), 2 June 1825

FATAL OUTRAGE. - A young man of the name of John Roberts, in a violent rage, went to a house in the parish of Llanddeniolen, in this county, called Fron Chwith, on Friday last, where he had some time ago been in service, and shocking to relate, he took up a bill-hook, or a reaping-hook, and cut the woman of the house about the arms in a shocking manner - he also made a dreadful incision on her head; the poor woman lingered till yesterday morning, when death put an end to her sufferings; she was a most charitable and humane woman, and has left an affectionate husband to deplore her loss.  He also cut the servant man and girl with the same instrument in endeavouring to save their mistress. - The wretch is now in Carnarvon Gaol, where he awaits his trial.

 

The Cambrian, 21 January 1826

   We have to record the death of a gentleman, well known and universally respected throughout the Principality.  On the 27th ult. J. Royle, Esq. (brother to the Rev. J. Royle, Rector of Compton Martin, Somersetshire), for some years resident in this city, went out shooting with a friend, accompanied by two of his sons, to the woods skirting the town (Mynydd bach), and whilst entering the cover, the gun, which had a percussion lock, and which he had not been in the habit of using, exploded, and the contents passing from under his chin through the head, caused his instant death. - Bangor Paper.

 

The Cambrian, 30 August 1828

   At the Carnarvon Great Sessions, Wm. Williams,  for the manslaughter of Robert Williams, was, in consideration of his having been in prison some months, and the case not being aggravated, sentenced to pay a fine of one shilling, and was then discharged.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 22 January 1830

FATAL ACCIDENT AT TREMADOC. - On Thursday, the 31st ult. a daughter of Mr. Spooner, Tremadoc, lost her life by the accidental discharge of a fowling piece.  We have been favoured by a correspondent with the following particulars of this melancholy event.  Mr. Spooner's sons having marked down a couple of woodcocks came into the parlour for their guns to go in pursuit of them.  The eldest son, it seems was standing at the fire place, ascertaining with the ram rod of the gun was loaded, (which proved to be the case) and turned the ramrod about half way into the socket, when the gun exploded, and melancholy to relate the whole contents lodged in the head of his sister, a fine young girl 12 years of age, who was sitting at work at the table close beside him, and she died in about 4 hours.  It was an old flint gun, and not a very good loc k; and whether it went off by a spark from the fire, or in the boy's hurry in raising the gun off the hearth stone, the trigger, or the  cock, caught against the fire irons (which projected over the fender)  no one can tell.  The coroner held an inquest on Saturday, when the jury were unanimously of opinion it was purely accidental. - North Wales Chronicle.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 19 June 1829

   Two persons, Evan Williams, of the Gimlet Rock House, and his son, a lad about ten years of age, were on Monday week unfortunately drowned during a fresh gale from the South West, while markarel fishing in Pwllheli Bay.  They were about two miles from the shore, and within three hundred yards of the Preventive Boat, when the crew of the latter saw them ship a heavy sea, and they immediately disappeared; the Preventive Boat was on the spot in a few minutes, but nothing could be discovered except the oars and a loose oft.  The bodies have not yet been found, Williams has left a widow and four small children to deplore his untimely end.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 28 November 1829

DREADFUL EVENT. - (Abridged from the Hull Packet of Thursday.) .  .  .  mere detail of the facts of he case, as disclosed at the inquest held yesterday, at the Mansion house, upon the remains of he two unfortunate individuals, .  .  .  Mr. Wm. Henry Henttig, merchant, and Mrs. Hentig (both now unhappily deceased,)

   At about eleven o'clock on Sunday evening last, the watchmen and neighbours were alarmed by a cry of fire, and a female was heard shrieking for assistance at an attic window.  .  .  .   After a long period had lapsed, during which time, by the active exertions of he firemen, and of many gentlemen who had in the interim arrived on the spot, the danger from fire having been averted, his bed-room of Mr. and Mrs. Hentig was entered, when a horrible sigh presented itself.  Mr. H. was found dead on the floor with the upper part of his skull blown to pieces by a pistol shot, and Mrs. H. lying in the bed, in a sleeping position, dead, with her head penetrated by a pistol ball, which had passed through her left eye, her face scorched to perfect blackness, the hangings burnt from the bestead, and the mattress and bedding in flames. .  .  . 

   The jury having examined the premises, and viewed the melancholy remains, returned to the Mansion-house, where the evidence was submitted to their consideration.

    The two verdicts were given in substance as follows: That he deceased William Henry Hentig, while in a state of temporary insanity, had shot himself with a pistol, from the effects of which he had died; and that the deceased Sarah Hentig had died from the effects of a pistol ball, discharged at her by the said William Henry Hentig, while in a fit of insanity. .  .  . 

 

Carmarthen Journal, 15 October 1831

FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Thursday afternoon, between 2 and 3 o'clock, as a boat belonging to Mr. R. Jones, iron founder, of Bangor, was returning from Beaumaris to that city, she was upset by a sudden squall of wind, and melancholy to relate two fine youths of about 18 years of age, who were on board, both found a watery grave.  The one was Robert Jones, son of Mr. Jones, founder, Bangor; the other David Williams, son o a workman in M. Jones's employment.  The melancholy catastrophe was witnessed by many persons from Hirael and Port Penrhyn, and among them Mr. Jones, the farther of one o the sufferers, but unfortunately no timely assistance could be rendered.  The accident was attributed to the boat carrying too much sail and too little ballast.  The boat has since been found on the Lavan sands, but the bodies of the two young men have hitherto been sought for in vain.

 

Carmarthen Journal, 23 December 1831

ACCIDENT FROM FIRE. - A shocking accident occurred at Conway, on Tuesday last, which shows the impropriety and danger to suffer children to play, unattended, in apartments where fires are kept.  Two little boys, sons of Mr. Davies, of the Coach and Horses, having got out of bed a little before their parents, went, in their night clothes, into the kitchen, and one of them coming by some means or other in contact with the fire, was so severely burnt that his life is despaired of.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 7 January 1832
CAUTION TO SPORTSMAN. - About a fortnight ago, a son of Mr. Evan Jones, of Rhiw-Dafna near Llanrwst, Carnarvonshire, being out rabbit shooting, with another person, in the neighbourhood of Llanrwst, and having incautiously placed his arm on the muzzle of his gun while he was threading the legs of a rabbit which his companion had shot, a little spaniel, in springing at it, touched the trigger, when, the gun discharging the whole charge passed through the arm-pit through the shoulder joint.  The poor man lingered for eleven days before he expired.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 25 February 1832
  MANSLAUGHTER. - On Thursday se'nnight, at the Bear's Head inn, in Ewloe, Carnarvonshire, a young man, named John Shaw, of good general disposition, struck a person of the name of Edward Thomson, during a frivolous quarrel., of which the latter immediately died.  The young fellow is committed to Flint Castle, charged by a coroner's jury with manslaughter.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 3 March 1832
COUNTRY NEWS. Awful calamity. - On Wednesday in the last week a melancholy and fatal accident befell Mr. Henry Jones, who occupied a small farm, called Quellyn, near the lake of that name, and about seven miles from Carnarvom.  He had bored a hole in a fragment of rock, in one of his fields, for the purpose of blasting it, and while he was "stamping" the powder it by some means or other ignited.  The poor man's face and head were so dreadfully shattered as to present a most appalling spectacle.  No other person was present when the catastrophe took place, but he was soon found and taken home.  He continued lingering for fifteen or sixteen hours, till at length death brought him relief.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 9 June 1832
FATAL EFFECTS OF DRUNKENNESS. - On Sunday evening a sailor belonging to the Llewellyn steam-boat, then at anchor in Carnarvon straits, presented himself at the pier in a state of intoxication, and requested to be taken on board.  The boat belonging to the Air, which was lying-to at the pier was lowered to take him on board, and he was safely deposited on the deck of the Llewellyn.  Shortly afterwards, one of the men in the Air heard a splash in the water, and gave an alarm.  No trace was found of the unfortunate man, except that his hat was discovered on the spot where he had been left.  Boats were instantly lowered, and drags procured, but though the search was continued for two tides, the body was not recovered.  His name was Hugh Hughes, and he belonged to Cadnant, near the Menai bridge.  He has left a widow and several children.

Monmouthshire Merlin, 15 August 1840

   A fellow named William Thomas, stone-mason, of Caernarvon, so brutally kicked and struck his wife, on the night of Saturday se'nnight, that she died soon after.

 

Monmouthshire Merlin, 17 October 1840

DREADFUL ACCIDENT. - On Monday last, a poor woman was most dreadfully crushed on the railway near Pont Newydd, between two waggons, as she was in the act of descending from one of them.  She survived until six on the morning of Wednesday when she expired.  It appeared upon the inquest, which was held before W. Hunter Hughes, Esq., coroner, that the name of the unfortunate woman was Jane Evans, a pauper of Llanwnda, and that she was on her return from Groeslon, where she had been to the relieving officer, when the fatal accident occurred.  The waggon on which she rode was full of slates, and when near Pont Newydd, she attempted to get out of the back of the vehicle in order to walk homewards, but her dress becoming entangled, she fell, and thus could not get out of the way of the other vehicle.  A verdict of accidental death was recorded, with a deodand of one shilling upon the waggons.  No blame is attached to any party. - Carmarthen Herald.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School