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Colonial Cases

1894-1896

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 9 January 1894

An inquisition indented taken at M. M. Satterwhite's plantation in Newberry County the 9th day of January A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Della Brooks then and there being dead by the oaths of Burton Satterwhite, Lewis Dorrah, Austin Adkins, Prince Caughman, Tom Gilliam, Hamp Butler, Cole Mangum, Charley Brown, Charley Gary, Steve Satterwhite, Albert Caughman, Press Mangum being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Della Brooks came to her death upon their oaths do say that Della Brooks came to her death from accidental burning January 8, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Burton Satterwhite Foreman, Lewis (X) Dorrah, Austin (X) Adkins, Prince (X) Caughman, Tom (X) Gilliam, Hamp (X) Butler, Cole (X) Mangum, Charley (X) Brown, Charley (X) Gary, Steve (X) Satterwhite, Albert (X) Caughman, Press (X) Mangum

EVIDENCE

Alice Brooks being sworn says: I am the mother of Della Brooks. On the 8th day of January 1894 I left my two children in the house and went to the spring after water and when I came back and got near the house I saw Della standing in the door and on fire with nearly all her clothing burned off. I ran and threw water over her and put the fire out and she died in a few minutes. I hollered and others came.  Alice (X) Brooks

Dr. W. D. Senn being duly sworn says: I certify that I have examined the body of Della Brooks and find that she came to her death from being burned over the entire body.  W. D. Senn MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 11 January 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Welmor Gauntt's place in Newberry County the11h day of January A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Hattie Jackson then and there being dead by the oaths of Julius Bonds, Jim Counts, Mose Counts, Joseph Collins, Frank Dock, Noah Kenedy, Joe Penny, John Harmon, Burr Wood, Dave Gallman, Richard Shell, W. G. Houseal being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Hattie Jackson came to her death upon their oaths do say that Hattie Jackson came to her death from accidental smothering at Wilmon Gauntt's place on June 11, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Julius Bonds Foreman, Jim  (X) Counts, Mose (X) Counts, Joseph (X) Collins, Frank (X) Dock, Noah (X) Kenedy, Joe (X) Penny, John (X) Harmon, Burr (X) Wood, Dave (X) Gallman, Richard (X) Shell, W. G. Houseal

EVIDENCE

Fannie Cannon being sworn says: I am the mother of Hattie Jackson. She was going on eight weeks old. She died sometime today before day Jan 11, 1894. I found her dead this morning when I got up. She was alive this morning after the first shower of rain. That was about 1 o'clock. The baby was not sick that I know of. When I went to bed she nursed the breast last about 1 o'clock. She did not cry during the night. She has not had a cold or cough lately. She has been healthy since she was born. Has not been sick any. Had a cold two or three weeks ago. She was lying on my arm when I found her dead. The cover was over her. Whether I got on her during the night or not I don't know. I don't know what caused her death. Addie Glenn and her husband were in the house with me last night. I live in the same house with them. I slept sound last night and don't know what happened between the last time the baby nursed one o'clock and daybreak. It was about half past seven when I woke up and found the baby dead.                             

Fannie (X) Cannon

   Addie Glenn being sworn says:  Fannie Cannon lives in the house with me and my husband. I did not know Hattie Jackson was dead until I got up this morning. Fannie got up this morning and said, "Addie, I believe my baby is dead." I told her to hold her ear down to it and see if it was breathing. She did so and told me it was not breathing. I held my ear down to it and found it dead. Fannie then said, "Yes, my baby is dead", and came to the fireplace crying. She took its death pretty hard. It had been a healthy child ever since it got over a cold, which it had when it was about three weeks old. It did not look any way peculiar. Looked just like it was living when I saw it dead this morning. Red water ran out of its mouth after I came back from my father's. That was about 9 o'clock. I did not hear the baby cry during the night.  Addie (X) Glenn

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I have examined the dead body of Hattie Jackson. I found no evidence of any violence or disease. In my opinion it was smothered to death. 

W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 11 January 1894

An inquisition indented taken at the Satterwhite's place in Newberry County the 11th day of January A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Fannie Hill then and there being dead by the oaths of Whit Andrews, Young Brown, Dock Mangum, Bill Pitts, John Burton, Jordan Griffin, Jack Leak, Charlie Cook, Pink Workman, Andy Grey, Pink Satterwhite, W. H. Wallace being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Fannie Hill came to her death upon their oaths do say that Fannie Hill came to her death from accidental suffocation on the Satterwhite place on the 11th day of January 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

W. H. Wallace Foreman, Whit (X) Andrews, Young (X) Brown, Dock (X) Mangum, Bill (X) Pitts, John (X) Burton, Jordan (X) Griffin, Jack (X) Leak, Charlie (X) Cook, Pink (X) Workman, Andy (X) Grey, Pink (X) Satterwhite,

EVIDENCE

Bill Hill being sworn says:  I am the father of the child Fannie Hill. My wife awoke and said, "Bill, I believe the child is dead". I got up, got a light and looked and told her it is dead. Was not sick that I knew of. It fretted a little. The baby was lying upon her arm when I went to sleep.

Bill (X) Hill

   Alice Hill being duly sworn says:  I am the mother of the dead child Fannie Hill. She was lying upon my arm. When I woked up it had gotten under my arm. I felt it and it was limby and I told Bill I believed it was dead. He got up and got a light, went back and looked and said he believed it was dead. Don't think it was sick. When I waked up its face was down between my arm and breast. My other baby cried was what waked me up. I had twins. I guess it was between 11 and 12 o'clock.  Alice (X) Hill

Dr. T. W. Smith being duly sworn says: I have examined the body of deceased and find death caused from suffocation.

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 21 January 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Mrs. Lula W. Long's place in Newberry County the 21st day of January A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Lucenia Downes then and there being dead by the oaths of Henry Robertson, Stanmore Neal, William Mendenhall, Bass Emory, Jerry Nelson, David Boseman, Joe Davis, Stephen Mathis, Pierce Butler, George Smith, George Spearman, William Gary being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Lucenia Downes came to her death upon their oaths do say that Lucenia Downes came to her death from accidentally being choked on Mrs. Lula W. Long's place in Newberry County on the 20th day of January 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Pierce (X) Butler Foreman, Henry (X) Robertson, Stanmore (X) Neal, William (X) Mendenhall, Bass (X) Emory, Jerry (X) Nelson, David (X) Boseman, Joe (X) Davis, Stephen (X) Mathis, George (X) Smith, George (X) Spearman, William (X) Gary

EVIDENCE

Mrs. Lula W. Long testimony:  When the child was brought down to my house by its father it was almost dead. I had them carry it into the light and I ran my fingers down its throat. I succeeded in getting a good-sized piece of bread out of its throat.              Lula W. Long

Bennett Downes being sworn says: I am the father of Lucenia Downes. She was standing at the table eating some grease and bread and she got choked. We beat her in the back and gave her some water and then ran my fingers down her throat. Then we taken her and ran down to Mrs. Lula Long's and she ran her finger down her throat and got a piece of bread out of her throat and then we gave her some more water and she made two gasps and died. We then carried her back home.            Bennett (X) Downes

   Mattie Downes being sworn says: I am the mother of Lucenia Downes. Lucenia Downes got choked on bread last night, January 20, 1894 and I beat her on the back to try to get it out. We then taken her down to Mrs. Lula W. Long's to see if she could do anything to relieve. She done all that she could but Lucenia died there and I brought her back home.  Mattie (X) Downes

Dr. J. H. McCullough being sworn says:  This is to certify that I have examined the body of Lucenia Downes and find that she came to her death from being choked on bread, Newberry SC, January 21, 1893     J. H. McCullough MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 3 February 1894

An inquisition indented taken at J.B. Clary's place in Newberry County the 3rd day of February A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Carrie Spence then and there being dead by the oaths of T. F. Hendrix, D. S. Teague, T. N. Boozer, W. P. Johnson, Tommie Hendrix, J. R. Senn, L. H. Dennis, J. B. Clary, J. S. Boozer, J. G. Senn, J. D. Boozer, Dr. W. D. Senn being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Carrie Spence came to her death upon their oaths do say that Carrie Spence came to her death from post partum hemorrhage on J. B. Clary's place 2nd February 1894 in Newberry County. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

James B. Clary Foreman, T. F. Hendrix, D. S. Teague, Thomas N. Boozer, W. P. Johnson, Tommie Hendrix, L. H. Dennis, J. S. Boozer, J. G. Senn, J. D. Boozer, Dr. W. D. Senn, W. T. Hendrix

EVIDENCE

Mrs. Sallie Reid being sworn says: I was called in to see Carrie Spence and she was not as bad off as have seen many one. I waited on her as I do other women. I knowed she was not doing well when I left her but was sick and could not stay longer. She was wasting a great deal. Her labor was normal. I remained two hours after the child was born. She suffered some with shortness of breath but did not have any spasm but complained of being cold. She said she had been sick all night. I was with her about 1 ½ hours before the child was born. She did not waste any before the child was born. I gave ergot to check the hemorrhage but it did not check. She was conscious when I left. I asked her if she felt any better and she said not much. Her feet and legs were not swollen but was very pale. She complained of the shortness of breath right after the child was born. She complained of a hurting in her breast. She was pale before the child was born. She complained of being very thirsty. She wanted coffee but I told her not to drink it more than blood hot. She never got up after the child was born. I don't think she complained of the pain in the chest before the child was born. She did not have a chill. I told aunt Tiddy to wrap her up in warm cloths.  S. A. Reid

   Tildy Robertson being sworn says:  I came down here this morning and asked what was the matter with her. She said her back hurt her. I said, "You had better let me go after Mr. Spence". She said, "I am afraid." I said what afraid of? She said, "I am (afraid) he will beat me to death and I want to get up and get me a razor. She did not say what she was going to do with it. I did not ask her what she wanted with the razor. She did not get up to hunt for the razor. A pain struck her and she laid down. She just laid there and grunted. I heard her say last week she was going to kill herself. She did not (say) how she was going to do it. I did not see her have any medicine. I stayed with her about one half hour but was in and out until she died but had gone to milk when she died. I laid my ear down when I came back to see if I could hear her breathe but could not. Told Mr. Spence she was dead. She wasted I think about a quart altogether. I came in a stream [of wasting]. I was in the room when the child was born and she complained of a pain in her stomach. I put my hand on her stomach. I did not feel any lump. There was no 'hard' - not there. When I rubbed her stomach the blood would run a little and stop. She said she was wasting terribly. There was nothing done to stop it - the hemorrhage. I have had children but never wasted like she did. I never had pains in the bottom of my stomach and be wasting at the same time. She did not ask me for anything but said she wished she had something to stop the hemorrhage. We saved all the cloths that was stained with blood. She did not tell me why she was going to kill herself. She never told me that any body had or had not threatened to hurt her. The last thing she told me was to come here quick. She believed she was dying but I did not go but told her to wait until I come back from milking but left Martha Hunter with her.

Tildy (X) Robertson

   Fannie Means being sworn says:  I came over late yesterday evening. She called for some camphor. I asked Mr. Spence for it. He gave it to me and I gave it to her. I did not give her any wine. She just smelled the camphor. She was not complaining of any pain but she said she felt bad. I don't know whether she was wasting or not. She was lying still on her back. I was not here when she died. She did not say anything to me except she felt bad. She did not look wild but looked like she always did to me. I never noticed her looking pale. She was not sweating as I know of but (I) did not have my hands on her. She did not get up while I was there. She did not say anything to me about killing herself. I guess the sun was down when I went home. It was cloudy.               Fannie (X) Means

Dr. J. H. McCullough being sworn says:  This is to certify that I have examined the body of Miss Carrie Spence and find that she came to her death from Post Partum hemorrhage, Newberry SC, February 3, 1894   J. H. McCullough MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 6 February 1894

An inquisition indented taken at G. B. Summer's place in Newberry County the 6th day of February A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Silas Hart then and there being dead by the oaths of G. B. Summers, Sam Higgins, E. L. Paysinger, Dennis Farrow, C. T. Paysinger, Rube Watts, Sam Robertson, F. P. Culbreath, John Higgins, Sam Jackson, Andrew Gadson, Butler McGraw being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Silas Hart came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Silas Hart came to his death by being accidental burns received the 4th of February 1894 on G. B. Summer's place in Newberry County. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

G. B. Summers Foreman, Sam Higgins, E. L. Paysinger, Dennis (X) Farrow, C. T. Paysinger, Rube (X) Watts, Sam Robertson, F. P. (X) Culbreath, John (X) Higgins, Sam (X) Jackson, Andrew (X) Gadson, Butler (X) McGraw

EVIDENCE

Sam Robinson being sworn says:  I came about 4 o'clock to Frank Hart's house. The little child came along down the path crying. I thought it was going to Mr. Summer's house and he came running to me holding up his hands and Ma said to me "Look, old man - the child." I came over in the path and took him home and put him in the bed. He was burnt all over his hips and legs and privates.                       

Sam (X) Robinson

   Clara Robinson being sworn says:  It was about 4 o'clock when we came to Frank Hart's and as we walked up we met the little child. He had his arms held up. He was whining and I said to Sam to take him and I said, "Lord have mercy Sam, that child is burnt nearly to death. You take the child home and I will go to Mr. Summers and get him to blow the horn for its mother and father to come". But he said they could not hear it but that he would go up and see it and brought Mr. Schumpert and brought some linseed oil and put on it.  Clara (X) Robinson

   Willis Hart being sworn says: I saw my little brother when he caught fire. There was a chunk of wood in the fireplace and he set down on it. He said he wanted to die. When he caught fire I pulled him out and poured water on him.            Willis (X) Hart

Dr. J. H. McCullough being sworn says: I have examined the body of Silas Hart and find that he came to his death from burns received on both thighs, bowels, scrotum and penis.  Newberry SC, February 6, 1894        J. H. McCullough MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 14 February 1894

An inquisition indented taken at P. S. Brook's place in Newberry County the 14th day of February A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of P. S. Brooks then and there being dead by the oaths of W. H. Wendt, W. P. Lominick, J. H. McGraw, S. J. D. Price, J. A. McGraw, L. C. Caldwell, Joseph M. Brown, Nathan Caldwell, Chris Ruff, S. W. Wilson, John G. Price, Godfrey Price being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said P. S. Brooks came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said P. S. Brooks came to his death from natural causes at his place in Newberry County  the 14th of February 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

W. H. Wendt Foreman, W. P. Lominick, J. H. McGraw, S. J. D. Price, J. A. McGraw, L. C. Caldwell, Joseph M. Brown, Nathan (X) Caldwell, Chris Ruff, S. W. Wilson, John G. Price, Godfrey (X) Price
 EVIDENCE

M. R. Brooks being sworn says:  I am the son of Mr. P. S. Brooks. This morning February 14th my father got up to all appearances well with the exception of the toothache. He ate breakfast as heartily as he usually ate. After breakfast he sat by the fire. Seemed to be well, reading a paper. About 11 o'clock I walked off to uncle Nathan Caldwell's and stayed over there until about 12 o'clock. When I came back he was eating his dinner. I ate mine right after him. He was nearly done eating when I got home. After I ate dinner I went and watered the mules and came back into the house and threaded a needle to fix a bridle. My father helped to twist the thread. While we were twisting the thread Messrs Sim Price and Chris Ruff came in. My father sat down on the right hand of the fireplace to shield his left jaw from the fire as he was still suffering with the toothache. He joked Mr. Price about his pants. Mr. Price asked him to lend him a plug of tobacco. He got up to the bureau to get it. After he got the tobacco and gave it to Mr. Price he complained of a pain in his chest. He said, "Oh such a pain struck me in my chest." He then sat down in his chair and didn't sit there two minutes before he got up and went to the door and tried to throw up. Mr. Sim Price asked him if he was sick. He said he was feeling a little nauseated from the pain. He then went and laid down on the bed. After he laid on the bed a few minutes he went to the door and threw up. After he threw up he said, "Malcolm, get me one of those doses of morphine and give it to me quick. After I gave him the morphine he told me to iron his breast with a hot smoothing iron. I did so. While I was ironing his breast he told me to make a pallet in front of the fire - that his feet were cold. I did so. After lying before the fire I ironed his breast again. He got so bad that I asked him if he wanted me to send after Dr. Brown. He said no. He kept growing worse and Mr. Price said, "You better send for Dr. Brown." Mr. Chris Ruff went after Dr. Brown. We rubbed his chest with Jackson's Magie Balsam. He complained the pain had gone lower down - to rub his stomach. I then rubbed his stomach. He told Mr. Price that he felt a little better - that the pain was moving about. He asked me to rub his chest again. I did so. I asked him how he felt. He said a little better if the pain just didn't go to his heart. After he said that he asked me to get another dose of morphine, which had been fixed by Dr. Brown for him before. I got it and dissolved it in water but before I could give it to him he was dead. My father was forty-eight years old. Dr. Brown did not come to see him. Sent some morphine powders. He died about 2:30 about an hour after the pain struck him in the chest.   M. R. Brooks

   S. J. D. Price being sworn says:  I came to Mr. Press Brooks today at about 1:20. When I came in Mr. Brooks was at the bureau with a plate. Chris Ruff came in with me. He started to sit in the right hand corner. Mr. Brooks told him he wanted to sit there to shield his left jaw, as it was hurting. We joked one another. I asked him for some tobacco. After he gave me the tobacco I saw him going to the door with his hands on his chest. I asked him what was the matter. He said he had a terrible pain in his breast. He then went and lay on the bed. Lay there a few minutes and then went to the door and tried to throw up. He said he was not sick - only the pain. He threw up and went back to bed and asked Malcolm to give him a dose of morphine quick. Malcolm gave it to him. He then asked for a hot iron to iron his breast. Malcolm ironed his breast. He asked for Magie Balsam to have his breast rubbed. Malcom got it, rubbed. He asked for a pallet before the fire, as his feet were getting cold. He lay a little and said, "Rub my arms". It is getting in my arms". He then complained of pain in his stomach. His stomach was rubbed. I then asked him if he felt any better. He said, "Yes, I feel a little better now". He said, "The neuralgia had left my jaw and gave in me and if it goes to my heart it will be bad." He then said, "The pain has gone back to my breast" and we rubbed his chest again. He asked Malcolm for the other dose of morphine quick. Malcolm got the morphine and dissolved it in the spoon. He went to raise up but fell back. I saw his feet jerk like a spasm. Malcom then said, "Sim, pa is dying". Mr. Brooks then opened his mouth and gave a long breath and was dead.       S. J. D. Price

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says:  I examined the dead body of Mr. P. S. Brooks today February 14, 1894. In my opinion his death was caused by organic heart disease.      W.G. Houseal MD

P. S. Brooks, 48 years old, died at his home 7 miles from Newberry on 2/14/1894 with organic heart disease. Newberry Observer, 2/21/1894

 

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 19 February 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Mount Olly (Olive?) Church in Newberry County the 19th day of February A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of George Clary then and there being dead by the oaths of Pet Miller, Coleman Reeder, Burt Satterwhite, Charles Turner, Isaac Miller, J.C. Reeder, Adam Teague, Milton Turner, William Reeder, Jesse Coleman, Milton Alexander, Tom Davis being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said George Clary came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said George Clary came to his death on February 14, 1894 on Andrew Johnson's place from a wound of the left foot accidentally made from a saw on Mr. M. M. Satterwhite's place January 30, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

P. Miller Foreman, Coleman (X) Reeder, Burt (X) Satterwhite, Charles (X) Turner, Isaac (X) Miller, J.A. (X) Reeder, Adam (X) Teague, Milton (X) Turner, William Reeder, Jesse (X) Coleman, Milton (X) Alexander, Tom (X) Davis

EVIDENCE

John Bonds being sworn says:  I was acquainted with George Clary. I saw George Clary last alive the day before he died. I saw him several times before that after he was hurt. He was in bed all the time I saw him. I did not see where he was hurt. I saw his foot tied up. He had it from under the cover. I think it was his left foot. I asked him how he felt. He said he felt pretty bad. The first time I saw him in bed he told me he got his foot cut at Mack Satterwhite's. The last day I saw him knew he was pretty sick. He got his breath slow and in a jerky way. He also would draw up and frown. I heard afterwards that he had the lockjaw. I made the coffin for him on Thursday, the day he was buried. I never heard George Clary say how he got his foot cut. Nor did I ever hear him say that he was not in charitable love with everybody on Mack Satterwhite's place.  John (X) Bonds

   Ben Toland being sworn says:  I saw George Clary first after he was hurt on last Monday night. He was at his mother's house on Andrew Johnson's place. I was with him all Monday night and waited on him. His foot was tied up. I never saw it untied. It was his left foot. He was pretty sick all Monday night. Was sweating and had jerky spells. We had to turn him first one way then another. He could not lie in one position long. I heard on Sunday, the day before I was there, that he had lockjaw. He was stiff all over when I was with him Monday night. We could not open his mouth more than half an inch. We gave him nothing but coffee and water. He called for water very often. Mr. Andrew Johnson came down in the night and gave him some resting powders, one dose, and one dose of quinine. I left him Tuesday morning about daylight. I saw him no more until he was dead. He died Wednesday night. He was buried last Thursday. I did not hear him say how he got cut. On Monday night when I was with him, Milton Turner, his mother and his brother Jim Clary and Pinckney Turner were also with him.                  Ben (X) Toland

   Burt Satterwhite being sworn says: I saw George Clary after he was cut at Mr. Mack Satterwhite's. It was about two days after he was cut. I think it was on Friday. He was sitting in the chair and had his foot lying in another chair. I told him I wanted to look at his wound. He said he was mighty proud of it. He wanted me to see how bad it was cut and wanted me to wash it and do it up for him. I undone it. I asked him how it got it cut so bad. He told me he went to hand Mr. Mack Satterwhite a shingle block. He went to shave some saw dust down and the saw caught him. His little toe was sawed in two lengthwise and his foot was sawed down towards his heel. His foot smelled bad and he was suffering a right smart that morning. He did not blame anybody. He said he ran off and called Mr. Mack Satterwhite. He told me Dr. Senn had seen him and had sewed it up and dressed it. It was sewed up when I saw it. I saw him when he passed my house going to Tom Gilliam on the other side of the river. He was walking. It was a little over a mile and a half from Tom Gilliam to Mr. Mack Satterwhite. Tom Gilliam told me he stayed at his house all night and left next day. He went then to Mr. Andrew Johnson's. He was walking when he left Tom Gilliam's. I don't know whether he walked all the way. I don't know when he got to Mr. Johnson's. I don't know whether he stopped on the way. I did not see him alive anymore. I don't know who was present when he was cut. He was buried last Thursday about sundown. I was at the burying ground when the body got there. I told them when the grave was being dug that an inquest ought to be held. Ben Toland, Ike Turner and Milton Turner came to dig the grave. Others helped. Will Reeder was one. Pet Miller said, "Better have the Coroner"          Burt (X) Satterwhite

W. G. Houseal being sworn says:  I examined the dead body of George Clary, February 19, 1894. I found a wound of the left foot reaching from the little toe to the heel. The said wound was sufficient to cause death.   W.G. Houseal MD

George Clary, colored, on 1/30/1894, while working with a circular saw, sliced off the entire length of a side of his foot along with the little toe. After having the foot stitched he walked several miles across country to his place on Andrew Johnson's plantation where he died 2/14/1894 from lockjaw. Newberry Observer, 2/21/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 15 March 1894

An inquisition indented taken at the Carr place in Newberry County the 15th day of March A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Ginsy Kinard then and there being dead by the oaths of Roddy K. Moon, John Copeland, Charles Turner, Milton Alexander, Coleman Reeder, William Reeder, Abraham McMorris, Perry Grey, John Kinard, Paris Simpson, Adam Teague, Jonas Kinard being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ginsy Kinard came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Ginsy Kinard came to her death from Natural causes on the Carr Place in Newberry County on 14th day of March 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Roddy K. Moon Foreman, John Copeland, Charles (X) Turner, Milton  (X) Alexander, Coleman  (X) Reeder, Willis Reeder, Abraham  (X) McMorris, Perry  (X) Grey, John  (X) Kinard, Paris  (X) Simpson, Adam  (X) Teague, Jonas  (X) Kinard

EVIDENCE

Ned Kinard being sworn says:  I am the husband of Ginsy Kinard. Yesterday, March the 14 she had dinner and she ate as hearty as usual. After dinner I went to my son's house. She seemed to be all right and talked freely. It was about 10 o'clock. She ate dinner before I left. I came back in about an hour and found her lying on the floor dead. She had been ailing for sometime and could not talk much. She had a choking in her throat sometimes. She complained of her throat being sore. I am the only one that stayed in the house with her. She was about 95 years old.             

Ned (X) Kinard

   Louisa Kinard being sworn says:  I have known Ginsy Kinard for sometime. I lived next house to her. I was at my house yesterday March 14, the day she died. Uncle Ned called me. I found her lying on the floor on her back, dead. She had a rolling in her throat for sometime and complained of her throat being sore. She had some coughing at times.  Louisa (X) Kinard

Dr. T. W. Smith being sworn says:  I have examined the body of Ginsy Kinard and am of the opinion that she came to her death from asphyxia.   March 15, 1894   T. W. Smith MD

Ginsey Kinard, colored, living 12 miles from Newberry on the Carr Place, in No. 5 Township, dropped dead 3/14/1894. Newberry Observer, 3/21/1894

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 18 March 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry in Newberry County the 18th day of March A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Berthena Danielson then and there being dead by the oaths of J. T. Setzler, J. J. Senn, W. T. Darby, J.A. Senn, Henry C. Koon, Jerry Bouknight, George Davis, G. W. Feltman, Milton White, A. L. Prysock, J. E. Yon, J. M. Foster being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Berthena Danielson came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Berthena Danielson came to her death at Newberry SC March 18, 1894 from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. T. Setzler Foreman, J. J. Senn, W. T. (X) Darby, J. A. Senn, H. C. Koon, Jerry Bouknight, George Davis, G. W. Feltman, W. M. White, A. L. Prysock, J. E. Yon, J. M. Foster

EVIDENCE

Mrs. L. E. Jones being sworn says:  Mrs. Berthena Danielson died this afternoon at Colonel J. R. Leavell's place between 4 and 5 o'clock. The ladies held a mission meeting at Col. Leavell's this afternoon. Mrs. Danielson had just led in prayer. I heard some one call Mrs. Danielson. I turned and noticed some persons held her in their arms. I told them to lay her down. She did not draw more than a half dozen breaths before she was dead. Dr. J. K. Gilder came in about 10 minutes but he felt no pulse - said she was dead. Her face was washed with water and her arms were rubbed with mustard before Dr. Gilder came. She never spoke after she said "Amen". Her prayer was very short. She was accustomed to praying longer. I never heard Mrs. Danielson complain.

Mrs. L. E. (X) Jones

   Mrs. Eliza Dobbins being sworn says:  I and Mrs. Jones worked with Mrs. Danielson after she fell at the missionary meeting at Col. J. R. Leavell's this afternoon, March 18, 1894. I have heard Mrs. L. E. Jones testimony read. The facts which she told are true and I can add no more to her testimony.  Mrs. Eliza (X) Dobbins

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says:  I examined the dead body of Mrs. Berthena Danielson today March 18, 1894. Her death was from natural causes.     W. G. Houseal MD

Mrs. Theodore Danielsen, died suddenly 3/18/1894 at the home of Col. John R. Leavell. Burial was in Rosemont Cemetery. Newberry Observer, 3/21/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 26 March 1894

An inquisition indented taken at J. M. Livingston's Place in Newberry County the 26th day of March A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Warner Gary then and there being dead by the oaths of John Robertson, J.M. Livingston, Larkin Boozer, David Robertson, Lewis McMorris, Pickens Coleman, Smith Davis, Ive Rhodes, James Satterwhite, Mack Kibler, Stan Neal, David Werts being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Warner Gary came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Warner Gary came to his death from natural causes on J. M. Livingston's place March 25, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

David Werts Foreman, J.M. Livingston, John (X) Robertson, Larkin (X) Boozer, David (X) Robertson, Lewis (X) McMorris, Pickens (X) Coleman, Smith (X) Davis, Ive (X) Rhodes, James (X) Satterwhite, Mack (X) Kibler, Stan (X) Neal

EVIDENCE

Abbie Wheeler being sworn says:  I am Warner Gary's sister. I live at Dead Fall. I have seen Warner every day lately. He has not been well since Christmas. He has been confined to his house for two weeks. He lived here alone. He had a bad cough and cold. He coughed up thick mucous - like corruption. I came down every day to see him. He had fever for sometime. He died Sunday March 25 about midday. I did not see him die. I left him late Saturday evening. I thought then that he would soon die. There was no one with him when he died.                               

Abbie (X) Wheeler

   Mack Henderson being sworn says. I know Warner Gary. He is my wife's uncle. I have been to see him every night or two since he had been down. He has been confined to bed about a week. He complained of his side. He had a bad cough and sometimes high fever. I was with him all night Saturday night. I left at daylight Sunday morning. He did not know anything all night or next morning. I did not see him anymore until after he was dead.     Mack (X) Henderson

Dr. J. M. Kibler being sworn says:  This is to certify that I have examined the body of Warner Gary and that he came to his death from natural causes.  J. M. Kibler MD Newberry SC   March 26, 1894

Warner Gary, colored, 80 years old, living on John M. Livingston's place in No. 8 Township died alone at his place on 3/25/1894. Newberry Observer, 3/28/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 2 April 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Prosperity in Newberry County the 2nd day of April A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of L. C. McNeary then and there being dead by the oaths of U. B. Whites, B. C. Cameron, A. G. Wise, Hayne Hawkins, T. L. Schumpert, R. C. Kibler, J.C. Counts, J. H. Gilliard, D. H. Witherspoon, T. B. Bedenbaugh, J. A. Rikard, A.H. Miller being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said L. C. McNeary came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said L. C. McNeary came to his death from natural causes at Prosperity in Newberry County April 2, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

U. B. Whites Foreman, B. C. Cameron, A. G. Wise, A. H. Hawkins, T. L. Schumpert, R. C. Kibler, J.C. Counts, J. H. Gilliard, D. H. Witherspoon, T. B. Bedenbaugh, J. A. Rikard, A.H. Miller
 EVIDENCE

B. B. Schumpert being sworn says:  Mr. Levi McNeary came in the store of Mosely Brothers and traded a little. He asked for a piece of _. I walked off then. Mr. Boland called and when I looked around Mr. Boland had the old man in hand and called for camphor. I found he was dead, went for Dr. McFall and found Mr. McNeary dead when returned. He looked natural and when inquired of how about his health he replied he was well.                            B. B. Schumpert

L. C. Boland being sworn says:  As I went in the grocery side of the store (I) saw Mr. McNeary sitting on the counter. He seemed jovial. While weighing up some coffee heard some noise and upon looking around saw Mr. McNeary on the floor. Ran to him as quick as possible. I administered camphor. He breathed twice and died. He never spoke.  L. C. Boland

April 2, 1894    I certify I was called to see Mr. L. C. McNeary and found him dead when I arrived and pronounced it of heart failure.  W. T. McFall MD

L. C. McNarey, 68 years old, of No. 9 Township died suddenly from heart failure 4/2/1894 while trading in Moseley Bros.' store. Newberry Observer, 4/4/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 22 April 1894

An inquisition indented taken at W. I. Herbert's place in Newberry County the 22nd day of April A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Aggie Williams then and there being dead by the oaths of Charley Herbert, Robert Adell, Madison Spearman, Wilson Herbert, Sam Coleman, Nathan Hawkins, Jack Farrow, John Farrow, Dave Werber, Ely Scott, James Hair, Stan Neal being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Aggie Williams came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Aggie Williams came to her death in W. I. Herbert's place at Newberry SC April 22, 1894 from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Charley (X) Herbert, Robert (X) Adell, Madison (X) Spearman, Wilson (X) Herbert, Sam (X) Coleman, Nathan (X) Hawkins, Jack (X) Farrow, John (X) Farrow, Dave (X) Werber, Alex (X) Scott, James (X) Hair, Stanmore (X) Neal

EVIDENCE

Lewis Williams being sworn says:  I live on Mr. Walter I. Herbert's place. My wife Aggie Williams lived with me. I and my wife went to town yesterday morning. After awhile she complained about having a toothache. She told me to see Mr. Herbert and she would go to Caroline Wilson's restaurant and get warm. When I saw her afterwards on the street was when she first complained of toothache. It was about between 12 and 1 o'clock. She said it was toothache and thought about having her tooth pulled but after getting her money from Mr. Herbert she declined the idea. We came on home about three o'clock. After she got home the toothache continued. About between 11 and 12 o'clock the pain went down between the jaw and neck on the left side - about between 1 and 2 o'clock. I was bothered about trying to relieve her. I can't tell the exact time she took a bad coughing. Breath was tight and short. She asked me to go to Mr. Herbert's to get something to relieve her. I went and came back and did what Mrs. Herbert told me - vis - I put a rag saturated with kerosene oil to her neck. This was the last remedy that I used. I ran to Mr. Butler's for assistance when they were putting her to bed. Scilla Ring and my daughter. She did not lie in the bed all the time. She was first up and then down. We turned her over on her side. I said, "Ain't she dead Scilla?" Scilla said she did not think so. I examined her and found no heartbeat. I ran down to Mr. Herbert's and told him she was dead. She was caught Friday evening in the rain. After she got so bad off I sent after Dr. Lake. When he got here she was dead. Dr. Lake came before day. She died about half past three o'clock am April 22, 1894.  Lewis (X) Williams

   Scilla Ring being sworn says:  I came to Lewis Williams house last night after 3 o'clock. Lewis sent for me. Aggie, his wife, was sitting in a chair when I got here. She said she was nearly choked to death. She got up and went to bed and lay there a few minutes and got up and came back to the fire. I was sitting in a chair. She fell down across my lap and said, "I am nearly dead." She got up and went towards the bed but turned around and started back towards me and began to fall. I caught her. She never spoke anymore. I held her until after a quilt was spread on the floor and then we laid her on the floor and spread some covers on her. I don't know when she did die. Lewis Williams asked me if she was dead and I told him no, I did not think she was dead.          Scilla (X) Ring

   Fannie Williams being sworn says:  I am Aggie Williams daughter. My mother complained of a toothache when she came home from town. I made a hot ash poultice and put (it) to her jaw. She said she was choking to death. She told Pa to pray for her. She got in the bed this morning before she died this morning and stretched out and got up. She got on the floor. We helped her up and put some quilts under her. Put three pillows under her head. I do not know when she died. Pa found she was dead. She didn't take any medicine of any kind. Our remedies were external applications, poultices, etc.   Fannie (X) Williams

W. G. Houseal MD being sworn says:  I examined the dead body of Aggie Williams today April 22, 1894. Her death was from natural causes.  W. G. Houseal MD

Aggie Williams, colored, died suddenly on 4/22/1894, on W. I. Herbert's Plantation. Newberry Observer, 4/25/1894.

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 22 April 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Prosperity in Newberry County the 22nd day of April A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Martha Lewis then and there being dead by the oaths of S. L. Fellers, Pleas McFall, A. G. Wyse, W. L. Morris, F. M. Bowers, Walter Washington, Pres Giles, George Gibson, Bluford Washington, Isaac Gray, James Riley, Henry Lomax being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Martha Lewis came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Martha Lewis came to her death from natural causes at Prosperity SC April 22, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

A. G. Wyse Forman, S. L. Fellers, Pleas (X) McFall, W. L. (X) Morris, F. M. Bowers, Walter (X) Washington, Press (X) Giles, George (X) Gibson, Bluford (X) Washington, Isaac (X) Gray, James (X) Riley, Henry (X) Lomax

EVIDENCE

Juda Young being duly sworn says:  Sister to Martha Lewis. She was sitting at breakfast and when I got to her while she was sitting in the chair at breakfast she died. She had been sick over a year. She complained of her throat. She complained of nothing but her throat. She was up yesterday and went to town. Was not complaining anymore than common. She coughed more this morning before day than usual. No one else present when she died. No doctor waited on her lately. Dr. Langford had been waiting on her but had not attended her lately. She showed no signs of pain nor made any other fuss when she died. She fell on the off side.  Juda (X) Young

J. R. Langford being sworn testifies:  That having examined the body of Martha Lewis and having found no evidence of violence he believes that death was the result of natural causes. April 22, 1894           J. R. Langford MD  

Martha Lewis, colored, of near Prosperity, dropped dead 4/22/1894 at breakfast. Newberry Observer, 4/25/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 1 May 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Prosperity SC in Newberry County the 1st day of May A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Andrew Sheppard then and there being dead by the oaths of Lawson Bowers, Jacob Mills, W. P. Hair, E. N. Kibler, S. S. Birge, Irvin Boozer, W. R. Elmore, J. H. Cannon, Isador Ruff, M. C. Morris, John B. Fellers, John Mayes being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Andrew Sheppard came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Andrew Sheppard came to his death from his own hand with a rope made of a corn sack at Prosperity SC in the guard house, May 1, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

John B. Fellers Foreman, J. L. Bowers, W. J. Mills, W. P. Hair, E. N. Kibler, S. S. Birge, W. I. Boozer, W. R. Elmore, J. H. Cannon, Isador Ruff, M. C. Morris, J. J.  Mayes.

EVIDENCE

U. B. Whites being sworn says:  I, as special police, arrested Andrew Sheppard about 10 o'clock pm April 30. Put him in the guard house after 10 on a warrant issued by L. L. Fellers for assault and attempt to rape. Read the warrant to said Sheppard on the way to the guardhouse. Said he expected to be hung. Prisoner was searched and a knife was taken from him. Knife was open in his pocket. Knife seemed to be sewed to his clothes. Also found a file on his person. Both knife and file exhibited to the jury. Prisoner locked securely in guardhouse. I know nothing of Sheppard until half past 8 am following day at which time I carried his breakfast and found him in the position in which he was viewed by the coroner's jury. I spoke to him while in that position. He made no reply. I immediately notified the trial justice, S. L. Fellers, and the mayor of the town and carried both of these officials to the place or cell where he was hanging. Was not possible for anyone to have had the keys save myself.     U. B. Whites

   S. L. Fellers, Trial Justice, being sworn says: On Friday night Andrew Sheppard was causing considerable disturbance. George Caughman and Bunk Adams came and reported the above to me. I said to Caughman and Bunk Adams to grab him and bring him to me and I would put him in the guardhouse if he did not behave himself. Then was the time he created the disturbance. I carried him immediately to the guardhouse. U. B. Whites notified of his, Sheppard's, condition in the guardhouse. I, in company with the Mayor of the town and U.B. Whites found him in the condition he was in when viewed by the Coroner's jury.  S. L. Fellers

This is to certify that I examined the dead body of Andrew Sheppard in a cell in the guardhouse of the town of prosperity and that he came to his death from strangulation, bagging rope being cut from his neck by me.  May 1, 1894  bP. G. Ellisor  MD 

Andrew Sheppard, COURT OF SESSIONS, assault with intent to ravish, not guilty, Newberry Observer, 11/15/1893; Andrew Sheppard, colored, of Prosperity, committed suicide in the jail. He had been arrested last July for a similar crime and had been acquitted. Newberry Observer, 5/2/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 2 May 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Blair Place in Newberry County the 2nd day of May A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Emanuel James then and there being dead by the oaths of  J. H. Smith, Walter Graham, J. W. Gilliam, Bose Counts, James Adams, Harry Jeter, R. W. Glymph, Neel Gilliam, Nathan Lindsay, West Chapman, Stout Goree, Howard Jeter being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Emanuel James came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Emanuel James came to his death from natural causes on the Blair Place in Newberry County on the night of the first of May 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. H. Smith Foreman, Walter (X) Graham, J. W. Gilliam, Bose (X) Counts, J. A. Adams, Harry (X) Jeter, R. W. Glymph, Neel (X) Gilliam, N. D. Lindsay, West (X) Chapman, Stout (X) Goree, Howard (X) Jeter

EVIDENCE

Charlotte James being sworn says:  I am the wife of Emanuel James. Emanuel has been complaining for some two days. Said he had pain in the shoulder and neck. Emanuel was at home last night May 1. Left home about 11 o'clock but don't know exactly. He said nothing when he left the house. Didn't see him anymore after he left the house until a while after sun up when I saw him dead in the pines. He was dressed when found, just as he was when he left the house the night before. His shoes was on when he left the house. When I saw him this morning they were off or missing. Can't find shoes nowhere. He had not taken any medicine. There is no poison in the house. Don't think he possessed any poison. When he left he locked the door and put the key through 'cat hall' on inside room. Was plowing yesterday. Said he felt bad when he came home from work. Eat a good supper. Didn't look for tracks. Had his shoes on when he eat supper but pulled them off soon after. Said he could not be satisfied anywhere he went. Think his sickness caused him to say this.  Charlotte (X) James

   Kirk Goree being sworn says:  I found Emanuel James soon after sun up the 2nd day of May 1894. Was passing through the pines. Was looking for Emanuel James. He was laying flat on his back. Did not look like any scuffling about place where he was lying. His shoes were off. Did not see any shoes about the place. Don't know that he had any difficulty with anyone. Was looking for him to get some melon seed. Told J. W. Gilliam that I had found him dead immediately afterwards. Brought Mr. Gilliam to the place where he was lying.  Kirk (X) Goree

Blair Place, Newberry Co. May 2, 1894

This is to certify that I have examined the dead body of Emanuel James and find that he came to his death from natural causes.                 P. G. Ellisor MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 12 May 1894

An inquisition indented taken at D. M. Ward's Place in Newberry County the 12th day of May A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of J. T. Knox then and there being dead by the oaths of W. Johnson, J. C. Myers, D. S. Ellisor, J. A. Blatts, R. L. Kibler, J. C. Neil, J. W. Earhart, W. T. McDonald, B. S. Morgan, J. H. Todd, J. C. Paysinger, John Kinard being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said J. T. Knox came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said J. T. Knox came to his death from a gun shot wound by the hand of Henry Piester on D. M. Ward's Place in Newberry County May 12, 1894. Wound was received May 10, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. C. Myers Foreman, William Johnson, D. S. Ellisor, J. A. Blatts, R. L. Kibler, J. Cal Neil, J. W. Earhart, W. T. McDonald, Butler S. Morgan, J. Henry (X) Todd, J. C. Paysinger, John Mayer Kinard
EVIDENCE

D. M. Ward being sworn says:  About 4 o'clock day before yesterday May 10, I was at the still house. Tom King and Henry Peister were there with me working on the house. While I was on the house I missed Henry Peister. I came down and in a few minutes heard the firing of some firearms. I thought there were six or seven reports of the gun or pistol. I then heard a female voice screaming. I went towards the firing and when I came near I saw Henry Peister on Knox, beating him with his fist and then with a gun. Henry left before I got to him. When Henry left he had a pistol in his hand. I then lifted Knox up and brought him home. Tom King was with me then. When I got to Knox he said the Negro has killed me. He then opened his cloths and showed me the wound in the right side. He also had several wounds on the head. The gun that Knox had was my gun but Knox had it in his possession. The gun was not broken before this day. Knox and the Negro had had some difficulty that day. The Negro had no business in the field where Knox was working so far as I know. The Negro and Knox were both peaceable men. The Negro told me that he had told Knox he was going to use the cultivator in Knox's field and Knox told him he could not do it. The Negro cursed Knox and told him he would do it, that he was afraid of no God d_ poor white man. Knox then got his gun and the Negro left. This is all I know about the trouble until I heard the gun and pistol fire. He said he had no pistol when Knox drew the gun on him at dinnertime at the house. Mr. Knox told me on the way to the house that the Negro had shot him without a cause. He had told the Negro to keep out of his field. The Negro told him he could not make this crop, if the Negro went to the spring in Livingston's field for water. It was not the nearest water he could have gotten. Knox said the Negro passed him in the field in order to renew the difficulty. The Negro was not accustomed to carrying a pistol.       D. M. Ward

   Mrs. Lula Knox being duly sworn says:  I am the wife of J. T. Knox. I was in the field when the shooting occurred between Henry Peister and Mr. Knox. I was so frightened that I could not understand what was said. The Negro went to the spring in Livingston's field and came back by Mr. Knox who was plowing with his hand on the pistol in his pocket. He passed Knox going. Also at noon I hear my husband tell the Negro he would better take the horse and plow in the field now. The Negro said he didn't have any more respect for a God d__ poor white man than for a damned dog. Mr. Knox ordered the Negro out of the yard and came in the house for his gun. The Negro went into a Negro house in our yard when Mr. Knox came out with the gun. Mr. Knox did not follow him any further. When Mr. Knox went into the field he carried his gun with him but did not say for what purpose. I did not notice what he did with the gun after he got there. Mr. Knox, after he was shot, said nothing to me about the difficulty. This was the first time I ever knew Mr. Knox to carry his gun to the field.  Lula Knox

   Tom King being duly sworn says:  I was down at Mr. Ward's still house on May 10, 1894. I know Henry Peister. At noon Henry cursed Knox about plowing in Knox's field. Knox then got his gun and Henry went in Laura's house and stayed in there until he had eaten dinner. I ate dinner with him. He had no pistol then. After dinner he went to town for Mr. Ward, to settle the difficulty. I saw a pistol in his pocket when he came back. I don't know where he got the pistol. When he came back he said he was ready for anything. The first I knew of difficulty in the field was the shooting that I heard. Henry used water from Livingston's spring every day. When I heard the shooting I ran to Knox and Henry was on him beating him with a gun. Henry was on a direct line from the spring to the still house when he passed Knox in the field. When I got to Knox I helped to get him home. Mr. Knox told me he and Henry shot about the same time. That he shot twice and Henry shot three times. The spring in Livingston's field is a good deal further from the still than the spring at the house.  Tom (X) King

   James Knox being duly sworn says:   I am the son of J. T. Knox. I was at home when Henry Peister came into the yard and was talking to my father about plowing in the field. Henry told pa that he was going to plow the 'colt' (Cultivator?) in his field. Pa told him it would tramp down his corn. Henry said he would do it if he wanted to. When they came into the yard Pa told him he would better do it now. Henry said, "I don't respect a God d_ poor white man any more than I do a damned dog". Pa then came into the house for his gun and Henry ran into the Negro house in the yard. Pa then came back into his house and put his gun up. I was in the field about fifty yards from Pa when the shooting occurred. Pa told Henry when he was coming back from the spring not to come in his field again after what he had said at dinner. Henry then cussed pa for a s__ of a b___. Pa then got his gun which was about fifteen feet away and they both shot at the same time. Henry shot with a pistol. Pa shot twice and Henry shot three times. The last shot hit Pa. Henry then ran into Pa and knocked him down and beat him with the gun. Henry then left with his pistol in his hand. I will be eleven years old June 9, 1894. Henry had never plowed in Pa's field. Pa ordered Henry out of his yard at dinner before he got his gun and Henry would not go.  James (X) Knox

Dr. W. G. Houseal sworn says:   About 4 o'clock May 10, 1894 Mr. Ward came for me to go out and see Mr. Knox. When I arrived I found him sitting on the edge of the bed under great shock. I injected half a grain of morphine. I examined a gunshot wound over the region of the liver and a wound of the scalp on top of the head and outer table of the skull bone scaled. He also had a scalp wound of the forehead. The wound of the side killed him. I thought at first he would die under the shock. I told Mr. Knox that he was fatally wounded and that if he had any preparations to make he had better make them. After he was easing from the morphine I asked him who shot him. He said Henry Peister and that no one was present. I then told him he would better make a statement. He called Mr. Ward in and asked him to care for his son. He then told me then what took [place] in the field. He said he was plowing in the field and Henry passed him in the field going and coming from the spring and kept looking at Knox. He said, "Henry, after what you said at dinner I want you to stay out of my field and go out now". He said, "Damned s ___ of a b_, I'll cross this field when I get ready and I'll stay in here as long as I please". He then went for his gun and Henry pulled his pistol and both fired at once.  They were some distance apart. They then fired again. His gun was loaded with babbit. Then they closed on each other and Henry said, "Oh yes, damn you, I've got you now".  Henry fired the third shot and struck him in the side. He threw his gun at Henry and hit him on the leg. Henry picked up the gun and struck him on the head and brought him to his knees. He then struck him with his pistol or knucks and knocked him down and stomped him in the mouth. It was with great difficulty that he made this statement. The following morning after Knox was hurt he told me that Henry said he was going to plow a 'colt' in his cotton patch. He told Henry he would not allow anyone to plow a colt in his cotton patch. They cursed each other. Shortly afterwards in the yard Henry came to him and said, "Did you say I should not plow 'colt' in your cotton patch?" He said, "Yes I did Henry". Then said, "I have no more respect for a damned poor white man than I do for a damned dog". He came into the house for his gun and Henry ran into the Negro house.    W. G. Houseal

This certifies that J. T. Knox came to his death from the effects of a gun shot wound of the right side, the ball entering the body between the ninth and tenth ribs passing directly across the body through the liver.           J. M. Kibler MD  Newberry County SC   May 12, 1894   

James T. Knox, married Lula Merchant, both of Newberry, on 12/17/1893 at Ebenezer Church by Rev. W. L. Wait. Newberry Observer, 12/27/1893

J. T. Knox white, was shot and killed by Henry Piester, colored. Knox came from NC to Newberry via Greenville about 1 year ago. He was living on and running a farm on D. M. Ward's place about 2 miles east of Newberry at the time of the shooting. Page 3, column 5, Newberry Observer, 5/16/1894

Henry Piester, colored, shot and killed J. T. Knox, a white man who was plowing in his field at the time. Page 3, column 5, Newberry Observer, 5/16/1894; Henry Piester, COURT OF SESSIONS, murder, continued, Newberry Observer, 7/11/1894; Henry Piester, is a fugitive. The Governor offered $100 reward for his capture, wanted for the murder of James T. Knox in 1894. Newberry Observer 7/24/1895

 

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 19 May 1894

An inquisition indented taken at J. M. Wheeler's Place in Newberry County the 19th day of May A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Phillis Lewis then and there being dead by the oaths of D. H. Witherspoon, Cage Sligh, S. L. Fellers, Jim Wheeler, B. Washington, John Burton, Lang Grey, Malvus Jackson, Solomon Lewie, Jeff Roof, Young Bridges, J. B. Roof being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Phillis Lewis came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Phillis Lewis came to her death from natural causes on J. M. Wheeler's Place in Newberry County on the night of May 18, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

D. H. Witherspoon Foreman, Cage (X) Sligh, S. L. Fellers, James  (X) Wheeler, Bluford  (X) Washington, John Burton, Lang Grey, Malvus Jackson, Solomon  (X) Lewie, J. B. (X) Roof, Young Bridges, Jeff  (X) Roof

EVIDENCE

Lavinia Fair being sworn says:  I am the daughter of the deceased. Last night May 18, 1894 about 9 or 10 o'clock I was gone to bed and mother called me. I got up and went to her. She coughed severely and continuously. I asked what was the matter and she said breath was so short. Deceased suffered only about five minutes and died between 9 and 10 o'clock. Deceased was apparently well yesterday and helped me to wash and scour. Never complained prior to her attack, just before her death. Died before I could send for a doctor. James was in the yard. I called sister Davis but she did not get here before mother died. She (mother) asked me for something to stop her cough. I gave her some pepper vinegar, which she had asked for, but it seemed not o do any good.               Lavinia (X) Fair

Dr. W. T. McFall after examining the body gave the following statement: I have examined the body of Phillis Lewis and certify that in my judgment she died of heart failure.  W. T. McFall MD 

May 19, 1894

Phyllis Lewis, colored, died suddenly at her home in Prosperity 5/15/1894. She was the widow of Luke Lewis, a sexton of the Newberry Presbyterian Church. Newberry Observer, 5/16/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 22 May 1894

An inquisition indented taken at F. M. Schumpert's Place in Newberry County the 22nd day of May A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Ella Johnson then and there being dead by the oaths of F. M. Schumpert, Johnson Boulware, Charles Herbert, William Jackson, Abe Hall, Gross Floyd, Dangerfield Parker, Tom Schumpert, John Herbert, J.C. Schumpert, Lee Gary, Ed Schumpert being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ella Johnson  came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Ella Johnson came to her death from natural causes on F. M. Schumpert's Place in Newberry County on May 22, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J.C. Schumpert Foreman, F. M. Schumpert, Johnson (X) Boulware, Charlie (X) Herbert, William (X) Jackson, Abe (X) Hall, Gross (X) Floyd, Dangerfield (X) Parker, Tom Schumpert, John (X) Herbert, Lee (X) Gary, Ed Schumpert

EVIDENCE

Jordon Gary being sworn says:   Last night just about time I came home from the field Ella Johnson called me into the room where she was. She said to me, "You stayed late tonight. What is the matter?" I said I was on the river. I asked her if she felt any better. She said, "No. I feel no better". She said she wanted to get up. I told her she couldn't get up. She said yes she could. About that time Ivy Johnson and his wife came. They said, let her get up. She will rest better. She got up and sat in the rocking chair and rocked and saying, "Oh Lord Jesus have mercy". She asked me to keep her children together since she wouldn't be here in the morning. She went and lay down again - about 10 ½ o'clock. She got up again about 1 o'clock, sat in the rocking chair. I saw she was dying and told my wife. I sent my wife for Jesse Gary and his wife. When my wife got back she was still alive. She also went to Gross Floyd's and back before Ella died. She died about five minutes after 1 o'clock. Ella Johnson was sick about three months. Dr. Lake said she had grippe and locked liver. He saw her about six weeks ago. She went to see Mike Kinard last Sunday. He gave her medicine. I saw her take medicine she got from Mike Kinard last Sunday. Ella Johnson lived with me. She took no medicine but Dr. Kinards since she went to see him. She first took Kinard's medicine last Sunday. She said she thought Kinard's medicine helped. He rubbed her with medicine also. She couldn't lie on her right side and said most of her misery was on that side. If she would lie on the right side she coughed all the time. She would spit up yellow and green expectorations. Sometimes it was sticky and she would have to pull it off her mouth like dough. I don't know whether she had fever. I didn't see her sweat. She ate some at every meal. She was not confined to bed. She got up whenever she wished. Kinard said she had the lung disease and told her she couldn't live. I think riding to Kinard's and back didn't hurt her. Her feet were swelled. I marked on her feet with finger and it would leave indentation. I did that last Sunday and noticed her feet swollen two weeks ago. She breathed bad about three weeks before she died. The last week she got into a perfect jerking of her body at every breath.

There has been no difficulty between my family and Ella Johnson. There has been nothing but friendly relations. Ella Johnson has been married but has been parted from her husband 6 or 7 years. She had four children. I provided for them. I have three in my family, Ella Johnson's youngest children are twins, 22 months old. I am Ella's cousin. She had more relatives up the country. When I moved on Mr. Schumpert's place I got two houses - one for me and one for Ella. Ella didn't care to go into the house by herself. I made preparations for her to go into a separate house. It was satisfaction to her and my wife for her to live in house with me.  Jordan Gary

   Bettie Gary being sworn says:   I am Jordan Gary's wife. Ella Johnson died last night May 22, 1894 about between 2 and 3 o'clock. It was after midnight. She had been sick about four months. She had been bad sick about two months. She lived in the house with me. She was first cousin to my husband. We got along well together. Never had a fuss or fight. Ella's mother put her with me when she died. She gave birth to a child in my house and I was granny to it. She took cough medicine. Kinard rubbed her last Sunday and gave her one dose at his house on the same day. She brought some home but didn't take it. The only medicine she took from Kinard was at his house and some out of a vial. She took no medicine since Sunday night. After she took medicine out of the vial her bowels acted more.   Betty Gary

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says:   I examined the body of Ella Johnson. I found no marks of violence. I believe she died from natural causes.  May 22, 1894        W. G. Houseal MD

Ella Johnson, colored, died suddenly on F. M. Schumpert's place in No. 8 Township 5/15/1894. Newberry Observer, 5/16/1894

 

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 27 May 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in Newberry County the 27th day of May A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Young Saunders then and there being dead by the oaths of J. C. Wilson, W. J. Miller, W. E. Blatts, S.S. Coleman, J. A. Eddy, W. P. Bedenbaugh, Ed Franklin, Amos Taylor, B. A. Havird, Charles Montgomery, J. H. Todd, Abb Mingo being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Young Saunders came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Young Saunders came to his death from a gunshot wound the gun being fired by Annie Teague with intent to kill at Newberry Court House on May 26, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. C. Wilson Jr. Foreman, W. J. Miller, W. E. Blatts, S.S. Coleman, John A. Eddy, W. P. Bedenbaugh, Ed Franklin, Amos C. Taylor, B. A. Havird, C. W. Montgomery, J. H. (X) Todd, Abb Mingo
EVIDENCE

George Langford being duly sworn says:   I know Young Saunders. I saw him last night in town. I saw him between seven and eight o'clock. When I saw him again he was on my piazza dead. I was inside my house when Young Saunders was killed. My sister Annie Teague killed him with a shotgun. She was inside the door when she fired the gun. The door was shut. Young Saunders was on the outside. I had heard no one on the outside before the gun was fired. I did not know anyone was shot until I examined the hole in the door. My sister lives with me. About a minute before my sister picked the gun up she said it was in a dangerous place and should be moved. She then got the gun and in a minute I heard the gunfire. When I saw the gun in her hand it was in a position as if one was about to raise it to the shoulder. This is my gun. Young has been in the habit of coming to my house. He has stayed all night. He came to see my sister. My sister has lived with me about a month. My sister had a quarrel last night with another woman about Young Saunders. Young Saunders had a wife but his wife is married to another man. My sister has a husband but don't live with him. Young told me that he was going to marry my sister. I allowed him to stay in my house all night with my sister in her room. The gun will not stand cocked. The gun was shot only once last night. There was no one in the house but my wife, sister and daughter. There has been no quarrel in my house. The woman that my sister had a quarrel was Leah Brown. Young Saunders was killed about ten o'clock.   George (X) Langford

   Duncan Griffin being duly sworn says:   I know Young Saunders. I know nothing about how he came to his death. Before I heard the gunfire I heard quarrelling in George Langford's house. I don't know who was quarreling. It sounded like a man's voice. I could not tell whether it was on the outside or inside of the house. In about ten or fifteen minutes I heard the gunfire. I did not hear any noise after the gunfire. Mrs. Galamy came and told me there was a man killed.

Duncan (X) Griffin

   Louisa McMorris being duly sworn says:   I heard quarreling at George Langford's house last night. The difficulty was between a man and a woman. The quarreling was on the inside of the house. No quarreling was going on when I heard the gunfire. It was about an hour from the time of the quarreling. The woman said she had been working hard and the man said something about striking her. I saw Young Saunders yesterday afternoon on the street having some words with some woman. I don't know whether Annie Teague was in the crowd or not. I never heard a fuss here before. I live just across the street from Langford's house. His wife and he were having the fuss. I did not see Saunders at Langford's house. I have seen him visit Annie Teague frequently.      

Louisa (X) McMorris

   Laura Langford being duly sworn says: I know Young Saunders. He was accustomed to visit my house. I was at home last night. My husband and I were quarreling about an hour before Saunders was killed. Annie Teague killed Young Saunders. She was in the house when she shot him. About five minutes after the gun shot I examined the door and saw the hole in the door and Young Saunders on the outside dead. I did not know anyone was out there. I saw Saunders on the street yesterday and had not seen him since. I never saw Annie have the gun in her hands before. I do not know why Annie had the gun in her hands. I did not hear anything on the piazza until after the gun fired and then I heard some little noise. He was dead when I saw him. After the gun fired Annie said nothing. Annie had never said anything before tonight about moving the gun. The door was shut but not locked when Saunders was killed. He was killed between ten and eleven o'clock. When Annie saw the man dead she fainted off. I opened the door and saw a dead man but did not know who he was at first. Annie had been home about fifteen minutes before Saunders was shot. No one came home with her. Annie was not at home when the quarreling was going on. Annie was arrested by policeman Bradley.                                              Laura (X) Langford

George Langford recalled:  When Annie had fired the gun she set it down on the floor.     George (X) Langford

Caroline Langford being duly sworn says:  I was at home last night when Young Saunders was killed. Annie Teague killed him. She had been home about fifteen or twenty minutes before Saunders was killed. She came home by herself. The door was closed and I did not see her until she came in. She came in a good humor. The gun was behind the door when she got it. She said she would move the gun because the door opened on it. The gun always stayed behind the door. When the gun fired aunt Annie was frightened. My ma opened the door after the shooting to see what damage had been done to the doors. When ma told Annie she had killed a man Annie fainted. The first thing I heard her say was, "Lord have mercy. I have killed a man."        Caroline (X) Langford

This certifies that Young Saunders came to his death from the effects of a gun shot wound of the left side of the neck. The load of shot entered from the front and pressing directly backward and upward severing the entire soft parts of the neck.  Newberry SC    May 24, 1894       J. M. Kibler MD

Young Sanders, colored, was killed 5/25/1894 at the house of George Langford in Newberry by Annie Teague, colored. Details on page 3, column 4, Newberry Observer, 5/30/1894

Annie Teague, colored, killed Young Sanders, colored. Details on page 3, column 4, Newberry Observer, 5/30/1894; Annie Teague, COURT OF SESSIONS, murder, continued, Newberry Observer, 7/11/1894; Annie Teague, COURT OF SESSION, murder, not guilty. Newberry Observer 7/17/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 8 July 1894

An inquisition indented taken at M. J. H. Waldrop's Place in Newberry County the 8th day of July A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Isaac Boozer then and there being dead by the oaths of W. E. Longshore, H. B. Hendrix, J. S. Longshore, David Pitts, Henry Longshore, M. Jeff Waldrop, L. C. Boozer, Willie Hayes, W. D. Pitts, George Davenport, J. H. Hendrix, Will P. Reid being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Isaac Boozer came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Isaac Boozer came to his death from Malarial fever and spasms at  J. H. Waldrop's Place in Newberry County on July 8th 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

W. E. Longshore Foreman, H. B. Hendrix, J. S. Longshore, David Pitts, Henry Longshore, M. J. Waldrop, L. C. Boozer, Willie Hayes, W. D. Pitts, G. W. Davenport, J. H. Hendrix, William P. Reid
EVIDENCE

Hattie Boozer being sworn says:   I live on Mr. M. Jeff Waldrop's place. I am the mother of Isaac Boozer. He would be three months old tomorrow. He died this morning July 8, 1894 before sun up. He fretted last night before we went to bed, I thought he wanted to nurse. He got worse about midnight and had spasms. He had spasms pretty regular. I got up with him at 12 o'clock. I held him in my arms until he died. I thought he was having spells like he had before. I didn't know what was the matter with him. His hands and toes would draw up and I tried to straighten them out but could not. I wet a rag in cold water and put to his head. The rag would soon get hot. The child was so hot. He was fretting on Saturday. He would play until he would get a spasm. When I found out he was dying this morning, I screamed and cried. Dr. Senn was to see him last Tuesday one week ago. He made only one visit. He gave quinine and resting powders.     Hattie (X) Boozer

   Robert Boozer being sworn says:   I live with my wife Hattie Boozer on Mr. M. Jeff Waldrop's place in Newberry County. When I came in last night from work I played with my boy Isaac on a palate. Every once in a while he would jerk and draw up. He played until he would draw up. These spells would pass off and he would play again. I didn't know what was the matter with him.  Before I lay down I was not much uneasy about him. My wife woke me at 12 o'clock midnight. He was getting worse and I began to get uneasy about him. I stayed up with him until he got more easy and I went to sleep. My wife awoke me about an hour or two before day. He had got worse again. He died about an hour before sun up. He jerked and drew up and foamed at the mouth. I put my hand on him and he felt as hot as he could feel. My wife put wet rags on his forehead. He was sick last Sunday night one week ago. Dr, Senn made one visit to him last Tuesday night one week ago. He did not tell me what was the matter. He gave him quinine to rub him with and resting powders and a solution to keep off spasms. I did not give him any medicine last night. Neither did my wife.

Robert (X) Boozer

   W. G. Houseal MD being sworn says:   I examined the body of Isaac Boozer today July 8, 1894. I found no marks of violence. From my examination, the history of the case, I learned that his death was caused by very high malarial fevers and spasms.  W. G. Houseal MD

Robert Boozer, colored, his 3-month-old child died. Newberry Observer, 7/11/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 22 July 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Bush River Church in Newberry County the 22nd day of July A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Jesse Miller then and there being dead by the oaths of Henry Wallace, Dick Satterwhite, G. L. Clamp, James Davenport, S. E. Senn, Frank Spearman, L. C. Johnson, J. E. Senn, G. Z. Pitts, R. X. Cleland, J.J. Stillwell, Willie Dobbins being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jesse Miller came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Jesse Miller came to his death from natural causes on Mart H. Gary's Place in Newberry County on July 19th 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Henry Wallace Foreman, D. S. Satterwhite, G. L. Clamp, James H. Davenport, S. E. Senn, Frank G. Spearman, L. C. Johnson, J. E. Senn, G. Z. Pitts, R. X. Cleland, J. J. Stillwell, W. S. Dobbins
EVIDENCE

Beckie Neel being sworn says:   I lived in the house with Jesse Miller. He died Thursday morning about 9 o'clock, July 19, 1894. He lived on Mr. Mart Gary's place in Newberry County. I was in another room. Jesse Miller called me. I called Joe Neel. I was asleep and was awakened by his calling. I was in another room. I heard him groaning. I didn't go in the room where Jesse Miller was. I went in after Mrs. Alice Gary came. He was dead when I saw him. Mrs. Gary was putting him on a palate when I went in. He had been sick nearly two months. Dr. Senn had been to see him. He was swollen in his legs and feet. He was swollen up twice. Dr. Senn saw him when he was swollen - the first time but not the second time. It had been about two months since Dr. Senn saw him last. He sat up in the bed. Had been in bed about a month. George Miller, his son, had him buried. Jesse's wife was at the spring, washing, when he died. We were not expecting him to die. He ate but Wistar Gary was the first one to get to him after he called. Joe Neel was out where Wistar Gary was. I didn't go when he called me for I did not want to see him die. I thought he was dying from the way he groaned.             Beckie (X) Neel

   M. Wistar Gary being sworn says:   Jesse Miller lived on my father's place. I was in the yard. Had Joe Neel with me cutting some bushes. Beckie Neel came to the window and called Joe to come and see what was the matter with uncle Jesse. Both of us ran up and got there at the same time. He had fallen off the bed. Was on his knees with his head on the floor. I thought he was dead and told Joe to run and tell his mother. She came on. Mother, Mrs. Alice Gary, came and felt his pulse and said he was dead. His wife came about that time. Mother had her to put a quilt on the floor. Joe and I laid him on the quilt and he was covered with another.

He took a cold at first and his feet began to swell. He got medicine from Dr. Senn. He got well and went back to work. He was well about a month. He began to swell again. Dr. Senn came to see him and gave him medicine. I think he stopped another time. I think Dr. Senn saw him about three weeks before he died. He sat on bed and in chair most of the time. He hardly ever went out of the house. He lay down some but felt better sitting up. Dr. Senn sent him some medicine without charge. Dr. Senn inquired from me how he was. His feet and legs swelled first, then his body began to swell. His son George Miller had him buried. He died Thursday July 19, 1894. I know nothing outside of his sickness that could have caused his death. The last week of his life he didn't eat much. The relations between him and family were friendly. He suffered no neglect by his family. He didn't have enough medicine. His family was not able to get medicine. Dr. Senn gave him some. My mother sent him food and went to serve him.  M. Wistar Gary

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says:  I examined the body of Jesse Miller. The body was very much decomposed and works of violence would not show unless very violent, such as a cut or severe laceration. The man had dropsy of the whole body. His death was caused by kidney or heart disease, probably both.          July 22, 1894        W. G. Houseal MD

Jesse Miller, colored, who had been suffering from dropsy, died 7/19/1894 at M. H. Gary's place. The coroner performed an inquest and the verdict was death by natural causes. Newberry Observer 7/25/1894; A report on the event. George Miller is the son of Jesse Miller. Page 8,column 1 Newberry Observer, 8/1/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 22 August 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in Newberry County the 22nd day of August A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Amelia Burton then and there being dead by the oaths of J. R. Rivers, J. H. Goree, S. H. Chappell, C. W. Montgomery, John Grey, William Lane, Alex Ransom, Charles Brown, Alex Glascow, H. J. Knuckles, Ben Caldwell, Jordan Butler being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Amelia Burton  came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Amelia Burton came to her death from heart disease. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say Amelia Burton came to her death from heart disease in the town of Newberry on August 22, AD 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. R. Rivers Foreman, J. H. Goree, S. H. Chappell, C. W. Montgomery, John (X) Grey, William (X) Lane, Alex (X) Ransom, Charles (X) Brown, Alex (X) Glascow, H. J. Knuckles, Ben (X) Caldwell, Jordan (X) Butler

EVIDENCE

Abb Mingo being duly sworn says:   Amelia Burton yesterday was well and hearty as usual. She was sick about a month ago. Last night she ate supper and did not complain any. The first I knew of anything being wrong with her was this morning about day. My wife called me. I got up in my nightclothes. My wife had taken her out of the bed and let her in a chair. Amelia asked me to give her some salt and water to make her heave. My wife sent her girl to Mrs. Wilson's house to get some camphor salts. I gave her the salt and water. She seemed to rest a little easier. I then lay down. After awhile my wife and girl commenced crying and I got up again. She made one breath after I got up the second time. We then laid her down and she was dead. She had had three or four spells like this before. The first time I got up I did not think she was going to die. When she had these spells she could hardly get her breath. She always said she had heart disease. No physician had ever examined her for it. The first attack she had was last Fall. Every attack she had seemed to be worse than the previous. I am Amelia Burton's son-in-law.             Abb Mingo

   Amanda Mingo being duly sworn says:  Amelia Burton is my mother. She said she had heart disease. She has been complaining of this trouble ever since last Fall. When she had these spells she could hardly get her breath. If she took much exercise she suffered of shortness of breath. She felt this every day. She had no swelling about her anywhere. About day this morning she called me. I found her sitting up because she could not get her breath lying. She said she felt like she wanted to vomit. She lived about fifteen minutes after I got to her. Camphor did her no good as it used to.

Amanda (X) Mingo

This certifies that I have examined the body of Amelia Burton and find that she came to her death from heart disease.  Newberry SC                August 22, 1894  J. M. Kibler MD

Amelia Burton, colored, died at her home in Newberry of natural causes. An inquest was held on 8/22/1894. Newberry Observer, 8/29/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 27 August 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Seig Place in the County and State aforesaid the 27th day of August A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of William Braxton, alias Baxter, then and there being dead by the oaths of Richard Roberts, Wade Ruff, James Johnston, Mitchel Renwick, William Smith, Ransom Boozer, Peter Henderson, Thomas Renwick, Hampton Scurry, Hack Suber, Washington Crosson, Marcus Williams being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said William Braxton, alias Baxter, came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said William Braxton, alias Baxter, came to his death from a gunshot wound inflicted by James Sligh on 26th August1894. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid James Sligh by the him the said William Braxton, alias Baxter, in manner and means aforesaid then and there did accidentally kill. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Richard Roberts Foreman, Wade (X) Ruff, James (X) Johnston, Mitchel (X) Renwick, William Smith, Ransom (X) Boozer, Peter (X) Henderson, Thomas (X) Renwick, Hampton (X) Scurry, Hack Suber, Washington (X) Crosson, Marcus (X) Williams

EVIDENCE

Oscar Epps being duly sworn says:   James Sligh came along the road and William Braxton, alias Baxter, and Joe McMorris went out to the road and asked for a chew of tobacco. William Braxton, alias Baxter, took hold of James Sligh's gun and William Braxton let go the gun and James Sligh went backwards and said, "Take care boy - I am in a hurry", and the gun went off. Both were laughing and joking about a chew of tobacco. There were no hard feelings between James Sligh and William Braxton. William Braxton stood a few minutes and then fell. James Sligh immediately went for the doctor. James Sligh said he was sorry it had happened and was much troubled about it. I was twenty feet from them. It was entirely accidental. I did not see the gun when fired, but the smoke from the gun.      Oscar (X) Epps

   Thomas McMorris being duly sworn says:  On Saturday the 25th August 1894 about 5 o'clock pm, James Sligh came along the road and had a shot gun, single barrel, small size. Oscar Epps and William Braxton, alias Baxter, went out to James Sligh in the road. James Sligh said to William Braxton, "Get back". At this time Joe McMorris went out to the road where they were. James Sligh let the hammer of the gun down. William Braxton went up to him and took hold of the muzzle of the gun. He told him, William Braxton, to turn it loose and look out for his side and Joe McMorris told him also to turn the gun loose. William Braxton turned the gun loose. James Sligh went backwards and the gun went off. James Sligh said, "Did I shoot you both?"  Then William Braxton turned around and down and said, "You have shot my arm off."                 Oscar Epps asked him why he shot him and James Sligh said, "Oh, I did shoot him." Oscar Epps told him to go for the doctor. The parties were not mad or angry. The parties were in good humor. I know of no malice existing between the parties, James Sligh and William Braxton. It was accidental. I do not believe James Sligh intended to shoot William Braxton.  Thomas McMorris

   Joe McMorris being duly sworn says:   I was picking cotton on Saturday the 25th day of August about 2 hours by sun. James Sligh came along the road. Oscar Epps and myself asked him for a chew of tobacco and then William Braxton came out of the cotton patch into the road and asked him for a chew of tobacco. He told William Braxton he did not have any tobacco. William Braxton walked up to him and caught hold of the muzzle of the gun and pulled it around to his side. Then they quit handling the gun. Then William Braxton asked again for a chew of tobacco and James Sligh started off and then William Braxton walked up to him towards him. He told William Braxton to get back or he would shoot him. When he was beside me the gun went off and the load of shot (fired into) William Braxton in right arm and side. James Sligh and William Braxton were not angry or mad and were in fun when the gun went off. I know of no malice or ill will between the parties. It was purely accidental.            Joseph (X) McMorris

   R. C. Carlisle being duly sworn says:   William Braxton says it was accidental and James Sligh did not intend to shoot him. William Braxton had no ill feelings towards James Sligh. James Sligh seemed much troubled about the matter and wanted everything done for William Baxter that could be done and had agreed to work in his place until he recovered.  R. C. Carlisle

August 27, 1894  I hereby certify that I have examined the body of William Braxton, alias Baxter, and find that he came to his death from shock caused from a gunshot wound in his right arm and from gunshot wounds in his right side.  R. C. Carlisle MD

Will Baxter colored, was accidentally shot in the arm 8/25/1894 while hunting. He died during the amputation of the arm by Dr. McIntosh and Dr. Carlisle. Newberry Observer, 8/29/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 28 September 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Andrew Hawkins's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 28th day of September A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Matilda Hawkins then and there being dead by the oaths of R. T. Boland, B. B. Boland, D. E. Watson, J. F. Riley, Reuben Lomax, Pierce Ruff, H. C. Gallman, S. L. Fellers, Alex Caughman, George Gallman, W. G. Houseal, Rufus Ford being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Matilda Hawkins came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Matilda Hawkins came to her death from natural causes in the said County and State on the night of 25th of September, 1894. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Matilda Hawkins death was from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

R. T. Boland Foreman, B. B. Boland, D. E. Watson, J. F. (X) Riley, Reuben (X) Lomax, Pierce (X) Ruff, H. C. (X) Gallman, S. L. Fellers, Alex (X) Caughman, George (X) Gallman, W. G. Houseal, Rufus (X) Ford

EVIDENCE

Andrew Hawkins being sworn says:   I am the husband of Matilda Hawkins. Matilda ate a hearty dinner and washed dishes yesterday, September 25, 1894. I walked out in the lot and she picked up a basket and went alone to the garden to pick cotton. I noticed that she had fallen. She was on her back. I went to her and tried to lift her up. Called her and she could not speak. She was not quite dead when I got to her. She gasped once or twice after I got to her. It was not fifteen minutes after I went into the lot before I noticed she had fallen. My wife was at least 67 years old. She had been lingering with sickness all the year but kept going. About two weeks ago she got down in the bed. Dr. McFall came to see her. He gave her some medicine and she got up and was pert. She had been out of bed at least a week. She complained of back, side and head when she was sick. She had shortness of breath off and on during the whole of the year. She died yesterday September 25, 1894 about two o'clock. I believe she died a natural death. No one was present but myself. When I saw she had fallen I hollered for help. Alex Caughman was the first one to come after I called. She had not picked any cotton. She was very near dead when Alex Caughman arrived.                         

Andrew (X) Hawkins

   Alex Caughman being sworn says:   I heard someone calling yesterday about 1 ½ or 2 o'clock. I was at my house about 3 or 4 hundred yards from Andrew Hawkins. I saw him run out into the path and I answered Hawkins. He said, "Come here quick". I broke and run. When I got close up to him he said his wife was dead. I run on up to where she was. I caught her by the hand. She gasped one time. I saw she was dead.  Alex (X) Caughman

W. G. Houseal being sworn says:   I examined the dead body of Matilda Hawkins, found no marks of violence. I believe her death was from natural causes.  W. G. Houseal MD

Matilda Hawkins, colored, 67 years old, dropped dead on the way to a cotton patch near her home, 4 miles below Prosperity. An inquest proved death by natural causes. Newberry Observer, 10/3/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 4 October 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Prosperity in the County and State aforesaid the 4th day of October A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Dennis Miller then and there being dead by the oaths of M. M. Mills, S. M. Mathis, Butler Cromer, Noah DeHart, Luther Cook, Reuben Ruff, George Gibson, S. L. Fellers, Willie Taylor, J. H. Cannon, G. C. Fellers, W. L. McFall being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Dennis Miller came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Dennis Miller came to his death from natural causes in Prosperity on the 4th of October, 1894. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Dennis Miller came to his death in manner and form aforesaid of natural causes in Prosperity in Newberry County October 4, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

M. M. Mills Foreman, S. M. Mathis, Butler (X) Cromer, Noah (X) DeHart, J. L. Cook, Reuben (X) Ruff, George (X) Gibson, S. L. Fellers, J. W. Taylor, J. H. Cannon, G. C. Fellers, W. L. McFall
EVIDENCE

Saunders Johnson being sworn says:   I came past Dennis Miller's house this morning and saw the window open on October 4, 1894. I went to see him. I had heard he was sick. I called him. He didn't answer. I looked at him through the window. I told William Young I thought Dennis was dead, that someone (ought) to go and see about it. I haven't been there since. Saunders (X) Johnson

   Levi Boland being sworn says:   I went to Dennis' house this morning October 4 and found him dead. I went in and spread a quilt over him. He had been sick for about a week. He told me that he had been having fever. Had a chill. My cook told me that someone told her that they had called and Dennis did not answer.  L.C. Boland

This certifies that in the examination of Dennis Miller (I) found no marks of violence on no part of head or body. Noticed great spots of blood all around where he lay. I render a verdict that he came to his death from hemorrhages from the lungs.  October 4, 1894  W. T. McFall  MD

Dennis Miller was sentenced to 3 months in Newberry Jail and a fine of $100 for retailing liquor in Prosperity, SC. It is a dry town. Newberry Observer 2/18/1892; Dennis Miller, colored, of Prosperity died 10/3/1894. Inquest declared death of natural causes. Newberry Observer, 10/10/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 16 October 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Mount Olive Church in the County and State aforesaid the 16th day of October A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Ada Little then and there being dead by the oaths of Tom Speaks, Albert Gilliam, Tom Reeder, Silas Cannon, Anthony Griffin, Martin Kinard, Wilson Anderson, Charlie Turner, Shed Ferguson, D. C. Copeland, Uriah Speaks, Tom Dean being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ada Little came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Ada Little came to her death from natural causes on C. W. Buford's Place in Newberry County on the 8 day of October, 1894. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the said Ada Little by the manner and means aforesaid did die from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Tom (X) Speaks Foreman, Albert (X) Gilliam, Tom (X) Reeder, Silas (X) Cannon, Anthony (X) Griffin, Martin (X) Kinard, Wilson (X) Anderson, Charlie (X) Turner, Shed (X) Ferguson, D. C. (X) Copeland, Uriah (X) Speaks, Tom (X) Dean

EVIDENCE

Henry Little being sworn says:   I am the husband of Ada Little deceased. She had kind of a smothering, choking spell. It was Monday night October 8, 1894. I had gone to bed. I wakened up just as she called me. She said come and rub her. She said stop rubbing her just after she told me to rub her. She said she was obliged to die. Said give her something to make her throw up. Said let her go to bed. She lay down across the bed. Said "Lord Jesus - save her" was all she said. Dr. Evans had been practicing on her for womb disease. Had not been treating her for heart disease. She had had three spells before. First one she had was last year about this time. Never any trouble between us. No medicine she could have taken to cause death. Hadn't taken any medicine in three or four weeks. My mother was in the house when she died.       Henry (X) Little

   Vina Little being sworn says:   When I got up she was down by the fire and Henry was rubbing her. He called me to come right quick for he believed Ada would die. I went to her and she told me to rub her. Me and Henry rubbed her with all our might.  She got up and walked to the bed - fell across the bed. She tumbled over and Henry caught her. I don't believe she lived over twenty minutes. She had had light spells before but it had been a good while.    Vina (X) Little

Dr. T. W. Smith being sworn says:  I have examined the body of Ada Little deceased and am of the opinion that she came to her death from organic heart disease.  T. W. Smith MD  

Addie Little, colored, died suddenly on 10/10/1894 of natural causes. She lived on C. W. Buford Carr's place. An inquest was held. Newberry Observer, 10/17/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 3 November 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Dr. William M. Dorrah's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 3rd day of November A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Ned Ellison, then and there being dead by the oaths of L. C. Singley, J. P. Mangum, D. S. Satterwhite, J. L. Mayer, Judge Satterwhite, Wes Rutherford, Fayett Andrews, Dave Gary, Burt Satterwhite, Sol Harp, Boyce Rook, Ben Sheppard being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ned Ellison came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Ned Ellison came to his death at the hands of Ben Todd with an axe at the house of the said Ben Todd and Delia Downie on Dr. William M. Dorrah's place on the 3rd day of November 1894. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Ben Todd in manner and form aforesaid Ned Ellison then and there did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

L. C. Singley Foreman, D. S. Satterwhite, J. L. Mayer, Judge (X) Satterwhite, Wes (X) Rutherford, Fayett (X) Andrews, Dave (X) Gary, Burt (X) Satterwhite, Sol (X) Harp, Boyce (X) Rook, Ben Sheppard, J. P. Mangum

EVIDENCE

Delia Downie being duly sworn says:   I don't know exactly what time Ben Todd, Ned Ellison and myself came here. Ben Todd called me and I shut the door and asked, "What you want?" Ben wanted to stay in my house til day. He told me he would get a gun and shoot my brains out, and then said he would do nothing to me and called Ned Ellison to the door and said he wanted to talk to him. Ned came to the door and stood there awhile and asked Ben what he wanted. Ben said he just wanted to talk to him. Ben drew the axe back and I got out of the door. I saw Ben draw the axe and saw Ned fall but did not see Ben strike Ned. Ben then took Ned's pistol and said would kill me and then he would go. Ned was standing on the platform in front of my house. Ben had not been living with me. He had some meal and meat and nothing else. Did not see Ned when Ben struck him. They had not been here before last night. Ned was in my house when Ben called him. Ned and Ben came together with me from the wake but Ben stopped in the road before we got to the house. Tom Todd and Bob Mangum also came part of the way. Ben did not come into the house. Ned came into the house. I had been cooking for Ben and he said let his rations stay in my house til today and he would get somebody to cook for him. I told Ben I was not going to cook for him anymore. Ben whipped me about two weeks ago because George Davis was in my house. He had no right to whip me. Ned was sitting on a box and I was sitting on a bed when Ben called. I found Ned Lying in my yard. I then called for help. I asked Ned what Ben hit him with. He said a stick. Ned did not have a pistol in his hand when he came out. I tried to keep Ned from coming out. I thought Ben would shoot him or hurt him. Ben had told Ned he was going to see him just to wait until he went down to the house. They had had no quarrel. Ben said he would shoot me about fooling with him. He said I would drive him away from my house but would not drive anybody else away. Ben did not sleep in my house. He wanted to sleep here. Ned did not say anything except what I said. Only said he could not get up. I did not try to get Ned to stay with me til day. I did not see Ben get Ned's pistol but saw him searching in Ned's pockets. Ned had a walking stick under his arm when he came to the door. Did not know Ned had a pistol til I heard Ben say, "I've go the God d_ rascal's pistol". I did not ask Ned to come home with me. I cooked for Ben two weeks.      Delia (X) Downie

   J. H. Dorroh being sworn says:   I gave Ben Todd permission to live in the house occupied by Delia Downie. Don't know whether he did so or not such was my understanding. I gave him the permission four or five months ago and have heard of no complaints because of it. Neither Ben Todd nor Delia Downie paid rent for the house. I did not give Delia Downie permission to shut Ben Todd out of the house.  J. H. Dorroh

   L. E. Folk being duly sworn says:   Ben Todd came to Mr. J. H. Dorroh's and asked me for a pistol and said that Ned Ellison had drawn a pistol on him and had run off from Delia Downie's house and that he had some rations at her house and wanted to get them. After he came there he went to Aleck Satterwhite's and I heard him ask Aleck for a gun or pistol. Aleck refused saying that that would get him into it.  L. E. Folk

Dr. Van Smith being sworn says:   I have examined the body of Ned Ellison and find that his death was caused by a blow, which struck over the right eye by some blunt instrument.         November 3,

1894       Van Smith  MD

Ned Ellison, colored, was hit over the head with an axe by Ben Todd, colored. Ned lived for about 5 hours after the attack. Newberry Observer, 11/7/1894

Ben Todd, colored, hit Ned Ellison, colored, over the head with axe breaking the skull. Ned lived for about 5 hours after the attack. Newberry Observer, 11/7/1894; COURT OF SESSIONS murder, mistrial, Newberry Observer, 11/14/1894; Ben Todd, COURT OF SESSIONS murder, guilty of manslaughter, 6 years hard labor in the Penitentiary. Newberry Observer 3/27/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 4 November 1894

An inquisition indented taken at Zion Church in the County and State aforesaid the 4th day of November A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Bettie Dominick then and there being dead by the oaths of J. B. Stockman, George Stockman, J. F. Bedenbaugh, Jacob Mayer, D. M. Bedenbaugh, J. P. Mills, W. B. Harmon, J. W. P. Harmon, Lawson Mayer, Hilliard Cameron, J. C. Cook, W. P. Pugh being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Bettie Dominick came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Bettie Dominick came to her death from natural causes at W. C. Dominick's residence on the November 2, 1894. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the said that the aforesaid, that Bettie Dominick came to her death from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. B. Stockman Foreman, George Stockman, J. F. Bedenbaugh, Jacob Mayer, D. M. Bedenbaugh, J. P. Mills, W. B. Harmon, J. W. P. Harmon, Lawson Mayer, H. W. Cameron, J. C. Cook, W. P. Pugh
EVIDENCE

W. C. Dominick being sworn says:   Mrs. Bettie Dominick had chills and fever about a month ago. Sent after G. Y. Hunter MD about one month ago. He examined her and said she had shortness of breath. Then she improved about 3 days after that. She got able to go about. Could not rest well at night. About fifteen days after this she was taken a smothering. Could not get her breath. On Monday and Tuesday before her death she could not be down at all. One day before her death she improved and got up. The night of her death she went to bed as usual. Next morning about light I went to call her. She didn't answer. I called to my wife to bring the light. Both my wife and children went to her and she was laying on her left side as though she was almost asleep. A Negro, George Gallman, came in and with one of my boys took hold of her. Then I went out of the room. They turned her over and said she gasped one time. She was still warm when I left the room. She had been complaining for about two years with shortness of breath. She was 80 odd years old when she died. About a month before she died she had a spell of fever.  W. C. Dominick

   Johnie Dominick being duly sworn says:   She was ailing some time with dropsy and heart disease she said. She told several days before she died that she was going to die and none of us know it and on Friday morning me and Clifton went to shop and brother Eddie came there and said Granny was dead. I then run to the house. When I got there I and George Gallman went in the room and took a hold of her and turned her on her back and she gasped and I said to father that (she) was not dead but that was the last breath I saw her draw.       J. P. Dominick

   George Gallman being duly sworn says:   I went to the house after I heard the crying to see what was the matter. I heard Mr. Dominick say his mother was dead. I went in the room where she was and she was still warm. Johnie and I turned her over and she gasped one time. She had been ailing for about a month before she died.     George (X) Gallman

   Mrs. Edith Taylor being duly sworn says:   Mother was at my house about a week before she died. She had chills and fever about a month before this and I went up there. She said, "I am doing poorly". When I arrived she said. Creighton and Dr. Hunter was sitting at her bed when she came to know anything. She said she had "flooding at the heart and it was getting worse and am afraid I am going to drop off". She said she did not know what happened that night. Did not know she was stripped and dressed that night. This was about a month ago. I asked her to stay with me. Said I will when I am better. Last Tuesday a week ago she came to my house with my daughter. She did not eat hearty that day. She stayed two days and nights and then went home because she was not feeling well. At Creighton's new house she said she was no worse than she always was. I then asked her to stay at my house. She went back home with me and drank a cup of ginger tea. She did not eat a big supper. She then went to bed. I did not hear her that night, but said she was not feeling well that next morning. Creighton came to my house next morning and inquired about her and she was still unwell. She went home that evening with Creighton in a wagon on a load of corn. I did not see her again before her death. I inquired everyday after her. I was informed that on Monday she was doing very bad. A few days afterwards she was doing better.  Edith (X) Taylor

   Mrs. Sallie Dominick being duly sworn says:   Tuesday morning she called and said, "I believe I am dying". I told her I did not know what to do for her. She said, "I am going to die and you all will not know anything about it". After that she got better. She was up and down all day Wednesday. Thursday she got better and ate heartily. She ate a good big supper and then she went to bed. She got up about midnight Thursday night to get a drink of water. Friday morning Creighton called me to bring him the lamp. I found her lying on her left side. I then went away from her.          

Sallie Dominick

   Mrs. Alice Stockman being duly sworn says:   I dressed the body and did not see a single scratch on it. The body of Mrs. Bettie Dominick.  Alice Stockman

P. G. Ellisor MD being duly sworn says:   This is to certify that I have examined the body of Mrs. Bettie Dominick and that it is my opinion that she came to her death from natural causes.    
November4, 1894               P. G. Ellisor MD

Mrs. Bettie Dominick, 85 years old, was found dead in bed 11/2/1894. An inquest declared death by natural causes. Newberry Observer, 11/7/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 26 November 1894 

An inquisition indented taken near Bush River Church in the County and State aforesaid the 26th day of November A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Elvira Satterwhite then and there being dead by the oaths of W. G. Peterson, Joseph Pitts, H.H. Abrams, T. M. Smith, J. P. Mangum, T. P. Pitts, L. E. Folk, N. F. Johnson, L. C. Singley, E. P. Mathews, J. A. Garvin, J. H. Dorroh, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Elvira Satterwhite came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Elvira Satterwhite came to her death from natural causes near Bush River Church on the morning of November 26, 1894. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the said that the aforesaid Elvira Satterwhite came to her death from natural causes near Bush River Church on the morning of November 26, 1894. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

W. G. Peterson Foreman, Joseph Pitts, H.H. Abrams, T. M. Smith, J. P. Mangum, T. P. Pitts, L. E. Folk, N. F. Johnson, L. C. Singley, E. P. Mathews, J. A. Garvin, J. H. Dorroh

EVIDENCE

M. M. Satterwhite being duly sworn says:   I was aroused by boy at gate. Mr. Garvin was at the gate. I told the boy to tell Mr. Garvin to come in. Boy came in to make the fire and knocked at the door of my mother, Mrs. Elvira Satterwhite. My mother didn't answer. I then got up and unlocked the door. I then called her but she didn't answer. I then felt her and she was cold and dead. Mr. Garvin came into the room also. This was November 26, 1894.           M. M. Satterwhite

   W. D. Senn MD being sworn says:   I have been the family physician. Had attended the deceased. Attended her about 6 months ago. Was called in to treat her for pneumonia. She entirely recovered from it. I found while making physical examination for pneumonia that she had organic heart disease. I thought it may produce death at any moment. I also treated her for heart disease. She did not complain afterwards about her heart.  W. D. Senn MD

P. G. Ellisor being duly sworn says:   I have examined the body of Mrs. Elvira Satterwhite and I am of the opinion that she came to her death from natural causes.  P. G. Ellisor MD

Mrs. Elvira Satterwhite 65 years old, was found dead in her bed 11/26/1894 at the home of her son, M. M. Satterwhite near Bush River Church. The verdict of her inquest was organic heart disease. Newberry Observer, 11/28/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 2 December 1894

An inquisition indented taken at T. J. Maffet's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 2nd day of December A.D. 1894 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Ephraim Williams, then and there being dead by the oaths of E. L. Paysinger, L. C. Longshore, Albert Schroder, Wade Phillips, James Hendrix, D. A. Harp, F. K. Kinney, Charles Bates, Lewis Richards, Mad Burton, C. B. Benson, Jim Boozer being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ephraim Williams came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Ephraim Williams came to his death from a fall given by the hands of Tom Wilson accidentally given while in play at Silverstreet SC December 1, 1894 and died December 2, 1894 at L. J. Maffet's Place. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Tom Wilson him the aforesaid Ephraim Williams by the manner and means aforesaid did then and there accidentally kill. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. H. Foreman, E. L. Paysinger, L. C. Longshore, J. A. Wade Phillips, D. A. (X) Harp, F. K. Kinney, Charles (X) Bates, Lewis (X) Richards, Mad (X) Burton, C. B. (X) Benson, Jim (X) Boozer
EVIDENCE

James Jackson being duly sworn says:   Saturday morning December 1, 1894 I saw Ephraim Williams and Tom Wilson tussling in a good humor. Tom got Ephraim's head under his arm and they fell in this way. After the fall Tom got up and Ephraim could not. This was near the corner of Spearman Brothers store at Silverstreet. He, Ephraim, after the fall said he was done for.               

James Jackson

   Willie Scott being duly sworn says:   I saw Ephraim Williams and Tom Wilson playing. Tom had Ephraim's head under his arm and they fell to the ground in this way. After the fall Ephraim Williams said, "I am done". This occurred at the store of Spearman Bros. Silverstreet. (Deceased was) brought home in a wagon.  Willie Scott

   Lem Suber being duly sworn says:   I was at Silverstreet Saturday morning December 1st 1894 and saw Tom Wilson and Ephraim Williams playing but left before any accident happened. Ephraim Williams and Tom Wilson were in good humor.     Lemuel (X) Suber

   Bill Burton being duly sworn says:   Saturday morning December 1, 1894 I was at Silverstreet. I saw Ephraim Williams and Tom Wilson playing. Saw Tom throw Ephraim Williams and Ephraim said, "Boys, help me". I caught hold of him and helped him on the bench. He couldn't sit up on the bench and was carried home in a wagon. Saw both men fall to the ground. These men were in a good humor laughing and talking.   Bill (X) Burton

   Wade Wilson being duly sworn says:    Saturday morning December 1, 1894 I was at the store of Spearman Bros. Silverstreet and saw Jim Jackson coming up. R. K., Ephraim Williams and Tom Wilson, on seeing him said, "Let us take Jim Jackson's breakfast". And from this Ephraim and Tom began tussling with themselves. Tom got Ephraim's head under his arm. Then Ephraim caught Tom by the left leg and tried to throw him. Tom resisted and both to the ground, Tom on top. Tom got up and said, "Come here boys and help me with Ephraim, he is hurt". Then Lem Suber and Bill Burton helped Tom to get Ephraim up. They then carried Ephraim to a bench in front of Spearman Bros. store. Ephraim then said, "Carry me home and send for the doctor". I was about 7 or 8 yards from the men. Tom came part of the way with Ephraim, then went for the doctor. Tom and Ephraim were in good humor. Ephraim was brought home in a wagon.  Wade Wilson

   Al Herbert being duly sworn says:   Saturday morning December 1st 1894 I was at Silverstreet SC and saw Tom and Ephraim start to playing and then saw them fall. Then Tom Wilson said to Bill Burton and Lem Suber, "Come help me get Ephraim up". Men were in a good humor. The men had hold of each other while playing. Hear Ephraim say after he fell, "I am gone". Al (X) Herbert

   Tom Wilson being duly sworn says:   Saturday morning December 1, 1894 I was at spearman Bros. store Silverstreet SC. I and Ephraim Williams started to play in good humor and in tussling I got Ephraim's head under my arm and in tussling we fell. I found that Ephraim was hurt when I got up. Then I asked Bill Burton and Lem Suber to help me and we carried him to a bench. He then said, "Carry me home". We then put him in a wagon and carried him home. He then said to me to go and get the doctor as quick as you can. I went for the doctor.  Thomas Wilson

A. L. Longshore MD being duly sworn says:   This certifies that I have this day December 2m, 1894 examined the body of Ephraim Williams and found the 5th cervical vertebrae sufficiently displaced to cause the death of said Ephraim Williams by compressing the spinal cord. A. L. Longshore MD

Ephraim Williams was wrestling 12/1/1894 with Tom Wilson at Spearman Bros. store in Silverstreet. Wilson threw Williams to the ground and the injury caused death to Williams. An Inquest declared death by accidental injuries. Newberry Observer, 12/5/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 12 January 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Helena in the County and State aforesaid the 12th day of January A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Elizabeth Green of Helena Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of G. S. Coleman, A. Washington, Melvin Butler, Daniel Metts, John Higgins, Cesar Saunders, Charles Pitts, William Robertson, William Robertson Jr., Coleman Wright, Mack Marshal, James Irvin being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Elizabeth Green came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Elizabeth Green came to her death from natural causes at Helena, Newberry County SC,  January 123, 1895. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the said that the aforesaid, that the said Elizabeth Green, in manner and form aforesaid came to her death from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

G. S. Coleman Foreman, A. Washington, Melvin Butler, Daniel (X) Metts, John (X) Higgins, Cesar (X) Saunders, C. P. Pitts, William (X) Robertson, William (X) Robertson Jr., Coleman (X) Wright, M. C.  Marshal, James Irvin

EVIDENCE

 J. F. Jackson being duly sworn says:   Elizabeth Green is my mother - in - law. She lives with me. Her health recently has been good so far as I know. I saw her last night about eleven o'clock. She was not complaining then. She complained sometimes about swimming in the head. She suffered also from shortness of breath. Her appetite was good. I have lived with her about eighteen years. Have known her to complain about shortness of breath. Her appetite was good. I have lived with her about eighteen years. Have known her to complain about shortness of breath for ten years. She frequently mentioned it. She would be alarmed at times about it. I missed her from the
house and Siblie Holman went out and found her dead in the water closet. I then went out and saw her. I saw no marks of violence about her person. I then sent for help to bring her in the house.

J. F. Jackson

   Siblie Holman being duly sworn says:   J. F. Jackson and family are living here in my house with me for a few days. I knew Elizabeth Green for four years. I saw her last night at eleven o'clock. She was not complaining. I heard her go out this morning - was before seven o'clock. About twenty minutes before seven I went out to get some chips and saw her lying in the water closet door. I called her and she did not answer. I then came in and awoke the children and went back out, see her and pull down her dress. Her daughter, Mrs. Jackson was the first to discover she was dead.   

Siblie Holman

   Mrs. Martha Jackson being duly sworn says:   Elizabeth Green is my mother. She has been in good health recently except some little weakness and swimming in the head on violent exertion. She would suffer of shortness of breath. She slept in the room with me last night and went to bed about eleven o'clock. Was not complaining then. She got up this morning about seven o'clock and went out doors. I did not see her any more until I found her dead.                  Martha Jackson

Newberry County SC    January 12, 1895 This certifies that Elizabeth Green came to her death from heart failure.       J. M. Kibler MD 

Elizabeth Green, colored, died at her home in Helena on 1/12/1895. Inquest verdict was death by natural causes.  Newberry Observer, 1/16/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 15 January 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Jalapa in the County and State aforesaid the 15th day of January A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Tab Connor of Helena Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of W. H. Eddy, John M. Glymph, D. L. Clamp, Allen Clark, Tony Right, George Eddy, W. B. Johnson, Sigh Ruff, Peter Ruff, W. L. Waters, Bill Moseley, N. M. Darby being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Tab Connor came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Tab Connor came to his death on the CN&L RR by a concussion from the engine running through the place, Jalapa, accidentally, the 11th January 1895 about half past seven pm o'clock. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid, Tab Connor, in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by misfortune or accident. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

W. H. Eddy Foreman, J. M. Glymph, D. L. Clamp, Allen (X) Clark, Tony (X) Right, G. W. Eddy, W. B. Johnson, Sigh (X) Ruff, Peter Ruff, W. L. Waters, Bill (X) Moseley, N. M. Darby
EVIDENCE

Sam Franklin being duly sworn says:   I knew Tab Cannon. I saw him last Christmas at Mr. W. C. Sligh's. I saw him last night just after he was killed. I found him on the CN&L RR at the end of a car box by the side of the track.  He was dead when I saw him. I suppose he had been dead ten minutes. He was still warm. An extra freight train with three boxes had just passed going south. I did not hear the engine blow the station signal. I did not hear the bell ring either. The train did not stop at the station. I think the train was running at the rate of a mile per minute. It passed the station at that speed. I heard the train running is the reason I knew it was passing.         Sam M. (X) Franklin

   Ira Clamp being duly sworn says:   I knew Tab Connor. Have known him two years. He was deaf and dumb. I saw (him) last night after he was killed, about fifteen minutes after the train passed. He was lying on the CN&L RR track at the end of a car box. I suppose the train had killed him. I was in the store waiting on customers but did not hear the engine blown or the bell ring. I heard the train passing the station and saw it. It was running very fast. I suppose nearly a mile per minute. The reason why I thought Tab was killed by the train is because I saw where he had been dragged and some blood and hair left on the end of the cross ties and an impression of his head was on
the ground. He was dragged about ten feet. The back and side of his head were cut. The left leg was broken below the knee joint. The upper lip was cut and had bled over his face. Someone had told me that somebody was killed is the reason I went up to see about it. J. B. Campbell went with me.

Ira C. Clamp

   Jane Cannon being duly sworn says:   I have known Tab Connor ever since he was a child. He frequently told me that he could hear an engine blow. He could not hear people talk. I was coming up the railroad and saw him dead by the side of the track. The train did not blow nor bell ring for the station. I saw the train pass. It was running as fast as I ever saw a car run. I don't know how fast it was running. It was passing the station when I saw it.  Jane (X) Cannon

   This certifies that Tab Connor came to his death from certain wounds viz. fracture of left leg, several cuts on head and neck and concussion produced by a violent blow, as that which may be produced by a train running into one on the track.  J. M. Kibler  MD

   W. L. Weathersbee being duly sworn says:   I passed here Jalapa last Friday January 11, 1895. I did not see any person on the railroad tracks. Did not blow for the station. I was running about 30 miles an hour. I had a headlight.  It was 7:30 o'clock pm when I passed. My headlight was burning. I did not see anyone when I passed. I was looking out of the window ahead. I did not notice whether the stores were open or not. I had the fireman to ring the bell. I did not think it worth while to blow for the station as I had just blowed for the crossing above the station at Jalapa. W.L. Weathersbee

   N. S. Fowler being duly sworn says:   I was the conductor on the train, an extra. I was sitting on the left side of the engine. I was looking in front. Looking out the window. Did not see anyone when I passed the station. No of the engine was '26'. I saw no one on the railroad track. The bell was rung as we neared the station and passing through the station.          N. S. Fowler

Tab Connor, colored deaf mute, was killed by a CN&L RR freight train. Details Page 3, column 4, Newberry Observer, 1/16/1895; His family is suing the CN&L RR for $10,000 damages. Newberry Observer, 1/23/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 23 February 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Longshore's in the County and State aforesaid the 23rd day of February A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Bessie Harp of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of Joseph Pitts, J. M. Counts, J. Y. Floyd, Franklin Boozer, W. E. Roland, William Davenport, Thomas Frederick, J. E. Senn, Sam Austin, John Bobb, Lewis Robertson, Eff Boozer being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Bessie Harp came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Bessie Harp came to her death
by accident at Longshore's on February 22, 1895. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the said that the aforesaid, that Bessie Harp in manner and form aforesaid came to her death by misfortune or accident. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Joseph Pitts Foreman, J. M. Counts, J. Y. Floyd, Franklin Boozer, W. E. Roland, William Davenport, Thomas Frederick, J. E. Senn, Sam Austin, John Bobb, Lewis Robertson, Eff Boozer
EVIDENCE

Jake Connor being duly sworn says:   I was at Willis Glenn's house yesterday February 22, 1895. Was ready to go home. Saw two children was playing with fire and saw one run and look back and heard the other holler and when I looked Bessie Harp was in a blaze. I ran to her and pulled her clothes off. There was some fire at the hog pen in the yard. I suppose there is where she caught on fire. There was no one about but the two children.               Jake (X) Connor

   Margaret Glenn being duly sworn says:   I never saw the child when it caught on fire. I was sick in my house. That was yesterday February 22, 1895. They were playing then with the fire. I don't know where they got the fire. I told them not to play in the fire. Margaret (X) Glenn

John Longshore being duly sworn says:   I was in the yard yesterday working with a tub. I have two children with me, one named Bessie Harp and the other Mamie. Bessie was left with me by her mother. I told Mamie to bring me a coal of fire. She did so. When I asked her for it she said it was out. When I was through with the tub I went in the house and then to the store. On the way to the store I met Bessie with fire in a pan. M. Glenn asked me if I wanted fire. I said no, I am through with what I was doing. I told Bessie to put the fire down and never noticed her anymore. I did not see her catch on fire. I was gone off.        John B. Longshore

I certify that I have examined the body of Bessie Harp and am of the opinion that she came to her death from being burned.  W. D. Senn MD

Bessie Harp, colored, 6 years old, living on Longshore's, died from fire to her clothing. Inquest verdict was death by burns. Newberry Observer, 2/27/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 13 March 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid the 13th day of March A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Wesley Simmons of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of John Eddy, Thomas Hayes, R. C. Williams, M.J. Scott, E.B. Martin, T. E. Epting, J. P. Aldrich, C. L. Havird, J. E. Clary, G. J. Ruff, Lang Werts, David Sparks being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Wesley Simmons came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Wesley Simmons came to his death from a blow on the head from a rock thrown by Charlie Jackson on March 4, 1895 and died March 13, 1895 at Newberry Court House, SC. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid, Charlie Jackson in manner and form aforesaid Wesley Simmons then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

R. C. Williams Foreman, John A. Eddy, T. J. Hayes, M. J. Scott, E.B. Martin, Thomas E. Epting, J. P. Aldrich, C. L. Havird, J. E. Clary, G. J. Ruff, Lang (X) Werts, David (X) Sparks
EVIDENCE

James Williams being duly sworn says:   I was not close to him, Wesley Simmons, when he was hit. I only got there in time to help bring him in the house. He was speechless. This happened on Monday the 4th day of March. It was done in front of Wesley Simmons' gate. The boy that they said hit him was about 30 yards from him when I saw him. Charles Jackson was the boy that I saw.  James (X) Williams

   Winnie Simmons being duly sworn says:   I was standing between Wes and Charlie Jackson and I told him not to hit Wes and he said he would hit him if he lived. I moved towards the right and just as I moved to the right I heard the rock pass and heard Wes grunt. I saw the rock when it left his hand. They had a few words before he threw the rock. It was on Monday the 4th March. When I turned around I saw my husband laying on the ground and I said, "Ch-my husband is dead. Come here with some camphor". Aunt Harriet came with some water. I was on the left, she was on the right. I ran to the house and got a bucketful of water and carried it out there. They were in front
of Mr. McClellan's gate. They were about 12 or 14 feet apart. What caused Charlie to throw the rock - they were quarreling. Rock was presented to the jury.  Winnie (X) Simmons

   A. P. Butler being duly sworn says:   On Monday 4th March my attention was called to some trouble among my scholars. When reaching Mr. Simmons corner I saw Charlie Jackson and the deceased. They were talking quietly. I passed. After passing I heard loud talking. I returned. Jackson said, " Simmons, don't strike me." I went up to them. Mrs. Simmons came out the gate about the same time. I said to Jackson, "You go on". I also took Simmons by
the arm. He said, "Jackson called my wife a fool. I won't take it." He asked to be turned loose and forcibly broke loose. He then turned and advanced towards Jackson and kicked at him. Jackson said, "I told you not to strike at me. I am going to kill you." He then ran out in the road and came back. Mrs. Simmons stood between her husband and Jackson. My impression is Simmons stooped down before he could straighten up Jackson threw a rock and struck Simmons. Simmons fell. Afterwards we carried him in the house - we, Billie Sheppard and myself and others. A. P. Butler

   Harriet Hargrove being duly sworn says:   As I came out of my gate Charlie Jackson drew back his hand and before I could get him Wes Simmons fell. I saw Charlie Jackson throw the rock that struck Simmons. I was about 20 yards from them. This was on the 4th of March 1895.               

Harriet (X) Hargrove

   Leatha Tillman being duly sworn says:    I first saw Professor Butler and Mr. Simmons talking and then went back to my ironing. Afterwards I heard talking and went back to the door and saw Mr. Simmons lying on the ground. Leatha Tillman

This is to certify that we have this day examined the body of West Simmons and find that his death was caused by two fractures of the skull, one extending from a point opposite the right ear to the top of the skull and the other through the tempus portion of the left temporal bone. The immediate cause of death was due to the blood clot which was caused by the fractures above mentioned. Newberry SC, March 13, 1895                O. B. Mayer MD/P.G. Ellisor MD

Wesley Simmons, colored, died 3/12/1895. He had been struck on the head with a rock by Charlie Jackson, colored, 10 days ago. There will be an inquest. Newberry Observer, 3/13/1895; Results of the inquest was death was the result of a blow to the head inflicted by Charlie Jackson. Newberry Observer 3/30/1895

Charlie Jackson, colored, hit Wesley Simmons, colored, on the head with a rock 10 days ago. Mr. Simmons died 3/12/1895. Newberry Observer, 3/13/1895; COURT OF SESSIONS murder, not guilty. Newberry Observer 3/27/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 19 March 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid the 19th day of March A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Henry Eichelberger of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of Burr Rains, Green Jones, J.D. Kinard, J. H. Livingston, Charles Montgomery, Caddie Simmons, Ben Lindsay Jr., Calvin Glenn, W.T. McDonald, B. A. Havird, W. C. Sheppard, J. B. Walton being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Henry Eichelberger came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Henry Eichelberger came to his death by an accidental discharge of a pistol on March 18, 1895 in the hands of Ben Spence. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid, Henry Eichelberger in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by misfortune or accident. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. B. Walton Foreman, Burr Rains, Green (X) Jones, J. D. Kinard, J. H. Livingston, C. W. Montgomery, Caddie Simmons, Ben Lindsay Jr., Calvin (X) Glenn, W.T. McDonald, B. A. Havird, W. C. Sheppard

EVIDENCE

Edward Williams being duly sworn says:   I and Henry Eichelberger and Ben Spence were sitting on the railroad by the new road tank. Henry and I were talking and Ben had a pistol in his hand snapping it. I had my back turned on him and did not know in what direction he was pointing the pistol. Henry was lying down when the pistol went off. He was lying on his back and did not have his face towards either of us. When the pistol went off Henry jumped up and said, "Ben has shot me in the stomach," and asked me to bring him home. Ben said, "I did not know I had the hammer of the pistol on the ball." Ben helped me to bring him home. When Henry was shot I was between him and Ben. We were all quite near together. We had been fishing on the creek. There had been no fuss among us. Ben and Henry were good friends. Ben had not been shooting the pistol but knew it was loaded. It had three balls in it. It was a five-shooter pistol. Ben said the pistol was his. He was excited and sorry he had shot Henry.   Edward (X) Williams

C. W. Bishop being duly sworn says:   I am the Chief of Police of Newberry. I arrested Ben Spence on the 18th of March 1895 for shooting Henry Eichelberger. He said it was purely accidental. He offered no resistance but came on very willingly. He said they had been fishing together and had had no difficulty and were perfectly friendly. He was very sorry for it and hoped he would get well.  C. W. Bishop

Dr. J. M. Kibler being duly sworn says:   I attended Henry Eichelberger in his last illness. I told him this afternoon that he would certainly die from the effects of the wound. He was very much excited at first on learning this but he soon realized his condition and believed my statement correct. I then said, "Now Henry, before you go, I want to know why Ben shot you and what was the difficulty between you." he said it was purely accidental. "Ben did not go to shoot me. He was fooling with a pistol and it went off and shot me in the belly".              J. M. Kibler

Ben Spence being duly sworn says:   Edward Williams, Henry Eichelberger and myself were by the new railroad tank. We had been fishing. We came up on the bank to see the freight go down. Henry was lying down about ten feet from me. Ed was between us. I had a pistol and revolved it around to let it down on a chamber that was not loaded. Three balls were in the pistol. It shot five times. When I snapped it - it went off. I snapped it only and Henry jumped up and asked what I was doing and asked Ed Williams to carry him home. I helped to carry him home. We had had no fuss. I told Henry I did not go to do it. We carried him home and I went after a doctor. I got doctor Kibler. There was no bad feelings between me and Henry.        Ben Spence

This certifies that Henry Eichelberger came to his death on March 19, 1895 from the effects of a gun shot wound re: the ball entering the left iliac region, passing across the body a little downward, cutting the bowels and lodging itself in the opposite side of the body.

J. M. Kibler MD

Henry Eichelberger, colored, was accidentally shot in the abdomen by Ben Spence, colored. Eichelberger died and Spence is in jail, details on Page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer 3/30/1895

Ben Spence, colored, accidentally shot and killed Henry Eichelberger. Spence is in jail, details on page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer 3/30/1895; COURT OF SESSIONS murder, not guilty. Newberry Observer 3/27/1895; MAYOR'S COURT, was charged with rocking a woman's house, breaking up her furniture and of being drunk and disorderly. He was fined $25 or 30 days on the chain gang for the first offense and $5 or 10 days on the chain gang for the second offense. He chose the days. Newberry Observer  5/16/1901; Ben Spence, colored, was jailed for theft of a pair of trousers from a store and while the police were looking for his accomplice he was let out of jail by Tom Hampton, colored. Page 8, Newberry Observer 7/15/1902

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 13 April 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Floyd's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 13th day of April A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Jacob Coleman of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of Silas Walker, M. J. Longshore, J. J. Workman, J. H. Senn, B. C. Adams, P. B. Boland, F. W. Proctor, P. N. Boozer, J. T. Dennis, H. M. Boozer, W. J. Sullivan, C. J. Workman being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jacob Coleman came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Jacob Coleman came to his death from a gunshot wound in the hands of C. A. Floyd. Said act of C. A. Floyd was a justifiable homicide. Said shot was fired on the 12th day of April 1895 and died in a few hours. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Silas Walker Foreman, M. J. Longshore, J. J. Workman, J. H. Senn, B. C. Adams, P. B. (X) Boland, F. W. Proctor, P. N. Boozer, J. T. Dennis, H. M. Boozer, W. J. Sullivan, C. J. Workman
EVIDENCE

Madison F. Workman sworn says:   On the 12th day of April 1895 I was here at home all day. I saw Jacob Coleman on the 12th. He was here in the field lot and yard. He had difficulty with Claud Floyd yesterday at dinner. We had caught our stock to start to work. Claud told Jacob he had told him a lie in regard to the 'edging' of some cotton land. Jake [said], "I reckon not". He asked Claud what he had told him a lie about. Claud said, "You promised to help me 'eidge' cotton land and then you did not do it." Jake told Claud he did not promise and he repeated it three or four times. Claud said to Jake then, "I am a liar then." Jake said, "You are something. I don't know what you call it," and repeated the same one time. Claud said he would not take it. They both got mad. Jake put his right hand on a trough that runs water from the well to the horse trough and his left hand on the chain. Claud picked up a rock and threw it and hit Jake on the shoulder. Then Jake got the same rock in his right hand and a half brick in his left hand and he asked Claud three times if he meant it and "If you do, darn you, I will kill you." Claud said, "Yes, damn you, I do mean it." Jake started at him with a rock in each hand. He walked about ten steps towards Claud and then he had his right hand drawn back. Then the pistol fired and he fell. Two shots were fired. The first shot is the one that killed. The second shot passed through his hat brim. Claud Floyd done the shooting. They were about 4 or 5 steps apart. The killing took place on the Floyd place in Newberry County SC. The shooting was about one o'clock. Jake lived about two hours.  M. F. Workman

   Obedia Pitts sworn says:   I was here on the 12th of April 1895. I work on the Floyd Place. I do not know of any difficulty between Jake and anyone else. Jake was at the well. I was catching my horse in the lot. Mr. Floyd was there. I seen Mr. Floyd grab down and get a rock and threw and struck Jake. He stopped drawing water and got two rocks and asked Mr. Floyd if he meant that. Jake said, "I will kill you, durn you." Next Mr. Floyd shot. I then turned my back. I was scared. There were two shots. Don't know which one killed him. I was about 40 yards (from) them. Do not know what time of day it was. Didn't know how long Jake lived after he was shot. I do not know who done the shooting.  Oby Pitts

Jake Coleman, colored, was shot and killed by Claude A. Floyd in self-defense. Details on Page 3, column 2, Newberry Observer 4/17/1895

Claude A. Floyd shot and killed Jake Coleman in self defense. Details on Page 3, column 2, Newberry Observer 4/17/1895; Claude Floyd, COURT O F SESSIONS, murder, not guilty, Newberry Observer 7/10/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 15 May 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Mrs. Mary Nichols' Place in the County and State aforesaid the 15th day of May A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Albert Bugg of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of J. W. Reagin, W. A. Crouch, J.B. Berry, O. L. Singleton, Isaac Derrick, A. J. Bedenbaugh, Wade McNary, Anthony Moon, Stanmore Neil, John Brooks, Alex Marshal, Bluford Griffin being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Albert Bugg came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Albert Bugg came to his death from drowning in Saluda River on the 12th day of May 1895 and that one William Farrow was instrumental of the cause of the drowning of the deceased. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid William Farrow, him the said Albert Bugg by the manner and means aforesaid then and there did cause the said drowning of said deceased. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. W. Reagin Foreman, W. A. Crouch, J.B. Berry, O. L. Singleton, Isaac (X) Derrick, A. J. (X) Bedenbaugh, Wade McNary, Anthony Moon, Stanmore (X) Neil, John (X) Brooks, Alex Marshal, Bluford Griffin

EVIDENCE

William Farrow sworn says:   I don't know how he, Albert Bugg, came to get drowned. When last I saw him he was on the Edgefield side of Saluda River with one foot on the bank, the other in a boot. Then I was rowing on in the boat and was very near the Newberry side of the river. Then I turned around and went back to the Edgefield side. Then I went up the river to the other boys. I told the boys to let's go. I want(ed) my dinner. Then we went on. I asked the boys, Marshal Herbert, General Farrow where Albert Bugg was. They said they did not know. He came on down the river where he, William Farrow, was. I told the boys he was coming on back to put on his clothes. Then we went to calling him. I never told J. Berry, Anthony Moon and others that he was going across the cornfield. In about 30 minutes I raised the alarm and went and told his mother. About one month ago me and the deceased had some words. We were all fishing. We had done took our hooks up while Albert was on the Edgefield side. 

William (X) Farrow

   Marshall Herbert sworn says:   Albert Bugg and Oliver C. Neil went up the river after the dogs. Oliver came on back and stopped where me and General Farrow was. Albert took up his clothes and came on to where the boat was. Then he got down to where William Farrow was. I heard them in a dispute about some hooks. When William landed the boat and came to us he asked where was Albert. He never told us anything of where Albert was. I heard William tell J. B. Berry that Albert was going across the cornfield slapping his hands across his naked legs. After he told us, he, Albert, went across the cornfield, we went out that way to see if we could find him.  Marshall (X) Herbert 

   General Farrow sworn says:   On the 12th day of May 1895 - I was on Saluda River. We went to take up a trout line. Me and Marshal told Albert Bugg and Oliver C. Neil to go after the dogs so we could go home. They came back and they could not get the dogs. Albert came back and got his clothes and went down the river. I heard him and William Farrow talking. His hooks. He went to where the boat was. William Farrow came back and asked where Albert was. I heard him (William) tell Mr. J. B. Berry when he last saw Albert he was going across the cornfield slapping his hands. Marshal said he, Albert, must be in the river. William said, "He is not in the river. Now you boys want to make out that I put Albert in the river". William went to look for the deceased a little while then he stopped. Albert could not swim. Albert did not go in the river. William said, "Oh hell, I did not put that boy in the river." We were about 100 yards up the river from the boat. We had two boats. William had one out in the river. We could not see where Albert slipped in the river.  General (X) Farrow

   Oliver C. Neil sworn says:   Me and Albert went up the bottom after the dogs and we did not get them. We came back to where the other boys was. I stopped with the other boys. Albert got his clothes in his arms and went down to the river where William was. I heard him and William talking about their hooks. When William came back to where we was he asked us where Albert was. Marshal said he bet he was in the river. William, "You talk like I pushed him in the", William said, "Oh hell, I did not push him in the river." We was about 100 yards from the boat. We could not see down to the boat.               Oliver C. (X) Neil

J. B. Berry sworn says:   I asked William where the deceased was when he last saw him. He said he was going across the cornfield slapping himself with hand. Then he told Mr. Reagin when he last saw the deceased he was standing with one foot on the Edgefield side and one foot on the boat holding to a tree.  J. B. Berry

Savannah Farrow sworn says:   I seen deceased last yesterday morning. I know William Farrow. He and Albert was left home together. The boys was not on good terms. They quarreled about two weeks ago. They was always quarreling and fussing. William asked me if the deceased was at home and if he was not he was drowned for the deceased was on the bank and if he had moved me and General could have seen him. He told me there was no use to go look for him. He would not come and show me where he last saw him. This was about 6 o'clock in the evening on the 12th day of May 1895. He, William, told the deceased if he did not let him alone he would kill him. This was about 2 weeks ago when they had a fuss.   Savannah (X) Farrow

Albert Bugg, 14 year old colored boy drowned in the Saluda River on Mrs. Mary Nichols place in No. 8 Township on 5/12/1895. Newberry Observer 5/15/1895

William Farrow, 10-year-old colored boy, was with Albert Bugg when he drowned on Saluda River. Farrow told 2 or 3 different versions of the happening and the jury at the inquest found Bugg died by drowning and that Farrow was instrumental in the event. Farrow is in jail. Newberry Observer 5/15/1895; William Farrow, COURT OF SESSION, murder, not guilty. Newberry Observer 11/20/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 25 May 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Spearman's Plantation in the County and State aforesaid the 25th day of May A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Peter Harris (colored) of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of E. H. Longshore, W. A. Pitts, J. A. Schroder, Jim Young, Coleman Wright, W. W. Williams, Robert Farrow, Jim Young, Coleman Wright, Frank Glenn, Harrison Saunders, Alford Tucker being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Peter Harris came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Peter Harris came to his death from a gunshot wound in the hands of some party or parties unknown to the jury. Said wounds were inflicted on the night of May 24 or morning of May 25 on the C&G RR. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid the said Peter Harris came to his death in the manner and form aforesaid. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

E. H. Longshore Foreman, J. A. Schroder, Jim Young, Coleman Wright, W. W. (X) Williams, Robert (X) Farrow, Jim Young, Ward Hunter, Charlie Spearman, Coleman Wright, Frank Glenn, Harrison Saunders, A. L. (X) Tucker

EVIDENCE

E. H. Longshore says:   On the morning of May 23, 1895 about 7:30 o'clock on the old Spearman Plantation near the Southern RR track, I seen Peter Harris dead. Do not know how he came there. My attention was called by Nelson Sadler. Then I went down and found him as Sadler told me. I made a diligent search and found not tracks around the deceased. Deceased had pulled some weeds and briar off with his right hand.               E. H. Longshore

Nelson Sadler sworn says:   I drove Mr. Longshore's cows to the pasture and seen a hat - this. I looked up the Southern RR and seen a man lying by the track. I walked to him and seen he was dead. Then I went to Mr. Longshore's house and told him. The hat was about 75 yards down the RR from where the deceased was lying.  Nelson (X) Sadler

This certifies that Peter Harris came to his death from two gun shot wounds of the neck and head. One ball entering the neck on the right side immediately under the lower jaw and passing backward through the neck a little upward. The other ball entering the skull in the vault and lodging in the brain.  Newberry County SC              May 25, 1895       J. M. Kibler MD

Peter Harris, colored, was found murdered about 6 miles from Newberry 5/26/1895. Details are on Page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer, 5/29/1895

JURY REASSEMBLED June 1, 1895

Anthony Wallace sworn says:   On May 24, 1895 I was at Cauthen's. There were two other boys, Peter Harris and another fellow, don't know (his name), William Blake and Mose Kinley. McBoyd was not with me. Don't know Ira Bobb. I had been working at Williamston. Was coming on the freight train on the Southern RR. They do not bring passengers on it. I was riding on the rods. I call that 'beating the train'. The last place I saw Peter Harris was
at '96'. I left him at the well getting water. It was about dark. There was no one with me but Peter and the other fellow. The other fellow got with us 2 miles this side of Honea Path. I got on the train at '96'. I never got off anymore till I got to Newberry. One colored man said to us we had to get off when we get to Cauthen's. We got off at Cauthen's. Peter was with me there. Peter had a pistol. I seen him buy it. Did not talk to Peter about the pistol. I did not ask Peter about the pistol. I did not tell Peter to shoot the conductor. I did not walk any of the way from '96' to Newberry. I was up to Hodges. We got on the train at that place. No one told us to get off. After we left '96' the train was sometimes fast and then slow. At the Spearman place it was running 25 miles per hour. Peter had $2.50 in money. When the colored man told us to get off we was on the false bumpers. I am certain I never saw Peter Harris after I left '96'. I did not hear any pistol shots on the train. I had no pistol. I could not jump off the train at 25 miles an hour. Peter's pistol was a 32 caliber. I saw him buy cartridges. We did not pump off at over the head bridge. Peter never left '96' with me. I never told anyone I asked Peter about a pistol. The other fellow was a low dark man. The brakeman never said anything about passengers. He said the conductor said we had to get down and we must get down. The other fellow and Peter was left at '96'. No 3 did not tell us where he was going. The other fellow was the same man that came with us while McBoyd was with us. Did not hear him tell McBoyd his name. I got off the train at the Newberry tank. No one saw me get off. The first one that I met was Jane Monday. I came to Newberry on the No.64 fright train. The train slacked up at 'Old Town'. I did not see any section hands. Train did not stop at Silverstreet as we came by. I got home at 9 ½ o'clock. The train did not stop at 'Old Town'. It only slacked up. I did not sleep on the train. I only saw Peter with $2.50 in Money.  Anthony Wallace

   Anthony Wallace recalled:   Peter knew me or not, he would. I do not know if Poore knew me or not. He would know me if he would see me.  Anthony Wallace

   William Powell sworn says:   On the 24th day of May 1895 - I was brakeman on the freight train on that day. Was on train No. 64. I saw Anthony Wallace at Hodges on that day. He was standing around the Depot. After we left Hodges the conductor told me to go over and put the boys down. They went to Cauthens between 2 coal cars. They got down at Cauthens and I did not see them any more. One (was) a black man with an apron overalls on.         William Powell

   William Powell recalled:   The train No. 64 stopped at the water tank at 'Old Town' to get water. At Spearman's overhead bridge the train was very slow, say about between 4 - 8 miles per hour. We stalled before we got to register house at Helena. I was on the engine at Newberry. Did not see anyone at the engine except crew.  William Powell

   David Waldrop sworn says:   On the C&G RR.  I was working on section on the C&G RR. I saw Anthony Wallace on the 24th day of May 1895. There was another man, very black, had on apron overalls. It was about 200 yards from the Saluda bridge on this side they were walking. They were on the track and got off and let us pass. This was about sundown. The train No 64 had done and past us. I am sure that Anthony is the man with the man with overalls on. I did not see any but those two boys. The sun was ¼ hour high when the train passed us. He could not have got on the No 64.  David (X) Waldrop

   David Waldrop recalled:   On May 24, 1895 there was a whole crowd of section hands. To wit: William Drennan section master; Reuben Austin; Levy Todd; Ben Abrams; ice hands, all seen the same two men.  David (X) Waldrop

   J. W. Blanton sworn says:   I am the conductor. On May 24, 1895 I was on the No 64 freight train on the Southern RR. I did not see Anthony Wallace on that day. I saw two men after we left Hodges between two coal cars. I told William Parr to put them off. Did not see anyone at Newberry who had beat my train. J. W. Blanton

   J. W. Blanton recalled:   We left '96' on May 24, 1895 before sundown, I think between 5 and 6 o'clock. We stopped at 'Old Town' water tank and got water. We were there between 5 and 6 minutes. Train No 64 was at Spearman's bridge running between 7 and 10miles per hour. We stalled at the west switch at Helena before we got to the Register house. I was on the engine when we got to Newberry. Did not see any except the crew on '64'.  J. W. Blanton

   H. D. Nelson sworn says:   I am the flagman on the Southern RR. On May 24 1895 I was on the freight train No 64. Did not see Anthony Wallace on that day. Did not see anyone on my train. The train left '96' before sundown.  H. D. Nelson

   H. D. Nelson recalled:   The train No. 64 stopped at the water tank at 'Old Town'. We stopped some little time between 5 - 10 minutes. When '64'' passed the Spearman bridge we were running about 6 - 7 miles per hour. The track was wet. We stalled at the next switch above the Register house at Helena.  H. D. Nelson

   Robert Lewis sworn says:   I am a brakeman on the Southern RR. On the 24th day of May 1895 I was on the freight train No 64. I saw Anthony Wallace one time on that day. He was at Cauthens. He was standing around the train. He was by himself. I did not know anything of the Conductor's orders to put the boys off. I saw another man. He was a low chunky dark man. Robert (X) Lewis

   McBoyd sworn says:   On the 24th day of May 1895 I was two miles above Hodges at a colored lady's house. Anthony Wallace, Peter Harris and William Martin. Martin said he came from Hendersonville NC. He was a heavy chunky very dark man with side-whiskers and mustache. I left the three boys at the lady's house. Anthony was before me when Martin told me his name. We all came to the house at once. I came on to Hodges and got on the passenger train. I knew Peter had a pistol. Don't know if Anthony had a pistol or not. I left the boys 50 minutes before one o'clock. The boys were after the lady to cook them something to eat. Martin said he was going to '96'. His home was 8 miles on this side of '96'. W. Blake and Mose Kingly bought tickets to Columbia. Don't know Ira Bobb.  Peter had $2.90 in money. Anthony Wallace had $2.50.             Mc Boyd

   D. A. Harp sworn says:   I live at William Langford's plantation, near Silverstreet about ½ mile from the Southern RR. On the 24th day of May 1895 I was at the lot feeding. I heard the freight train come down that night about 9 o'clock. The train was very slow. I heard a report on the RR. Only heard one report. Then I knew it was a gunshot.  D. A. (X) Harp 

Peter Harris, colored, was found murdered about 6 miles from Newberry 5/26/1895. Details are on Page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer, 5/29/1895

Antony Wallace, colored, shot John Roof, colored, in the arm. Newberry Observer, 8/24/1893; Antony Wallace, has been arrested for the murder of Peter Harris after a sworn affidavit was given by the mother of Mr. Harris. Newberry Observer, 6/5/1895; Anthony Wallace, COURT OF SESSIONS, murder, not guilty. Newberry Observer 3/18/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 28 July 1895

An inquisition indented taken at E. Y. Morris' Plantation in the County and State aforesaid the 28th day of July A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Bluford Carwile (colored) of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of M. L. Gauntt, J. W. Perkins, M. Brogden, Howard Cannon, George Boyd, George Dewalt, Isaac Jones, Jack Douglas, Rush Anderson, Wash Halter, J. Wiley Jackson,  Mat Clide being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Bluford Carwile came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Bluford Carwile came to his death from a gunshot wound in the hands of Washington Carwile, colored, on July 21, 1895 and from which wound the said Bluford Carwile died in the said County and State on the 28th day of July 1895. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Washington Carwile, him the said Bluford Carwile in the manner and form aforesaid then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

M. L. Gauntt Foreman, J. W. Perkins, M. (X) Brogden, Howard (X) Cannon, George (X) Boyd, George (X) Dewalt, Isaac (X) Jones, Jack (X) Douglas, Rush (X) Anderson, Wash (X) Halter, J. Wiley (X) Jackson, Mat (X) Clide

EVIDENCE

Lewis Williams sworn says:   I was at E. Y. Morris' place on Sunday the 21st July 1895. I saw Bluford Carwile. Also saw Wash Carwile Jr. When Wash came from Sunday School he and Bluford started about a vest. He told Bluford to pull off his vest. Bluford did not say anything. Wash went in the house and got the gun and sat in the door with it across his lap. Bluford asked Wash if he had the gun to shoot him and Bluford started to Wash. Wash backed out of the door with the gun. Then I begged them to quit. Bluford was coming at Wash. Wash had the gun up. Do not know what Bluford had in his hand. When I last seen them Bluford was about 8 or 10 yards from Wash. They were not using any bad - bad language. They were out in the yard. I turned and ran for home to tell his people. I was about 100 yards when the gun fired. I kept on and told his people that the boys Bluford and Wash was fighting. Bluford had on Wash's vest. They did not have much dispute. Wash just went and got the gun. Wash did not say anything when he got the gun but sat in the door. I thought Wash was going to shoot Bluford is the reason I ran off. Did not hear any noise after the gun fired. I was close by the door when Wash went and got the gun. They were in the main part of the house when they first started. Nobody here but us three boys.             Lewis Williams

Wash Carwile Sr. sworn says:   On the 21st day of May 1895 I was at home in the evening. I found blood on the floor to the room. I found Bluford on the bed in the room. I came out and I was looking to see where the fuss started. I found the poking iron about 30 yards from the house. Then I walked up the road about the same distance and found another stick. I found blood on the stick and two shots in the stick. Then I came back to Bluford and asked him what they started about. He said it was about him having on Wash's vest. Then I went out to look for Wash. Did not find him.                Wash (X) Carwile Sr.

This is to certify I have examined the body of Bluford Carwile and find that he came to his death from a gunshot wound of the bowels resulting in peritonitis.  Newberry SC              July 29, 1895      

J.H. McCullough MD

Bluford Carwile, colored, was shot by his brother Wash Carwile Jr., colored, with a shotgun on 7/21/1895. Bluford died 7/28/1895. Both lived on E. Y. Morris' place about 2 miles from town. The fight was over clothing. Newberry Observer 7/31/1895; Bluford Carwile, was killed by his brother Wash Carwile in August 1895. Page 8, Newberry Observer 2/18/1902

Wash Carwile Jr. colored, shot and killed his brother, Bluford Carwile, colored, with a shotgun on 7/21/1895. Bluford died 7/28/1895. Both lived on E. Y. Morris' place about 2 miles from town. The fight was over clothing. Newberry Observer 7/31/1895; Wash Carwile Jr. who killed his brother Bluford in Newberry August 1895 has been captured in Saluda by Sheriff Buford. Page 8, Newberry Observer 2/18/1902; WashCarwile, COURT OF SESSIONS, murder, true bill, nolprossed. Page 8, Newberry Observer 2/21/1902

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 14 August 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid the 14h day of August A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Sam Johnson (colored) of Newberry County then and there being dead. Coroner F. M. Lindsay inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Sam Johnson came to his death do say that the said Sam Johnson came to his death from natural causes without blame on the part of another person. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Harriet Johnson sworn says:   Sam Johnson has been complaining since the first of 1895. He quit the RR just before Christmas and has been ailing ever since, complaining with pain in his left side. On this morning about 6 o'clock on the 14th of August 1895 he complained of his side as being worse and he grew worse and died about 9 o'clock am.  Harriet (X) Johnson

   Minor Teague sworn says:   On the morning of August 14, 1895 I was sent for by Sam Johnson's family. I went immediately. I found him in a dying condition. Then, in 15 minutes he died. He was complaining of his side. He has been complaining of his left side all of 1895. I helped to wash and lay out the deceased and found no marks of violence on the deceased. 

Minor Teague

Sam Johnson, colored, died suddenly at his home in Graveltown on 8/14/1895. Newberry Observer 8/21/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 17 August 1895

An inquisition indented taken at J. M. Smith's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 17th day of August A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of John Clary of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oaths of N. F. Johnson, J. C. Satterwhite, David Gary, Duff Boyd, George Gary, Boyce Rook, William Workman, Sam Boyd, Duck Cannon, John Pitts, Jeff Williams, Wade Davis being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said John Clary came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said John Clary (colored) came to his death by a lick struck by Wade Livingston at P. C. Smith's place, on August 17, 1895 and from which deceased died on August 19, 1895on J.M. Smith's place. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Wade Livingston, him the said John Clary in the manner and form aforesaid then and there feloniously did kill. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

N. F. Johnson Foreman, J. C. Satterwhite, David (X) Gary, Duff (X) Boyd, George (X) Gary, Boyce (X) Rook, William (X) Workman, Sam (X) Boyd, Duck (X) Cannon, John (X) Pitts, Jeff (X) Williams, Wade (X) Davis

EVIDENCE

P. C. Smith sworn says:   I had Wade Livingston at work on a concrete house. Said he had to step off a minute and immediately after I heard a fight going on. I ran down to the house. When I got there I saw Wade sitting on top of John Clary with his left hand choking him, his right hand trying to pull John Clary's pistol out of his hip pocket. John had hold of the pistol also. Wade got the pistol. I told him not to kill John but to give him a good whipping. He did not strike him at all. Wade's wife had hold of Wade, trying to pull him off of John. Wade got off of John and he got up and ran. Wade told me he hit the deceased on the head with a stick. Wade followed him a piece and shot at him one time. Deceased ran on about 200 yards, stopped. I looked back. I hollered to John and told him to get on. He did not want to go. I told the boys to catch my horse and I would make him go. I got on my horse and started. Rode out to Larkin Jackson's house. Did not see him. Concluded he had gone home. Did not know any better till about ½ past 10 o'clock. This was on the 17th day of August 1895. The distance of the concrete house is about 20 yards. Andrew Livingston sent me word John was lying just below his house.  P. C. Smith

   Walter Gary sworn says:   On the 17th day of August 1895 I was at Mr. Clark Smith's. I was lying across the bed. Heard Wade Livingston's wife holler, "Look out John Clary." Wade Livingston struck John once across the head with a hickory stick of a good size. I got up and stepped out of the window. Me and John was in the same room. I only heard the lick. Did not see who struck it. Did not see John try to get his pistol. I heard Mr. P. C. Smith tell John not to come on his place.         Walter (X) Gary

I do hereby certify that I have examined the body of John Clary deceased and find cerebral hemorrhage to have been the cause of death.  August 17, 1895; Van Smith MD

John Clary, colored, was hit on the head with a stick and killed by Drate (Wade) Livingston, colored, on the farm of Clark Smith in No. 6 Township. Newberry Observer 8/21/1895; On 10/16/1895 Wade Livingston, fugitive was found dead at his wife's house. An inquest verdict was death by natural causes. Newberry Observer 10/23/1895

Wade Livingston, colored, who was a fugitive, died at his wife's home on the Werber place near Saluda Old Town on 10/16/1895. He was wanted for the murder of John Clary, colored, in July. An inquest had a verdict of natural death. Newberry Observer 10/23/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 16 September 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Johnson's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 16th day of September A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of James Maybin of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oaths of T. B. Leitzey, J. J. H. Brown, B. R. Leitzey, R. T. Caldwell, C. D. Bushardt, Ned Spearman, Tommie Gray, John Baker, Rob Grey, Lias Worthy, Burr Wood, Mit Renwick being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said James Maybin came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said James Maybin came to his death by gunshot wound accidentally discharged in the hands of Eddie Maybin on the 13th September, 1895 at the Johnstone Place from the effects of which he died on the 15th September 1895.  And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Eddie Maybin, him the said James Maybin in the manner and form aforesaid then and there accidentally did kill. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

T. B. Leitzey Foreman, J. J. H. Brown, B. R. Leitzey, R. T. Caldwell, C. D. Bushardt, Ned (X) Spearman, Tommie  (X) (X) Gray, John Baker, Rob  (X) Grey, Lias  (X) Worthy, Burr  (X) Wood, Mit  (X) Renwick

EVIDENCE

Eddie Maybin being duly sworn says:   I was playing with James Maybin in the yard and then went in the house and got the gun and we came back in the piazza to load the gun, cocked the gun and was playing with Jim Maybin. The gun was accidentally discharged, hitting the above named Jim Maybin. Never have had any malice against him. Never had any fuss that day. Was just going to load the gun because we always keep it loaded. It was already loaded and I didn't know it. Did not point the gun at him. We were only playing with the gun. Both of us had hold of the gun when it was discharged. It was late in the day on Friday evening last.   September 16, 1895           Eddie (X) Maybin

   Hayne Williams being duly sworn says:   I came by the house. Saw Eddie Maybin and the deceased playing on the road. Was playing with a stick. Then I passed by the house. I saw them go into the house. When I got some distance up the road I heard the report of a gun. After that I heard James Maybin say, "Bud, you have shot me". Eddie replied, "Who loaded the gun?" "Yes, you have shot me". Eddie said, "I did not know the gun was loaded." I came back to the house and Jim said, "We were playing with the gun and Eddie has shot me." Jim said it was accidental. No one else was near when I passed by the house. Both of the boys were in a good humor when I passed.  Hayne Williams

   Ned Marshal being duly sworn says:   Don't know of any disagreement existing between the boys. Both are my grand children. Eddie had shot the gun off Thursday evening. They had not had any dispute that I know of that day. I loaded the gun Friday evening. Neither of the boys saw me load the gun. I was away from home when it happened.  Ned (X) Marshal

   P. G. Ellisor being duly sworn says:   I saw James Maybin about 10 o'clock Friday night. Was called to attend a gunshot wound. Saw him every day after that until he died. Each day he insisted that he had been accidentally shot by his brother and that they were playing with the gun at the time of the shooting. P. G. Ellisor MD

James Maybin, colored, 16 years old, brother to Eddie Maybin lived on the Johnstone Place 4 miles from town. He and his brother were tussling over a gun 9/13/1895, when it discharged, shattering his leg of which injury he died on 9/15/1895. Verdict of the Inquest was accidental death. Eddie Maybin was released on a $20 bond. Newberry Observer 9/18/1895

Eddie Maybin, colored, 14 years old, brother to James Maybin lives on the Johnstone Place 4 miles from town. He and his brother were tussling over a gun 9/13/1895 when it discharged, shattering the leg of James Maybin of which injury he died on 9/15/1895. Verdict of the Inquest was accidental death. Eddie Maybin was released on a $20 bond. Newberry Observer 9/18/1895; Eddie Maybin, COURT OF SESSION, murder, not guilty. Newberry Observer 11/13/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry , 4 October 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Helena in the County and State aforesaid the 4th day of October A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Mack Jackson (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead, for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Mack Jackson came to his death do say that the said Mack Jackson came to his death at Helena on October 4, 1895 from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid have set our seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Lewis Wright being duly sworn says:   Mack Jackson has been sick since in March 1895. Last night about 11 o'clock I heard Mack Jackson making a fuss. I ran down to Metts house and got him to come (calm) down and see what was the matter, as Mack lived in the next room to me. And when we went in we found Mack under the bed hollering. I called and he waved - not answered. I went up to John Caldwell's house and got him to come down and Davis Metts ran over and got Sim Wright. John Caldwell asked Mack if he knew him and Mack said no. Sim Wright asked if he knew him and Mack said yes. This was on the 4th of October 1895 and this morning his sister-in-law knocked at my door, as she was afraid to go into Mack's room. We went in the room. He said he was a little cold, to put some covers on him. I left this morning and went to work and when I got home this evening he was dead.  Lewis (X) Wright 

   Weston Wright being duly sworn says:   This morning October 4, 1895 I called Mack Jackson and asked how he felt. He said he felt something better. After I gave him his breakfast I went down to Wes Metts and stayed awhile. Being sick, I was afraid to stay in my room. This evening about 5 or 6 o'clock Drayton Wilson was passing and said he heard Mack Jackson draw a long breath and he went to Mrs. Metts and asked if there was anyone here sick. She said yes, so Drate came back and went in the room and found Mack dead. I was not at the house at the time. When I got in the yard Drate told me Mack was dead. I didn't see him draw any breath. Weston Wright

Mack Jackson, colored, died alone at his home from natural causes. Newberry Observer 10/9/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 8 October 1895

An inquisition indented taken at J. W. Reeder's Place in Number 6 Township in the County and State aforesaid the 8th day of October A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Ed Boatwright (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ed Boatwright came to his death do say that the said Ed Boatwright came to his death from an overdose of morphine taken by mistake for quinine on the 7th day of October 1895 from the effects of which he died on the 8th day of October 1895 on J. W. Reeder's place in No 6 Township. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set any hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Alice Boatwright being duly sworn says:   I am the wife of Ed Boatwright. Last night about 7 o'clock October the 7th 1895 he (had) taken some medicine that the children had found, thinking it was quinine, and went to bed, and then he called me and said he was getting worse. "Unless I get better, you must send for the doctor." Then I sent for Dr. Longshore. When the doctor came in he said Ed had taken morphine and Ed lived until before day this morning October 8, 1895. Alice (X) Boatwright

   George Wilson being duly sworn says:   Last night October the 7, 1895 I was sent for by Alice Boatwright and when I got here I went to the bed and shook him, Ed Boatwright, several times, but could not get him to speak and about that time the doctor came in and went to work on him. Ed Boatwright died this morning about daybreak.  George (X) Wilson 

Ed Boatwright, colored, had chills and took a teaspoonful of what he thought was quinine. He went to sleep and never woke up - he had taken morphine by mistake. Newberry Observer 10/9/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 10 October 1895

An inquisition indented taken at G. C. Williams' Place in the County and State aforesaid the 10th day of October A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Dave Dembo (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Dave Dembo came to his death do say that the said Dave Dembo came to his death from natural causes on G. C. Williams' Place on October 9, 1895. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set any hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Lee Gary sworn says:   I live on G.C. Williams place in Newberry County SC. October the 9, 1895 Dave Dembo left here about 9 o'clock pm, went to the cotton house. He came to the house and asked me for some salt. Said he had a bad cold. I told him to come to the fire and lie on the bed. He got out of bed, on the floor. He complained of his stomach. He said this will carry me over. He lived only about 10 minutes after he came in the house. Dave had been complaining for several days.              Lee (X) Gary

Dave Dembo, colored, died suddenly at his home in No. 8 Township on 10/9/1895. An inquest proved death by natural causes. Newberry Observer 10/16/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 14 October 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Werber's Plantation in the County and State aforesaid the 17th day of October A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of  Wade Livingston (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oaths of J.W. Saunders, J. W. Ropp, J. C. Carter, Wess Williams, William Key, Stephen Thompson, Lewis Kinard, Hamp Scurry, Chambers Williams, Alf Walker, Monday Firms, Anderson Satterwhite being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Wade Livingston came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Wade Livingston came to his death by natural causes on the Werber Place on the 16th day of October 1895.  And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Wade Livingston in the manner and form aforesaid died of natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J.W. Saunders Foreman, J. W. Ropp, J. C. Carter, Wess (X) Williams, William (X) Key, S. Y. Thompson, Lewis (X) Kinard, Hamp (X) Scurry, Chambers (X) Williams, Alf (X) Walker, Monday (X) Firms, Anderson (X) Satterwhite

EVIDENCE

Nicy Johnson sworn says:   I live at the Buck Satterwhite place in Newberry County SC. Deceased is my son. I saw him last Sunday at my house. He said he, "...was going home, I am so sick." Deceased complained of a misery in his head. Deceased said he had a chill a week before he was at my house. Deceased did not tell me of his taking any medicine.                 Nicy (X) Johnson

   Betsy Marshal sworn says:   I live at the Werber Place where Wade Livingston died. He died at my house. Wade Livingston came here last Sunday eve. He was sick. Said he had been having chills all week and a misery in his head. I have not given him anything but a little milk. He told his wife if she thought a doctor would do him any good to send for one.  Betsey (X) Marshal

   Ada Livingston sworn says:   I live with my mother at the Werber place. Am the wife of Wade Livingston. He came here on last Sunday eve. He was sick. He sent for me. He told me he had a misery in his head and had been having chills every day except Saturday. I asked him if he wanted any medicine. He told me he had taken one dose of calomel and if he  had to take another dose he would die. I have been here since August. I was living at Mr. Clark Smith's. After John Clary died we left John Clary and deceased got in a fight. Deceased said he never had any trouble since he killed Clary. He has not eaten anything except coffee and milk. Deceased said if he ate anything he believed he would die. Deceased has had no certain place since he killed Clary. I did not have money is the reason I did not have a doctor. Mr. Smith told Clary to stay away from me after he said he would kill Wade. Deceased was here on last Sunday a week ago. Me and Wade never had a fuss about Clary. We were on good terms when he died. Deceased was well when he was here two weeks ago. Deceased had some fits before he died. Deceased said he had not eaten anywhere but his Ma's.     Ada (X) Livingston

   John Livingston sworn says:   I saw Wade Livingston, my brother, on last Wednesday a week ago. I asked brother id he would have anything to eat. He said he did not want anything. Deceased said he had eaten before he came up home and it made him sick and he could not eat bread. He said he had a misery in his head. Deceased said he did not want any medicine for he could not live.               John (X) Livingston

This is to certify that I have this day October 17, 1895 examined the body of Wade Livingston and find death from natural causes.         A. L. Longshore MD

Wade Livingston, colored, who was a fugitive, died at his wife's home on the Werber place near Saluda Old Town on 10/16/1895. He was wanted for the murder of John Clary, colored, in July. An inquest had a verdict of natural death. Newberry Observer 10/23/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 5 December 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Cannon Plantation in the County and State aforesaid the 5th day of December A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Walt Suber (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oaths of W. T. Hatton, D. H. Livingston, J. C. Aull, T. A. Setzler, H. F. Counts, J. F. Miller, J. A. Summer, C. H. Counts, D. W. Holley, T. B. Graham, John Aull, Wash Wicker, Jule Rikard being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Walt Suber came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Walt Suber came to his death from a pistol wound inflicted by Ed Tobe on the 19th day of October 1895 and from which wound the said Walt Suber died in the County and State aforesaid on the 5th day of December 1895.  And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Ed Tobe, him the said Walt Suber by the manner and form aforesaid then and there did feloniously kill. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

W. T. Hatton Foreman, D. H. Livingston, J. C. Aull, T. A. Setzler, H. F. Counts, J. F. Miller, J. A. Summer, C. H. Counts, D. W. Holley, T. B. Graham, John (X) Aull, Wash (X) Wicker, Jule (X) Rikard

EVIDENCE

Thomas Koon sworn says:   I live in Newberry County SC. On the 19 day of October 1895 I was at Walt Suber's. There was a hot supper at Walt Suber's. There were papers thrown over the floor in the room where they were dancing. Pink Dimo and Ed Lake went out in the yard. Walt went out and said, "Boys, don't have no fuss. Walt turned his back and started in the house and Ed Lake shot at Walt three times. Walt fell at the last shot. I was standing about four feet from Walt when he was shot. Thomas (X) Koon

   George Setzler sworn says:   I live in Newberry County SC. On the 19th day of October 1895 I was at Walt Suber's. I saw Walt Suber come out in the yard and ask Ed Lake what that was he had drawn on him in the house. Ed slipped back and said, "Don't come another god d-step further." Walt turned and started in the house. Ed shot at him three times. He, Ed, shot Walt. I was about 5 yards from Walt when he was shot. I was about 10 feet from Tobe. Walt Suber died. Tobe shot Walt with a pistol.      George (X) Setzler

Amanda Suber sworn says:   I am the wife of Walt Suber. I did not see any of the first. Walt died at 12 o'clock, 5th day of December 1895.                                                                                                               

This is to certify I have examined the body of Walt Suber and that he came to his death by gunshot wound penetrating the lungs.  December 5, 1895              W. A. Dunn  MD

Walt Suber was shot twice in the back on 10/18/1895 by Ed Tobe. Newberry Observer 10/23/1895; Walt Suber died 12/5/1895 from the effects of the gunshot. Newberry Observer 12/11/1895

Ed Tobe shot Walt Suber, colored, on 10/19/1895. Mr. Suber died 12/5/1895 from the effects of the gunshot. Newberry Observer 12/11/1895

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 7 December 1895

An inquisition indented taken at Werber Plantation in the County and State aforesaid the 7th day of December A.D. 1895 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Bennie Downing of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oaths of J. J. Schumpert, B. B. Boozer, Scott Waits, Lewis Hurd, Fred Harris, Lewis Berry, Joseph Peister, Butler McGraw, John Nance, Boston Emory, Frank Conner, A. J. Bedenbaugh being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Bennie Downing came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Bennie Downing came to his death from a pistol wound inflicted by Mack Jones on the December 6, 1895 and from which wound the said Bennie Downing died in a few minutes in the County and State aforesaid and John Brown is an accessory to said killing.  And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Mack Jones, him the said Bennie Downing by the manner and form aforesaid then and there did feloniously kill. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

James J. Schumpert Foreman, B. B. Boozer, Scott Waits, Lewis (X) Hurd, Fred (X) Harris, Lewis (X) Berry, Joseph (X) Peister, Butler (X) McGraw, John (X) Nance, Boston (X) Emory, Frank (X) Conner, A. J. (X) Bedenbaugh

EVIDENCE

Burr Long sworn says:   I was at the Werber Place at a vacant house where Olie Wait gave a hot supper. Mack Jones, John Brown and myself was sitting on a plank on the inside of the house. There was a woman, Carrie Cannon, sitting on John Brown's lap. Ben Downing walked up and asked her who came with her. She said, "It ain't your business." He, Ben, asked her to go home with her. She said no. He, Ben, said, "You are money out by not letting me go." Mack Jones asked him, Bennie, what he meant. Bennie told him it was not his business. Mack Jones said, "God d_ you had better not own it." John Brown said, "Mack, do you sit there and let a man run over you that way." John Brown then ran back and threw his hand on his hip pocket. Then Mack got up and pulled his pistol out. Then Bennie started towards him and Mack shot Ben. John Brown said, "God d_ him. Shoot him," meaning Ben. Then Mack shot. This was the 6th December 1895. Ben died in a few minutes after Mack shot him. Burr Long

   Madison Jeter sworn says:   I was at a hot supper on the Werber Place on the 6th December 1895 at night. I was standing at Ben Downing's back. I heard Mack Jones tell him "D--- you, I dare you to own what you said." John Brown said, "Mack, you take that," and stepped back about two steps and put his hand on his hip pocket and said, "Kill the god d__ rascal," meaning for Mack to kill Ben Downing. Then Mack jerked out his pistol. Ben said, "Oh hell Mack, I am not talking to you." I asked Ben what is the matter. He said, "Oh nothing's the matter." Ben stepped over the bench and started to the fire. As he got his last foot over the bench, John Brown said, "Shoot him." Then Mack fired. Ben fell up against Mack. Mack ran out of the house backwards with his pistol in his hand. Ben only lived a short time after he was shot. Ben did not have anything in his hand. Ben was not mad.            Madison Jeter

This is to certify that Bennie Downing came to his death from gunshot wound of the neck.

P. G. Ellisor MD

Bennie Downing, colored, was shot and killed while at a hot supper at Mr. Werber's mill place by another colored man who has skipped. Newberry Observer 12/11/1895

Mack Jones, COURT OF SESSION, murder, guilty of manslaughter, sentenced to 5 years in the Penitentiary. A motion for a new trial was refused. A motion for an appeal was given. Newberry Observer 3/25/1896

John Mack Brown, COURT OF SESSION, murder, guilty of manslaughter, 5 years in the Penitentiary, motion for a new trial refused, motion for appeal was given. Newberry Observer 3/25/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 5 January 1896

An inquisition indented taken at T. F. Harmon's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 5th day of January A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of infant of Ada Glasco of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. The Coroner finds that the infant of Ada Glasco came to his death from some natural cause on the 5th day of January 1896 without blame attached to another person. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Ada Glasco being duly sworn says:   I am the mother of the dead infant who was four months old the 17th day of December 1895. It was always sick or most of the time. It was in as good health as usual last night when I went to bed and about 11 o'clock it cried some and about 4 o'clock this morning January 5, 1896 when I awoke the infant was dead. Ada Glasco

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 9 January 1896

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid the 9th day of January A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Malinda Lulabell Speaks of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. The Coroner finds that Malinda Lulabell Speaks came to her death from natural cause on the morning of January 9th 1896 without blame attached to another person. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Julia Speake being duly sworn says:   I am the mother of Malinda Lulabell Speake. She was well last night January 8, 1896 when I put her to bed and slept until between 3 and 4 o'clock this morning January the 9th 1896 when she awoke and I nursed her and she went to sleep again. I slept a little before sun up this morning and got up and left Malinda in bed, not knowing that she was dead, for some half hour or more, when I sent my daughter to get the children out of bed and found Malinda was dead.  She was nearly six months old. She had a bad cold and that may have been the cause of her death.  Julia Speake

 

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 18 January 1896

An inquisition indented taken at Brown & Moseley's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 18th day of January A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Mary Cureton of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. The Coroner sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what   means the said Mary Cureton came to her death does say that Mary Cureton came to her death from accidental burning on the night of January 17, 1896 on Brown & Moseley's near Prosperity. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County. 

EVIDENCE

Nerva Cureton sworn says:   I left Mary Cureton's house soon on the 17 day of January 1896. Mary Cureton was in the house when I left. She told me I could stay all night with William Porter. Mother was or seemed all right when I left her. I heard on the 18th day of January 1896 mother's house was burned and she was dead. Do not know how the house caught on fire. Mother had no lamp oil.  Nerva (X) Cureton

   Guss Jackson sworn says:   On the 18th day of January 1896 about 10 o'clock I came to Mary Cureton's. I saw Mary Cureton covered up. She was dead. She was burned to death. Sometimes she did not have a good mind at all times. I live about 500 yards from where the house was burned. Don't know when the house was burned. I went to bed about 9 o'clock. Seen nothing more.     Gus (X) Jackson

Mary Cureton, aged colored woman, lost her home to fire 1/18/1896. She was so badly burned she died that evening from the burns. Newberry Observer 1/22/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 4 February 1896

An inquisition indented taken at Gilliam Place in No 4 Township in the County and State aforesaid the 4th day of February A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Lilla Toland (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. The Coroner sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Lilla Toland came to her death does say that Lilla Toland came to her death from the effects of being accidentally burned February 3, 1896 on the Gilliam Place in the County and State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Mamie Toland being duly sworn says:   I am the mother of Lilla Toland. I left Lilla and my other two children in the house and went to a neighbor's for a while and the children screamed and called and I ran to the house and found that Lilla's clothes were on fire and nearly all burned off her. This was a little before sundown yesterday evening February the 3rd 1896. There is no suspicion of anyone having set her clothes on fire. It was purely accidental. Lilla Lived until about 12 o'clock last night.             February 4, 1896.  Mamie (X) Toland

   Lou Turner being duly sworn says;   On yesterday evening February the 3rd 1896 I heard Mamie Toland's children screaming and I ran to their assistance. When I got to the house Lilla's clothes were on fire and nearly burned off her. We threw water on her and outened the fire. This was about a quarter of an hour before sundown. I do not know what time she died.             February 4, 1896               Lou (X) Turner

Lilla Toland, 8 year old colored girl burned to death at her home in No. 4 Township on 2/3/1896. An inquest was held. Newberry Observer 2/26/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 21 Feb ruary 1896

An inquisition indented taken at John McCullough's Place in No 10 Township in the County and State aforesaid the 21st day of February A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Forrest Johnson (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oath of F. M. Lindsay,  Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Forrest Johnson came to his death does say that Forrest Johnson came to his death from accidental burning on the 20th day of February 1896 on John McCullough's Place in No 10 Township.. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Harriett Johnson sworn says:   I live on John McCullough's place in No 10 Township in Newberry County SC. I am the mother of Forrest Johnson. I was at home on the 20th day of February 1896 until in the evening. Then I went down to where my husband was cutting wood. I left my two little children at the house. Forrest is 3 years old. The other is 2 years old. I left the doors open when I left and a small fire in the fireplace. I was gone about 20 minutes. I came along back with wood. I came to the door and did not see Forrest in the house and I went on the other side. I saw smoke. Then I saw my child. He was dead when I got to him.                

Harriet (X) Johnson

Forest Johnson, a colored child of No. 10 Township was burned to death on 2/21/1896. An inquest was held. Newberry Observer 2/26/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 22 February 1896

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid the 22nd day of February A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Ola Collins (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oath of F. M. Lindsay, Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ola Collins came to her death does say that Ola Collins came to her death from being burned in a house the 22nd day of February 1896 at Newberry Court House SC. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Nora Collins being sworn says:  I am the mother of Ola and Annie Collins who was burned to death this morning February 22, 1896.I was over at my mother's house and heard Ada Gregory hollering, fire! and when I came out of my mother's house I saw the smoke coming out of the chimney. I came and went to the door and the fire came out so that I could not go in and my two little children was in there and we had to wait until the house was burned down before Ola could be got out. Ola was got out by Sim Counts and others. She was burned to a coal. When I left the house the fire was all right.          Nora (X) Collins

   Ada Gregory being sworn says:   This morning the first thing I knew of the fire I saw the blaze coming out of the window. I went to the door and tried to go in and get the children out but the smoke came and so bad that I could not go in. Then I gave the alarm.  Ada (X) Gregory                

Ola Collins, a 4-year-old colored child, child of Richard and Nora Collins, was burned to death in a tanyard house on 2/22/1896. An inquest was held. Details on Page 3, column 4, Newberry Observer 2/26/1896

 

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 22 February 1896

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid the 22nd day of February A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Annie Collins (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oath of F. M. Lindsay, Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Annie Collins came to her death does say that Annie Collins came to her death from being burned in a house the 22nd day of February 1896 at Newberry Court House SC. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Nora Collins being sworn says:  I am the mother of Annie and Annie Collins who was burned to death this morning February 22, 1896. My father was sick. He lived about 300 yards from my house and I went over to see him and was there only a few minutes until I Ada Gregory hollering, fire! and when I came out of my father's house I saw the smoke coming out of the chimney. I ran and tried to go in the house but the smoke and flames drove me back. My two children were in the house and the house was burned down on them. Sim Counts and others got the children out after the house was burned so that they could get to them. They were burned to a coal. When I left the house the fire in the fireplace.    Nora (X) Collins

   Ada Gregory being sworn says:   I live in the yard near the house that was burned this morning, the 22nd of February 1896. The first I knew of the fire I went out in the yard and saw the blaze coming out of the window and I went to the door and tried to go in as I knew that the children was in the house but the smoke was so dense that I could not go in. I gave the alarm as soon as I saw the fire.        Ada (X) Gregory

Annie Collins, a 2-year-old colored child, child of Richard and Nora Collins, was burned to death in a tanyard house on 2/22/1896. An inquest was held. Details on Page 3, column 4, Newberry Observer 2/26/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 5 March 1896

An inquisition indented taken at Walt Wicker's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 5th day of March A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Viola Koon (colored) of Newberry County SCthen and there being dead by the oath of F. M. Lindsay, Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Viola Koon came to her death does say that Vila Koon came to her death from natural causes on the 5th day of March 1896 at Walt Wicker's Place in Newberry Co. SC. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Fannie Koon being sworn says:   I am the mother of Viola Koon. Seemed to be sick yesterday, March 4, 1896 and would grunt and when she coughed would throw up. And when I would wake up in the night to nurse her she seemed to have something in her throat and this morning about 6 o'clock I got up and Viola cried a little and then hushed and I went and cooked breakfast before I went to see about her again. It took about an hour to cook breakfast and then I went to the bed for Viola and found that she was dead. I think that her death was caused by a bad cold. I have no suspicion of anyone having done any violence to Viola.  March 5, 1894.        Fannie (X) Koon

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 12 March 1896

An inquisition indented taken at J. L. Hunter's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 12th day of March A.D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Andrew Hawkins of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oaths of George W. Dominick, J.W. Wise, H. L. Fellers, George Dickert, W. S. Dominick, G. E. Dominick, W. W. Williams, Cage Oxner, Simon Dawkins, Eli Kinard, George Kinard, George Hair being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Andrew Hawkins came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Andrew Hawkins came to his death from a pistol wound inflicted by Merett Lindsay on the 12th March 1896 and from which wound the said Andrew Hawkins died immediately on J. L. Hunter's Place in the County and State aforesaid. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Merett Lindsay, him the said Andrew Hawkins by the manner and form aforesaid then and there did feloniously kill. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

G. W. Dominick Foreman, J.W. Wise, H. L. Fellers, George S. Dickert, W. S. Dominick, G. E. Dominick, W. W. Williams, Cage (X) Oxner, Simon Dawkins, Eli Kinard, George  (X) Kinard, George  (X) Hair

EVIDENCE

J. L. Hunter being sworn says:   I live in Newberry Co. SC. On the 10th day of March 1896 I was at home. When I came into my lot deceased Andrews Hawkins was in the lot. He said, "We had hell here yesterday evening." I told deceased Andrew Hawkins, "Yes, you all will keep up until you get hell, sure enough." Andrew asked me for a mule to go and indict Merett Lindsay for drawing a pistol on him yesterday evening. I told the deceased, "You all had better stop your foolishing." He said he was going to indict Lindsay if he had to walk. I told him he had better stop the whole thing and have no more of it. Andrew said, "Me or Merett will not work this year. I am not done with it and won't be till there is something done." Deceased said, "If Georgiana Lindsay's children say anything to me I will beat them and Georgiana too and if Merett says anything I will do him the same way." I asked Andrew to go to the house. Told him I would talk with him there. He started on and said, "It ain't done with me." He went about 10 yards and saw Merett Lindsay coming. He said, "Yonder is the d---son of a b--- now," and started towards him. Andrew came on back to the gate. When Lindsay was coming in the gate he had a stick in his hand. Coming on towards Lindsay he said something to Lindsay, did not hear it. I turned to come back. Heard Lindsay say, "Now you have started on me again this morning." When Lindsay heard deceased say d-son of a b--, then Lindsay says, "You are starting on me again this morning." Then deceased picked up a rock and came on to Lindsay and struck Lindsay several blows. Lindsay did not strike deceased at all. Then Lindsay shot Andrew Hawkins in the head. Andrew fell on his face and died at once.         J. L. Hunter

   Merett Lindsay being sworn says:   As I was coming down this morning as usual to my work. When I got in hearing of him, Andrew Hawkins, I heard Andrew Hawkins say, "Yonder comes the d--- son of a b--- now." I came on. I said, "You have started at me again." I came on in the lot. Andrew met me and struck me in the face with his fist, then the side of my head with a rock. He struck me several times. When the deceased came up to me he said, "I am ready for you." I pulled my pistol. Deceased kept on advancing on me and I kept giving back. Then I shot him.        
Merett Lindsay

I hereby certify that I have examined the body of Andrew Hawkins and find that death resulted from a gunshot wound in the head. Ball entering at the upper edge of the temporal bone and ranging backwards and downwards through the brain and lodged against the opposite side of the skull.  March 12, 1896  George Y. Hunter MD 

Andrew Hawkins, colored, was shot in the head by Merritt Lindsay, colored, near Graddick's Ferry on Saluda River. Newberry Observer 3/18/1896

Merritt Lindsay, colored, shot Andrew Hawkins, colored, in the head near Graddick's Ferry on Saluda River. Newberry Observer 3/18/1896; Merritt Lindsay, COURT OF SESSIONS, murder, not guilty. Newberry Observer 3/25/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 29 March 1896

An inquisition indented taken at Dr. R. C. Carlisle's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 29th day of March A D 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of David Rice (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. I being sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said David Rice came to his death upon oath do say that David Rice came to his death from a kick on the left side of his head inflicted by a horse on the 28th day of March 1896 from which wound Daniel Rice died immediately on the Crosson Place in County and State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Jim Clamp sworn says:   I live in Newberry County SC. I was at Mr. Jeter's Place on the 28th March 1896. Saw David Rice. He was leading a horse by the halter, bringing him to the house after watering him. Seen the deceased have the horse by the halter and belly band. The horse jumped and jerked loose and run by the deceased and kicked the deceased as it went by him. Deceased fell when the horse kicked him.        Jim (X) Clamp

   W. F. Brown sworn says:   I know David Rice. Saw him on the 25th March 1896. Deceased lived only a short while after the horse kicked him. I think the kicking was purely by accident.

W. F. Brown

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 11 April 1896

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid the 11th day of April A.D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of the infant of Mary Wright, colored, of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oaths of James M. Bowers, J. M. Bishop, J. W. Davis, T. B. Reagin, W. P. Bedenbaugh, Thomas D. Jones, J. H. Goree, R. S. Perry, R. R. Gilliam, G. W. Feltman, H. H. Houseman, J. B. Adams being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said infant of Mary Wright came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said infant of Mary Wright came to his death from a blow on the right side of the head at the hands of some unknown person or persons on the 10th day of April 1896 and that Clary Robertson, Cornelia Wright and Mary Wright are accessories to the same death of said infant at Newberry Court House SC on April 10, 1896. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Clary Robertson, Cornelia Wright and Mary Wright, the said infant, as accessories to the murder by the manner and form aforesaid. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

James M. Bowers Foreman, J. M. Bishop, J. W. Davis, T. B. Reagin, W. P. Bedenbaugh, Thomas D. Jones, J. H. Goree, R. S. Perry, R. R. Gilliam, G. W. Feltman, H. H. Houseman, J. B. Adams

EVIDENCE

Clary Robertson sworn says:   On April 10 1896 I was called to Mary Wright in the town of Newberry to deliver a child. I came to her room on the morning of the 10th. I stayed until between sundown and dark. The child was born about 8 o'clock. The child was very nearly dead when it was born. It was cold. I done all I could to save it. It never cried at all. I left Mary about 9 o'clock. The child was very nearly dead when I left. When I came back on the 11th day of April the child was dead. I was sure the (infant) would die when it was born. I think the child was smothered in blood and water. We did not send for a doctor. I have had them die before. I do not know whether it was a seven months child or not. The child was purple when it was born. It did not cry, only grunted. I tied the cord, washed and dressed it, laid it on the bed with its mother and wrapped it in a woolen skirt. This is the third child of Mary Wright. Mary has been having chills. The room was shut up and me and Mary was in it.           Clary (X) Robertson

   Mary Thompson sworn says:   I live in Newberry County SC. I know Mary Wright. She is my stepdaughter. I have had a talk with Mary as to her being pregnant. She denied it. This was about the 20th of March 1896.  Mary (X) Thompson

   Mary Cromer sworn says:   On the 10 day of April 1896 I was at Ned Wright's. I had a talk with Cornelia Wright. I asked her where is Mamie. She said Mamie was not here. I did not see Mamie on the 10th. I never thought anything about her.  Mary (X) Cromer

W. G. Houseal being sworn says:   I examined the dead body of the infant of Mary Wright today, April 11, 1896.I found the child was born alive. Also I found a cut on the right side of the skull down to the bone. The cut was about two inches long. Skull was fractured and brain tissue clotted with blood. I believe the wound above described was the cause of death of the infant. W.G. Houseal MD

Mary Wright, colored, gave birth to an infant on 4/11/1896, which was murdered after birth. See page 3, column 1, Newberry Observer 4/15/1896; Mary Wright, COURT OF SESSION, murder, not guilty. Newberry Observer, 3/10/1897

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 23 April 1896

An inquisition indented taken at the Charley Sligh Place in the County and State aforesaid the 23rd day of April A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Willie Campbell of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. By the oath of F. M. Lindsay Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Willie Campbell came to his death upon oath do say that Willie Campbell came to his death from a pistol shot wound through the head inflicted accidentally by his own hand at Calvin Baker's on the night of the 22nd day of April AD 1896 from which wound Willie Campbell died in about one hour. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Pickens Campbell sworn says:   I was at Calvin Bakers on the 22nd day April 1896 with Willie Campbell. Willie had a pistol in his hands fooling with it. The young ladies kept telling him to put it up. Then he shot himself accidentally.  Pickens (X) Campbell

   S. Lilla Baker being sworn says:   I was at home at Calvin Baker's in Newberry County SC. Willie Campbell had been playing the organ. My brother had Willie's pistol. Brother then gave the pistol back to Willie. Willie then took the pistol in his right hand and put it to the right side of his head said, "Someday I will play Dr. Harmon." I said, "Willie, please put the pistol down." Willie said, "There is only one ball in it', and then the pistol fired and Willie fell dead to the floor. Willie lived only one hour.  S. Lilla Baker

Willie Campbell, 17 years old, accidentally shot himself in the head and died in a few minutes, Page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer 4/29/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 8 May 1896

An inquisition indented taken at E. Y. Morris' Place in the County and State aforesaid the 8th day of May A.D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Lark Suber, colored, of Newberry County SC then and there being dead by the oaths of J. C. Neel, W. H. Bobb, W. R. Gauntt, M. L. Gauntt, A. L. Boozer, G. L. Perkins, Daniel Lyles, George Dewalt, Jake Glenn, Henry Dominick, Benson Caldwell, Wain Gallman being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Lark Suber came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Lark Suber came to his death from a pistol shot wound in the left breast inflicted by the hands of Benson Baker in said County and State on the 8th day of May 1896 and from which wound Lark Suber died on E. Y. Morris's Place on May the 8th 1896. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Benson Baker, him the said Lark Suber, by the manner and form aforesaid then and there did feloniously kill. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. C. Neel Foreman, W. H. Bobb, W. R. Gauntt, M. L. Gauntt, A. L. Boozer, G. L. Perkins, Daniel (X) Lyles, George (X) Dewalt, Jake Glenn, Henry Dominick, Benson Caldwell, Wain Gallman

EVIDENCE

W. E. Wallace sworn says:   I live in Newberry County SC. On the 8th day of May 1896 I was on Duffy Sligh's place in Newberry County SC when I came in sight of Lark Suber and Benson Baker was at the spring cussing. He, Lark, came back. He said he and Benson Baker had some words. I seen Baker unhitch his mule and leave the field. He was not gone long. Baker came back and went to plowing. Lark Suber stopped his plow and looked over this way. Then they both began cursing one another. Don't know who cursed first. Lark started towards Baker. Then Baker started towards Lark. Lark and Baker was about 300 yards apart. They met at the spring path on line between Duffy Sligh and E. Y. Morris. Lark's wife came and got between them. They were both still cursing. Lark had a stick in position of a walking cane. Then Baker shot. Lark was standing still when the pistol fired. Lark started towards Baker (who) was retreating. Baker shot again. Lark was going towards Baker with his stick slightly raised. Then Baker shot again. Then Lark threw the stick at Baker and started back about 10 or 15 steps and fell and only lived a short time. W. E. Wallace  

   Rachel Suber sworn says:   I live with John C. Neel. I am Lark Suber's wife. I was hoeing cotton for Mr. Gauntt on E. Y. Morris' Place. I heard Lark say, "You draw your pistol on me." Lark had lost his knife. Benson Baker shot Lark Suber.  Rachel (X) Suber

   Robert Johnson sworn says:   I don't know anything about the killing of Lark Suber. I seen Benson Baker. He left the field. Don't know where he went. He went to his house. I did not tell W. E. Wallace anything. I told Mr. Wallace that Baker was going to shoot Lark but I told Mr. Wallace a lie when I told him that.            Robert (X) Johnson

I hereby certify I have this day examined the body of Lark Suber and find that he came to his death from the effects of a gunshot wound, the ball entering the left breast to the left of the sternum about an inch, striking the third rib, glancing and penetrating the chest cavity at the lower part of the third rib after entering the cavity; penetrating the left lung, upper and left side of the heart and ranging back towards the spinal column.               May 8, 1896          James K. Gilder MD

Lark Suber, colored, was shot and killed by Benson Baker, colored, on 5/1/1896. Newberry Observer 5/13/1896

Benson Baker, colored, shot and killed Lark Suber, colored, on 5/ 1/1896. Newberry Observer 5/13/1896; COURT OF SESSION, murder, guilty with a recommendation for mercy. An appeal for a new trial was granted. Newberry Observer 7/22/1896; Benson Baker, COURT OF SESSION, murder, not guilty. Newberry Observer, 3/3/1897

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 14 May 1896

An inquisition indented taken at the O.H. Bushardt's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 14th day of May A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Foster Graham of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. F. M. Lindsay Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Foster Graham came to his death upon oath do say that Foster Graham came to his death from being accidentally burned on the 13th day of May AD 1896 on O.H. Bushardt's place in Newberry County SC. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Joyce Ann Graham sworn says:   I was at Hope Bushardt's place on 13th May. I was at my house about 4 o'clock. Left my two children in the house. Marie Graham is near three years old. Graham is about 9 months old. I left the children on a pallet. Left only a little fire when I went to the field. I came back to the house about half past six and found the children on the pallet. The pallet was on fire where Foster lay. Foster only lived a short (time) after I got in the house. I think the wind blew in the window and blew the fire to the pallet. Foster's feet were burned the worse though he was burned all over bad.  Joicy Ann Graham

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 23 May 1896

An inquisition indented taken at the J. R. Leavell's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 23rd day of May A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Susan Carter (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. F. M. Lindsay Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Susan Carter came to her death upon oath do say that Susan Carter came to her death from natural causes on J. R. Leavell's Place in Newberry County May 23, AD 1896. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

William Carter sworn says:   On the 23rd day of May 1896 I was at J. R. Leavell's place in Newberry County SC where I now live. My (wife) Susan Carter, was complaining for some time but did not go to bed. I buried one of my children and just got home. Wife fixed dinner. This was about ½ past one o'clock. After dinner the wife ate dinner. We came and set in the door. Wife asked for a little warm water. I laid on the bed. Wife was in the next room. I dozed in a sleep. The Children called me and said mother was dying. When I got to her she gave a long breath or two and was dead. Wife did not complain no more than usual today.  William (X) Carter

   Maggie Carter sworn says:   I am the daughter of Susan Carter. On the 23rd day of May 1896 Ma told me she had the shortness of breath. Ma came and sat on the trunk with the baby and let it run after dinner. She went and sat on the bed. Told me to come and get the baby so she could take a nap. She laid down. She went to sleep. She made a curious noise. My sister asked me what was the matter with her. Ma did not speak. Sister went to Papa and told him ma was dying. Pa came in the room and got the camphor bottle, put it to her nose and ma drawed her last breath.  Maggie Carter

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 26 May 1896

An inquisition indented taken at the J.G. Rikard's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 26th day of May A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of E. P. Chalmers of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. F. M. Lindsay Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said E. P. Chalmers came to his death upon oath do say that E. P. Chalmers came to his death from a stroke of lightening on the road between J. G. Rikard's and Jalapa on the 26th day of May AD 1896. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

J. G. Rikard sworn:   I live in Newberry County. Was at home on the 26th of May 1896 in the evening after the rain. We saw a mule and wagon standing near the corner of my yard. I was called to see it by John Hawkins who first went to it and found E. P. Chalmers lying in the wagon, his head nearly against the hind gate, his legs over the board seat, and his umbrella wrong side out under his head and torn to pieces. He was dead, cold and his face purple. One of the wagon shafts was broken in two and the mule covered on one side with sand as if he had been down. The mule was lame when taken from the wagon. Don't know how long the wagon been there. It had been about one half hour since we noticed it. After W. B. Aull and J. P. Mahon we took the body in the house. I suppose his death resulted from lightening.  J. G. Rikard

   John Hawkins being duly sworn says:   I was at J.G. Rikard's on May 26, 1876 and during the rain in the afternoon saw a wagon and mule standing nears the corner of the yard. When the rain slacked I went out in the yard and seeing that someone was in the wagon climbed over the fence and went near. Mr. E.P. Chalmers was lying on his back in the wagon dead. His head was near the hind gate and his knees covered with an oilcloth over the seat. I called Mr. Rikard and after a time W. B. Aull and J. P. Mahon came and with Pierce Connor we moved the body into Mr. Rikard's house. I suppose his death was caused by lightening.  John Hawkins

   W.B. Aull being duly sworn says:   When I reached Mr. Rikard's Mr. Chalmers was dead and lying in his wagon. I helped to move his body from the wagon to the house. I suppose his death was caused by lightening.  W. B. Aull

E. P Chalmers will occupy the new house of Dr. Mayer Jr. on Caldwell St. this year. He moved in Monday. Newberry Herald 1/2/1878; E. P. Chalmers, while on his way to town, was struck by lightening and killed. He was Clerk of Court 1877 to 1880 and a member of the State legislature 1886-87. Burial was at Head Springs Church. Page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer 5/27/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 1 June 1896

An inquisition indented taken at the J. J. Reeder's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 1st day of June A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of J. J. Reeder of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. F. M. Lindsay Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said J. J. Reeder came to his death upon oath do say that J. J. Reeder came to his death from natural causes at his home in the County and State aforesaid on the 1st day of June AD 1896. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

S.E. Kenerly sworn says:   I live in Newberry County SC near James J. Reeder. On June the 1st 1896 in the morning I was sent for to go  to J. J. Reeder's place. When I got here the room of J.J. Reeder was open and he was dead in his bed and from all appearances he died while he was asleep. My opinion is he died from natural causes.  S.E. Kenerly

   Adam Harmon sworn says:   I live with James J. Reeder in Newberry County SC. On June 1st 1896 I came to Mr. Reeder's bed room, found the door fastened, knocked and got no answer. I then went to the window and knocked again and got no answer. Then uncle Lias come up. I said, "I have knocked on Mr. Reeder's door and got no answer." Then uncle Lias knocked. Then I opened the door and went in and found Mr. Reeder in his bed dead. Then I sent for Mr. Alfred Reeder.  Adam (X) Harmon

J. J. Reeder has got his horse  "George" back again. The horse was found in GA. Newberry Observer 4/7/1892; James J. Reeder's gin house was burned down 2/1/1892. The loss was 3 good mules, 100 bushels of cotton, 100 bushels of corn, 3000 pounds of fodder, no insurance. Newberry Observer 2/4/1892; J.J. Reeder bought 137 acres of land for $800. Newberry Observer, 12/8/1892; J. J. Reeder is a new member of James D. Nance Confederate Veterans and their sons, Post No. 336. Newberry Observer, 7/25/1894; James J. Reeder, 52 years old, was found dead in bed in his storehouse at No. 5 Township on 6/1/1896 of heart disease. Burial was at Bush River Church. Newberry Observer 6/3/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 1 June 1896

An inquisition indented taken at the C. W. Welch's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 1st day of June A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of John Summers (colored) of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. F. M. Lindsay Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said John Summers came to his death upon oath do say that John Summers came to his death from natural causes on C. W. Welch's Place in the County and State aforesaid on the 1st day of June AD 1896. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Lang Glymph sworn says:   I live in Newberry County SC. On June 1, 1896 I was sent for to go to Mr. Welch's place to where John Summers was dead. He is my brother. My brother is subject to fits. He had had fits for 4 or 5 years. Brother was at my house last night. He lived with me. He had a fit last night at my house. Otherwise he was in good health.               Lang (X) Glymph

   Benny Connor sworn says:   I live with J. C. Perry on Welch's place. On June 1 1896 I was at home. About One o'clock when I started to work I seen John Summers lying on his face in the pine corner where he had been digging bait. I called Mr. Perry. He came and pulled John over and found him dead.  Benny (X) Connor

John Summers, colored, was found dead on 6/1/1896 at his place. He was known to be epileptic. Newberry Observer 6/3/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 4 July 1896

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid the 4th day of July A.D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Sallie Rice then and there being dead by the oaths of J. B. Walton, T. L. Lent, W. W. McGuinn, J. H. Moore, Dan Davis, J. A. Blackwelder, W. P. Bedenbaugh, J. H. Hayse, J. H. West, A. L. Prisock, J. C. Craps, John Ruff, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Sallie Rice came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Sallie Rice came to her death from a pistol wound inflicted by Charner Rice on the 4th day of July 1896 and from which wound the said Sallie Rice  died in about one hour in the County and State aforesaid on the 4th of July 1896. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Charner Rice, her the said Sallie Rice, by the manner and form aforesaid then and there did feloniously kill and murder. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. B. Walton Foreman, T. L. Lent, W. W. McGuinn, J. H. Moore, D. P. Davis, J. A. Blackwelder, W. P. Bedenbaugh, J. H. Hayse, J. H. West, A. L. Prisock, J. C. Craps, John R. Ruff,

EVIDENCE

Eliza Meredith sworn says:   I live in Newberry County SC in town. On July 4, 1896 I was at Mack Brazzleman's door. Charner Rice and Sallie Rice started to fuss in my house and I drove them out. Charner told Sallie to go and open her door. She offered him her key. When I got to Mack Brazzleman's I heard the shooting. They was on the sidewalk in front of my house when Sallie was shot. She ran in my house and fell. When I got home Sallie was lying on my floor. Sallie was still alive. The shooting was about 8 or 9 o'clock. Sallie lived about an hour. I seen the shooting. Don't know who done it. Charner told me he had been looking for Sallie since dark. Eliza (X) Meredith

   Cinda Stephens sworn says:   On July 4, 1896 I was in the town of Newberry SC. I was in front of Eliza Meredith's house. I was sitting in a chair. Sallie was in front of me. Charner and Sallie were there. Charner said he had got a buggy and went to the country after [later]. Charner said Sallie had not cooked for him today. Sallie said, "You are a damn liar." Charner got up and got his pistol out of his hip pocket and commenced firing. Sallie started up to her room. Charner shot four times. When Charner shot the second shot Sallie was trying to go up the steps. I think the first shot went under her right arm. Sallie was standing with her right hand in her bosom. I am sure that Charner done the shooting. Charner was about 6 or 8 feet from Sallie.                  

Cinda (X) Stephens

   Elvira Bowers sworn says:   I live in Newberry SC. On July 4, 1896 I was at home. I saw Charner Rice and Sallie. Charner was sitting in front of Eliza Meredith on a barrel. Sallie was standing on the sidewalk. Then I heard some shooting. I heard three shots. I was sitting on the sidewalk close to Cinda when I heard the shots and Sallie screamed and ran into the door and fell. Elvira (X) Bowers

   George Bowers sworn says:   I live in the town of Newberry. On July 4, 1896 I was standing in front of Eliza Meredith's house about 9 o'clock. I went down home. Charner Rice and Sallie Rice were at Eliza Meredith's quarreling. Sallie was not saying much. Charner was quarreling at her. I told Charner I was tired of them fussing. Then Charner said he was going to get his clothes and going to Helena. Then I went into Eliza's room and started back and met Sallie and Mariah. Charner was sitting there leaning against the foot of the bed. Then we all came out of the house. Charner sat down on a barrel. I heard Charner ask Sallie to go upstairs. She refused to go with him but offered him the key. In a few minutes I heard pistol shots. When the pistol fired the second time Sallie ran in the little alley. Then as she was coming out Charner shot again. The Sallie ran in the house and turned around and fell. I heard Sallie curse but don't know who she was talking to. I have heard Charner say week before last he was going to kill Sallie.       
George Bowers

   Mariah Bowers sworn says:   On July 4, 1896 I was at my house in the town of Newberry SC when the pistol fired. I ran across the street. Then when Sallie screamed I ran back to Elvira. I never heard two shots.                  Mariah (X) Bowers

I hereby certify that I have examined the body of Sallie Rice and find that she came to her death from a gunshot wound entering the chest cavity on the right side under the right arm between the first and second ribs.     July 4, 1896           James K. Gilder MD                

Sallie Rice, colored, was killed by her husband Charner Rice, page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer 7/8/1896

Charner Rice, colored, killed his wife, Sallie Rice, page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer 7/8/1896; Charner Rice, COURT OF SESSION, murder, trial set for 3/4/1897. Newberry Observer, 3/3/1897; COURT OF SESSION, murder, guilty with recommendation for mercy, State Penitentiary for life, Newberry Observer, 3/10/1897; CharnerRice, convicted in Newberry County for murder with a recommendation to mercy and sentenced to life in prison March 1897 is on the list of applicants for a pardon. Newberry Observer 10/10/1901; His pardon has been refused by the Governor. Newberry Observer 10/17/1901

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 25 September 1896

An inquisition indented taken at J. M. Bowers Place in the County and State aforesaid the 25th day of September A.D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Jordon J. Gary (colored) then and there being dead by the oaths of D. W. Barre, G. B. Suber, U. J. Stuck, J. R. Eison, Shed Suber, Gilbert Greenwood, Burley Hunter, Fate Andrews, Jim Hunter, J.J. Sease, L. M. Long, T. Z. Abrams, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jordan J. Gary came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Jordan J. Gary came to her death from a blow on the head with a stick inflicted by Mack Thompson on the 25th day of September 1896 and from which wound the said Jordan J. Gary died  in County and  State aforesaid on September 25, 1896 on J. M. Bower's place. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Mack Thompson, him the said Jordan J. Gary, by the manner and means aforesaid then and there did feloniously kill. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

D. W. Barre Foreman, G. B. Suber, U. J. Stuck, J. R. Eison, Shed (X) Suber, Gilbert (X) Greenwood, Burley (X) Hunter, Fate (X) Andrews, Jim (X) Hunter, J.J. Sease, L. M. Long, T. Z. Abrams

EVIDENCE

T. S. Davenport being duly sworn says:   I live in Newberry County SC on James Bowers place on the morning of September 25, 1896. I was at home. I was unloading a load of cottonseed at the gin house. Jordan Gary came and got in the wagon. He and Jim Caldwell commenced to curse each other and began to fight. I stopped them. Jim got out of the wagon and ran. Jordan was after Jim and kicked him as he ran. Jordan caught Jim, then Jim got loose. Then Jim ran off about 10 yards, got a rock and came towards Jordan and threw the rock. Then Jim ran and Jordan caught him at the gate. Then Mack Thompson came up and got a fence brace and hit Jordan on the head. Jordan fell on his side and died. Jordan lived only 4 or 5 minutes. Jordan, Jim and Mack have all been fussing for about 10 days. Jim and Jordan had a fight on the 19th of September. Jim went to Mack's house and got Mack's gun and Mack called his wife and told her to take the gun from Jim. On the 21st of September Mack went to the stable where Jordan was and they had a little quarrel. When I got to the gate Jordan was down and Mack had the stick in his hand. Then Mack left I have not seen him since I saw Mack strike Jordan with the stick.

T. S. Davenport

   Jake Clark sworn says:   On the 19th of September 1896 I live on Miss Sallie Barre's place in Newberry County SC. Jordan Gary was telling me about Jim getting Mack to shoot him. I asked Mack what he gave Jim the gun for. Mack said he did not give it to him. Mack said Jim Cromer for a piece of bread and stole the gun out. I told Mack, "You are all too old to be going on that way. First you know you will kill each other. " Mack said, "If Jim was scared to kill him, I will kill the son of a b_." On Sunday I had a talk with Jim. He said Jordan Gary was in his road and he said any man who would get in his road he would kill them. Jim said if I could borrow a pistol or a gun he would kill the damn son of a b-before he rested.   Jacob Clark

   Walter Gary sworn says:   I am Jordan Gary's adopted son. I saw Jordan Gary and Jim Caldwell in the wagon. Pa said if it had not been for Jim's lies the wagon would have been unloaded. Jim called Pa a damn liar. Then Pa knocked Jim down. Mr. Davenport stopped them. Then Jim got out of the wagon and Pa kicked him up to the gate. Then Pa caught Jim and paddled him with a board. Then Jim told Pa to let him loose and Pa did so. Then Jim got a rock and threw it at Pa. Then Jim ran and Pa after him. Pa caught him. Then Mack Thompson came up and got the stick off the fence and hit Pa with it and said, "Let Jim go." Mack did not say a word - just came up and struck Pa. Pa and Jim had a fuss on Saturday morning, the 19th of September 1896. Jim told Pa to wait till he came back. Jim went to Mack's house and got Mack's gun. Hattie Thompson taken the gun away from Jim. Jim told Pa to, "Get off of me." Jim did not call for anyone to take Pa off. After Jim could not get Thompson's gun he went down and tried to get George Workman's. George would not let him have it.    Walter (X) Gary 

   Jim Caldwell sworn says:   I live on Mr. Bower's place in Newberry County SC. Me and Jordan Gary had a fuss on the 19th of September1896. Jordan jumped over the fence and asked for his basket. I told him he ought not do me that way. He said he could whip as same as if I was a baby. He said the rest of them beat you about and I will do the same. I told him, "Oh no he won't." He followed me to the foot of the hill and gave me a kick. Then I ran off from him. I ran on in Mack's house, then came out and went on to George's. Jordan was still after me. I never had no gun at Mack's. I only had a stick in my hand. I did not ask George for a gun. On the 25th of September Jordan knocked me down and I jumped out of the wagon and ran hi [fast]. I ran about 30 yards and he caught me and kicked me three times. Said, "I am going to kill you." I got loose and ran about 40 yards. He caught me again and kicked me and hit me in the ribs. I got loose again and ran about 30 yards. He caught me again and kicked me in the stomach with his knee. Then he hit me with a board. Then I got loose again and ran to the gate about 13 yards and he caught me again and rammed me up against the pines and butted me. I called for someone to take him off of (me). Mack Thompson came up and I seen the shadow of a stick and Jordan fell. I did not see Jake Clark on Sunday, the 20th September 1896. Me and Jordan have never had a fuss about my woman. I went to Jordan's house and asked him if Anna was at his house. He said she had gone up the road. I did not tell Ann I was going to take my axe and split Jordan's head open. I did not curse Jordan. I asked him if my children could stay. He said yes. I passed Mack's wife. She did not take anything from me. I disremember what I had in my hand. I did tell George I saw a rabbit. I wanted his gun to kill it. Me and Mack have never had any conversation as to what Mack was going to do with Jordan. Mack was coming on towards the gate and I hollered to take Jordan off. Mack went back to the well and told Jordan's boy to tell his, Mack's, wife to send him some camphor. If I threw a rock I don't remember.  Jim (X) Caldwell

   Bettie Gary sworn says:   I am Jordan Gary's wife. Jim came to our house on the 18th September 1896. Jim came and asked if Annie was at our house and called Jordan out. Jim was mad and cursed and raved and seemed to be mad at Jordan.            Bettie (X) Caldwell

   Hattie Thompson sworn says:   I am the wife of Mack Thompson. On last Saturday I was coming through the lot and met Jim. He asked me for my key. Said he wanted some bread. I gave him the key and he went in the house and got Mack's gun and ran out of the house with the gun. I ran and caught him and took the gun away from him. Jim said, "Let me have the gun, Hattie, let me have the gun." When I took the gun Jim went towards George  Workman's house.       

Hattie Thompson

This is to certify that Jordan Gary came to his death from the effects of a blow upon the head causing a fracture of the skull.  Newberry County SC  September 25, 1896       J. M. Kibler MD

Jordon Gary, colored, was killed by Mack Thompson, colored, see details on Page 3, column 1, Newberry Observer 9/30/1896

Mack Thompson, colored, killed Jordon Gary, colored, see details on page 3, column 1, Newberry Observer 9/30/1896; The Governor has offered a $100 reward for his capture. Newberry Observer 11/18/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry , 10 October 1896

An inquisition indented taken at the Robert Moorman's Place in the County and State aforesaid the 10th day of October A. D. 1896 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Robert Moorman of Newberry County SC then and there being dead. F. M. Lindsay Coroner, sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Robert Moorman came to his death upon oath do say that Robert Moorman came to his death from a gunshot wound accidentally inflicted by his own hands on the 10th day of October AD 1896 at Aull's Mill and from which wound the said Robert Moorman died instantly without blame attached to any living person in the State and County aforesaid. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hands and seal the day and year aforesaid.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

EVIDENCE

Marion Moorman being duly sworn says:   We went out hunting today. No one but Hal, me and Papa. Hal is my brother. We had started home in our carryall. Hal and I were in front. Papa (Robert Moorman) was behind. Had been out hunting to Mr. Gruber's about 2 miles. Had gotten back to the steam mill about ¼ mile from home. Heard the gun go off and Papa say Oh. It was the gun he had in the buggy with him. No one else shot him. Was carrying the gun between his legs with the muzzle up. It was a breech loading gun. My father had promised to take us hunting today. It was a rented gun, not his own.  Marion Moorman

   Hal Moorman being duly sworn says:   October 10, 1896 Saturday father, my brother and I all went out hunting. We had been out towards Captain Folk's hunting about 2 miles. We were coming home from hunting at the time of the accident. I was riding in the front. The accident took place at Aull's steam mill. I heard the gun shoot. Then my father said Oh. I then looked around and saw my father leaning over on the wheel.  This happened about half past 5 pm. The gun was loaded with No 6 shot. We had been hunting squirrels and rabbits. He held the gun between his legs with both hands on the barrel and the butt end on the floor of the carriage. I saw my father a few minutes before. I heard the shot and had just heard him speak to a colored woman, saying to her, "Good evening." Had been gone since 12 o'clock. Took out the hordes and put him in Mr. Gruber's stable. Mr. Gruber then went hunting with us. Mr. George Fulmer and his two boys went with us. We killed one rabbit and one squirrel. I know it was done accidentally.    Hal Moorman

   Dr. D. L. Boozer duly sworn says:    About one hour by sun I think it was. I was in Aull's steam mill. There were a good many colored men in the mill who had come for their meal. I walked towards the window, looked out, and saw the carriage about 50 yards in the main public road leading from Rikard's. I started to the carriage at once. Got about half way when I heard someone say, "Drive the carriage on home." One or two colored had gotten up to the carriage by that time. The carriage moved on about the time I got half way to it. Saw Mr. Moorman on the back seat and his boys Hal and Marion on the front seat. They got home about 50 yards ahead of me. I followed the carriage. When I got to the house I saw a colored man take a gun out of the carriage and also take the cartridges out of the gun. I told him to give me the gun and I leaned it against the piling. One of the cartridges was empty. The other was not. I felt his pulse in front of the house and discovered that he was dead. There were two colored men, Mrs. Mahon, Mrs. Moorman, and daughter and the two boys Hal and Marion. I did not take him out of the buggy. This we decided at the request of Mrs. Moorman. He was removed to the house.         D. L. Boozer

We the undersigned citizens of the neighborhood hereby request F. M. Lindsay Coroner to hold one inquest on the body of Robert Moorman. John Hawkins    D. L. Boozer

Robert Moorman Jr. died 10/10/1896 by accidental shooting. Born 11/15/1858, son of Honorable Robert Moorman. He married 11/25/1880 to Addie Davis, daughter of Joseph H. Davis of Marion SC. He leaves a wife, 2 sons (Hal and Marion) and a daughter. He was insured for $10,000. For details see Page 3, column 4, Newberry Observer 10/14/1896

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School