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Colonial Cases

1890-1893

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 6 January 1890

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry Court House at J. C. Russell's store before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on the 6th and 8th of January 1890 view of the dead body of J. G. Pitts by: G. Stout Noland Foreman, J. W. Coppock, Theodore Johnston, J. W. Kibler, J. D. Chapman, R.T. Caldwell, B. M. Dennis, W. M. Shackleford, M. J. Scott, J. G. Salter, John D. Shockley, George W. Martin, a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said J. G. Pitts came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said J. G. Pitts came to his death on 6th of January 1890 on the Richmond & Danville RR, Columbia & Greenville division from a blow from some of the took Newberry Court House from natural causes. Witness our hands and seals this 22nd December 18ls (?)hauled from a lever car, said car having been struck by an engine of an extra car, while in motion.                 C. B. Buist, Coroner

G. Stout Noland Foreman, J. W. Coppock, Theodore Johnston, J. W. Kibler, J. D. Chapman, R.T. Caldwell, B. M. Dennis, W. M. Shackleford, M. J. Scott, J. G. Salter, John D. Shockley, George W. Martin            

W. A. Pitts sworn: I am the son of J. G. Pitts. (I) am employed on the C&G RR. I was on the road on the 6th Jan. 1890 about ½ past 8 am. I was on a lever car. (I am) employed on the section force. My father was on the same train. Was not on the same train when struck. When my train was struck it was about ½ past 8 o'clock am. My train was struck by the engine of the freight train. After the engine struck the car I noticed my father lying on one side of the track. I went to him and called him but received no answer. He was dead. It was a piece of iron toll that struck him. The engine passed on. The conductor returned. No one made any remark. Engine then went on. My father was over 50 years old and was a very healthy man. My instructions were to keep a sharp lookout for extras. (I) had no knowledge of the engine coming. Had no warning. It was their duty to give warning. The warning was two long and two short whistles. The distance to give warning is about 900 yards. I saw the engine coming but it did not give warning. It was my duty to give warning if I could have done so. The engine was running at least 25 miles an hour. I was running very slowly. I was one and I went off the curve. It was a dark, foggy morning. 

W. A. Pitts             

   J. P. Cook sworn:  When the accident happened I was 400 yards from the place. What I saw was after the accident happened. I went to the spot and saw Mr. J. G. Pitts was dead. I think that it was from the iron tools that he was struck. When the engine struck the lever it ran about two telegraph posts when it stopped. I noticed before the accident happened it was usual for trains to blow but no whistle was blown. I heard a whistle blow about one mile from where the accident happened. They are not as strict as they use to be about blowing. I am a farmer living near the road. I am satisfied that the lever could not get away on such a dark morning with a signal given.  J. P. Cook                                                                                

   A. E. Boyd sworn:  I am a section hand on the G&C RR. I was on the RR when the engine struck the lever. I saw the engine strike it. I heard no warning before the engine struck it. I saw Mr. Pitts when he was struck. He was instantly killed. The engine went on - two telegraph posts and stopped. I heard the engineer ask if anyone was killed and then went on with his engine. When struck, the tools fell with great force. He was struck by some of the iron tools. The train passed me before it struck the lever. Mr. Pitts was in the ditch when it struck. A. (X) E. Boyd

   W. Lindsey sworn:  I was out the side of the RR when the engine struck the lever. Heard no warning before the engine struck the lever. After the engine passed I saw Mr. Pitts. He was dead. He was killed by some of the tools. The lever was on the track when struck. The lever was standing still when struck. I went to Mr. Pitts at once and was the first to get there. It was the rule to blow on all road crossings but the engine did not blow.           W. (X) Lindsey                                     

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I hereby certify that I have this day 6th January 1890, examined the dead body of J. D. Pitts and find that his death was caused by two wounds upon the skull. One above the right eye, above the frontal bone, one on the left parietal bone, made by a blunt instrument, causing fractures of the skull and concussion of the brain.   W. G. Houseal MD               


State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 6 January 1890       

Personally appeared before me, W. A. Pitts who being duly sworn says that John Syfan and W. H. Cullum are important witnesses in this case and that they are now absent.  W. A. Pitts

Sworn to before me on the 6th of January 1890, C. B. Buist, Coroner and NP of Newberry County    

Jury adjourned to meet Wednesday 8th January 1890 at 4 o'clock pm at J. C. Russell's store in order that Syfan the engineer and Cullum the conductor of the engine and train which ran into the lever car, should appear and give evidence in the case. G. R. Talcott was telegraphed and sent a reply that: "Will send engineer Syfan and conductor Cullum to Newberry by tomorrow's train to appear before the coroner's jury. They are both out on the road and I cannot get them there earlier. signed G. R. Talcott".          

Jury met 4 pm on 8th January 1890

John C. Syfan sworn: I am an engineer on the C&G division of the R&D RR. I left Columbia at 10 minutes after 5 o'clock am. It was an extra train and had three cars. Reached Prosperity safely. Four miles from Prosperity I struck a dump car. I saw it 150 yards before the striking. I stopped the train as soon as possible after I struck the car. Could not stop it before striking. I was making slow speed after leaving Prosperity. Conductor Cullum and myself went back to the dump car after striking to see what damage was done. We saw the dump car knocked (off the track) afterwards and Mr. Pitts dead. When I saw the dump car, (I) blew brakes and reversed my engine and threw sand on the track. I gave all the signals usually given and one extra one after leaving Prosperity. I gave the road-crossing signal about 50 yards from the dump car. I blew a whistle after I passed Colony Church and then blew a long whistle. No instructions in regard to lights on foggy mornings. Every effort was made by those employed on the dump car to get it off track before it was struck. I was running between 10 and 12 miles an hour when I saw the dump car. It was impossible to use any other effort than was used to avoid striking the dump car. I have run into dump cars before.      J. C. Syfan

   W. H. Cullum sworn: I was conductor on the extra train that left Columbia 10 minutes after 5 am on 6th January 1890. (The train) reached Prosperity safely, struck the dump car about at the 44-mile post. (I) have nothing to do with giving signals. As far as I know signals were correctly given. After striking the dump car, returned with Mr. Syfan, saw we had knocked the car off and had hurt Mr. Pitts badly. I was on the engine when it struck. We were 150 yards from the dump car when we first saw it. I saw the engineer use every precaution to stop it. We were 16 minutes running 4 miles. We were not in rapid motion. My instructions are in regard to the rear lights not  l___. It was my last trip from Alston as conductor. The usual rate is between Prosperity and Newberry about 24 miles. It is hinted to us that we (were doing) the maximum speed. We __ 11 miles on 6th Jan. 1890 from Columbia to Seneca. W. H. Callum

   J. N. Maddox sworn:  I was flagman on the train, which left Columbia for Seneca on 6th Jan. 1890. My principle duty is to flag the rear and if necessary the front. I have nothing to do with signals. In my opinion all the proper signals were given before striking the dump car. We returned after the dump car was struck and saw the car knocked off and Mr. Pitts lying down. I heard the whistle before the accident. I have been flagman four months.      J. M. Maddox       

   Joe Green sworn: I was a train hand on the Road when the accident happened. I have been a month and a half on the Road. Have nothing to do with signals. When the engineer blew the brakes I put them on. Blew the brakes before reaching the dump.     Joe (X) Green

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 22 January 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 22nd Jan. 1890 at Mrs. Lou Senn's place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Jack Summers by: W. T. Langston Foreman, Nelson Crawford, Caleb Mangum, Sol Harp, William Davenport, Ed M. Gary, Tom Gary, Daniel Ellison, Charles Gary, Alf Rhodes, G. W. Pinson, Westley Stephens a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Jack Summers came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Jack Summers came to his death on 21st of January 1890 on Mrs. Lou Senn's Place from a blow received by being flung from a mule against a tree.     C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. T. Langston Foreman, Nelson (X) Crawford, Caleb (X) Mangum, Sol (X) Harp, William (X) (X) Davenport, Ed M. (X) Gary, Tom (X) Gary, Daniel (X) Ellison, Charles (X) Gary, Alf (X) (X) Rhodes, G. W. (X) Pinson, Westley (X) Stephens

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Nannie Bug sworn: I reside on Mrs. Lou Senn's place. Jack Summers was my son. He lived on the same place with me. He was out after daylight yesterday morning January 21, 1890. He was well when he left me. I saw him when he came back from Mrs. Lou Senn's after he got his mule. He was brought back by E. F. Boozer about 12 o'clock. He was complaining and went to bed. He said his bowels hurt him but was in too much pain to tell how he was hurt. E. F. Boozer said Jack Summers was thrown from a mule. I sent for Dr. Senn but he did not come until he was dead. He died about half an hour before sundown.  Nannie (X) Bugg                                                                                     

   J. E. Senn sworn:  I saw Jack Summers get on his mule to start to dinner. He was in good health. He got home and was behind. He started on to feed the mule and was 300 yards from home when the mule began to run. The mule threw him off after running about 30 yards. He was thrown against a pine tree, about three feet from the ground. I picked him up but he was not breathing. He was alive. I asked him how he was hurt and he said across the bowels. I sent him to his home by E. F. Boozer. When I next saw him I supposed him nearly dead.  J. E. Senn      

   E. F. Boozer sworn:  I am acquainted with Jack Summer and saw him when he first went to work, half-hour after the sun rose. He was well. I saw him when the mule ran off with him. (I) think the mule was frightened by a bucket around its neck. I saw the mule when it flung him. I went up to him and he was alive still. I took him by the arm and brought him to the house. I saw him in the afternoon. He was still living.  E. F. (X) Boozer                                                                                            

W. G. Houseal sworn: I hereby certify that I have this day January 22, 1890 examined the dead body of Jack Summers and in my opinion he came to his death from internal injuries caused by a blow upon the abdomen.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 24 January 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 24th Jan. 1890 on the farm of F. H. Dominick by C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Carrie Sheppard by: R. M. Martin Foreman, Asa D. Johnson, R. J. Johnson, J. H. Adams, A. W. Langford, J. R. Sligh, E.D. Reeder, Stokes Dandy, John Dilliard, R. Griffin, John Peterson, Giles Davis a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Carrie Sheppard came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Carrie Sheppard came to her death on 22nd of January 1890 on F. H. Dominick's Place from accidental burning.        

C. B. Buist, Coroner             

R. M. Martin Foreman, Asa D. Johnson, R. J. Johnson, J. H. Adams, A. W. Langford, J. R. Sligh, E.D. Reeder, Stokes Dandy, John Dilliard, R. Griffin, John Peterson, Giles Davis. 

EVIDENCE

Richard Sheppard sworn:  I am the father of Carrie Sheppard. She was about 6 years old. I did not see her alive on 22, Jan 1890. I saw the house where Carrie Sheppard lived on fire, about 10 o'clock pm. There was no chance of saving the same after it was on fire. I saw it was on fire all around me and I could not get in it. My daughter Carrie Sheppard was burnt in the house. There was no chance of saving her.                Richard (X) Sheppard                                                                                        

   William C. Sheppard sworn:  I saw Carrie Sheppard about daylight on the morning of the 22nd of January 1890. She was alive and in good health. I did not see her again until I saw her dead body. She was burnt in the house where she lived. The house was bolted and locked. No one could get out.               W. C. Sheppard                                                                   

   Wade Ruff sworn: I did not see Carrie Sheppard alive on 22nd January 1890. She was dead when I saw her body. No one was in the house with Carrie Sheppard and Ada Waldrop. There was no chance of their getting out while the house was burning. I think the house caught from the inside. The house was 300 yards from Mr. F. H. Dominick's residence.    Wade (X) Ruff

W. G. Houseal MD:  I hereby certify that I have examined the dead body of Carrie Sheppard and found it burned to a crisp, which I suppose caused her death.  W. G. Houseal MD

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 24 January 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 24th Jan. 1890 on the farm of F. H. Dominick by C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Ada Waldrop by: R. M. Martin Foreman, Asa D. Johnson, R. J. Johnson, J. H. Adams, A. W. Langford, J. R. Sligh, E.D. Reeder, Stokes Dandy, John Dilliard, R. Griffin, John Peterson, Giles Davis a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Ada Waldrop came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Ada Waldrop came to her death on 22nd of January 1890 on F. H. Dominick's Place from accidental burning.               

C. B. Buist, Coroner

R. M. Martin Foreman, Asa D. Johnson, R. J. Johnson, J. H. Adams, A. W. Langford, J. R. Sligh, E.D. Reeder, Stokes Dandy, John Dilliard, R. Griffin, John Peterson, Giles Davis
EVIDENCE

J. H. Waldrop sworn:  I am the father of Ada Waldrop. I saw her at 7 am on Jan. 22, 1890. She lived in a house on Mr. F. H. Dominick's farm. I did not see her again until I saw her dead body. I saw the house on fire but could not get in to save her. The house was locked on the inside and bolted on the other side. She was not quite 1 year old. The house was burnt to the ground.     J. H. Waldrop                                                                        

   Richard Sheppard sworn:  I am the father of Carrie Sheppard. She was in the same house that was burned with Ada Waldrop. I saw Ada Waldrop's dead body. There was no chance of saving either one.  Richard (X) Sheppard                                                                   

W. G. Houseal MD:  I hereby certify that I have examined this day the dead body of Ada Waldrop and find the body burned to a crisp which I suppose caused her death.              W.G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 30 January 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 30th Jan. 1890 at the C. H. Suber place by C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Laura Eichelberger by: William Dawkins, George Spearman, Phil Glasgow, Tom Johnson, John Higgins, Tom Ruffin, W. T. Hipp, J. J. Paysinger, T. F. Waters, Pen King, J. H. Dennis, J. T. Dennis a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Laura Eichelberger came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Laura Eichelberger came to her death on 30th of January 1890 on C. H. Suber's farm from natural causes. C. B. Buist, Coroner
William Dawkins, George Spearman, Phil Glasgow, Tom Johnson, John Higgins, Tom Ruffin, W. T. Hipp, J. J. Paysinger, T. F. Waters, Pen King, J. H. Dennis, J. T. Dennis
EVIDENCE

Foster Farrow sworn: I am the son of Laura Eichelberger and lived in the same house with her. When I got up I heard my sister say, "Mother was dying". My sister and mother slept together. I went to my mother's bed and found her strangling. She died in a few minutes. She was picking cotton on Jan. 29, 1890. She did not complain during the day. She retired about 8 o'clock January 29, 1890. She has three children living with her. I heard nothing from her during the night. If she had made any noise I would have heard it. After I heard her strangling she died in about three minutes.  Foster (X) Farrow                                                                                 

   Dora Dawkins: I am 13 years old. I lived in the same house with Laura Eichelberger and was in the same bed and room with her when she died. She slept well during the night. I was awake when I heard her coughing and choking and she died immediately. She was picking cotton yesterday and did not hear her complain during the day. Dora (X) Dawkins

W. A. Houseal MD sworn: I hereby certify that I have examined the dead body of Laura Eichelberger and in my opinion she died from natural causes.                     W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 17 February 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 17th Feb. 1890 at the W. C. Swittenberg's place by C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Jack Davis by: J. M. Sligh Foreman, J. W. Brooks, Tom Abrams, George Clark, Burley Davis, Nathan Swindler, James Clark, David Warner, W. Wilson, Peter Williams, Alex Davis, James Gary a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Jack Davis came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Jack Davis came to his death on 17h of February 1890 on W. C. Swittenberg's place from the effects of a wound caused by a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of Doc Sligh.  C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. M. Sligh Foreman, J. W. Brooks, Tom (X) Abrams, George (X) Clark, Burley (X) Davis, Nathan (X) Swindler, James (X) Clark, David (X) Warner, W. (X) Wilson, Peter Williams, Alex (X) Davis, James (X) Gary

EVIDENCE                                                                              

J. H. Shell sworn: I am the stepson of Jack Davis. I was raised by him. He was a quiet and peaceable man. I saw him on Monday 17th Feb. 1890 after he was shot. When I saw him he was laying on the ground. He was complaining. He said he was obliged to die. He said he was shot through the bowels. He did not say who shot him. I did not ask him who shot him. Lou Abrams told me that Doc Sligh had shot him before I saw him. He died between 30 and 40 minutes after I saw him. He left no wife but 6 children survive him. He was dead before Doctor Clark reached him. He was over 60 years of age. Doc Sligh was over 20 years of age.  J. H. Shell                                         

   Lou Adams:  I knew Jack Davis and Doc Sligh. I saw Jack Davis before he was shot. I saw Jack Davis after he was shot. He told me he was dying and wanted him (J. H. Shell) to take care of his children. I heard him say nothing else.              Lou (X) Abrams                                                                   

   Bedford Sligh:  I was acquainted with Jack Davis and Doc Sligh. I saw them both on the 17th Feb. 1890. They appeared to be in good health when I saw them. I saw Jack Davis after he was shot, a little after 8 am. He seemed to be in pain. He did not say who shot him. My son Doc fired the pistol that caused his death. I have seen Doc with a pistol before this. Doc went off after shooting him and carried the pistol with him. Doc and Jack had no quarrel before this. Jack was a peaceable man. Doc was a quiet boy at times but sometimes he was quite windy. Jack Davis did not carry a pistol. Doc carried a pistol with him regularly. Jack died in about 30-40 minutes after he was shot. I have not seen Doc since he shot Jack Davis. Jack and myself were good friends. I did not hear what passed between Jack Davis and Doc Sligh but saw Doc when he fired the pistol.    Bedford (X) Sligh                                                                 

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I hereby certify that I have this day Feb. 17, 1890 examined the dead body of Jack Davis and find that he came to his death from a pistol shot wound 3 ½ inches below and 1 ½ inches to the left of the right nipple, the ball passing through the liver and defrag mating and lodging in the right thoracic cavity.  W. G. Houseal MD              

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 20 March 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 20th March 1890 at Newberry Court House before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Jeannie King by: Reuben Harrington Foreman, Major Cannon, Charles Williams, Turner Bond, Hack Hentz, W. Robinson, Laurens Fleming, Henry Abb, Andrew Burton, Fielding Wright, S. Blakely, Mike Reeder, a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Jeannie King came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Jeannie King came to her death on 20th  of March 1890 on Mrs. Mary Goodman's place from natural causes.

C. B. Buist, Coroner

Reuben (X) Harrington Foreman, Major (X) Cannon, Charles (X) Williams, Turner (X) Bond, Hack (X) Hentz, W. (X) Robinson, Laurens (X) Fleming, Henry (X) Abb, Andrew (X) Burton, Fielding (X) Wright, S. Blakely, Mike Reeder

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Isabella Simms sworn: I knew Jeannie King. She had lived with me two weeks. She had been sick since she came but not sufficiently so to lay in bed. She had lived at Helena before she came to live with me. She was on the street this morning and returned complaining of being sick. She laid down and died in about a half of an hour. I sent for a doctor but none came before she died. She was about 21 years of age, a light colored woman. No doctor attended to her during the time she lived with me but she was constantly complaining.  Isabella (X) Simms                                               

   Mary Goodman sworn:  Jeannie King was staying in my yard when she died. I saw her 15 minutes before she died. She was having fits. She kept jerking in the bed. I did not know her but have seen her passing.  Mary Goodman                                                                     

   Mollie Simms sworn:  I went about ½ past 8 o'clock am with Jeannie King on the street. She was complaining. We came back together. She went to bed. She said she thought she felt bad and thought she would go to bed. I went for a doctor and she was dead before I got back.                 

Mollie Simms
W. G. Houseal MD:  I hereby certify that I have this day March 20, 1890 examined the dead body of Jeannie King and in my opinion she came to her death from Natural causes. W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 23 March 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 23rd March 1890 at Robert Porter's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Milton Brown by: W. B. Spence, F. M. Bowers, A. G. Wise, G. L. Paysinger, E. K. Bedenbaugh, H. Graham, G. A. Maffett, W. W. Fulmer, W. P. B. Harmon, J. L. Langford, W. Brown, G. Cannon, a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Milton Brown came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Milton Brown came to his death on 23rd of March 1890 on Robert Porter's place from natural causes.  C. B. Buist, Coroner 

Mr. G. Wise (Foreman), W. B. Spence, F. M. Bowers, G. L. Paysinger, E. K. Bedenbaugh, H. Graham, G. A. Maffett, W. W. Fulmer, W. P. B. Harmon, J. L. Langford, Washington Brown, George Cannon

EVIDENCE

Robert Porter sworn: I am acquainted with Milton Brown. He lived on Mr. Young's Place. I saw him before day in my house on 23rd March 1890. He slept in my house. He was not complaining when he went to bed. He retired to bed between 8 and 9 o'clock pm. When I first saw him this morning he was making a noise, as if in pain. I did not send for a doctor but sent for his wife. I was not here when she came as I had gone to let his other children know. It was 11 o'clock am when I returned. I left about daylight. He was dead when I returned. He was an old man. He was my wife's father. He was crippled with rheumatism as long as I knew him. He was not breathing when I went after his wife.                R. Porter                                                                               

J. M. Kibler MD:  I hereby certify that I have examined this day the 23rd of March 1890 the dead body of Milton Brown and that he came to his death of natural causes.               J. M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 24 March 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 24th March 1890 at Newberry Court House before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of J. A. Reeder by: W. F. Ewart, W. T. Tarrant, R. H. Wearn, W. Johnson, G. J. Ruff, E. Scholtz, J. W. Kibler, J. L. Kennerly, W. W. Hodges, J. W. White, J. W. M. Simmons, E. C. Jones a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said J. A. Reeder came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said J. A. Reeder came to his death on 24th of March 1890 in Iley W. Fant's bar room from the effects of a wound received from a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of Jason Summers.  C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. F. Ewart (Foreman), W. T. Tarrant, R. H. Wearn, William Johnson, G. J. Ruff, E. Scholtz, J. W. Kibler, J. L. Kennerly, W. W. Hodges, J. W. White, J. W. M. Simmons, E. C. Jones

EVIDENCE                                                                              

J. W. McCullough sworn:  I reside in Jalapa but was in Newberry on the 24th March 1890. I knew Jack Reeder and Jason Summers. I was present at the shooting. I saw Jack Reeder off and on all day. I saw Jason Summers before the shooting took place. Before the shooting occurred the lie was passed by both of them. Jack Reeder walked out and returned. The lie was passed. Jason Summers caught Jack Reeder by the beard and fired. After the shot I saw Jack Reeder. He was dead. Jason Summers leaned over the counter and caught Jack Reeder by the beard and fired. Jack Reeder walked out after he was shot and his body was brought back to the bar room.     J. W. McCullough                                                                      

   P. B. Reeder sworn:  J. A. Reeder is my first cousin. I saw J. A. Reeder on the 24th March 1890. I was present when the shooting occurred. It occurred at Iley Fant's bar room between 4 and 5 o'clock p.m. I heard words passed between Jason Summers and J. A. Reeder. Both passed the lie. Then Jason Summers shot from behind the counter. Before he shot he caught J. A. Reeder by the beard. J. A. Reeder was shot in the front room of Iley Fant's bar room. J. A. Reeder walked out after he was shot. J. A. Reeder fell inside the bar room. He was living when I saw him. Then I walked out. J. A. Reeder had no weapon in hand when shot. Before the shooting occurred Mr. Reeder said he would go and get a pistol.  P. B. Reeder                                                          

   I. W. Fant sworn: Jason Summers was my barkeeper. He had been in my employ for a month. He was a peaceable man. Whenever J. A. Reeder came to Town he came to my bar room. J. A. Reeder was in my bar room when I saw the shooting. I heard J. A. Reeder called a liar first. J. A. Reeder returned the lie. Then J. A. Reeder said he would go and get a gun and after he returned the lie was passed between them again. When Mr. Reeder returned he made a motion to draw his pistol. Then Mr. Summers fired from behind the counter. Mr. Reeder did not return the fire. Mr. Reeder walked out after he was shot. I saw him after he fell. He was breathing.  Iley W. Fant             

   S. P. Fant sworn: I am the brother of I. W. Fant. I heard J. A. Reeder called Jason Summers a liar first. Mr. Summers returned it. Jason Summers fired. I saw no pistol in J. A. Reeder's hand. I saw Mr. Reeder make a motion to draw a pistol when Mr. Summers fired. After Mr. Summers fired Mr. Reeder walked to the door. I saw Reeder when he fell. He was breathing when I got to him. He died in 2 or 3 minutes. I saw no pistol in Mr. Reeder's hand. I saw Reeder make a grab at Summers' before he, Jason Summers, fired.  S. Preston Fant                                  

James K. Gilder MD sworn:  I hereby certify that I have examined the body of Mr. J. A. Reeder and find that he came to his death from the effects of a gunshot wound in the left breast entering about 2 inches above the nipple.   James K. Gilder MD                                              

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 25 March 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 25th March 1890 on Levi F. Longshore's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Fannie Humphries by: J. S. Spearman, David Pitts, L. F. Dennis, W. A. Read. T. F. Hendrix, E. F. Longshore, W. W. Waldrop, B. M. Adams, L. F. Longshore, J. D. Spearman, H. Hendrix, John Harp a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Fannie Humphries came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Fannie Humphries came to her death on 25th of March 1890 at Levi F. Longshore's Place from internal injuries received in the tornado of March 22, 1890 at F. H. Dominick's place. C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. R. Spearman (Foreman), David Pitts, L. F. Dennis, W. A. Read. T. F. Hendrix, E. F. Longshore, W. W. Waldrop, B. M. Adams, L. F. Longshore, J. S. Spearman, H. Hendrix, J. A. Harp                                                                              

EVIDENCE                                                                              

C. N. Humphries sworn:  My wife's name was Fannie Humphries. On Saturday 22nd March 1890 myself and wife were in the house when the tornado commenced. I left the house when it commenced and told her to follow me. When I saw her again the house had fallen on her. She could not be seen unless the timber was removed. I carried her to a house 100 yards off. She was alive. She remained here until 23rd March when she was moved to Mr. Levi F. Longshore's house, where she died 25th March 1890 at 5 o'clock am. Dr. Senn and Smith attended her. They attended her for internal injuries.  Charles (X) Humphries

J. M. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that I have this day examined the dead body of Fannie Humphries and that she came to her death from internal; injuries received from falling timber on March 22, 1890.  Newberry County SC, March 25, 1890  J. M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 28 March 1890

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry Court House at the RR Depot before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of John Robertson by: D. W. Hicks, Isaiah King, J. H. Turner, Palmer Henley, Silas Abrams, Dan Spelling, Robert Harris, Winback House, Frank Miller, John McMorris, Morgan Scurry a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said John Robertson came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said John Robertson came to his death on 28th of March 1890 while engaged in coupling the cars of the Greenville & Columbia division of the Richmond & Danville RR from the injuries received from being crushed between the cars.

C. B. Buist, Coroner

D. W. (X) Hicks (Foreman), Isaiah (X) King, J. H. (X) Turner, Palmer Henley, Silas Abrams, Dan Spelling, Robert (X) Harris, Winback (X) House, Frank (X) Miller, John McMorris, Morgan Scurry

EVIDENCE                                                                              

B. F. Pennington being duly sworn deposes: I was acquainted with John Robertson. He was in the employ of the G&C RR division of the R&D RR. I saw him this morning at 5:30 am. I had him throwing wood off a flat of timber and then went to couple the cars. He tried to make the couplings between two flat cars and was killed. I saw him killed. Had hold of him when he died. His head was crushed between the cars. He died within minutes. He was trying to couple cars on the wrong side. He should have been on the outside of ___ of road. I immediately removed the body.              B. F. Pennington

J. M. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that John Robertson came to his death from the effects of a smash while coupling cars on the G&C RR causing a fracture of the skull and concussion of the brain.  J. M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 2 April 1890

An inquisition indented and taken at Jacob Bedenbaugh's place on 2nd April 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Adam Sligh by: J. B. Bedenbaugh, B. B. Hair, R. Stewart, E. Mayes, John Atwood, Calvin Henderson, H. Cannon, Stan Mayes, James Mayes, J. Cannon, John Sligh, E. B. Bowers a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Adam Sligh came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Adam Sligh came to his death about 11 am on 1st of April 1890 on Jacob B. Bedenbaugh's Place from congestion. Witness our hands and seals on this April 2 in the year of Our Lord 1890.            C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. B. Bedenbaugh (Foreman), B. B. Hair, R. Stewart, E. Mayes, John Atwood, Calvin Henderson, H. (X) Cannon, Stan (X) Mayes, James Mayes, J. Cannon, John Sligh, E. B. (X) Bowers

EVIDENCE

Lula Sligh sworn: Adam Sligh was my husband. I saw him on April 1, 1890. He was well. He worked all day. He went to bed about 9 o'clock pm. About the middle of the night he pushed me with his hand. I turned over and called him. He did not answer. I called my grandson and told him his grandfather was dying. He got a light. He (Adam) was breathing. After my grandson and myself got the light and looked at him, then he quit breathing and I saw he was dead. He was about 72 years of age. I sent for his daughter and Mr. Bedenbaugh to let them know he was dead. Lula (X) Sligh

   James Mayes sworn: I am the grandson of Adam Sligh. I slept in the same house with him on April 1, 1890. His wife woke me up in the night and told me to get a light and said Adam Sligh was dying. I did so and went to the bed with her and he then died. Two breathes and died. I went off then and informed his children.           James (X) Mayes                                                                                  

J. M. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that Adam Sligh came to his death from congestion. 
Newberry County, April 2, 1890  J. M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 16 April 1890

An inquisition indented and taken at Andrew J. Langford's Place on 16th April 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Bessie Caldwell by: A. J. Langford Foreman, F. A. Kenny, Lem Hunter, Charles Bates, M. Ellison, E. Satterwhite, Jacob Cannon, H. Abraham, Isaac Harp, A. Flanagan, H. Wertz, W. G. Houseal a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Bessie Caldwell came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Bessie Caldwell came to her death about 11 am on 15th of April 1890 on A. J. Langford's Place from inflammation of the lungs. Witness our hands and seals on this April 2 in the year of Our Lord 1890.                 C. B. Buist, Coroner

A. J. Langford Foreman, F. A. (X) Kenny, Lem (X) Hunter, Charles (X) Bates, M. (X) Ellison, E. (X) Satterwhite, Jacob (X) Cannon, H. (X) Abraham, Isaac (X) Harp, A. (X) Flanagan, H. (X) Wertz, W. A. (X) Houseal

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Jane Satterwhite sworn:  I saw Bessie Caldwell on Monday. She was crying all day. On Tuesday I saw her again. She was better. I saw her on Tuesday afternoon 15th April 1890. She was dead. I live on Mr. A. J. Langford's Place where Bessie Caldwell lived. I was surprised when I heard of her death. Linda Williams told me she was dead.          Jane (X) Satterwhite                                                              

   Lucinda Williams sworn: I live on Mr. A. Langford's place where Bessie Caldwell lived. I saw her on Monday. She appeared to be sick. I saw her again on Tuesday morning and she seemed to be better. I saw her next on Tuesday afternoon 15th April 1890, she was dead. I was surprised to hear of her death. Her mother, Linda Jackson, called me and said she was dead.          

Lucinda (X) Williams                                                                                           

   Lucinda Jackson sworn:  I was the mother of Bessie Caldwell. She appeared to be sick for some days past. She appeared to be better on the 15th April 1890. About 2 o'clock I went and left her. I left a little boy with her. When I got back about ½ hour until sun (down) she was about dying. I took hold of her hand and she was dead.              Linda (X) Jackson                                                 

W. A. Houseal MD sworn:  I hereby certify that I have this day April 16, 1890 examined the body of Bessie Caldwell and find that her death was caused by inflammation of the lungs.      

 State of South Carolina, Newberry County     W. A. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County. 23 April 1890

An inquisition indented and taken at F. H. Dominick's Place on 23rd April 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Leonard Sheppard by: Preston Dominick (Foreman), D. Griffin, W. Turner, E. Burton, George Sheppard, C. E. Steck, G. Harris, Asa Longshore, John Boozer, Wallace Davis, R. Sheppard, J. Cleland a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Leonard Sheppard came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Leonard Sheppard came to his death on 23rd of April 1890 on F. H. Dominick's Place from the effects of a wound received from a ball fired from a pistol accidentally discharged by him. In witness whereof we have placed our hands and seals on this 23rd April Anno Domini 1890.       C. B. Buist, Coroner

Preston Dominick (Foreman), D. (X) Griffin, W. (X) Turner, E. (X) Burton, George Sheppard, C. E. Steck, G. (X) Harris, A. W. Longshore, John Boozer, Wallace Davis, R. (X) Sheppard, J. R.  Cleland

EVIDENCE

Fanny Sheppard sworn:  Leonard Sheppard was my son. He was 7 years of age. About sun up I called him. He was well. I left him eating his breakfast. I went to Miss Alice Miller's to wash. I heard a report of a pistol. I came to the house to see what was the matter and when I got to the house I did not see my son. He was not in the house. I did not see him but Mary Bonds saw him lying on the road. He appeared to be dying. I saw he was shot. Blood was coming from the wound, which appeared to be in his breast. I saw no pistol with him. I found a pistol lying in front of this house. It was my pistol. When I left it was partially loaded. I always kept it in the house but had it his where no one could find it, as I thought. The boy had seen it before. It was a five shooter but only three chambers were loaded. When I went off I left him in charge of the baby, which was my usual custom. I found the baby in the house crying. No one was with the boy when I left him except the baby. When Mary Bonds told me she had found the boy I went to the place where his body was. Mary Bonds and myself were washing together. I came ahead of Mary Bonds and she following in the road was the reason of her first seeing him.                

Fanny (X) Sheppard                                            

   Mary Bonds sworn:  I and Fanny Sheppard were washing together on the morning of Wednesday 23rd April 1890 Miss Alice Tanner's when I heard the report of a pistol. Fannie Sheppard started to see what it was and I followed her. I found the boy lying along the side of the road. I saw he was bleeding. I and another woman, Caty Wyatt brought the body to the house. On examination I found he was shot by a ball. He was dying when I first saw him, but was dead when we reached the house. I live on the same place with Fanny Sheppard but not in the same house. It was about 9 o'clock in the morning when I heard the report of the pistol.                           

Mary (X) Bonds                                                                                                                    

   Caty Wyatt sworn:  I live on the same place with Fanny Sheppard but not in the same house. I heard of Leonard Sheppard being shot but did not hear the report of the pistol. I started and came to the house when I saw the people around the body. The boy was dead when I and Mary Bonds brought him to the house. It looked as if a ball had entered his breast as the blood seemed to come from there.   Caty (X) Wyatt                                                    
W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Leonard Sheppard and find that he came to his death from a pistol shot wound upon the right breast, two inches above and two inches to the left of the right nipple, the ball passing obliquely downward and backward through the edge of the superior lobe of the right lung, through the right pulmonary vein and lodging nears the border of the right scapula.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 11 May 1890

An inquisition indented and taken at Michael Wertz's Place on 11th May 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Ella Wilson by: S. Boozer, P. Wertz, A. Lake, A. Burton, W. Scott, A. Long, E. Young, G. Lake, E. Penn, M. C. Moon, H. Boyce, G. Wilson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Ella Wilson came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Ella Wilson came to her death on 10th of May 1890 on Michael Wertz's Place from accidental burning on 7th May 1890. In witness whereof we have placed our hands and seals on this 11th May Anno Domini 1890.  C. B. Buist, Coroner       

 S. (X) Boozer (Foreman), P. (X) Wertz, G. (X) Lake, A. (X) Burton, W. (X) Scott, A. (X) Long, E. (X) Young, B. (X) Lake, E. (X) Penn, M. C. (X) Moon, H. (X) Boyce, G. (X) Wilson
EVIDENCE

David Wilson sworn: I am the father of Ella Wilson. She was burnt on 7th May 1890 and died 10th May 1890 at ½ past 9 o'clock pm.  She was 8 months old. I and my wife left her on the 7th May 1890 with a little boy. She was burned on the fanny. My brother who is 15 years old was with her before she was burnt. We left her on the floor and walked out and came back in a half hour. When we returned she was in the fire. When we returned we took her out of the fire and called my brother in. The child lingered until Saturday night and died. My opinion is the child crawled from the middle of the floor into the embers we had left her on one or two occasions before with a little boy.  David Wilson

   Sudy Wilson sworn:  I am the mother of Ella Wilson. Left her on the 7th of May 1890 in the house. When I returned she was burned. She was 8 months old. I think she must have turned or rolled over into the fire. She died on the 10th May 1890.I applied linseed oil, lime and lard to the burns. I did not send for a doctor. She had constant spasms and died in a spasm. We thought she would die every moment. We did not send for a doctor. We live on Michael Wertz's place and he thought it was of no use to send for a doctor, as he could do no good.  Sudy Wilson         

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I have this day May 11th 1890 examined the dead body of Ella Wilson and find her feet and legs, left forearm and hand and abdomen badly burned which burns caused her death.     State of South Carolina, Newberry County,            W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 13 May 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 13th May 1890 at F. G. Spearman's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Ella Wilson by: Jonathan Wertz Foreman, J. D. Pitts, James B. Stewart, Lewis Jesse, Lewis Young, Silas Sanders, J. M. Swindler, F. G. Spearman, J. M. Sanders, J. S. Werts, S. Calless, J. Anderson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Ella Wilson came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Ella Wilson came to her death on 10th of May 1890 on Michael Wertz's Place from accidental burning on 7th May 1890. In witness whereof we have placed our hands and seals on this 11th May Anno Domini 1890.   C. B. Buist, Coroner

Jonathan Wertz Foreman, J. D. Pitt, James B. Stewart, Lewis (X) Jesse, Lewis (X) Young, Silas (X) Sanders, J. M. Swindler, F. G. Spearman, J. M. Sanders, J.A. Werts, S. Calless, Jim (X) Anderson

EVIDENCE

Thomas Wilson sworn:  I am Ella Wilson's uncle. I saw her on the 7th day of May 1890 in the morning. I left Ella Wilson half in front of the door when I went into the field. Father gave me some medicine to take and I stayed at home that day. I was sick. I left the baby with George Lake, a boy four years old. I found the baby on the hearth lying on its stomach with its feet in the fire. The head was laying on the __ in front of the fireplace. I saw the child first after I returned to the house. Nothing of the clothing was burned but the stockings. When I came back to the house there was about as much fire in the fireplace as I could hold in my hat. There was as much fire in the fireplace or less. The fire was made up of live coals. David Wilson is my brother. I was working this year with my father George Wilson. I was plowing with my brother David Wilson. We all planted together. I was at the graveyard the day the inquest was held. My brother married Sarah Penn's daughter. I and Sarah Penn are friends. Sarah Penn said nothing to me about the child being burnt. I did not hear that Sarah Penn thought anything more about my leaving the child. I left the baby five feet from the hearth when I went out. The child could crawl a little. It was 8 months old. I know nothing of what became of the clothing of the child after it was burnt. I was about one half hour from the time I went out until I came back. I went out because I was taking medicine. When I found the child burnt I took it out of the fire and called my brother David Wilson. Thomas Wilson                                                                           

   Sarah Penn sworn:  I am Ella Wilson's grandmother. I came up on Wednesday night to see her. Her uncle Ned came for me. He told me about the child being burnt. I asked him how it happened. He said he did not know. The child was left with Tom Wilson on Wednesday night when the child was burned. I dressed the child, its clothes were on it and I stayed until Saturday morning. I took the clothes off (Witness showed the clothes and they were examined by the jury). They are the clothes that were on the child when it was burnt. I said nothing to Tom about burning the child. I attended the funeral on Sunday on the 13th May 1890. I went at Newberry with G. Penn to find out what had been done about it. I thought it strange the child was burnt and none of its clothes were burnt. Coroner told me my husband was one of the jury. I was not satisfied. I asked the doctor did he think the child could be burnt that way without its clothes being burnt. I told people in Newberry that the child was burnt but its clothes were not. I went to the solicitor, Mr. Schumpert. He sent for the coroner. I told the solicitor that it seemed strange the clothes were not burnt. I said the jury on the past inquest did not act right because they asked no questions about the child's clothes. I conveyed to the solicitor, that it was owing to Tom's carelessness. I was present Sunday when the inquest was held. I said nothing to the coroner on Sunday. I did not offer any evidence on Sunday. I am friendly with the grandfather of the child. I am not so friendly with Laura Wilson. We had a difficulty before this and Laura was cool towards me. I went to the Solicitor because I thought the verdict of the coroner's jury on Sunday was wrong. I could get no satisfactory information from my husband G. Penn. That is the reason I went to the solicitor. I have nothing to _ with. Tom Wilson, he has never been to my house but once. The diaper was on the child when I took the clothes off on Saturday. None of it was burned. The child was burned on Wednesday evening and died Saturday night at ½ past 9 o'clock pm. I don't know that this was the same diaper that the child had on when burned but this is the same outer clothes.                 Sarah (X) Penn                     

   Laura Wilson sworn:  I am Ella Wilson's grandmother. I was present at the Coroner's jury on Sunday and was satisfied with the verdict of the jury. I am friendly with Sarah Penn. I thought Sarah was alright with me. We had a quarrel on the night the child was born. The clothes look like the same clothes the baby had on when burnt. I did not know if any of the baby's clothes were burnt. I was more than astonished to know that Sarah Penn had gone to have another inquest held. Ella Wilson's father and mother did all they could to save that child. The child could roll a little and slide backwards. I think it could move a distance of five feet.    

Laura (X) Wilson                                                                                                                                  

   David Wilson sworn: I am the father of Ella Wilson. On Wednesday I left the baby with Tom. He was sick. We carried the baby to my mother's house but she was not at home and it was left with Tom. He was there. Ned, my brother, came riding rapidly on a mule and told me the baby was burnt. When I got to the house the baby was in Mitty Wertz's lap. I did not notice whether the clothes were burned. I went to Mr. Wertz, had to go after grandmother to stay with the baby. I went through the lot and asked Mr. Wertz to get me some medicine for the burn as he was going to Town. The child died Saturday night. I sent for a coffin but not for the coroner. I did not know an inquest was necessary. I am friendly with Sarah Penn.      David Wilson

   Sudy Wilson sworn:  On Wednesday morning I carried the baby to its grandmother's house. Tom kept her until dinner. I carried her to my house at dinner. After dinner I carried her back to Tom with dinner and to keep which he promised me (he) to do. When I left the house the baby was in the middle of the floor. Ned Wilson told me the child was burnt. I went back to the house and found my child in Mitty Wertz's lap and the clothes were not burnt. Tom seemed to be kind to the child. I would have trusted the child with him anytime. This is the first time I had left the child with Tom. I was satisfied with the verdict of the jury on Sunday. I was surprised that Sarah Penn was not satisfied. The wrapper was not burned or separated but had ashes on it. My baby could not crawl but could move about from rolling from one side to the other on its stomach. I never knew it to move more than about one yard, if not quite. The clothes exhibited are the clothes the baby had on. I doubt whether there was any hot water about the fire.             Sudy Wilson

   George Wilson sworn: I am the grandfather of Ella Wilson and husband of Laura Wilson. I heard Sarah Penn's evidence and was astonished at it. I and Sarah were friendly. I heard Sarah and my wife Laura once had a quarrel. I was satisfied with the verdict on Sunday. I saw the child burnt in Mitty Wertz's lap. I did not notice the clothes. Saw the foot and the abdomen were burned. Tom Wilson is my son and is a well-behaved boy. I had given him medicine. A dose of calomel. I don't think that Tom would do the child harm. When I came in the house the ashes were swept over the fire.  George (X) Wilson 

   Pressley Werts sworn:  I am no relation to Ella Wilson. I live on Walter Spearman's place. I went to Town on the 11th May 1890 for a coffin for Ella Wilson. I saw the child on Wednesday after it was burned, 7th May 1890. I paid no attention to whether the child's clothes were burned. I was one of the jury at the first inquest. I did not hear Sarah Penn offer to give any evidence on Sunday. I saw her at the inquest after the verdict was given. She expressed no dissatisfaction about the verdict. Riley Penn, the husband of Sarah Penn, agreed. He was satisfied and agreed with the other jurymen in the verdict given on Sunday.  Pressley (X) Wertz                     

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I examined the dead body of Ella Wilson May 13, 1890 and found a severe burn upon the abdomen, left hand and feet and legs, the loss of the left foot being burned to a crisp. The burns in my opinion were made by fire and caused the death of the said Ella Wilson.   State of South Carolina, Newberry County               W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 8 June 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 8th June 1890 at Benjamin Halfacre's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Corrie Moore by: D. A. Ruff Foreman, Jefferson Quattlebaum, Perry Halfacre, Benjamin Halfacre, William D. Halfacre, F. C. Maybin, R.C. Maybin, H.E. Buzhardt, C. O. Buzhardt, W. J. Sheeley, W. P. Meetze. W. Coleman a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Corrie Moore came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Corrie Moore came to her death on 7th of June 1890 on Benjamin Halfacre's Place from strangulation at the hands of Doc Moore. In witness whereof we have placed our hands and seals on this 8th June 1890.       C. B. Buist, Coroner

D. A. Ruff Foreman, Jefferson Quattlebaum, Perry Halfacre, Benjamin Halfacre, William D. Halfacre, F. C. Maybin, R.C. Maybin, H.E. Buzhardt, C. O. Buzhardt, W. J. Sheeley, W. P. Meetze. Walter Coleman

EVIDENCE

John H. Banks sworn:  Read the following statement:

Newberry County June 8, 1890.

The following is the confession of Doc Moore to the undersigned, on the above date, concerning the killing of his wife, on the night of 7th June 1890:

Said - Doc Moore came to my house on Sunday morning 8th June 1890 between daylight and sun-up and called my son, who being asleep, did not answer. I went to the door and asked what he wanted and at the same time said to him," You talk like one in trouble". He answered that he was in a great deal of trouble. I asked what was the matter and (he) replied the reply that he hated to tell. I then asked how he could expect help or advise if he did not state his trouble. Moore then said that he had killed his wife. Upon interrogation as to how it happened he said that his wife had provoked him by using some bad language when he told her that he would not take such language from anybody and struck her with the outer edge of the hand on the side of the neck, which killed her. That he had used camphor with the hope of resuscitating her without effect and had then carried her body to the pond when found and sank it. When informed by Doc Moore as to the situation of the body of his wife, I went at once to the residence of Mssrs. Willie and Ben Halfacre and got them to go with me and secure help to find and raise the body, placed it upon the bank of the pond and covered it with bushes, in which condition I suppose it now lies. We then dispatched Joe Suber to summon the coroner.                                                                    John F. Banks

   Derry Rutherford sworn: I live on Ben Halfacre's place. I heard Doc Moore and Corrie Moore quarrelling about 10 o'clock pm on 7th June 1890.      Derry (X) Rutherford                          

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I this day June 8, 1890 examined the dead body of Corrie Moore and found that her death was caused by strangulation.     W. G. Houseal MD

The State of South Carolina, Newberry County

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 30 July 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on July 30, 1890 at John M. Hartman's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of James Ruff by: S. C. Barre, B. B. Hair, J. M. Hartman, J. L. Cook, G. B. Cook, J. M. Taylor, A. L. Purcell, W. E. Bowers, J. M. Wertz, J. C. Cook, L. J. Long, Mark Reeders   a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said James Ruff came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said James Ruff came to his death on 29th of July 1890 on the Settlement Road near Springfield Township No. 9, Newberry County from a blow from a shovel in the hands of David Page.               C. B. Buist, Coroner

B. B. Hair (Foreman), S. C. Barre, J. M. Hartman, J. L. Cook, G. B. Cook, J. M. Taylor, A. L. Purcell, W. E. Bowers, J. M. Wertz, J. C. Cook, L. J. Long, Mark Reeders                           

EVIDENCE                              

J.M. Hartman sworn: I was on the Settlement Road when David Page struck James Ruff. It was about ½ past 11 o'clock am on the 29th July 1890. James Ruff called Page a liar when David struck him with a shovel, fracturing his skull. He died about four hours afterwards.  

J. M. Hartman                                       

   John Schumpert sworn:  I was on the Settlement Road when the act was committed. The boys were quarrelling when David Page told James Ruff   he would cut his head off wit the shovel. James Ruff called David Page a liar. When David Page hit James Ruff with the shovel, his skull was fractured. This happened at ½ hour past 11 o'clock am. The body was taken to his father's house where he died. David Page escaped. This happened on 29th July 1890. John M. Schumpert               

   Boss Boozer sworn:  I was present when David Page struck James Ruff with a shovel. It was about ½ past 11 o'clock am on July 29, 1890. James Ruff's skull was fractured. James Ruff died four hours after he was struck. David Page escaped. They were quarrelling when James Ruff was struck. David Page hit James Ruff an overhand blow, having both hands on the shovel.      

Boss (X) Boozer                                   

W. G. Houseal MD sworn: I certify that I examined the dead body of James Ruff July 29, 1890. He came to his death from a fracture of the skull and compressions and concussions of the brain. 

W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 14 August 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 14th August, 1890 at Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Pickens P. Matthews by: A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. C. Sligh, P. Clark Smith, W. S. Dobbins, G. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, P. B. Workman, J. F. Johnson, G. Z. Pitts a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Pickens P. Matthews came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Pickens P. Matthews came to his death on 14th of August 1890 on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's from the accidental explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. C. Sligh, P. Clark Smith, W. S. Dobbins, G. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, P. B. Workman, J. F. Johnson, G. Z. Pitts                        

EVIDENCE                              

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I am the owner of the steam engine that exploded. Seven hands were employed. The engine was in good order on 13th August 1890. I heard the explosion on the 14th August 1890 at 7 o'clock am. I was at Dr. J. W. Dorrah's place when the explosion occurred. I came up and saw the engine was destroyed. I found four men killed. The engineer was killed. Three were scalded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.  E. P. Matthews                            

   J. H. Dorrah sworn: I heard the explosion of the engine on the 14th August 1890. I came up at once and found four men killed and three scalded. The engine was destroyed. I was at home ¾ of a mile from the explosion when it occurred.               J. H. Dorrah                          

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of P. P. Matthews and find that his death was caused by an explosion, his body being horribly mangled and torn. 

W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 14 August 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 14th August, 1890 at Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Carey Davis by: A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, G. B. Pitts, R. C.  Lake, P. B. Workman, N. F. Johnson, J. S. Pitts, Nelson Crawford, Lewis Robinson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Carey Davis came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Carey Davis came to his death on 14th of August 1890 on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's from the accidental explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors:

A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, G. B. Pitts, R. C.  Lake, P. B. Workman, N. F. Johnson, J. S. Pitts, Nelson (X) Crawford, Lewis (X) Robinson
EVIDENCE

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I was ¾ mile from the explosion occurred. Came up and found four men killed and three men wounded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.

E. P. Matthews

   J. H. Dorrah sworn: I was ¾ of a mile from the explosion. Came up and found four men killed and three wounded. Think the explosion was caused from want of water.               J. H. Dorrah

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Carey Davis and find that his death was caused by an explosion, the top of his skull being blown off and his body wounded in other members.      W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 14 August 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 14th August, 1890 at Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Tump Ellison by: A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, G. B. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, J. F. Workman, N. F. Johnson, G. S. Pitts, Nelson Crawford, Lewis Robinson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Tump Ellison came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Tump Ellison came to his death on 14th of August 1890 on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's from the accidental explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors:

 A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, G. B. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, J. F. Workman, N. F. Johnson, G. S. Pitts, Nelson (X) Crawford, Lewis (X) Robinson                       

EVIDENCE                              

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I was ¾ mile from the explosion occurred. Came up and found four men killed and three men wounded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.          

E. P. Matthews                     

   J. H. Dorrah sworn: I was ¾ of a mile off and heard the explosion. Came up and found four men killed and three wounded. Think the explosion was caused from want of water.    

J. H. Dorrah.                         

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Tump Ellison and find that his death was caused by his skull being blown open, said wound caused by an explosion. W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 14 August 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 14th August, 1890 at Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Hillery Chalmers by: A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, J. B. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, J. B. Workman, N. F. Johnson, G. S. Pitts, Nelson Crawford, Lewis Robinson, J. H. Dominick a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Hillery Chalmers came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Hillery Chalmers came to his death on 14th of August 1890 on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's from the explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors:
A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, J. B. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, J. B. Workman, N. F. Johnson, G. S. Pitts, Nelson Crawford, Lewis Robinson, J. H. Dominick                         

EVIDENCE                              

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I was ¾ mile away when I heard the explosion. Came up and found four men killed and three men wounded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.
 E. P. Matthews

   J. H. Dorrah sworn: I was ¾ of a mile off when I heard the explosion. I came to the sawmill and found four men killed and three wounded. Think the explosion was caused from want of water.    J. H. Dorrah

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Hillery Ellison and find that his death was caused by an explosion, his body being horribly mangled and lacerated. W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 15 August 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 15th August, 1890 at Abney Reeder's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Milton Abb by: J. H. Aull, J. Z. Pitts, Eugene Leavell, R. A. Welch, W. E. Merchant, W. S. Dobbins, Calvin Williams, James Young, W. Gillam, H. Clark, E. Clark, J. H. Workman a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Milton Abb came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Milton Abb came to his death on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place on 14th of August 1890 from the accidental explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors:

J. H. Aull, J. Z. Pitts, Eugene Leavell, Robert A. Welch, W. E. Merchant, W. S. Dobbins, Calvin Williams, James Young, William Gillam, H. Clark, E. Clark, J. H. Workman                      

EVIDENCE

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I heard the explosion about 7 o'clock am. I was about ¾ mile away on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place. I found four men killed and three men wounded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.            E. P. Matthews

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Milton Abb and find that his death was caused by a wound of the hip joint, made by a missile, hurled from some explosion.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 30 August 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 30th August, 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Adam Davis on Mr. Werber's Place by: Alan Mendenhall, Andrew Gallman, Joseph Moon, Richard Nance, Oley Waits, Simon Waits, Neill Nance, Bennet Dowling, James Stewart, Billy Mendenhall, Joe Boozer, B. L. Boozer being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Adam Davis came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Adam Davis came to his death on the 29th of August 1890 from a blow from a tree falling on him. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors have set our hands and seals this 30th day of August 1890.
Alan (X) Mendenhall (Foreman), Andrew (X) Gallman, Joseph (X) Moon, Richard (X) Nance, Oley (X) Waits, Simon (X) Waits, Neill (X) Nance, Bennet (X) Dowling, James (X) Stewart, W. (X) Mendenhall, Joe (X) Boozer, B. L. Boozer

EVIDENCE

Benny Davis sworn:  I was with Adam Davis on 29th August 1890. I saw him cutting a tree. I was 8 feet from him. I went up to him when the tree fell. He was trying to crawl. I called for grandmother. She came and we brought him to the house. He lived about two hours after he came to the house.  Benny (X) Davis

Mary Wheeler sworn:  Benny Davis called to me to help and bring Adam Davis to the house. We brought him to the house. He was groaning. I sent for a doctor. He died before the doctor came. He lived for about two hours after he came to the house.  Mary (X) Wheeler 

J. W. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that Adam Davis came to his death from internal injuries received from a falling tree. Newberry Court House, August 30, 1890          J. M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 2 October 1890

An inquisition indented and taken at the County Poor House on 2nd day of October, 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of John W. Counts by: T. B. Leitzey, W. Reighly, M. Dickert, Antoin Buzhardt, Wade Ruff, Pierce Suber, George Pope, Joe Kinard, Thomas Gray, Henry Gray, Rob Caldwell, John Thomas being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said John W. Counts came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said John W. Counts came to his death on the 1st of October 1890 at the Poor House in Newberry County from a wound inflicted by a falling tree. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors have set our hands and seals this 2nd day of October 1890.  C. B. Buist, Coroner

T. B. Leitzey (Foreman), W. Reighly, M. Dickert, Antoin Buzhardt, Wade (X) Ruff, Pierce (X) Suber, George (X) Pope, Joe (X) Kinard, Thomas (X) Gray, Henry (X) Gray, Rob (X) Caldwell, John (X) Thomas
EVIDENCE

Elery Fair being duly sworn says:  I saw the body of John W. Counts after the tree fell on him. It was about 4 o'clock pm on October 1, 1890. He was dead when I saw him. He was mashed by the tree and his intestines were out.        Elery (X) Fair                                        

   Lydia Peeler being duly sworn says: I saw the body of John W. Counts after he was dead. The tree fell on him. He was dead when I first saw him. His bowels were mashed out.          

Lydia (X) Peeler

James M. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that I have examined the dead body of John W. Counts and that he came to his death from a wound inflicted by a falling tree. James M. Kibler MD  Newberry County, October 2, 1890

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 4 November 1890

An inquisition indented and taken on 4th November 1890 at the George Griffin's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Eolas Renwick by: W. G. Houseal Foreman, Edward Chalmers, W. H. Davis, Jacob Miller, Edmund Johnson, Neill Renwick, Boyce Clark, Wade Suber, Bill Davis, Martin Wilson, Henry Tanner, Anthony Young who being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Eolas Renwick came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Eolas Renwick came to his death on the 3rd of November 1890 on George Griffin's Place from accidental burning.               C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. G. Houseal Foreman, Edward Chalmers, W. H. Davis, Jacob Miller, Edmund Johnson, Neill Renwick, Boyce Clark, Wade Suber, Bill Davis, Martin Wilson, Henry Tanner, Anthony Young              

EVIDENCE                              

Rachel Renwick sworn: I am the mother of Eolas Renwick. He was burnt on the 3rd November 1890 at 11 am at my house on George Griffin's place. I was at Ben Turner's about 300 yards off picking cotton. I left my house at 8 o'clock am. I left Eolas with my 8-year-old daughter. My husband Alex Renwick told me my child was burnt and to come in a hurry. When I met Eolas he told me to take him. He was burning up. All his clothes were burnt off. He had on several garments and was well clothed. He died at 5 minutes after 5 pm. The house was not locked. I frequently left my child with my daughter.      Rachel (X) Renwick

   Frances Renwick sworn: I am the sister of Eolas Renwick. I was in bed sick when Eolas was burnt. Was not sick when my mother left the house. I had a chill. I was asleep when Eolas woke me up crying. I tried to put the fire out. When I went to bed Eolas was sitting by the fire. I poured water on him. All his clothes were burnt.   Francis (X) Renwick                                                  

Alick Renwick sworn: I am Eolas Renwick's father. I came to my house about 11 am for my girl to haul cottonseed. I found Eolas with all his clothes burnt off. He was severely burnt - all over the body. Eolas was 3 years old and was in the habit of leaving the child under charge of my eight-year-old daughter.  Aleck (X) Renwick

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I examined the dead body of Eolas Renwick on the 3rd of November 1890 and find his death was caused by a burn from fire.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 30 December 1891

An inquisition indented and taken on W. G. Gary's Place on 30th December 1891 before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County, on view of the dead body of Mattie Farrow by: W. G. Gary, J. F. Senn, J. W. Smith, B. Wilson, J. A. McConnell, H. Abrams, J. M. Smith, J. Senn, J. Miller, J. Brown, D. Clinton, J. McConnell who being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Mattie Farrow came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Mattie Farrow came to her death on W. G. Gary's Place, Newberry County SC on December 30, 1891 from burns received on her body on December 29, 1891. In witness whereof we the jurors and coroner of aforesaid have hereunto set our hands and seals on the 30th December 1891.  C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. G. Gary (Foreman), James F. Senn, P. Smith, A. W. Chick, B. Wilson, F. McConnell, H. Abrams, J. Senn, J. Miller, J. Harmon, A. Christie, G. McConnell                                                                            

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Evans Farrow sworn: I am brother to Mattie Farrow, the burnt child. My father left me about 11 o'clock on Tuesday 24th December 1891 to take care of matters. I went out to play about 2 o'clock and came back about 4 o'clock. I came back to see if she was all right. I found her on the bed covered up, her clothes about half burnt off. I did not know she was burnt till I came back. She died about 7 o'clock last night. There was no fire on the clothes when I came back.   

Evans (X) Farrow                                                                                 

   Catherine Green sworn: About an hour before Evans came back to the house on December 29, 1871 I heard her crying and calling Evans. I live about 100 yards from the house in which Mattie lived. I heard her crying often. I didn't know she was on fire until I got to Abe Farrow's.

Catherine (X) Green

   W. G. Gary sworn: Evans was going with me after a calf; after he came to see about Mattie I came by to get Evans. He said he could not go. He said Mattie was burnt. I told Jane Green to go and tell her mother to come. I went and told my mother to come. My mother came up and brought a bucket of lard. She had the child taken over to Jane ___, back of our dwelling. My mother took off her apron and dressed the child with it. Afterwards I took it to Alf's home. The child was cold. She had it wrapped in a quilt and a big fire made at Aunt Marie's. Dr. Senn came next morning.  W. G. Gary

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I have examined the dead body of Mattie Farrow. Her death was caused by a sever burn of the left side of the body, extending over the left side of the abdomen and chest, left arm, and left side of the left leg.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 24 January 1892

An inquisition indented on 24th January 1892 before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on J. G. Norris's Place on view of the dead body of Lizzie Kinard by: J. Cal Neel, J. C. Neal, J. G. Norris, E. Nance, J. Rutherford, J. Henderson, D. Lyles, B. Maybin, G. Jones, W. Maffett, E. Mower, W. Snowden who being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Lizzie Kinard came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Lizzie Kinard came to her death on 24th January 1892 from discharge of a shot waged in her body fired from a gun in the hands of Henry Wilson on the 23rd of January 1892 and from the evidence that we got we find it accidental. In witness whereof we the jurors and coroner of aforesaid have hereunto set our hands and seals on the 24th January 1892.      C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. Cal Neal (Foreman), J. C. Neal, J. G. Norris, E. Nance, J. Rutherford, G. Jones, W. Maffett, W. Snowden, E. Moot, W. Ronnin, J Sun

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Della Dembo sworn: I lived in the house with Lizzie Kinard on J. G. Norris' place. Lizzie was standing on the backside of the house by the trunk. Uncle Henry Wilson was standing on the back door of the house, pointing his gun out of the front door. Lizzie Kinard ran from the backside of the house up to the fireplace. Just as she was within the two doors the gun went off. He ran and picked her up and asked if she was hurt. She said, "Yes and I am dying". I am in my 12th year. Lizzie was shot in the morning about an hour and a half before day. Henry Wilson had the gun in his hands all the morning. I did not hear the gun snap but heard the report. There was no cap on the gun.  Della (X) Dembo

   Jane Dembo sworn: I am the niece of Henry Wilson and live in the house with him. Lizzie Kinard was at the back of the door of the house by the trunk. Henry Wilson was by the back door pointing his gun out the front door. Lizzie ran around the house to the fireplace and just as she was between the two doors the gun went off. I did not hear the gun snap but heard the report of the gun. I did not see whether the gun had a cap on it or not.  Jane (X) Dembo                                  

   Henry Wilson sworn: I was standing in the back door of my house. Lizzie Kinard was at the back door of the house at the trunk. I was pointing my gun out the back door. __told Lizzie I had the gun. She ran towards the fireplace. She got nearly to the fireplace. I was laughing. I was pulling down on the trigger. The hammer went down and the gun went off. The gun had no cap on it. When the gun went off she fell and said she was shot. I went to her and picked her up and held her head high up. I laid her down; I went to J. S. Norris'  house to get a mule to go after a doctor. I went after Dr. __  who came. Lizzie died about 2 o'clock am on the 24th. I had the gun out Saturday morning - trying to kill some birds. I had no cap. Tried it but the gun would not go off. I threw the cap away. The gun was loaded with birdshot.   Henry (X) Wilson                                             

W. G. Houseal MD: I certify that I have examined the dead body of Lizzie Kinard. She came to her death from a gun shot wound entering the left side at the middle of the outer border of the shoulder blade, cutting part of the muscle of the lower part of the upper chest, of the left arm and entering the left lung.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 27 January 1892

An inquisition indented on 27th January 1892 before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on Mr. Stone's Place on view of the dead body of Harriet Suber by: Tom Wilson, H. Maffett, H. Coates, S. Wilson, R. Gallman, W. Ruff, H. Ruff, F. Dawkins, J. Ruff, R. Mayes, J. Maffett, J. Singley who being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Harriet Suber came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Harriet Suber came to her death on 26th January 1892 on Ed Sloan's Place by accidental burning in the conflagration of the house in which she resided. In witness whereof we the jurors and coroner of aforesaid have hereunto set our hands and seals on the 24th January 1892.   C. B. Buist, Coroner

Tom Wilson (Foreman, H. Maffett, H. Coates, P. Wilson, R. Gallman, A. M. Ruff, T. Ruff, F. Dawkins, J. Ruff, R. Mayes, W. Maffett, G. Singley

EVIDENCE                                                                              

G. L. Seiss sworn: I live in front of the house in which John Sligh lived and which was owned by Sloan. My house is about 350 yards off. I was over in my field ploughing about 600 yards off yesterday when I saw the fire. It was between 2 and 3 o'clock when I first saw the blaze. The kitchen roof had given way when I got to the house. I broke the door open of the swelling. The house consisted of a dwelling and kitchen, a vacancy of about 12 feet between them (with) a bed against the door. I pushed it open. I threw out the bedding. I heard a child in the corner making a noise. I picked it up and carried it about 20 steps from the house. Had I just been a minute later I could not have saved the child. When I came back from the child the house was on fire and I could not enter. I carried the child further off. I heard nothing about Harriet Suber being burnt until I went back to the house. When I first saw the skull it was whole and looked like it had been mashed in the forehead. My son came and told Mrs. Harriet Suber was burnt up. I came back and saw the body when it was lying down. The fire was not out. The body was not burnt then as much as it is now.  G. L. Seiss           

   John Sligh sworn: I live on Ed Sloan's Place. Have it rented. I lived in the house that was burnt. On yesterday the 26th January 1892 Harriet Suber lived with me. She was no relation of mine. She was about seventy years old. She was active and could get about very well. I went to Newberry Court House yesterday morning. I was there when the fire occurred. I got back about a quarter of an hour to sun. I heard that my house was burned before I got back. I saw the remains of Harriet Suber lying where they are now. When I got back my wife and two children lived in the house. My wife was not at home. Our child, a boy, got singed a little. He was about 15 months old. Everything I had was burnt except a quilt. Harriet Suber was well when I left her. John (X) Sligh                                                                                                            

W. G. Houseal MD: I have examined the body of Harriet Suber. The body is completely carbonized by fire. 27th January 1892, State of South Carolina, Newberry Court House      W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 15 February 1892

An inquisition indented on 15th February 1892 on Jacob B. Fellow's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Maria Gallman by: Jacob B. Fellows, B. S. Hardy, John King, James Williams, George DeWalt, Sam Atchison, Henry Gallman, George Pitts, Duffie Boyd, George Bedenbaugh, John Gallman, James Dawkins who being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Maria Gallman came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Maria Gallman came to her death on February 14,1892 on J. B. Fellow's Place by natural causes. In witness whereof we the jurors and coroner of aforesaid have hereunto set our hands and seals on the 15th February 1892.         C. B. Buist, Coroner

Jacob B. Fellows, B. S. (X) Hardy, John (X) King, James (X) Williams, George (X) DeWalt, Sam (X) Stephens, Henry (X) Gallman, Charles (X) Pitts, Duffie (X) Boyd, George (X) Bedenbaugh, John (X) Gallman, James (X) Dawkins

EVIDENCE                                                                              

George Gallman sworn: Maria Gallman was my mother. On 12 o'clock Friday February 13, 1892 she was at my house. She left my house to go to Mrs. Beacham's, to visit a friend there. The next I saw her was on the 14th February 1892 on Sunday at 9 o'clock am. I saw her dead body in Mr. Fellows pasture. I saw no marks of violence on her.               George (X) Gallman                                                            

   Joe Boozer sworn: I saw the dead body of Maria Gallman in Mr. Fellow's pasture. She was lying on her back. I saw no marks of violence on the body.               Joe (X) Boozer

George Y. Hunter MD: I certify that I have examined the dead body of Maria Gallman and find that her death resulted from natural causes.                G. Y. Hunter MD

February 15, 1892, Newberry County South Carolina

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 24 February 1892

An inquisition indented on 24th February 1892 on Dr. John M. Thompson's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of the dead child of Anna Tribble by: T. J. Maffett, J. S. Scholtz, J. J. Stilwell, D. B. Williams, J.T. Smith Sr., Robert Floyd, Giles Davis, John Spearman, Ben Reeder, W. Duckett, Sim Suber, D. Sim Johnson who being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said the dead child of Anna Tribble came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said the dead child of Anna Tribble came to her death on 23rd February,1892 from criminal neglect on the part of the mother, Anna Tribble. In witness whereof we the jurors and coroner of aforesaid have hereunto set our hands and seals on the 24th February 1892.   C. B. Buist, Coroner 

D. Sim Johnson (Foreman) T. J. Maffett, J. S. Scholtz, J. J. Stilwell, D. B. Williams, J.T. Smith Sr., Robert (X) Floyd, Giles (X) Davis, John (X) Spearman, Ben (X) Reeder, W. (X) Duckett, Sim (X) Suber                                                                          

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Anna Tribble statement: My name is Anna Tribble. I gave birth to a child just before day on February 23, 1892. I knew I was pregnant. I began to be sick last Saturday the 18th. Night before last was the first pain. Began in the hip. Back and neck. I had no pain anywhere else. I did not know Tuesday morning before my child was born that I was in labor. I have had three children before. Tuesday morning, before day, when I had the child, Mr. Wertz was up. I had made pie. Had the child down on the pasture on this side of the creek. I started over to Mr. Hock Wert, after a pack of sweet potatoes. I was in pain when I went. I had been in pain before. I slept well Monday night. I had the child on the path. The further I walked the greater the pain. I crossed the creek before I had the child. When I saw I could not get to Mr. John Wertz I came back. I had a stick, crossed the creek on two logs. I sat on the logs a good while. I had no pain in my stomach until then. I was by myself. I wanted to go over to Mr. Wertz's wife for whom I work. I got up from the log and tried to walk to the house. I stopped on the way in the path and gave birth to the child. I could not walk far. (I) walked a piece and stopped after I had the child. I stopped a good while before I could move. The child did not cry when it was born. I had not 'fell' it since I squatted. I think it was last Thursday when I squatted. I tried to bring the child with me to the house. I took my piece of sack, which I had with me to get potatoes, and wrapped it up good with the sack. I left it there and came to the house. The child was not cut loose. It came loose itself. I came to the house and had the afterbirth at my house, which I put in the fire. I told nobody about the child when I got to my house. I live by myself in Mr. W. H. Wertz's yard. I went after the child before dawn yesterday. I put the child by a poke salad bush when it was born. I was above the spring when the child was born and (I) have not moved it since. The first time after I went after the child I intended to go because I did not wish to say anything to Mrs. Wertz. The second time I went I did not see it where I put it. Nobody asked me at dinner yesterday if I had given birth to a child. Mr. Wertz saw one go to the branch river and asked me what I was doing there. Mr. Wertz told me I had a child and I told him no sir, I did not make way with it. I did not say I had the child when I met Mr. Wertz. When I went back the second time he asked me if I had destroyed the child. I said no.  Anna (X) Tribble                                                                           

   W. H. Wertz sworn: I knew Anna Tribble was pregnant. On Tuesday 23rd February 1892 she was sick. I came in her house. Aunt Dicey Duckett was in. I asked Anna what was the matter. Had not she had a baby. She said no. I said, "I believe you have had". She told me when she made water blood passed from her. I further told her that always came after the baby. She again denied it. She seemed to be suffering a good deal at the time. This was a short time after breakfast early Tuesday morning. She stayed in the house until afternoon. I was in my lot and saw her going up the pasture. I went that way bird hunting with my gun and watched her. I asked her down there near the branch what she was doing there. She told me she was walking about. Thought it would make her feel better. She came back toward the house. I crossed the fence and came back up the branch and found an infant in a hole of water in the branch. I came on up to her and told her I had found the child and she owned to it. She asked me to let her off that time and she would work for me a year. I told her I wouldn't do it for $1,000. She then said she would work for me for five years if I would not report her. I came to the house. I spoke to Mr. Gregory who was passing by. He told me to go and put it in a box. I carried D. C. Senn and William Burton down to the creek and we put the infant in a box and brought it to the house. W. H. Wertz

W. G. Houseal MD sworn: I certify that I examined the dead body of an infant of Anna Tribble on February 24th 1892. The child was well formed and well developed. No marks of violence were found. In my opinion the child was born alive and died from exposure and neglect.               

W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 12 May 1892

An inquisition indented and taken on 12th May 1892 on J. P. Mahon's Place before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Harriet Cannon by: W. B. Aull, W. C. Hays, J. G. Rikard, J. P. Mahon, Kirby Glymph, Lee Brooks, Wash Brown, Robert Foy, John Fry, Young Marcus, John Chappell and Ephraim Washington who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Harriet Cannon came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said the dead child of Harriet Cannon came to her death on 12th May,1892 from natural causes. In witness whereof we the jurors and coroner of aforesaid have hereunto set our hands this 12th day May 1892.           J. W. Reagin, Coroner

W. B. Aull (Foreman) W. C. Hays, J. G. Rikard, J. P. Mahon, Kirby Glymph, Lee Brooks, Wash (X) Brown, Robert (X) Foy, John (X) Fry, Young (X) Marcus, John (X) Chappell and Ephraim (X) Washington                                                                             

EVIDENCE                                                                             

George Jackson being duly sworn says: I was present at the time of her death. She was apparently well. Was talking with the deceased. She put one hand on her stomach and fell forward on her face, said, "Lord", and died.              George Jackson                                                                   

   Bettie Cannon sworn says: She lived with the deceased. Had not been complaining in the last few days. Saw nothing unusual about her looks or behavior. I was in the house when she died. She had no falling out with anyone. Don't think she was poisoned.  She was sitting out in the yard, crocheting, talking with George Jackson. I saw her when she fell over. She said nothing but 'Lord' and put her hand on her stomach and fell forward on her face dead. Made no struggle at all. Been sick a great deal this spring but not confined to her bed lately. There were three children present.  Bettie Cannon

   Preston Cannon sworn says: Deceased is my wife. (I) not present at the time of her death. Saw her this morning at breakfast. Complaining no more than usual. (She was) confined to her bed in the spring. Had a physician at that time. Complained of the left side hurting her. Has been troubled with shortness of breath. Has made complaints of heart and fluttering at the heart. I was in the cornfield at the time of her death. She was dead when I got to the house.

Preston (X) Cannon                                                                                            

T. W. Smith MD sworn: I certify that I examined the dead body of Harriet Cannon on the 12th day of May 1892 and it is my opinion that the deceased came to her death from organic heart disease.  T. W. Smith MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 25 May 1892

An inquisition indented and taken on 25th May 1892 at the house of Tom Davis colored, in the County of Newberry before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of said County on view of the dead body of George Sheeley by: H. M. Adams, W. Sondley, W. P. Harris, William Hogg, James Counts, Wesley Cromer, J. H. Adams, Wright Rutherford, Alfred Morgan, Abram Simms, Brooks Griffin, James G. Brenan, who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said George Sheeley came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said George Sheeley came to his death on 21st  May,1892 by drowning by misfortune or accident.      John W. Reagin, Coroner

H. M. Adams (Foreman, W. Sondley, W. P. Harris, William Hogg, James Counts, Pressley Cromer, J. H. Adams, Wright Rutherford, Alfred Morgan, Abram Simms, Brooks Griffin, James G. Brenan                                                                             

EVIDENCE                                                                             

Rebecca Davis being sworn: George Sheeley lived with me and was raised by me and my husband. Yesterday May 21st at about 1 o'clock and 15 minutes I left home for Town and told George not to leave home for he might fall into the creek and get drowned. He said he was going a fishing. I told him not to go by himself. He said he was not going by himself. Perry Wilson was going with him. I got back from Town about dusk. I found nobody at home but Mary Wheeler. She told me George had gone down on the creek. We, my husband and I stayed at home all night and went to hunt him the next morning early.  I went to Pressly Cromer and asked him if he saw George yesterday afternoon. He said no. Tom, my husband, and I searched up the creek for him. I went up the creek as far as I could walk. I found him first. He was dead. I called my husband and told him. His legs were buried up to his waist in the sand. His face was buried in the sand His bucket was hanging on his arm. His bait gourd was strung around his neck and was lying by him in the water. He had a fit Saturday morning about 10 o'clock. He had fits all his life since he was two years old. He would be 23 years old Christmas next.  Rebecca Davis                                              

   Mary Wheeler being sworn says: George told me he was going a fishing. I told him not to go. He might get drowned. He had just had a spell that morning. He dug his bait and went a little before 4 o'clock. When he was going out of the bars I called him and told him not to go. He said nothing and went on. Perry Wilson slipped off from him for he did not want him to go. Perry went out of the bars but did not go in the direction of the creek. He went down the road. I haven't seen Perry since.  Mary Wheeler

   Tom Davis being sworn says: George lived with me. He was raised by me. My wife and I left him at home about dusk. We didn't find George____. My wife asked Mary where was George. She said he gone a fishing. I tried to sit up until he came home but went to sleep in the chair and then went to bed. Next morning soon my wife and I went to hunt him. My wife walked faster than I. I went with my wife to Press Cromer. He said he had not seen him and did not think he had passed down the creek. We both went up the creek about one half mile til we found him. My wife came to him first. He was lying with his face buried in the sand. I saw the bucket but did not notice on which side. His legs were buried up to his waist in the sand. I was shocked and did not examine carefully. I went down the creek and asked Butler Rice to draw him out of the creek. I also went and told Mr. Sheck. I then went for the coroner. I got Mr. R. C. Maybin, Trial Justice. Mr. Maybin went to the body with a jury of inquest. I sent for the body and had it brought to the house by Mr. Maybin's order. George Sheely was found in Sheck's or Williams'  Creek on Mr. A. H. E. Sheck's land.        Tom Davis

W. G. Houseal sworn: I certify that I have examined the body of George Sheely this day May 22, 1892.His death was caused by drowning.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 27 May 1892

An inquisition indented and taken on 27th May 1892 at a house of Dr. John Thompson's near Helena, occupied by Richard Werts in the County of Newberry SC on the dead body of Clarence Werts, an infant child of Richard Werts before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry by: C. J. Zobel, T. A. Williams, Allen DeWalt Jr., John Schumpert, Allen DeWalt Sr., Henry Bragg, Lee Gary, Alf Wilson, Bill Harris, John Rutherford, J.N. Boatner who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Clarence Werts came to his death, on their oaths do say that from the evidence and examination  of the body that the said Clarence Werts came to his death from natural causes. John W. Reagin, Coroner Newberry County

C. J. Zobel (Foreman), T. A. Williams, Allen DeWalt Jr., John Schumpert, Allen DeWalt Sr., Henry Bragg, Lee Gary, Alf Wilson, Bill Harris, John Rutherford, J. N. Boatner

EVIDENCE

Carrie Johnson being sworn says: I was here last night. The baby has been sick all his life. We have been sitting up with it for two weeks looking for it to die. I sat up last night until 1 o'clock. She carried it to the doctor last Saturday and intended to carry it yesterday but it was too cold. It was worse last night that it was - it looked like it was dying. When I laid it down this was about 1 o'clock. I would call its mother very often and ask how it was. I always found her awake. She gave it about two drops of whiskey in some breast milk. Don't know when it died or whether anybody knows when it died. When I was called by its mother to come and see if it was dead. I found it was and called Georgianna Bluford. The medicine the doctor gave it on Saturday before it died on Monday seemed to do it some good. I was looking for it to die about a week before it did. Last time I took notice of it was about 1 o'clock. I did not know what was the matter with it. Carrie Johnson

   Richard Werts being sworn says: I am the child's father. The baby has been sick all its life. But I thought it was better. Teething is what I thought was the matter with it. I took it to the doctor. I did not notice it was worse than it had been. Did not watch anymore than I had been watching before I went to sleep. About 12 o'clock we gave it no medicine but the whiskey - about two drops. I gave no medicine but what I got from the doctor to it. Had given out before the child died. It was on the outside of me and my wife. When I woke up it was dead. It was about daylight. My wife found it first. There was a light in the house all night. I went for the doctor to come see what caused the death of the child. He said it had dysentery. When I carried it to him. When he looked at it he said it had been smothered.        Richard Werts                                                   

   Bettie Werts being sworn says: The child was eleven months old the 10th May 1892. I saw the child at about 12 o'clock. My sister brought it to the bed. She had taken it up to rest it. Its face was towards me. It was lying on its side. Its head was not covered up when I found it. It could not turn about. It was a boy child and named Clarence. I did not expect it to die anymore last night than I had before. It was a little worse last night, about 12 o'clock. I did not give any medicine except what I got from the doctor. It gave out about a week before it died. It was not good daylight when I found it dead. It was warm at that time. I woke up my sister Carrie and my husband and told them it had no pulse. When it went to sleep it was breathing all right. I gave the whiskey because it was coughing.  Bettie Werts                                                                       

Dr. J. H. McCullough being sworn: I have examined the body of Clarence Werts and find that he came to his death from natural causes.  J. H. McCullough MD State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 17th June 1892 in the Town of Newberry on the dead body of Arthur West before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry by: William F. Ewart, B. M. Dennis, A. C. Knighten, E. V. Mobley, J. P. Aldrich, H. H. Franklin, W. B. Rikard, J. H. Eddy, Albert Paysinger, H. M. Havird, W. A. Kinard, T. B. Perry, who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Arthur West came to his death, on their oaths do say that from the evidence and examination  of the body that the said Arthur West came to his death from hemorrhage due to pistol shot wounds inflicted by George Scott on June 16, 1892.  John W. Reagin, Coroner Newberry County

William F. Ewart (Foreman), B. M. Dennis, A. C. Knighten, E. V. Mobley, J. P. Aldrich, H. H. Franklin, W. B. Rikard, J. H. Eddy, Albert Paysinger, H. M. Havird, W. A. Kinard, T. B. Perry

EVIDENCE                                                                             

Thomas Wilson being sworn says: I know the deceased Arthur West. I saw Arthur West and George Scott have a difficulty. Scott asked Elack William was he one of the club. Arthur West told him he did not want any club. He was to do all that was to be done from that. Arthur cursed George for d-nm son of a b--- and George told him he was another one back. Arthur got mad and told George not to call him a da-m lying s-of a b-h or he would take his shovel and beat the hell out of him. He caught his shovel by the middle of the handle and went towards George. George drew his pistol and told him to stand back or he would kill him. West stopped then. George dropped his pistol to his side. Arthur commenced to curse him again. George cursed him back. Lawrence Phinney came in between them then and told them there was no use in that and he was not going to have it. Lawrence pushed them apart and George walked from Arthur West. Arthur followed George up. George kept giving back. Lawrence was still between them. George still retreating after George had walked back the same distance he had already walked. George stopped. Arthur pushed by Lawrence towards George. Lawrence told Arthur to goon now or he was going to get hurt. Arthur West pushed up his sleeves and told George he didn't believe his g_d__m eight_ would fire and started after George, reaching after him with his left hand with his shovel raised in his right hand. George commenced to shooting at him. Arthur did not stop at the first shot but kept advancing until he got hold of George, when George shot twice more. The third shot Arthur let go of George and fell. Shooting was done so quick. Arthur didn't have time to strike. This happened at Peak's station on the C&G RR in Lexington County in this State, on Thursday morning June 16, 1892. Arthur West was not yet dead. We put him on the freight train and started to take him to his home at Chappell's Depot in Newberry County. Stopped at Newberry to see the RR surgeon.         Thomas Wilson                                                                                    

John Williams being sworn says: We were working at Peaks Station on the material train Thursday morning June 16, 1892. George Scott asked Alec Williams was he in the club. Arthur West answered and said he didn't want anybody else in the club with him. West cursed George Scott and George gave it back to him. Next I saw George and West were on the RR track. George giving back and West following him, a shovel in hand. Lawrence Phinney got in between them. I saw George Scott pull his pistol out. When I saw George raise his hand with the pistol in it I ran behind the cab to keep from getting shot. I heard the firing. I could not swear George shot Arthur for I did not see the shooting. When I saw Arthur West next he was lying on the ground shot.               John Williams                                                                                                                       

POST MORTEM on the body of Arthur West June 17, 1892: Dr. James H. McIntosh sworn says: I find two bullet wounds on the body. The first one entering 2 inches to the inner side and 1 inch below left shoulder ranging upwards and inward and entering the chest cavity between the 2nd and 3rd ribs - passing through the upper end of the upper lobe of the left lung and entering the spinal column between the 1st and 2nd dorsal vertebrae. (The bullet) is buried in the body of the 2nd dorsal vertebrae. The second (bullet) entering in the left nipple line 1 inch below the free border of ribs ranging downward and inward entering the abdominal cavity, just to the left of the umbilicus and passing through the cavity - cutting the duodenum in 3 places and passing through the ascending colon about 3 inches from the vermiform appendix and cutting the extreme lower edge of the right lobe of liver - passing out through the iliac fossa and lying buried in the wing of the right iliac. The abdominal cavity was distended with blood on first being opened, containing at least three quarts of fluid from the cut in the liver or tears in the intercolons and this was in my opinion the cause of death.              James H. McIntosh MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 3 June 1892

An inquisition indented and taken on 3rd day of June 1892 on the plantation of B. F. Griffin, known as his 'Quarters Place'  before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry over the dead body of an infant child of Love Dendy's by: John A. Wallace, W. H. Wallace, Fred Wyatt, Cole Wyatt, Billy Floyd, Belt Simpson, Dennis Kinard, Millidge Thrift, Martin Alfred, Martin Pitts, Anthony Glenn, Cube Mangum who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the death of the child on their oaths do say that from the evidence and examination  of the body that the said the child came to his death from a stroke of a bench that fell as the nurse was rocking it.

 John W. Reagin, Coroner Newberry County

John A. Wallace (Foreman), W. H. Wallace, Fred Wyatt, Cole Wyatt, Billy Floyd, Belt Simpson, Dennis Kinard, Millidge Thrift, Martin Alfred, Martin Pitts, Anthony Glenn, Cube Mangum

EVIDENCE                                                                             

Cora Robertson being sworn says: I was rocking the baby day before yesterday on a bench and it was a heavy bench. That it turned over and the baby's head struck the bench and killed it at once. I was sitting on the bench rocking the baby and the bench turned over and killed the baby and hurt me. People were at work in sight of the house. Nobody in the house at the time of the death. Cora Robertson

   Love Dendy being duly sworn says: I am the father of the child killed at J. C. Wilson's place. The child was about dead when I got to the house. To my Knowledge the child was not sick before. Was about 3 1/3 months old. Tom Hill brought the baby here to the graveyard to bury it on B. F. Griffin's plantation. Saw a bruised place on the right temple. The women tried to examine it. I was about 100 yards from the place.     Love Dendy                                                                          

   Frona Dendy being duly sworn says: I am the mother of the child. Wasn't sick before hand that I know of. Cora called me to the house. We were about 100 yards from the house. When I got there the baby was dead. Bench was straightened up when I got there. Cora told me how it happened when I got there. Cora had laid it on a pallet when I got (to) the house. Cora is my brother's daughter.  Frona Dendy                                                                  

T. W. Smith being duly sworn: I have examined the (body) of the deceased infant and am of the opinion that deceased came to its death from a blow on the brain caused from a violent fall.

T. W. Smith MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 14 July 1892

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry Court House, Newberry County on 14th day of July1892 before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry over the body of Harriet Herbert then and there being dead by the oaths of: J. T. Mayes, T. B. Perry, G. F. Ruff, H. N. Auton, C. W. Miller, J. M. Bouknight, J. A. Blats, J. H. Goree, G. W. Feltman, William Kibler, R. L. Kibler, A. W. Cromer, who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means Harriet Herbert came to her death on their oaths do say that on the 14th July 1892 Harriet Herbert came to her death from natural causes.       

J. W. Reagin, Coroner Newberry County

J. T. Mayes (Foreman), T. B. Perry, G. F. Ruff, H. N. Auton, C. W. Miller, J. M. Bouknight, J. A. Blats, J. H. Goree, G. W. Feltman, William Kibler, R. L. Kibler, A. W. Cromer                                  

EVIDENCE                                                                             

Burr M. Raines sworn says: Harriet Herbert does not live with me. (She) lives across the street. She brings my meals and I boards with her. She brought me my breakfast this morning and asked me if I had any fresh water. I told her no - she got the bucket and went to the well after water. I was pressing and happened to look through the window and from the position she was in I thought she was looking for something. She was on her knees and elbows near the water bucket on my back porch. I didn't come to her right away. I pressed outdoors. I looked at her again and she was still in the same position. I suspected something was wrong with her. I came to her and called her and she didn't answer. Then I called Rachel Simms. We raised her up and Rachel Simms or I said she looks like she is dead. We laid her in the position she is in now.

B. M. Raines                                                                                                                                         

W. G. Houseal: I certify I have examined the dead body of Harriet Herbert this day July 14th 1892. She came to her death from natural causes in my opinion, cerebral apoplexy.   W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 24 July 1892

An inquisition indented and taken at the residence of Wilmon Gauntt in Newberry County on 24th day of July1892 before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry over the body of Elliott Zebidee Gauntt of Newberry then and there being dead by the oaths of: W. B. Caldwell, J. H. Todd, Edward Franklin, Robert A. Attaway, N. M. Darby, R. P. Franklin, G. C. Gruber, W.C. Hayes, Kirby Glymph, W. W. Caldwell, W. L. Jones, W. Y. Darby who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means Elliott Zebidee Gauntt came to his death on their oaths do say that on the 14th July 1892 Elliott Zebidee Gauntt came to his death from natural causes. In witness whereof I, J. W. Reagin, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals this 24th day of July 1892.

W. B. Caldwell (Foreman), J. H. Todd, Edward Franklin, Robert A. Attaway, N. M. Darby, R. P. Franklin, G. C. Gruber, W.C. Hayes, Kirby Glymph, W. W. Caldwell, W. L. Jones, W. Y. Darby

EVIDENCE July 24th 1892                                                                    

Mrs. Scilla Gauntt sworn says: I am the mother of Elliott Zebidee Gauntt. My baby is about seven months old. I woke up this morning and went in the dining room to get some breakfast and told some of the children to go and fan the flies off the baby. No one went. I went and fanned the flies off myself and saw he didn't look right. Then I called my husband to come because I thought he was dead. He came and said yes, he is gone. He was pert all day as far as I know until late yesterday evening when he fretted a great deal. He would not lie down until I lay down with him. I didn't give any medicine or tea of any kind. He had not taken any medicine since last Monday night when he took some soothing syrup. I nursed him and took care of him myself. I didn't think the child was much sick yesterday evening. I slept hard after 12 o'clock. He fretted all night. I could hear him. He has not been hurt any way. When I got up I thought the baby was asleep but he must have been dead.        Scilla Gauntt

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I have examined the body of Elliott Zebidee Gauntt. He came to his death from natural causes.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken at Coleman's Ferry near Chappells in Newberry County on 18th day of August 1892 before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry over the body of William Peterson of Newberry then and there being dead by the oaths of: J. J. White, S. R. Keitt, L. B. Betts, Ben B. Watkins, Bob Coleman, Charlie Cobb, Whit Gary, Mat Farrow, Dan Pinckney, Ephraim Payne, Will Lark, Ed Cobb who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means William Peterson came to his death on their oaths do say that William Peterson to his death from drowning in the Saluda River while attempting to swim across it 17th August 1892.      

J. W. Reagin, Coroner

J. J. White (Foreman), S. R. Keitt, L. B. Betts, Ben B. Watkins, Bob Coleman, Charlie Cobb, Whit Gary, Mat Farrow, Dan Pinckney, Ephraim Payne, Will Lark, Ed Cobb                                  

EVIDENCE August 18th 1892                                                                              

Dennis Lindsay sworn says: He came to my home and woke me up and asked me to go over to Mr. Webb's with him. He had some flour over there and wanted to go after it. We came to the ferry and the ferry was not there. A boy told us he (ferryman) was gone to the mill and did not know when he would be back and he said he would be obliged to have some provisions. . He pulled off his clothes and attempted to swim over. When reaching about half way he stopped and turned down the river and then sunk without saying anything. He rose the three times and sank but never rose anymore. I then went to the house and told my father and family. Ed Cobb, Berry Lindsay and others. This was on Wednesday 17th August 1892 about 9 o'clock in the morning. I know the deceased, Bill Peterson. The boy had gone back to the house when this happened. Dennis Lindsay                                                                                             

Cullin Lindsay sworn says: I was here when the body was found. It was found about 30 yards below where the witness said he last saw him. He was found about 11 o'clock today the 18th 1892.    Cullin Lindsay

August 18, 1892 - A. A. Madden MD called and sworn and upon examination says that Bill Peterson came to his death from drowning.  A. A. Madden MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 30 August 1892

An inquisition indented and taken at the Town of Newberry on 30th day of August 1892 before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry over the body of Paralee Hurst of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: M. Reily, J. P. Cook, J. H. Todd, G. W. Havird, J. H. Alewine, W. L. Jones, J. M. Bouknight, H. J. Darby, M. B. Graham, James Sligh, T. J. Lathrop, Levi Britt who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means Paralee Hurst came to her death on their oaths do say that Paralee Hurst to her death from a fall out of the back door of a house on a slab that broke the skull and penetrated the brain causing death in about 8 hours after the accident which happened in the Town of Newberry on August 29th 1892.  J. W. Reagin, Coroner

M. Reily (Foreman), J. P. Cook, J. H. Todd, G. W. Havird, J. H. Alewine, W. L. Jones, J. M. Bouknight, H. J. Darby, M. B. Graham, James Sligh, T. J. Lathrop, Levi Britt               

EVIDENCE                                                                             

Jane Hurst sworn says: I was in the house when the child fell out of the door. My boy picked up the child. Slab did not stay in its head. Mamie Williams pulled up the slab. I knew she had fallen on a slab and sent for my husband. She fell about 12 o'clock on the 29th of August. (She) lived about 8 hours. It was about one half hour after the injury until the doctor arrived. She was in perfect health up to the time she fell. I am the mother of the child. She is about 18 months old. Her name is Paralee Hurst.  Jane Hurst                                                                            

   Ira Lewis sworn says: When I got there the mother of the child had the child in her arms. I took the child away from her and gave it to Manda Anderson. Did not know what was the matter until I saw the stab. After I noticed the stab I saw it had went into its head. I was not present when the child went out the door.  Ira Lewis                                                                 

J. H. McCullough MD sworn says: I have examined the body of Paralee Hurst age 18 months and find that she came to her death from a compound commutated complicated fracture of the skull.   J. H. McCullough MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 1 September 1892

An inquisition indented and taken in Newberry County on the John P. Sloan Place on 1st day of September1892 before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry over the body of Queen Isabella Thacker of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: M. Reily, J. W. Nance, J. H. Brown, W. B. Cromer, D. S. Minick, Caesar Maffett, Dolphus Means, John Williams, Fred Sligh, William Williams, David Lyles, Walter Ruff who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means Queen Isabella Thacker came to her death on their oaths do say that Queen Isabella Thacker to her death from disease or natural causes on the John P. Sloan Place in Newberry County on September 1, 1892.  J. W. Reagin, Coroner

M. Reily (Foreman), J. W. Nance, J. H. Brown, W. B. Cromer, D. S. Minick, Caesar Maffett, Dolphus Means, John Williams, Fred Sligh, William Williams, David Lyles, Walter Ruff

EVIDENCE September 1, 1892

Laura Thacker sworn says: I am the mother of Queen Isabella Thacker. She was 5 months old. She had a rising in the neck. (The rising) took about 3 weeks before it came to a head. It bursted last Thursday morning. It was closed up and had not been running since. It had been having fever. It fretted yesterday evening. I didn't think it was sick. It fretted during the night. I turned it over to the front side of the bed. It continued to fret. I patted it and turned it over to the middle of the bed and nursed it. I thought it went to sleep. Got quiet this morning. I found it dead. I have not given it any medicine. Poulticed the boil on the side of its neck. Thought that was all that would do it any good. I had no idea it was sick enough to die. I wanted to carry it to the doctor but my husband said, "No. It had nothing but a rising. When it bust it would get well." 

Laura Thacker                                                                                                                                      

   Frank Thacker sworn says: I am the father of Queen Isabella Thacker. She has not been sick any way that I knew of except the rising on her neck. (I) thought that when it bursted it would get well. I lay at the foot of the bed last night. I didn't hear it any during the night. I was tired and was rest broken and slept hard. I got up this morning and went to the door to wash my face when my wife called me and told me it was dead. Don't think it was possible it was lain on by either of us and thereby causing its death. I was surprised when my wife told me it was dead for I didn't think it was sick.  Frank Thacker

                                                                               

W. G. Houseal sworn says: I have examined the body of Queen Isabell Thacker this day September 1, 1892. Its death was from natural causes, in my opinion, from and abscess and blood poisoning.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 2 September 1892

An inquisition indented and taken in Newberry County at Deadfall over the body of J. T. Smith then and there lying dead on 2nd day of September 1892 before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry County by the oaths of: W. E. Welch, Levi M. Etheredge, D. L. Ham, D. B. Werts, P. S. Livingston, Thomas S. Blair, D. G. Livingston, Jeff Davenport, John McCarty, J. W. Crouch, T. D. Gentry, J. S. Bickley who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means J. T. Smith came to his death on their oaths do say that J. T. Smith to his death from natural causes on 2nd September 1892 at Deadfall in Newberry County.   J. W. Reagin, Coroner

W. E. Welch (Foreman), Levi M. Etheredge, D. L. Ham, D. B. Werts, P. S. Livingston, Thomas S. Blair, D. G. Livingston, Jeff Davenport, John McCarty, J. W. Crouch, T. D. Gentry, J. S. Bickley                                                                           

EVIDENCE September 2, 1892                                                                          

Mrs. Lucretia Smith sworn says: Mr. Thomas Smith is my husband. He has been sick with neck and head about 3 weeks. He could not lie down on account of pain in his neck. He was sick yesterday but worked some. This morning he arose and went outdoors and came back and asked me if I had had a good night's rest. He then lay down in bed with me and began snoring. I put my hand on him but could not awaken him. I got up and tried to raise him in bed. He died within five minutes afterwards. I called Mr. Etheredge at once and also a Negro. The complaint he suffered with mostly was smothering in bed at night. Often he would have to go out doors to get relief. He said he thought these smothering spells would kill him sometime.         Lucretia Smith                                     

   John Smith sworn says: I am a son of Thomas Smith. When I heard Ma call me I ran to the room and Pa was dying. I then went for Mr. Blair and Etheredge. Pa was not dead when I left but was when I came back. I was gone about 5 minutes. I heard my father complain a good deal lately. He was sick all day yesterday but worked some. His principal complaint was smothering of the breast. He has been taking some medicine prescribed by Dr. Mayer. He had not been taking the medicine for neuralgia of head and neck.      John H. Smith.                                                     

Dr. J. M. Kibler sworn says that J. T. Smith Sr. came to his death of heart failure.   
J. M. Kibler MD, September 2, 1892

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 5 October 1892

An inquisition indented and taken on Thompson Conner's Place in Newberry County over the body of Martha Brown of Newberry County on 5th of October 1892 before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of said County by the oaths of: Milton Flanagan, Tom Reeder, Adam Harmon, Young Richie, William Gary, Si Cannon, Bill Davis, Tom Davis, Lawrence Gary, Henry Davis, Manuel Reeder and Henry Reeder who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means Martha Brown came to her death on their oaths do say that Martha Brown to her death on the Plantation of Thompson Conner on the 5th October 1892 from natural causes.  J. W. Reagin, Coroner

Milton Flanagan (Foreman, Tom Reeder, Adam Harmon, Young Richie, William Gary, Si Cannon, Bill Davis, Tom Davis, Lawrence Gary, Henry Davis, Manuel Reeder and Henry Reeder

EVIDENCE                                                                             

Jesse Brown being sworn says: I am the husband of Martha Brown. She has been sick the whole year but has not been confined to her bed. She had asthma, shortness of breath. It came on by spells. When she walked about her breath was so short she seemed to give out and had to stop. Night before last she took worse and could not lay down a minute. Last night she was still worse when I came out of the field. I gave the medicine the doctor had given for her. I went to the doctor yesterday morning after medicine. This morning I went after Dr. Clark at 7 o'clock. Got back a little after 7 o'clock. She was dead when I got back. I put a pepper poultice on her night before last. My little boy met me when I came back and told me his mother with her reared back. I came in the house and found her on the rug. Her head was on the bed. She was dead.             

Jesse Brown                                                                                                                                                         

   Thompson Conner being sworn says: Martha Brown lives on my place all the year. I knew she was a diseased woman. I did not know until the night before last that she had asthma. She was not a hired hand. Her husband had a house rented from me. She had hoed and picked some cotton for me this year. She milked for me for sometime past - a couple of months. She worked for me picking cotton last Monday. She milked last Monday Morning. I have not seen her from her house since then. I gave her husband orders to go after Dr. Clark for her this morning. I saw her at 8 o'clock dead. Jesse came and told me, "My wife, she was dead". T. Conner                          

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I have examined the body of Martha Brown. She came to her death from natural causes, in my opinion, from heart disease.             W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 10 October 1892

An inquisition indented and taken on 10th of October 1892 in the Town of Prosperity in Newberry County over the body of Anderson J. Beachum before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry County, SC by the oaths of: A. H. Wheeler, Robert E. Brenan, G. W. Dominick, J. C. Counts, J. M. Stockman, John B. Fellers, A. H. Hawkins, B. B. Hair, W. R. Maffett, R. C. Kibler, B. B. Schumpert, Anderson Kinard who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means Anderson J. Beachum, now lying dead, came to his death on their oaths do say that Anderson J. Beachum came to his death by a blow from a stick in the hands of Lewis Moore on the 9th October 1892 in the Town of Prosperity, County of Newberry, SC.                J. W. Reagin, Coroner

A. H. Wheeler (Foreman), Robert E. Brenan, G. W. Dominick, J. C. Counts, J. M. Stockman, John B. Fellers, A. H. Hawkins, B. B. Hair, W. R. Maffett, R. C. Kibler, B. B. Schumpert, Anderson Kinard                                                                              

EVIDENCE                                                                             

John Burton being sworn says: I saw the ?Lich? It was in the Town of Prosperity. It was on Sunday the 9th October 1892. I saw Anderson Beachum and Frank Boozer coming down the road. They met in front of the stable about two steps from the stable. Lewis Moore asked Bunk Beachum why in the hell he didn't come up there while he was there. Bunk asked up, "Where?" Lewis Moore said, "God d -m it you know up where". Lewis cursed Bunk, "You God d__m low down rascal and God d__m red-eyed s_of a b__h", and he started towards Bunk. Bunk said, "God d_m it, don't come another step"  towards him and if he did he would kill him then. Bunk cursed Lewis and Lewis cursed Bunk back. Each called the other God d_m s_of a b__hes. Then Bunk run his hand in his pocket and pulled out a pistol out of his hip pocket. Lewis told him, "Don't do that". At that time Bunk had got his pistol out and had it in his hand trying to cock it. Then Lewis ran up to Bunk and struck him with a stick on the head. Lewis had the stick in his hand all the time of the quarrelling. It was a persimmon stick about 4 feet long and 1¼ inches thick. I could not tell that either of them were drinking. I didn't take notice that either of them were drinking. Bunk fell when Lewis struck him. He only struck him once. Bunk did not speak after he was struck. Bunk and Frank Boozer came down together and Lewis came along about the same time. I saw Bunk go into Lewis'  wife's house and I saw him come out. He had not been in the house long before Frank Boozer went in. I am no kin to Lewis Moore. Lewis Moore struck with both hands.  John (X) Burton                                                                                        

   W. W. Fulmer sworn says: The fuss was on the 9th October 1892 about 75 yards from where I was at the time. I heard the fuss and went to see what it meant. I went there and found Beachum lying on the ground. The only fuss I heard was Beachum's daughter crying. When I got there a crown was standing around Beachum. He was lying on the ground with a pistol at his side, close to his right hand - about three inches from his right hand. I saw someone pick up the pistol but did not notice who it was. It lay on the ground about 5 to 8 minutes before it was picked up. I would know the pistol if I saw it. (Here the pistol was shown to Mr. Fulmer and he recognized it as the same pistol he saw on Sunday laying by Beachum).         W. W. Fulmer                                                      

   Frank Boozer being sworn says: I live at Mr. Arthur Kohn's in the Town of Prosperity - No. 9 Township, where the new road train comes up. I was on my way to the Baptist church. Lewis Moore said he intended to kill Bunk Beachum. He told me he intended to kill Bunk Beachum if it was the last thing he did. Henry Gallman was there and heard it. I said, "Lewis, I would not do it". Then I went up the road towards Mr. Lindsey Dominick and I met Judy Boozer and Mary Moore. I turned around and came back with them to the well at the RR Mineral well. They got a pitcher of water. I went on back with them and got the bridge at Dr. Wilke's house. Lewis was on the bridge and said Mary had Bunk shut up in her house. Mary said, "If you think so, go and see". It was Mary Moore's house where she lived. She rented (from) Jackson. Old man Kinard was on the bridge with Lewis. I went on with the women until they turned off. I went to Pink Porter's house and got a drink of water. Pink's house is opposite Mary's. I then went back to the bridge. Then I saw Bunk go to Mary's house. I then went on over that way. Bunk went into Mary's house. I went to tell him what Lewis had said. (He) didn't stay long.  We came out and passed Lewis. Lewis said something to Bunk. Could not hear what he said. It was near Luther's stables. Lewis came on toward Bunk with his stick. He caught the stick with both hands when he got close to Bunk to strike. When Lewis started bunk didn't have his hand on his 'Bunk's' pistol hung in his pocket. Just as he got it out Lewis struck him. Pistol fell and I grabbed it. I didn't know what Lewis would do if he got hold of the pistol. Lewis caught Bunk and lifted him up. Bunk's head dropped to one side. Lewis laid him down and walked off. I put the pistol back where I got it from and then took it up again. I didn't let it lay long before I picked it up again. I suppose I let the pistol lay about 2 minutes. They took Beachum to his house.  Frank Boozer          

Dr. C. T. Wyche sworn says: On the evening of the 9th October 1892 I 3as called to see Anderson J. Beachum and found him conscious bur dull and stupid, Found a swelling over the right eye evidentially caused by hemorrhage into the orbit. Found no abrasions on the face as would be caused by a sever blow. Diagnosed fracture by countercoup producing hemorrhage and compression. I found a large clot of blood in the right frontal convolution evidentially causing death by compressing of the brain.     C. T. Wyche MD                                                                        

John Burton recalled: When Lewis Moore struck Bunk he fell straight back on the back of his head. The ground was very hard where he fell at. They were facing each other. Lewis struck him straight down across the head.  John Burton

Dr. C. T. Wyche sworn says: I certify I have examined the body of Anderson Beachum and find that (death) resulted from compression of the brain resulting from rupture of a blood vessel caused by fracture on the lower part of the frontal bone.                C. T. Wyche MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 13 October 1892

An inquisition indented and taken on the plantation of Robert W. Atchison in Newberry County SC on the 13th of October 1892 over the dead body of Jim Wyatt of Newberry County before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry County, SC by the oaths of: R. W. Atchison, Lem Suber, Andrew Gray, Henry Phinney, Pink Satterwhite, Anthony Glenn, Wright Wyatt, Cole Wyatt, Jim Wyatt, Fred Wyatt, Alf H. Andrews, Wiley Wyatt who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means Jim Wyatt, now lying dead, came to his death on their oaths do say that Jim Wyatt came to from natural causes on the 17th October 1892 on the plantation of Robert Atchison.                  

J. W. Reagin, Coroner         

R. W. Atchison (Foreman), Lem Suber, Andrew Gray, Henry Phinney, Pink Satterwhite, Anthony Glenn, Wright Wyatt, Cole Wyatt, Jim Wyatt, Fred Wyatt, Alf H. Andrews, Wiley Wyatt                                                                          

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Noah Wyatt sworn says: Jim Wyatt is my son. He was out and about a month ago by Dick Floyd's. The difficulty was at Jake Amick's place. I met my boy coming home after he was cut. I looked at the cut. It was a bad cut on the left shoulder, laid wide open as my hand and about as long as my hand. I took him to Dr. Senn who sewed it up. The wound did bad for about a week and then began to heal very fast. I thought it healed too fast to be sound inside. It healed all except at the lower edge. He stopped work for about 2 weeks and then picked cotton. He always complained of that arm being numb and dead and could hardly use it. He went to bed last Thursday one week from today. He complained of his left side and arm and suffered all the time until he died. Dr. Smith came and gave him two doses of medicine and made out quinine powders. He complained of his head very much. He had fever all the time while he was in bed. I don't know that he was taken with a chill but he had fever. When I found him he had cold spells and fever would rise on him.      Noah (X) Wyatt                                                                    

   Adline Wyatt being sworn says: I am Jim Wyatt's stepmother. I was at home with him when he was sick. He had high fevers when he was sick. He complained of being cold at times then his fever would get higher. I saw his wound the day it was cut. It was a bad cut. It got well very quick except a little at the lower end. He did a little work after being cut. Then he went to bed. He complained of his head and his left arm. I know what kind of medicine he took. I think he died Tuesday night before day.  Adline Wyatt                                                                               

   Noah Wyatt recalled: Jim Wyatt died Tuesday night about midnight. I gave him medicine first on Monday morning early. It must have been dovers powder. It was white. He rested well after an hour or two. The doctor came at 11 o'clock Monday and left the medicine. I think it was calomel. I gave two doses: One at 12 o'clock and one in the evening. Dr. said if the bowels didn't act by bedtime to give a dose of salts or oil. I gave him oil. His bowels acted twice that night and once about day the first action was very black. The next was reddish. The third was very small. He took some quinine after the medicine acted. I gave four doses in about four hours. The fever got no better. He got more deranged. I gave him no more. I gave him the last dose of quinine Tuesday about 12 o'clock. The doctor did not come back after the first visit.  Noah Wyatt

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I have examined the dead body of Jim Wyatt. The wound on his left shoulder did not cause his death. In my opinion he came to his death from natural causes.   W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 10 November 1892

An inquisition indented and taken in Newberry SC on the plantation of J. F. Todd of said County and State on the 6th of November1892 before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of Newberry County, SC over the dead body of Spencer Ruff who then and there being dead by the oaths of: John Caldwell, M. C. Holmes, Rush Anderson, Ben King, Henry Jones, Belford Stafford, Louis Williams, William Carter, Shelton Rice, Jack Bettis, Mack Jones, James Washington who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means Spencer Ruff, now lying dead, came to his death on their oaths do say that from view of the body and testimony we find Spencer Ruff came to from burns inflicted on the body on the plantation of J. F. Todd in Newberry County SC on the 5th November and died 6th November 1892.  J. W. Reagin, Coroner

John Caldwell (Foreman), M. C. Holmes, Rush Anderson, Ben King, Henry Jones, Belford Stafford, Louis Williams, William carter, Shelton Rice, Jack Bettis, Mack Jones, James Washington                                                                         

EVIDENCE                                                                             

Pleasant Ruff being sworn says: When I saw Spencer Ruff he was coming down the spring road. I had no water. I heard him holler his clothes were on fire. I ran on to the spring and got a bucket of water and threw it on him and put the fire out. He asked me to put him in the spring but I would not do it. I do not know how he caught on fire. When I left the house I left my sister Leolia with him. There was a fire in the house. This happened about 5 o'clock on the evening of the 5th November 1892. He was four years and nine months old. He is my brother.

Pleasant Ruff                                                                                                        

   Manus Ruff being sworn says: I came home from Town a little before sundown. I am the father of the child. I found him burned all around the waist. I went right off for Dr. McCullough. He came about 8 o'clock. He said he could not live until day. I think it must have been accidental. My wife was away from home. He died that night about half past 1 o'clock.  Manus Ruff                

   Leolia Ruff being sworn says: He is my brother. He was playing in the fire with a string and his dress caught fire. He hollered and I caught him and carried him on down to the spring where my brother was. He threw a bucket of water on him. He carried him up to Catherine Williams house. Lucien Carter brought him back home and put him in the cradle and put flour on his burns. I saw her put the flour on him. She did not put anything else on him. She did not stay until mother came.             Leolia Ruff            

J.H. McCullough sworn says: I have examined the body of Spencer Ruff, age 4 years and 9 months and find that he came to his death from burns inflicted on both thighs, the abdomen, and back on November 5th 1892.     J. H. McCullough, this November 6, 1892

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 30 November 1892

An inquisition indented and taken in Newberry SC on the 30th of November1892 on the plantation of Jordan Green before J. W. Reagin, Coroner of said county over the dead body of Bettie Boozer of Newberry County upon the oaths of: James Goodman, John Jackson, Wesley Stephens, Riley Gary, Mack Gary, Alf Smith, Jesse Miller, Peter Boozer, Bela Burton, Francis Christie, John Golding, Wiley Rhodes who being a lawful jury of inquest and being solemnly sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means Bettie Boozer, now lying dead, came to her death on their oaths do say that from evidence and examination of the body of Bettie Boozer came to her death from accidental burning on the 29th of November on the Plantation of Jordan Green in Newberry Co. SC.  J. W. Reagin, Coroner

James Goodman (Foreman), John Jackson, Wesley Stephens, Riley Gary, Mack Gary, Alf Smith, Jesse Miller, Peter Boozer, Bela Burton, Francis Christie, John Golding, Wiley Rhodes                                

EVIDENCE                                                                             

Charley Brown sworn says: Bettie Boozer lived with me. Is my niece. Is about 5 years old. She was burned yesterday about sundown here at my house. The first I knew of it my wife came for me. When I came I found my wife had torn the old burnt clothing off and put on other clothes and laid her in bed. I sent for a doctor. He was sick and could not come. He sent me some medicine with instructions to mix with lard and grease her with it. I did that but the child died by daylight, 30th November 1892. She was able to talk - asked for some water and I gave it to her. I asked her how she caught on fire. She said she did not know.  Charley Brown                                          

   Adline Brown sworn says: She went to the spring and left the child in the house. Heard her hollering and went back and met her. She had her clothing on fire. There was a small fire in the house. This was at sundown 29th Nov. 1892. I tore the clothing off the child and went for my husband. The child lived until daylight the 30th 1892. The child was named Bettie Boozer.

Adline Boozer

Dr. W. D. Senn sworn says: I have examined the body of Bettie Boozer and find that she came to her death from burns which covered almost the whole of the body except the face and anterior portion of the thorax. November 30, 1892           Dr. W. D. Senn MD              

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken in Newberry SC on the 23rd of December1892 on James Nelson's plantation Newberry County before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the dead body of Mary Gilreath of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: James Nelson Foreman, Newton Wheeler, Randolph Jefferson, Alfred Counts, Wallace Tribble, Simp Kemp, W. G. Houseal, Daniel Spearman being charges and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Mary Gilreath, came to her death on their oaths do say that Mary Gilreath came to her death from natural causes in witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay , Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year before mentioned.                               

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County                                                                                                      

James Nelson Foreman, Newton Wheeler, Randolph Jefferson, Alfred Counts, Wallace Tribble, Simp Kemp, W. G. Houseal, Daniel Spearman, Tom Werts, Daniel Adams, John Werts, Hamp Lake 

EVIDENCE                                                                             

Ellen Gilreath being sworn says: I live on James Nelson's Place in Newberry County. My mother and I live in the same house. She was sitting up this morning laughing and talking. She got up this morning as usual about two hours before she died. She was sitting in the chair and said, "Children, I have got swimhead so bad". Then she fell over and never spoke anymore. She did not work this morning but was fixing to run on the machine. She was in good health as far as I know. She complained a right smart for some time of swollen at the heart and shortness of breath in going up a hill. She became very short winded and would spit up blood.        Mary Gilreath     

   Young Gilreath being sworn says I lived with my sister Ella and mother. My mother has been complaining for a long time when going up a hill (she) became very tired and breath was short. She did not complain this morning. She got up this morning and went to the door and hollered down to the Risers to somebody. This was about 4 o'clock. She died about 6 o'clock. She said, "Oh Lord Children, I have got the swim head," and she fell out of the chair. She died at once. Young Gilreath

Dr. W. G. Houseal being duly sworn says: I examined the dead body of Mary Gilreath today. She died from natural causes; in my opinion organic heart disease.          W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 9 January 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at D. M. Langford's Place in Newberry County before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the dead body of a child, Nance Gallman then and there being dead by the oaths of: R. J. Stoudemeyer, W. Y. Taylor, Ben Hardy, J. C. Counts, P. E. Wise, J. P. Bowers, A. P. Dominick, R. C. Kibler, Jim Kinard, Young Jones, Press Long, M. W. Davis being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Nance Gallman, came to her death on their oaths do say that Nance Gallman came to her death by accidental burning at D. M. Langford's Place at 12 o'clock on the 9th day of January 1893. That Nance Gallman, in manner and form aforesaid came to her death by misfortune or accidental burns. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition.                     

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

P. E. Wise (Foreman), R. C. Kibler, R. J. Stoudemeyer, J. C. Counts, J. P. Bowers, A. P. Dominick, M. W. Davis, B. J. Hardy, W. Y. Taylor, James Kinard, Y. C. Jones, Press Long                                                          

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Evidence of Francis Gallman being sworn says on January the 9th 1893 I came into my house and found my child on fire and thought it was dead. I picked her up and laid her in the bed. The child was alive. I sent for Dr. A. F. Langford and he came. It lived from 12 to 6 o'clock. I was at D. M. Langford's kitchen cooking when the child caught fire. My little girl called me and said Nance was on fire.              Frances Gallman                                                                 

Dr. A. F. Langford being sworn said: The child came to its death by being burned.     

A.    F. Langford MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 22 January 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at the Dominick Butler Place in County of Newberry on the 22nd day of January 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the dead body of Ned Maybin of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: Fred Brooks, Jacob Chappell, Ned Benjamin, John Brooks, Spencer Kinard, William Bullock, Edmund Johnson, David Warner, Charles Kinard, Calhoun Gray, Monroe Turner and Nathaniel Swindler being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said he came to his death upon their oaths do say that Ned Maybin came to his death from the effects of a burn by his a house accidentally burning on him. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

Fred Brooks, Jacob Chappell, Ned Benjamin, John Brooks, Spencer Kinard, William Bullock, Edmund Johnson, David Warner, Charles Kinard, Calhoun Gray, Monroe Turner and Nathaniel Swindler                                                                               

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Thomas Young being duly sworn says: I was in my house when I first heard the fire roaring. I went to the window and looked towards my lot but did not see the fire. I then looked towards the spring and saw my father's house burning. No one lived in the house with him. This was between 11 and 12 o'clock at night January 21, 1893, I immediately went to his house. I was the first one to get to the house. I saw no one but my father. He was on the ground about three or four steps from the door. He was dead when I first saw him. I called for my neighbors. My son John came and put a basket over my head so I could draw my father away from the house. When I pulled him away his clothing came on fire. I put out the fire on his clothes. I pulled his clothes partly off and saw that his body was badly burned. I then went after John Brooks. When we came back I spread a quilt over my father's body and left him there until morning. My father had been in good health this winter. He was in my house yesterday. He did his own cooking. He had fire in his house every night.              Thomas (X) Young

Dr. J. M. Kibler being duly sworn says. I hereby certify that Ned Maybin came to his death from the effects of a burn received January 21, 1893.  J. M. Kibler MD, Newberry SC, Jan 22, 1893

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 24 January 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at Silverstreet Colored Baptist Church in Newberry County on the 24th day of January 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the dead body of Henry Spearman then and there being dead by the oaths of: Jacob Cleland, Larkin Boozer, T. A. Williams, Preston Werts, Cadie Simmons, Phil Reeder, Henry Rhodes, Summer Lark, Ben Reeder, Charles Jesse, Ephraim Williams, and Stephen Matthis being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Henry Spearman came to his death upon their oaths do say that Henry Spearman came to his death from injuries received January 10, 1893 from accidentally falling from his horse. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

Jacob Cleland (Foreman), Larkin Boozer, T. A. Williams, Preston Werts, Caddie Simmons, Phil Reeder, Henry Rhodes, Summer Lark, Ben Reeder, Charles Jesse, Ephraim Williams, and Stephen Matthis                                                                

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Boz Johnson being duly sworn says: W. A. Hill, Duffie Stephens, Frank Cannon, Henry Wallace, Henry Spearman and myself were coming home from Mr. Hill's lower place and going home. Henry spearman and I did not live at the same place. I live with Mr. Hill. Henry Spearman (lived) on Yancy Coleman's place. We were all riding along laughing and talking. We all had whiskey along and all drank some. We all felt lively from the whiskey. We had had no words with each other during the day. We had been to a house raising on Mr. Hill's Place. Henry Spearman's horse was running and Henry fell off and Mr. Hill called to us to come back, that Henry had fallen off his horse. I did not see him fall. When I came back I found Henry lying in the road on his back. He could not get up. He did not know anything. Myself and others carried him to brother Wash's house. He was still unconscious. Frank Cannon and I went for Henry's brothers and we stayed with him till 1 o'clock that night.  Boz (X) Johnson                                                 

   Frank Cannon being duly sworn says: I had been at Mr. Hill's place raising a house. I came back in company with Mr. Hill, Henry Wallace, Duffie Stephens, Boz Johnson and Henry Spearman. We all had been drinking whiskey. We were all going along laughing and talking. I was ahead of Henry when he was hurt. Mr. Hill called us to come back that Henry had fallen off his horse. His horse was running. I went back and found Henry lying on his back on the road. He did not know anything. We carried him to Wash Butler's house. Boz Johnson and I went after his brothers. Lee Spearman came and saw Henry and then went after the doctor. When I found him in the road I saw a wound on his head and I rubbed his head. There was no one with Henry when he fell but Mr. Hill. We were in front running our horses.   Frank (X) Cannon                                 

   Duffie Stephens being duly sworn says: I saw Henry Spearman the day he was hurt. It was two weeks ago today. We all had been at Mr. Hill's 'Longshore Place' raising a house. We were going home when Henry was hurt. We all had been drinking. I pulled Mr. Hill off his horse. This was before Henry was hurt. Henry Spearman and I helped him back on his horse. Mr. Hill did not get mad. Henry could not get back on his horse, as there was no girth on the saddle. Henry was drunk. Henry Spearman went off in front of Mr. Hill and me. Henry's horse ran up the road and passed Frank Cannon. Henry fell off the horse after he passed Frank. I saw him fall. He was drunk and his saddle turned. No one had struck Henry. He was on his back on the road unconscious. I went with him to Wash Butler's house. After Henry fell off his horse Frank Cannon's mule ran over him. Henry was about 10 yards in front of me and Mr. Hill. I think Henry's head struck the ground first.     Duffie (X) Stephens

Dr. J. M. Kibler MD sworn says: This is to certify that Henry Spearman came to his death from concussion of the brain caused by a blow upon the skull.  J. M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken at Helena in Newberry County on the 10th day of February 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the dead body of Bessie Burton of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: Melvin Butler, Edward Lewis, Anthony Williams, George Gary, Paul Swittenberg, Berley Hunter, R. M. Devin, David Holman, A. M. Mitchell, L. P. Lewis, W. M. Mitchell, Hamp Robertson being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Bessie Burton came to her death upon their oaths do say that she came to his death from accidental burning. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

Melvin Butler (Foreman), Edward Lewis, Anthony Williams, George Gary, Paul Swittenberg, Berley Hunter, R. M. Devin, David Holman, A. M. Mitchell, L. P. Lewis, W. M. Mitchell, Hamp Robertson                                                                

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Carrie Burton being duly sworn says: I am the mother of Bessie Butler. I left Bessie at home sitting in a chair and went to see Narciss Williams. This was about sundown. Bessie was well. I heard an alarm calling for help. I ran to Bessie and picked her up. She had been on fire. Mary Cook had put the fire out. Bessie was burned nearly all over her clothes. I brought her to the doorsteps and had her greased and flour put on her. This was on Wednesday. I sent for a doctor the next morning. He came. Dr. Kibler came. Bessie told her aunt that she caught fire. She still had the spoon in her hand when I got to her. Narciss Williams took the spoon from her.               

Carrie (X) Burton                                                                                                 

   Mary Cook sworn says: When I saw Bessie Burton she was out doors between two trees. The fire was up over her head when I saw her. Her dress was falling off. I got a bucket of water and went to her and put the fire out. I was in my house door when I saw her. Everything was burnt off but a woolen underskirt. Her body was badly burnt. She had a spoon in her hand when I saw her. She said she was getting peas from a pot when she caught fire. Carrie Burton got to her Bessie. After I had put out the fire Vina Lindsay was standing in the road but no one else was with me when I put out the fire. I did not help to bring Bessie in the house. I had no more to do with her.   Mary Cook                                                                                                 

Narciss Williams being duly sworn says: I did not see Bessie until after she was burnt. I was in my house ironing and Sallie King came along and told Carrie Burton that Bessie Burton was burning up. I ran out and looked but saw nothing. The alarm kept up and I came to the gate and Mary Cook told Carrie (that) Bessie was burnt up. Carrie Burton was in my house when I heard the alarm. I ran to Bessie but her mother was there first. I helped to take the clothes off Bessie after she was brought to the house. She had a spoon lightly in her hand.  Narciss (X) Williams

I hereby certify that I have carefully examined the body of Bessie Burton and that she came to her death from the effects of a burn.                February 10th 1893,            J.M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 27 February 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at Mr. Cleland's Place in Newberry County on the 27th day of February 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the dead body of Hattie Mangum of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: Mr. Cleland, Allen Waldrop, Griffin Gary, Pierce Butler, Caleb Mangum, Laz Senn, W. G. Houseal, Dock Mangum, J. L. Harp, William Davenport, Sam Austin, Abner Magnum, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Hattie Mangum came to her death upon their oaths do say that Hattie Mangum came to her death from accidental burning on Mr. Cleland's Place on February 26, 1893. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.     

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

Mr. Cleland (Foreman), Allen Waldrop, Griffin Gary, Pierce Butler, Caleb Mangum, Laz Senn, W. G. Houseal, Dock Mangum, J. L. Harp, William Davenport, Sam Austin, Abner Magnum          

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Ford Mangum being sworn says: I am a brother of Hattie Mangum who was burnt on Mr. Cleland's Place. February 23, 1893 in Newberry County SC. I and Hattie and Nancy and the baby were at home yesterday. Mother and father left in the afternoon to go to the Mangum's. They went directly after dinner. Hattie was sitting in the corner of the fireplace and fire popped out on her dress. Her dress caught on fire and she ran out the door in the garden. The grass in the garden brought on fire. I ran out and tried to outen the fire but could not. She died yesterday directly after the fire was put out before sundown. I got both hands burnt trying to put out the fire.            Ford (X) Mangum                                                                                                

   J. H. Dorrah being sworn says: I was at Mr. Cleland's and heard Ford Mangum hollering. I and Mr. Cleland and Mack Satterwhite came up to Press Mangum. We found Hattie Mangum lying in the garden burning. I pulled her out of the fire among the burning grass. Only a little of its clothes remained - a little around the neck and shoes on. A little around her body but it pulled off when I pulled the child out of the grass. She died in a few minutes after being pulled out. She was a small child about three years old.   J. H. Dorrah                                                                       

W. G. Houseal being duly sworn says: I examined the dead body of Hattie Mangum February 27, 1893. Her death was caused by a severe burn.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 8 March 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at Silverstreet in Newberry County on the 8th day of March 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the dead body of Mary Lilla Glenn of Silverstreet then and there being dead by the oaths of: Thomas J. Maffett, Minor P. Harrington, Willie Spearman, W. R. Grogan, J. B. Stewart, P. B. Butler, L. B. Boozer, Gilliam Floyd, Charles Benson, Lewis Mack, Henry Rhodes, Wess Samuels, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Mary Lilla Glenn came to her death upon their oaths do say that Mary Lilla Glenn in manner and form aforesaid came to her death by misfortune or accidentally resulting from burns on the upper parts of the body and arms.  In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.            F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

Thomas J. Maffett (Foreman), Minor P. Harrington, Willie Spearman, W. R. Grogan, J. B. Stewart, P. B. Butler, L. B. (X) Boozer, Gilliam (X) Floyd, Charles (X) Benson, Lewis (X) Mack, Henry (X) Rhodes, Wess (X) Samuels

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Charles Benson being sworn says: I was passing the house at 9:30 or 10 am. Heard the child crying. Came in and found her in rags on fire. Pulled off her clothes and put out the fire. Then wrapped up the child left it while he went to Church its mother and father whom he sent to it.       
Charles (X) Benson

   John C. Glenn being duly sworn says when he reached the house the child was in another girl's arms and was wrapped in a quilt. He immediately left the house to go for a doctor. Called Dr. W. D. Senn who came to the child twice and dresses its burns and left directions for treatment. Child died before the doctor's second visit. (Carried over through mistake) - Child was 3 ½ years old and died on Wednesday morning about 10 am.  John C. Glenn                                                                             

James H. McIntosh MD being duly sworn says that he is a practicing physician. That he viewed the body of Lilla Mary Glenn and finds there extensive burns of the third degree covering the whole front of the chest, the flex or surface of both arms and forearms, the neck and face and about one half of the surface of the posterior surface of the thorax being quite sufficient injuries to have caused death and that he believes the said mary Lilla Glenn to have come to her death from the said burns and from no other cause.  James H. McIntosh MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 8 March 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at the residence of Mr. G. P. Bedenbaugh in Township No. 9 in Newberry County on the 8th day of March 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the dead body of Chesley Andrew Bedenbaugh of Township No. 9, Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: S. L. Fellers, Thomas B. Morris, B. F. Boozer, G. A. Minick, T. C. Lester, J. W. Thomas, M. Hawkins, John D. Boozer, Robert H. Gallman, Jerry Jackson, Luther L. Lever, J. H. McIntosh, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Chesley Andrew Bedenbaugh came to his death upon their oaths do say that Chesley Andrew Bedenbaugh in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by a deed? of Providence. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.    F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

S. L. Fellers (Foreman), Thomas B. Morris, B. F. Boozer, G. A. Minick, T. C. (X) Lester, J. W. (X) Thomas, M. Hawkins, John D. Boozer, Robert H. Gallman, Jerry (X) Jackson, Luther L. (X) Lever, J. H. McIntosh                                                                   

EVIDENCE                                                                              

G. P. Bedenbaugh being duly sworn says: The child was slightly fretful on Monday. Went to bed as well as would on Wednesday. Was alive and well at 2 am when it was given the nursing bottle. When next seen in the early morning was dead. Child was 4 months and 14 days old and was one of twins.  G. P. Bedenbaugh                                                                       

James H. McIntosh being duly sworn says: I am a practicing physician and that he has viewed the body and examined the remains of Chesley Andrew Bedenbaugh and that there are no marks indicating injury, nor any signs of violence on the said body and that he believes the said Chesley Andrew Bedenbaugh to have come to his death from perfectly natural causes. 

James H. McIntosh MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 22 March 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at M. L. Dickert's Place in Newberry County, No. 2 Township, the 22nd day of March 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the dead body of Ellen Coats of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: Antine Buzhardt, M. L. Dickert, H. M. Sligh, Levi Kibler, William Hogg, G. W. Montgomery, C. O. Buzhardt, D. P. Dobbins, T. W. Folk, Andrew Cromer, Jeff Ruff, Wally Keitt being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Ellen Coats came to her death upon their oaths do say that Ellen Coats came to her on T. J. McCrary's Place march 19, 1893 from a burn received accidentally on March 16th. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

Antine Buzhardt (Foreman), M. L. Dickert, H. M. Sligh, Levi Kibler, William (X) Hogg, G. W. (X) Montgomery, C. O. Buzhardt, D. P. Dobbins, T. W. Folk, Andrew (X) Cromer, Jeff (X) Ruff, Wally (X) Keitt

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Henry Coats being sworn says: I am the stepfather of Ellen Coat. She died Sunday morning at 5 o'clock on Mr. T. J. McCrary's place from the effects of a burn received on the previous Thursday morning, March 16th. I didn't see her burn. When I saw her first she was lying down in my house with her clothes burnt off. This was about an hour after she burnt. She was stripped off and greased. We did not send for a doctor for didn't think one was needed. We didn't think she was more than skin burnt. She was scarcely 100 yards from the house when burnt. I had told her to drag out some brush and burn off some broom sage. It was not more than one hour's work. I examined the burns as soon as I saw her. Ellen didn't ask for a doctor. She moaned and seemed to suffer and complained of her breath.   Henry (X) Coats                                                                        

   Willie Coats being sworn says: I am the brother of Ellen Coats. She and I together went to burn new ground last Thursday March 16. She was fighting fire and the wind blew the blaze to her back. I saw the fire after she caught. She hollered to me and said she was on fire and broke across the field running. She fell down and rolled. Ma run and met her and outened the fire with water on her. Ma carried her in the house when the fire was out. Ellen rolled on the floor when she got in the house. She cried some. Ma put a gown? On her and the burnt place was greased. I didn't hear her say anything about a doctor. Ma got her some salt.      Willie (X) Coats                    

W. G. Houseal MD being sworn says: I examined the dead body of Ellen Coats this day March 22, 1893. Her death was caused by a sever burn of the right side.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 29 March 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at Mrs. Mary Dobbins Place in Newberry County, the 29th day of March 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the body of Jesse Beasley of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: G. Z. Pitts, J. C. Reeder, Albert Jones, Joe Sligh, Hillery J. Ruff, W. G. Houseal, E. P. Matthews, W. S. Dobbins, Cyrus Ruff, M. E. Clark, Mose Thompson, Jasper Jones being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Jesse Beasley came to his death upon their oaths do say that Jesse Beasley in manner and form aforesaid came to his death from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.      F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

G. Z. Pitts, J. C. Reeder, Albert (X) Jones, Joe (X) Sligh, Hillery J. (X) Ruff, W. G. Houseal, E. P. Matthews, W. S. Dobbins, Cyrus (X) Ruff, M. E. (X) Clark, Mose (X) Thompson, Jasper (X) Jones                                                                  

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Press Senn being sworn says: Jesse Beasley lived on the place of Mrs. Mary Dobbins. He died today march 29th at 12 o'clock. He was not sick so far as I know until yesterday evening. We were down in the holler just below the stables yesterday evening rolling out logs. I told him to go into the field and get the axe and I would cut the log up. When he started out he commenced staggering and said he was drunk. He fell and we picked him up and brought him to the house. He never spoke after we brought him to the house. His left hand was clenched. His left leg was stiff and drawn.  Press Senn

   Edmond Clark being sworn says: I was with Jesse Beasley in the holler yesterday when he took sick. Press Senn told him to go after the axe. When he started he fell. He said he was cramped in his leg and arm and was drunk. We told him to come to the end of the field where we threw the log. He said, "I can't come". Press Senn went to him and helped him up. We had to carry him out to the log and set him down. He said his head hurt him. He never spoke anymore. We brought him to the house. He died today. We had no doctor. Press Senn went after Dr. Senn but Dr. Senn said he could not come.  Edmond (X) Clark                                                                  

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I examined the dead body of Jesse Beasley this day March 29. There are no external marks of violence. His death was from natural causes. In my opinion of cerebral apoplexy.   W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 7 April 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at Jalapa, Dr. Clark's Place in Newberry County, the 7th day of April 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the body of Isabella Sligh of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: Moses Thompson, Cross Boyd, William Chalmers, F. W. Sligh, Berry Conner, Warren Cannon, Thomas Gary, Henry K. Wilson, John Neal, Sim Neal, Henson Clark, James Hunter being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Isabella Sligh came to her death upon their oaths do say that Isabella Slighin manner and form aforesaid came to her death from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.        F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

Henry K. Wilson (Foreman, F. W. Sligh, Moses Thompson, Berry Conner, Thomas Gary, Henson Clark, Sim Neal, Cross Boyd, William Chalmers, Warren Cannon, John Neal, James Hunter                                                                  

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Berry Conner being sworn says: Isabella Conner and I lived on Mr. William Wright's Place. I knew Isabella Sligh. She has not been in good health this year. She was confined to her bed and house all the time. She was swollen in her feet and bowels all the time. She did not have a doctor with her over here. She had shortness of breath and could scarcely walk or talk. She died yesterday evening. I did not see her die.  Berry (X) Conner                                                 

   Warren Cannon being duly sworn says: I knew Isabella Sligh. She lived on Mr. William Wright's place. She had not been in good health this year. She complained with her bowels and legs and feet being swollen. She died yesterday evening.              Warren (X) Cannon                                            

   Lottie Glymph being duly sworn says: I knew Isabella Sligh. She had not been in good health this year. She complained of her bowels, legs and feet being swollen. I stayed with her nearly all day yesterday. She died yesterday evening. She has had an abscess of the breast but it was well. She suffered of shortness of breath and could scarcely talk.     Lottie (X) Glymph                                               

I hereby certify that Isabella Glymph came to her death from natural causes.       

J.M. Kibler MD, Newberry County SC, April 7, 1893

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 9 April 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry Court House in Newberry County, the 9th day of April 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the body of James Cannon of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: S. H. Chappell, W. G. Teague, Dewitt Johnson, Robert Johnson, Burr Boozer, William Paysinger, Thomas Turner, C. W. Montgomery, Henry King, William Satterwhite, Neil Stephens, George Pressley being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said James Cannon came to his death upon their oaths do say that he came to his death from heart failure. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.     F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

S. H. Chappell (Foreman), W. G. Teague, Dewitt Johnson, Robert Johnson, Burr Boozer, William Paysinger, Thomas (X) Turner, C. W. Montgomery, Henry King, William (X) Satterwhite, Neil (X) Stephens, George Pressley

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Diley Cannon being duly sworn says: I am James Cannon's daughter. I saw my father last at 8 o'clock last night. He was at home. He was not complaining. He ate supper at home. He was not at home all night. He left at 8 o'clock. I do not know where he went. He was accustomed to staying at home every night. He had been subject to attacks of swimming in the head and falling for eight or nine months. He always became unconscious in the attacks. He did not froth in the mouth. He would feel the spells coming and know it. He would feel sick awhile after the attacks but would go on with his work. He would breath fast as if out of breath. I saw him have three or four attacks last year and one this year.  Diley Cannon                                                                             

  Maggie Spearman being duly sworn says: I know James Cannon. Have known him all my life. I have heard of James having these spells. He had one in my house before but I was not at home. James came to my house this morning about sunrise. He knocked at the door and said he was going to the woods today and wanted to tell me something before he went. I opened the door and he came in and took a seat and began to talk. He was not drunk as I know he spoke of what few words he said all right. He was in my house about ten or fifteen minutes before he fell from the chair. He was here last night about ten o'clock and asked for a dose of quinine for his cough. I gave it to him and he took it. He came here a while after dark and left at ten o'clock. He was complaining of nothing but a cold and cough. I did not see him any more til this morning. When he fell out of the chair I got some water and bathed his face. He did not speak after he fell. He did not die immediately. No one but my two children was in here with me this morning. No one else was here last night either. He was coughing this morning but was not complaining otherwise.  Maggie (X) Spearman                                                                        

   Rachel Godberry being duly sworn says: I am James Cannon's daughter. I have been living with him this year. He ate his supper at home last night and left home about 8 o'clock. He has not been back since. He has not been in good health for three years. I have never seen him have one of those falling spells. He told me he had them. I did not hear him complain any last night. He did not say where he was going when he left home.   Rachel (X) Godberry                                     

This certifies that James Cannon came to his death from heart failure.   

J.M. Kibler MD, Newberry SC, April 9, 1893

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 24 April 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at Sweet Springs Church in Newberry County, the 24th day of April 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the body of Emma Rivers of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: Perry Caldwell, Henry Mitchell, Adolphus Worthy, Sim Edwards, Pierce Calmes, B. W. Caldwell, Howard Sligh, H. S. Scurry, Andrew Glenn, Belton Sherer, Hack Williams, Aleck Gilmore being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Emma Rivers came to her death upon their oaths do say that Emma Rivers came to her death on Lot Glenn's Place in Newberry County on the 21st April 1893 from being accidentally burnt on the 20th of April 1893. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.   F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

Perry Caldwell (Foreman), Henry (X) Mitchell, Adolphus (X) Worthy, Sim (X) Edwards, Pierce (X) Calmes, B. W. (X) Caldwell, Howard (X) Sligh, H. S. (X) Scurry, Andrew (X) Glenn, Belton (X) Sherer, Hack (X) Williams, Aleck (X) Gilmore

EVIDENCE                                              

Mary Cannon being sworn says: Emma Rivers lived in the house with me on Lot Glenn's Place. Emma was ten years old going on 11 years. Emma was burned on the 20th April. I put on my bread and told "Duly' (I called Emma 'Duly') to go to the spring and bring Aunty a bucket of water right quick and then go to the wash place and get trash to wash with next day. I then went in the garden to hoe some corn. About the time I got one row half done I heard her little brother say Aunty, is my sister going to die? I dropped my hoe and ran fast as I could and when I got to one corner of the chimney, she passed the corner of the house in a blaze. I hollered to her to run to me but she ran across the field. After she took across the field I tried to catch her. I didn't catch until she was rundown. When I caught her everything was burnt off except her dress collar and the seams on her shoulders and around the arm. They were in a blaze. I tore them off. She was burned from her head to her heels. I called Abner and Bettie Clark. They came and also Kil Gray. Kil Gray and Abner Clark carried her into the house. She was wrapped in a quilt and put to bed. She died 11 o'clock Friday 21st April. She was burned about 5 o'clock Thursday. A mush poultice was made and she was wrapped in it until we could send for a doctor or medicine. John Cannon went to Jacob for medicine but Emma died before he got back.  Mary (X) Cannon            

   Bettie Clark being sworn says: I heard Mary Cannon call me and I ran up to her house. When I got there I saw Emma Rivers, She was badly burned. All her cloths were burned off. She met me when I ran up. I saw her taken into the house and wrapped up and put to bed. Also saw her poulticed. I was present when she died. She died 11 o'clock Friday 21st. Bettie (X) Clark    

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I have this day April 21 AD 1893 examined the dead body of Emma Rivers. Her death was caused by a severe burn by fire.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 4 May 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry Court House in Newberry County, the 4th day of May 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the body of Mrs. Martha Wood of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: W. F. Ewart, J. W. Bouknight, W. R. Bedenbaugh, J. E. Prince, B. S. Morgan, G. W. Fellman, William Kibler, J. A. McDowell, J. W. Davis, J. R. Rivers, J. T. Mayer, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Mrs. Martha Wood came to her death upon their oaths do say that the deceased Mrs. Martha Wood came to her death from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.   F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

W. F. Ewart (Foreman), J. W. Bouknight, W. R. Bedenbaugh, J. E. Prince, B. S. Morgan, G. W. Fellman, William Kibler, J. A. McDowell, J. W. Davis, J. R. Rivers, J. T. Mayer                                            

EVIDENCE                                                                              

Joseph Wood being sworn says: I came home from work yesterday evening and found my wife on the floor and went to her and tried to awaken her but she did not speak. I sent right away for Dr. McCullough.  J. Wood                                                                               

This is to certify that I have examined the body of Mrs. J. Wood and find that she came to her death from heart trouble.   Newberry, SC   May 4, 1893          J. H. McCullough MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 26 May 1893

An inquisition indented and taken at Trinity Church in Newberry County, the 26th day of May AD 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the body of Mary Cooper of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of: R. M. Martin, John Martin, Robert Reagan, Willie M. Davenport, Thomas M. Bishop, Levi Britt, Henry Hendrix, W. P. Davenport, Wildon Longshore, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Mary Cooper came to her death upon their oaths do say that the deceased Mary Cooper came to her death on Thomas Smith's Place on May 23rd from an accidental burning by herself on May 20th 1893. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal, the day and year above mentioned.      F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County

Robert T. Reagan (Foreman), R. M. Martin, John Martin, Willie M. Davenport, Thomas M. Bishop, Levi Britt, Henry Hendrix, W. P. Davenport, Wildon Longshore, T. S. Davenport                 

EVIDENCE                                                              

Mrs. Lucretia Smith being sworn says: I live with Mrs. Fred Smith. Miss Mary Cooper was burned Saturday evening May 20. I went into the house Saturday afternoon and Miss Cooper was by herself. She said she wanted to smoke and asked me to hand her pipe. I did so. Then I picked up my bonnet and she asked, "Where are you going Mrs. Smith?" And I said I was going to sweep the yard. She had lighted her pipe when I left. I asked her if she wanted me to light her pipe and she said, "No, I have matches in my pocket". She could always light her pipe when she had matches. She was a great smoker and always carried her matches in her pocket. The back door was shut where I was sweeping the yard. She was sitting right inside the front door. I heard her little grandson and his mother and Miss Cooper hollering and I ran to the house as fast as I could. Her daughter and little son had put on a bucket of water. When I got in the house I went to the dining room and got two horse buckets of water. I took her by the arm and lifted her up and her daughter poured the water on and outened the fire. We carried her and put her on a bed. Her daughter asked her how she caught on fire. She said, "I never had got my pipe lit. I tried the match and took a 'swimming head' and let the match fall down on my clothes. Miss Cooper (was) 82 years old last March. She was very feeble and could not get about without help. We had to help her from one room to another. We dressed her and put her to bed. Dr. Senn was sent for at once. He came in less than an hour and attended her until her death Tuesday afternoon. My son, Mr. T. J. Smith - son in law of Miss Cooper - was not at home. He did not stay at home all the time. (He) lives at Cross Hill and comes home every two weeks. We sent for him Sunday morning.    Mrs. Lucretia (X) Smith                                                                                                                      

   Mrs. Smith recalled: Says both of Miss Cooper's legs were burnt, one nearly to the heel but the other burnt to the heel. Her right hand was severely burnt. Her thighs were burnt, one leg and one eyebrow were singed. She didn't complain much. Said her right hand hurt her the most. Dr. Senn gave morphine when he first got there. Dr. Senn had been called to see her in January. She had been strong since. Could not get anywhere without help and would often fall down if she tried to get up out of her chair. For the last three weeks she was subject to attacks of vertigo. The family relations was friendly and pleasant and all got on well together.  Mrs. Lucretia (X) Smith

   Elmina Mingo being sworn says: I live close to Mrs. Fred Smith with whom Miss Mary Cooper lived. On Saturday evening I heard Mrs. Smith's little boy call his mother. I saw Mrs. Smith break and run and I saw smoke. I was about 150 yards off. Mrs. Smith ran to the well. I ran down to see what was the matter. I saw old Miss Cooper on fire and ran in the house to help put out the fire. Nearly all of cloths were burnt off up to her waist. Her right hand was burnt. I helped dress her and put her to bed. She suffered a great deal. I was present immediately after she died. She died Tuesday afternoon. I helped dress her for burial.               Elmina (X) Mingo

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn say I certify that Miss Mary Cooper's death was caused by severe burn by fire. W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 2 June 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry C. H. in Newberry County the 2 day of June AD 1893 before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of said county upon view of the body of Becky Johnson then and there being dead by the oaths of Jno. Lindsay, A. L. Knighton, A. Taylor, Henry Lindsay, W. J. Miller, I. D. Shockley, Jno. W. Smith, J. S. Mathews, Sampson Taylor, Mark L. Gauntt, Alf Shell, Ivy Add, being a lawful jury of inquest to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Becky Johnson came to her death upon their oaths do say that Becky Johnson came to her death June the 2nd AD 1893 at Newberry C. H. SC from being struck by a bolt of lightning. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seal the day and year above mentioned.               F. M. Lindsay, Coroner Newberry County.

Irby D. Shockley (Foreman), J. A. Lindsay, A. L. Knighton, Amos Taylor, H. R. Lindsay, W. J. Miller, J. S. Mathews, Sampson Taylor, M. L. Gauntt, Alf Shell, Ivey Add, J. W. Smith

EVIDENCE

Maggie Johnson being sworn says: I live in the flat below jail in the 2nd house. I was sitting off from the door inside my house this afternoon when Becky Johnson came to my house and asked for a piece of soap. I told her I did not have a piece of soap or that I needed some myself. She said she only wanted a little piece of soap to wash her blue dress because it had faded. These were her last words. There was a loud flash of lightning and she fell. The house was full of smoke. I was shocked myself and am weak yet. After I got out of the door Mary Rikard exclaimed Lord ____ Margaret, Becky is dead. I looked back and saw her lying down. I then went up street and told the people and sent word to Chief of Police Bradley.              

Maggie (X) Johnson

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I certify that I examined the dead body of Becky Johnson this day June 2, 1893. Her death was caused by a bolt of lightning striking her body behind left ear and passing down spinal column.              W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 10 June 1893 

An inquisition indented taken at P. C. Smith's place in Newberry County the tenth day of June A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Laurens Pitts (colored child) then and there being dead by the oaths of Duck Cannon, Dave Gary, Jonas Gary, Boyce Rook, Spence Conner, Belton Rook, Dave Wyatt, Nelson Livingston, Anthony Pitts, Noah Griffin, Whit Andrews, Andrew Gray being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Laurens Pitts came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Laurens Pitts came to his death on the 10th day of June 1893 on Mr. P. C. Smith's place in Newberry County on account of concentrated lye having been given it the hands of its little sister Sula Pitts on June 9.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Spencer Cannon, Foreman, Duck (X) Cannon, Dave  (X) Gary, Jonas (X)  Gary, Boyce (X)  Rook, Belton  (X) Rook, Dave  (X) Wyatt, Nelson  (X) Livingston, Anthony (X)  Pitts, Noah  (X) Griffin, Whit  (X) Andrews, Andrew (X) Gray

EVIDENCE

Ella Pitts being sworn says: Laurens Pitts is my child. I was in the field hoeing cotton. Just before dinner Aunt Mary Leak came and called me. She told me to come to my boy. I came and as I got near to the house my little girl told me my baby was dying - to come quick. I came and picked it up. When I first saw it its lips were swelled and I thought its mouth was mashed. When I picked it up I smelled lye upon it and its clothes were slick with concentrated lye. I asked my little girl who gave it the concentrated lye. She said she gave it to it. She said she didn't know why she gave it to the baby. My little girl is six years old. She said she poured it out in a plate and gave it to the baby. The lye was sitting on the water shelf behind the water bucket. My little girl got up on the table to get the lye. The lye was given to the baby yesterday and it died today June 10th before dinner. About 10 o'clock Dr. Smith was here to see my child last night. I gave it oil and lard. Lelia Owens came to the house about 9 o'clock to put on bread and go to Mr. William Smith's after milk. She said the baby throwed up one time when she came up. The little girl asked her to come see about the baby but she didn't have time and paid no attention to it.   Ella (X) Pitts

   Mary Leak being sworn says: When I was going to my house to get dinner yesterday June 9th I heard Henry Ella's little boy hollering. I thought it was mine. I went home. My little boy told me I ought to go and see Ella's baby. He said it was throwing up and blood was running out of its mouth. He said Henry was calling his mother because he thought the baby was dying. I came up and found the baby throwing up what it had eaten.  I raised its head up and wiped its mouth and went out and called Ella Pitts, its mother. When she came from the field I came with her. She took up the child and said, "Lord have mercy, my child had lye'. I said - how you know? She got the box and said, "Look here". She got the box off the shelf and said it had been sitting there all the year. I saw no plate with lye.  Mary (X)  Leak

   Lela Owens being sworn says: I came to our house to put on bread. The baby was in the cradle. It was about 10 o'clock. The baby was throwing up vituals. Sula, Ella's little girl, told me to come and see about the baby. I said I didn't have time and paid no attention to the baby. Thought it had eat a fly. When I came to the house there was nobody there but the children. I saw no plate with lye - didn't notice. When I came back to the house after going to Mr. William Smith's I found a plate on the table that had lye in it. The plate was covered up by the big dish pan. I didn't notice the plate when I made up dough for dinner. When I first came to the house I _Ella Pitts- went to the field to get her yesterday morning and left nobody but the children.  Lela  (X) Owens

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I have examined the dead child of Ella Pitts, Laurens Pitts. Its death was caused by swallowing concentrated lye.   W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberrym 5 July 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Sam Tribble's place in Newberry County the 5th day of July A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Lizza Pitts then and there being dead by the oaths of Sam Tribble, Alex Davis, Mack Thompson, Joe Randal, William Burton, Joseph Sheppard, Jake Clarke, James Nelson, Andrew Burton, Levi Ebo, Billy Wilson, Willis Burton being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Lizza Pitts came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Lizza Pitts came to her death on Sam Tribble's place in Newberry County on the July 4th 1893 from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F.  M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Sam  (X) Tribble Foreman, Alex (X) Davis. Mack (X) Thompson, Joe (X) Ranson, William (X) Burton, Joseph (X) Sheppard, Jacob (X) Clarke, James (X) Nelson, Andrew (X) Burton, Levi (X) Ebo, Billy (X) Wilson, Willis (X) Burton

EVIDENCE

Sallie Pitts being sworn says: I am the mother of the dead child Lizza Pitts. She was eleven months old. We live on the Sam Tribble place in Newberry County. I left home yesterday July 4 about 2 o'clock or a little after. She was well as far as I know. She had not been sick any time lately except she had 'the throat', but it was nearly well. When I left home I went to ''a burying' down at Workman's about 2 miles away. I came back home at dark and found my child dead. It was lying on the floor where it is now but I put the palate under it. We dressed it for burial. I saw no marks of violence upon except a little place on its nose. I don't know what caused its death. When I went away I left Lizzie with two little boys, my brother's children. They didn't live in my house but on the Tribble Place joining this. They were the only persons here when I left. I left it lying on the palate. The palate has been changed. I told the boys to keep it on the palate. When I got back they told me they had not taken it off the palate. The boys are named Foster Boozer and Arthur Boozer. They came to my house day before yesterday and have been here since. When I came back home only the two boys were there and the dead child. My house was as I left it. Her dress was over her face when I found her. It was a thin dress. The boys came with their father Monday night and he went to the 'sitting up'. I had left Lizzie with the two boys Arthur and Foster before by themselves. They were never ill with it in any way. I have not heard the boys threaten Lizzie. They have always taken good care. They could not tell me anything about how my child died. I got it to sleep before I left and covered its face. The face was covered when I came. The boys told me it had awaked up while I was gone. The boys said they had not handled it. They didn't say that they took my child and put in the bed.  Sallie (X) Pitts

   Annie Boozer sworn says: I am the mother of Foster and Arthur Boozer. Arthur is going on six years old. I don't know how old Foster is. I went to a 'burying' yesterday at Workman's. I came to Sallie Pitts house last night after I heard Lizzie was dead. Lizzie was dressed when I saw her. She had on one piece of clothing, a diaper. I saw no marks of violence on the child. I saw Lottie Pitts dress it.               Annie (X) Boozer

   Willis Pitts being sworn says: I am the father of Lizzie Pitts. On July 4th I went to 'a burying' at the Workman's. I left home before my wife. I came back home in the night. Soon in the night before 12 o'clock I heard before I got home that one of my children was dead. Somebody hollered it. I was surprised for it was not sick when I left home. When I left my wife the two boys Foster and Arthur Boozer and my two children. No one else was at my house when I left. W. J. Pitts

   Foster Boozer being sworn says: I was at my aunt's all day the day she went to the burying. Lizzie was lying on the palate all day. I didn't know Lizzie was dead when Aunt Sallie came home from the burying. She lay on the palate with a thin dress over her head. Nobody was here while aunt Sallie was gone.       Foster (X) Boozer

   Sam Boozer being sworn says: I am the father of Arthur and Foster Boozer and Foster will be 9 years old September 16. Arthur will be 6 years old the 22nd of next April. I know about how Lizzie Pitts came to her death on July 4th. I was at the burying on the Workman Place. I 'sat up' with the corpse the night before. I never knew my boys to do anything so mean as to hurt helpless children.  Sam Boozer

   Amanda Mingo being sworn says: I saw a child lying here playing on the floor yesterday evening July 4th. It was one quarter of an hour before sundown as far as I know. Nothing was the matter with her. She was alive and playing. I came to the front door and looked in. I saw two little boys. These two boys, Arthur and Foster Boozer are the boys. A child was lying on a quilt near where one is now. It had a little stick, playing. I just stepped to the front door and asked where is your Auntie. Foster Boozer said, 'Gone to the burying'. I asked what is the baby named and he said Minnie. He said the baby was in the room asleep. I went on my way. I went to Sam Tribble to see his wife and came up here to see Sallie. I don't know which one was on the quilt, Minnie or Lizzie.  Amanda (X) Mingo

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I have made a dissection and examined the dead body of Lizzie Pitts. I found no evidence of violence having been used upon her person. In my opinion her death was from natural causes.   W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 10 July 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Mrs. Sallie Wert's place in Newberry County the 10th day of July A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Palace Davenport of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of V. G. Longshore, Wilson Herbert, John Werts, Henry Robertson, John Robinson, Lewis Scott, Tom Sheppard, Will Herbert, Adam Nelson, Tom Werts, Dave Werber, Hamp Lake being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Palace Davenport came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Palace Davenport came to her death on Mrs. Sallie Wert's place in Newberry County on the July 9th 1893 from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

V. G. Longshore Foreman of the Jury, Wilson (X) Herbert, John  (X) Werts, Henry  (X) Robinson, Lewis (X) Scott, Tom  (X) Sheppard, Will  (X) Herbert, Adam  (X) Nelson, Tom  (X) Werts, Dave  (X) Werber, Hamp  (X) Lake

EVIDENCE

Palace Davenport being sworn says: I was in the bed asleep and my mother called me and told me to come there. I didn't get up right off after she called me. After awhile I heard her coughing. When I got up she was staggering about in the yard. She was coughing violently, straining like. I took her by the right shoulder and sat her down on the doorstep. I went up to Ella Harp's house to get her to stay with me until she got better. I was gone about five minutes and when I got back she was breathing her last. She was lying back on the doorstep with her head lying in the door. She had been having coughing spells for several years. She would spit up when coughing. I never noticed what she spat up. She hauled cotton Wednesday. I never heard her complain. She had a spell Wednesday but it didn't come on her good. Palace Davenport was my mother. She and brother Joseph Davenport and I lived together on Mrs. Sallie Wert's place in Newberry County. My mother took sick late Sunday evening July 9th 1893 after dark. She died shortly after dark. I had gone to bed and gone to sleep. She was sitting on the doorstep when I went to bed and was not complaining of being sick. My mother stayed at home all day yesterday. Ella Harp came back with me when I returned from her house. She stopped at the corner of the house. She didn't come up to where my mother was. I told her mother was foaming at the mouth and she went away. After she went back her husband came. She never had a doctor to treat her for the coughing spells. A doctor was to see her in April. She was sick in childbed.
 Palace (X) Davenport 

   Ella Harp being sworn says: Little Palace came to my house yesterday evening about good dusk and asked me to come down to her house and stay for her mother was having one of them coughing spells. I went but didn't go any further than the corner of the house. Little Palace said she was breathing her last and I turned around and went back home and got a light. When I got back I didn't go closer than the corner of the house. Abe Harp, my husband, took the light. I sat at the corner of the house. Old Palace told me she had coughing spells. I never saw her have them. She said nothing about them being bad.  Ella (X) Harp

   Abe Harp being sworn says: When I went to Palace Davenport's house last night I stopped at the corner of the house until the white people got down there. Then we all went up to Palace together. She was dead. White foam was coming from her mouth.         Abe (X) Harp

W. G. Houseal being sworn says:  I have examined the dead body of Palace Davenport. In my opinion her death was caused by congestion of the lungs and heart failure.           W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 22 July 1893

An inquisition indented taken at J. C. Lane's place in Newberry County the 22nd day of July A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Edy Caldwell (colored child) then and there being dead by the oaths of J. C. Lane, Spencer Rutherford, Elias Simms, Levi Kibler, Ervin Maffett, Thomas Folk, William Hogg, Bug Wood, Henry Gray, Jeff Ruff, John Harmon, Joe Adams being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Edy Caldwell came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Edy Caldwell came to her death on Mr. J. C. Lane's place from accidental burning on July 22nd 1893. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.   F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. C. Lane Foreman, Spencer (X) Rutherford, Elias (X) Simms, Levi (X) Kibler, I. H. Maffett, T. W. Folk, William (X)  Hogg, Bug (X) Wood, Henry (X) Gray, Jeff (X) Ruff, J. (X) Harmon, J. H. Adams

EVIDENCE

Alice Keitt being sworn says: I came down to Miss Lizzie Lane's after a smoothing iron. She did not have one so I went up to James Caldwell to get one and when I got there I found the child on fire and then I ran and told Joe Collins to come and outen it and then I went after the child's mother. The fire was all around it when I saw it. Did not try to put out the fire and was too scared. It was laying out in the porch. It was not crying. It was not making any fuss at all. I think it was dead. Do not know how it caught fire. Its mother said she was going up to Miss Lizzie Kibler's. Did not see any fire anywhere - only that which was burning the child. When I saw her mother she had not got to Mrs. Kibler's. She asked me if it was burned much. Did not see anyone at the house. She did not say how she thought it caught fire. Do not know where its father was. It looked like its feet burned first. Do not know how long after I left the child burning till someone else came. Do not know how old the child was. Its mother says she left fire in the yard but I don't know.  Alice Keitt

   Bettie Caldwell being sworn says: I do not know how it got burnt. I went up to Mrs. Kibler's after my dress. Before I got there Jane Gallman called me and told me my baby was dead. I told her no, there isn't anything the matter with it. She said it was burnt up. I asked her how she knew and she said Alice Keitt said it was burnt up. She said there wasn't anyone there but the child. When I got home I found it dead. I smoke but was not smoking when I left. I had my pipe in my pocket. Have not smoked any since this morning. The palate was made about 12 o'clock but did not make it myself. My nurse made it. The child had been lying on the palate about a half hour before I left. It was asleep when I left. I did not lay it down but my nurse did. I stopped at Mrs. Dickert's a few minutes but was not smoking but had my pipe in my hand.  I lit my pipe this morning with a coal of fire. My husband was at town. He went before 12 o'clock and I went direct from the house. It was about a quarter of an hour after I left till I heard it was on fire. I have no idea how my child caught (fire). I sent my nurse to the well but she did not come back to the house while I was there. I was gone when I heard it. I turned and ran all the way back. I am certain there was no fire about it except what was in the house and that was around the pot in the yard. I had the fire in the yard washing. I was not in the habit of washing in the yard. The reason I washed here today was because I did not have much to wash and had nearby water, enough at the house to wash with. She has been left alone before.  Bettie (X) Caldwell

   Joe Collins being sworn says:  When I was down to the well Alice Keitt came running and told me to come and outen the child. It was on fire when I got there. The chaps had a bucket of water. I poured it on the child and put it out. The child was not quite dead when I got there. There was fire in the house and yard. Wind was blowing right smart. All the clothes were pretty well burned off. I think the child could have caught from either place, house or yard. There was no wood around the pot. There was a little on the fire in the house. There was some fire under the house and I put it out. The palate was made of a quilt. It was mostly burned up. Do not know whether the fire under the house came from the palate or pot but do not think the fire under the house was enough to have set the palate on fire. I think it caught at the child's feet. When I poured the water on the child it moved a little.                 Joe (X) Collins

   William Hogg being sworn says:  I was at Mr. Lane's when I heard that the child was on fire. Alice Keitt told me. I came up to the house to see about it. I found it with fire all around it with nearly everything burned off. Uncle Joe Collins kicked off the old quilt that was burning in the piazza. I did not do anything to it. I did not see any fire anywhere else except in the house. Did not know there was any pot in the yard. I do not think it caught from the pot. I think its mother dropped fire from her pipe on the quilt before she left. Do not think the wind could have blown the fire from the pot onto the palate where the child was lying. I seen a little fire under the house but it came from the quilt. When I got there the child had been pulled off the palate but no water had been poured on it. Old Uncle Joe Collins poured water on it and outened it. There was enough palate left to be in a blaze. When I got there I think it was still alive for when the water was poured on it  - it made 2 or 3 efforts to catch its breath. The wind was blowing about like it is now, coming about west. This was about 3 or 4 o'clock. I think it must have been on fire about a half hour. It was just burned into a coal. I think the palate and clothing, which was on, was sufficient to keep up the fire enough to burn it just like it is. The quilt, which it was lying on, was folded about four times. It had a pillow under its head. I do not think the wind caused the burning. Unless it was a whirl wind - it might have done it.                  William (X) Hogg

   Carrie Caldwell being sworn says: I did not see the child get burned. Do not know how it got on fire. Alice Keitt told me later it was on fire. I was at Aunt Sallie's house when she told me. I went home when she told me. When I got there she was almost burned up and I rolled her off the palate and Joe Collins poured some water on her. I was not at home when Bettie left. I did not see any smoke around the pot. She was not smoking when I left. Bettie had sent me to the well for water before she left home. Drayton Gist was at the well when I got there. He and I went off together. He had a bucket too. Both of us went after water. I built the fire under the pot and put pinewood on the fire. The pot did not boil. I put the child on the palate. It was asleep. I had not been at the well long. I did not see Bettie go off. Did not hear her call me. She was starching when I left. I was not smoking while starching. I was the first one saw it after Alice Keitt. The quilt had been on the piazza all day. I did not make the palate but it did not stay out all night, but do not know who put it there. I got the fire out of the house to make a fire around the pot. The quilt was out there then. The baby had not been out in the piazza till Bettie went off.          

Carrie (X) Caldwell

J. H. McCullough being sworn says:  This is to certify that I have examined the body of Edy Caldwell and find that she came to her death from a burn inflicted on her chest, abdomen, legs and arms.                     J. H. McCullough MD   Newberry County SC July 22, 1893

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 29 July 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Y. Y. Thompson's place in Newberry County the 29th day of July A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Fed Bailey then and there being dead by the oaths of J. S. Ruff, John Spence, Sim Price, Charles Rutherford, Stephen Charles, Jacob Glenn, J. Y. Thompson, W. C. Bowles, Preston Brooks, Fred Morgan, Butler Rutherford, Willie Ruff being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Fed Bailey came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Fed Bailey came to his death from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

John S. Ruff Foreman, J. C. Spence, S. J. D. Price, Charlie (X) Rutherford, Stephen (X) Charles, Jacob (X) Glenn, J. Y. Thompson, W. C. Bowles, P. L. Brooks, Fred (X) Morgan, Butler (X) Rutherford, Willie (X) Ruff

EVIDENCE

Joseph Pinney being sworn says: About 12 o'clock at night Fed Bailey was bad off but seemed to change for the better. Saw him then again about one hour before day. Was sitting up but said he felt bad but well enough for his uncle to go home. Saw him again at daybreak and found him half lying in bed with feet on the floor in a moist sweat - but on shaking him failed to arouse and answer. Was still warm at this time. Quit work four weeks ago but has been lingering for three months. Has had a cough and cold during this three months. Was doing as well as usual yesterday up to 12 o'clock. Bowels began running off about 4 in the afternoon every 2 or 3 minutes. Feet has swollen about 8 days. Hands and feet have swelled since last Friday July 21, 1893.            Joseph (X) Pinney

James H. McIntosh being sworn says: I have viewed the body of Fed Bailey and apparently he came to his death from natural causes due to some long constitutional disease and from conversation with his relatives and friends and also with Dr. Brown. I believe this to have been consumption. There is no evidence of any foul play- his death being due to the above natural causes, consumption.  J. H. McIntosh MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 16 October 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in Newberry County the 16th day of October A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Thomas Williams then and there being dead by the oaths of M. J. Scott, W. P. Bedenbaugh, Will Kibler, Will Watts, Patts Miller, Will Eddy, Frank Wearn, Buck Glascow, K. L. Kibler, Robert Smith, John Aldrich, B. B. Davis being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Thomas Williams came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Thomas Williams came to his death in Newberry SC on the October 15th from a pistol shot wound received Saturday night on October 124th on P.N. Livingston's place in Newberry County. Pistol fired by the hand of Reuben Glenn. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

M. J. Scott Foreman of Jury, W. P. Bedenbaugh, William Kibler, J. W. Watts, J. G. Miller, W. H. Eddy, G. F. Wearn, J. B. Glascow, R. L. Kibler, R. G. Smith, J. P. Aldrich, B. B. Davis

EVIDENCE

Illinoise Spearman being sworn says: On Saturday night October 14th I was at the frolic on P. N. Livingston's place. Reuben Glenn was betting on Jess Jones' chucks. Reuben won a dollar from Jess and Jess would not give it to him. Reuben told him he could not shake  (Roll the dice?) anymore. Jess got up and hit Reuben with a little stick. Jess ran and Reuben shot at him twice. Tom Williams ran out of the door, the front door and said, "Reuben, don't start any fuss here", and then went walking up to him. Reuben said, "Get back, don't walk up on me or I will shoot you". Tom said, "No, I don't believe you will shoot me" and went walking on up to him.  Reuben cocked his pistol and pointed it at him. Tom knocked his pistol around on his left side and when he knocked it around he broke and ran. Reuben snapped his pistol and it did not fire. Tom turned to go in the door. He was shot in the left side. Reuben was forty feet about from Tom when he fired the fatal shot. Reuben walked on down the road and shot twice more towards the creek. One of the fellows told Reuben to shoot Tom but I don't know who it was. I would know him if I would see him. After Tom was shot he went into the house and laid down. He said he was shot by the boy and didn't (believe?) that he would get over it. He asked for a doctor. When Reuben shot the last time he went down the road towards the creek. I am no kin to any of the parties. I was not engaged in the game. Tom Williams had no pistol - nothing but a stick. Tom Williams gave the supper and said he did not want it broke up.  Illinoise (X) Spearman

Reuben Glenn's pistol was a Smith & Wesson. Tom Williams died Sunday night at 12 o'clock.

   Frank Lindsay being sworn says: I was at the frolic Saturday night on P. N. Livingston's place in Newberry County SC. Tom Williams and Ike Glenn gave the supper. The difficulty was after supper about 10 or 11 o'clock. When the fuss began I was in the crowds and when a pistol fired I ran down through the pines and when I got back everything was over. I heard no threat before the pistol was fired. Tom Williams was hauled into town Saturday night about 3 am in a wagon. I live on the P. N. Livingston place near the scene of the difficulty.   Frank (X) Lindsay

   Dave Johnson being sworn says: I was in the house at the supper when the fuss began. When I found out that man Tom Williams was shot he was down on the floor hollering 'Oh Lord'. I don't know who did the shooting. I came out the house and (went) home.         Dave (X) Johnson

   Reid Lark being sworn says: Saturday night I was at the frolic at the house on P. N. Livingston's place. I don't know anything about the first starting of the fuss. I was in the house where dancing was going on. When I stepped outside the door I saw people running and heard somebody say 'Shoot him'. Then I heard a pistol fire. I went on back in the house. I didn't go when the fuss was going on. I don't know who shot the pistol. I heard two pistol shots. Tom Williams ran into the house and said, "Oh Lord, I am shot", and fell in the door. I heard Tom Williams say that Reuben Glenn shot him.  Reid (X) Lark

   Jesse Jones being sworn says: I was at the frolic at P.N. Livingston's place Saturday night. The fuss began between me and Reuben Glenn. I owed Reuben a dollar. I had borrowed a dollar from him. We had been on bad terms for about two weeks and he seemed to be about half drunk and cursed me for a G_ D_ son of a b__. Told me if I didn't pay him he was going to wash my G_ D_ mouth. He said he came out there to kill a Negro anyhow and would just aslease (as easily?) kill me as anybody.  I told him he was not the best man there was in the world. That he had all the boys scared of (him). He did not win a dollar from me. We were not throwing dice out there. I did not have a dice cup. Some of the boys had dice but I did not see anybody shaking dice not did I shake any. I did not pick up any money of Reuben's. He pulled his pistol out and raised it up. I hit him with a little walking stick not big enough to kill him. I hit him to keep him from shooting me. When I hit him I ran out and he shot at me twice.  He didn't hit me. This is all I know. I don't know who shot Tom Williams. I heard a pistol shot when I was about a quarter of a mile away off.  Jesse Jones

   Elliot James being sworn says:  I was at the frolic Saturday night. I was in the house and was beating straws for the fiddler where dancing was going on. Tom Williams was standing by the fire. I heard a pistol fire twice out of doors. I and Tom Williams and some others run out to see what was the matter. Tom asked Reuben Glenn what was the matter. I didn't hear Reuben's answer. I heard Tom Williams say to him, "We don't want to have any fuss out here tonight Reuben". Reuben then asked Tom was he a friend to him. Tom Williams said, "Yes, I am a friend to you. Now you be quiet. We don't want to have any fuss". About that time about 8 or 9 young men went walking up towards him. If they had any pistol I didn't know it. I thought they were for making peace and restoring quiet. Reuben Glenn said "Don't nobody come near me for I will shoot you". Tom Williams was nearer to him then than anyone else. Then Reuben said "You don't believe I will shoot you do you". Tom Williams said, "No, I don't believe you will do what you said". Then Reuben Glenn pointed his pistol at Tom Williams. Tom Williams then struck at him with a stick. Tom Williams struck him or the pistol. Reuben ran backwards and snapped his pistol twice. Two young men were standing behind Reuben Glenn. I don't know who they were. I heard someone say, "Shoot him. If your pistol don't fire I have one that will". I don't know who said that. I thought Reuben aimed to shoot somebody and I stepped about 10 steps to the left, NW. Then while I was making the move the pistol fired. It was more than half a minute after the pistol snapped twice until the pistol fired. It gave about ten or twelve men time to get into the house. Tom Williams was behind them all except me. I was standing at the NW corner of the house. I went into the house and heard the woman crying who was his wife and found out then that Tom Williams was shot. His wife pulled up his clothes and I saw the wound in his left side. I heard Tom Williams say Reuben Glenn shot him. After Reuben shot he went down the road towards the creek accompanied by several others whose names I don't know. A pistol fired a couple of times then.  I saw no dice that night nor any card playing. I saw Tom Williams have nothing but a small stick.  Elliot James

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I made a post mortem examination today October 16th of the body of Thomas Williams. His death was caused by a pistol shot wound entering the body on the left side three inches above the crest of his ileum in the axillary line. The ball gauged obliquely upwards piercing the __ colon and lodging in the liver.  W. G. Houseal MD

Tom Williams, colored, was fatally shot by Reuben Glenn, colored, page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer, 10/18/1893

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 16 October 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Thomas F. Harmon's place in Newberry County the 16th day of October A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Reuben E. Gauntt then and there being dead by the oaths of Charles S. Paysinger, George Spearman, John Kinard, Thomas Hamlin, John Havird, George Gruber, Lawson Babb, Lige Kinard, Sherman Coleman, Lige Robinson, J. Henry Caldwell, W. G. Houseal being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Reuben E. Gauntt came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Reuben E. Gauntt came to his death on Mr. Thomas Harmon's place in Newberry SC on the October 16th  1893 from natural causes. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Charles S. Paysinger Foreman of Jury, George (X) Spearman, John (X) Kinard, Thomas (X) Hamlin, John R. (X) Havird, George (X) Gruber, L. Babb, Lige (X) Kinard, Sherman (X) Coleman, Lige (X) Robinson, J. H. Caldwell, W. G. Houseal

EVIDENCE

Christina Ann Gauntt being sworn says: I am the wife of Reuben E. Gauntt. We live on Mr. Thomas F. Harmon's place in Newberry County SC. Reuben E. Gauntt died about 4 o'clock today Oct 16, 1893. He was picking cotton. I found him dead. He was on his knees and elbows with his face on the ground. I laid my hand on his heart but found it was not beating. I turned him over on his back as he is now lying. He had a spell last night and one today before dinner. When he had those spells his heart beat fast, not much pulse at his wrist and the blood would fly to his head and his face would turn black. I saw him picking cotton just after dinner about 3 o'clock.  Christina (X) Ann Gauntt

   Susan Kinard being sworn says: Mr. Reuben Gauntt was picking cotton today. I saw him picking cotton on the last row he picked. This was not long before his death. I heard his wife scream and came to see what was the matter. When I saw him he was lying just like he is now. I was picking cotton just up on the hill. I could see him picking cotton from where I was picking. Susan (X) Kinard

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I have made a postmortem examination of Reuben E. Gauntt. His death was caused by organic heart disease.  W. G. Houseal MD

Reuben E. Gauntt, 60 years old, died 10/16/1893. He lived 3 miles from town on the Lindsay Bridge Rd. on the Thomas F. Harmon Plantation.  He was a Yankee soldier who came to Newberry after the war. Newberry Observer

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 9 November 1893

An inquisition indented taken at C. W. Buford's place in Newberry County the 9th day of November A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Pleas Suber (colored) then and there being dead by the oaths of C. W. Buford, William Caldwell, Calvin Gilliam, Milton Saunders, Joe Smith, Will Buford, J. O. Bishop, Bill Miller, William Furguson, Newton Wilson, John Bonds, Andrew Horton being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Pleas Suber came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Pleas Suber came to his death by being accidentally run between a cog wheel and trundle head at Mr. C. W. Buford's gin on the 8th day of November 1893.  In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

C. W. Buford Foreman of the jury, W. L. Caldwell, Calvin (X) Gilliam, Milton (X) Saunders, Joe (X) Smith, W. L. (X) Buford, J. O. Bishop, Bill (X) Miller, William Furguson, Newton (X) Wilson, John (X) Bonds, Andrew (X) Horton.                                                               
EVIDENCE

William Douvard being sworn says: While I was at work at Mr. Buford's gin on November 8th Pleas Suber came to the gin and he was playing on the cog wheel. I told him to get down and leave. After I told him Howard Young told him to leave also. I heard him holler. I saw him fall from the wheel. When he fell I turned my back and called Andrew Horton who was 'fading' the gin.  William (X) Douvard

   Howard Young being sworn says: I and Pleas Suber were sitting on the cogwheel. I did not see the wheel catch him. I heard him holler. I saw him fall.  Howard (X) Young

J. P. Johnson being sworn says: Being a practicing physician (I) have carefully examined the dead body of Pleasant Suber and find that by accident has been run over by a horse plow passing between the cog wheel and trundle head, crushing his head and causing the brain to exude; both eyes to protrude from their sockets. Also passing over the right shoulder and arm causing a compound fracture of the same, which undoubtedly caused his death.  J. P. Peterson MD

Pleasant Suber, colored, 11 years old, got his head caught between a cogwheel and tunnel head of an old-fashioned horse powered gin. An inquest was held. Newberry Observer, 11/15/1893

 

 State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 15 November 1893

An inquisition indented taken at E. R. Hipp's place in Town of Newberry in Newberry County the 15th day of November A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Janie Samantha Hall (10 months old, colored) then and there being dead by the oaths of W. F. Ewart, J. L. Kenerly, Robert Hatton, Jeff West, J. A. Eddy, G. F. Smith, O. H. Duncan, J. A. Bouknight, W.A. McFall, B. B. Davis, A. M. Teague, Stout Noland being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Janie Samantha Hall came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Janie Samantha Hall came to her death from the  accidental administration of opium given probably without evil intentions.  In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

William F. Ewart Foreman of the jury, J. L. Kenerly, R. H. Hatton, J. H. West, J. A. Eddy, G. F. Smith, O. H. Duncan, J. M. Bouknight, W. A. McFall, B. B. Davis, A. M. Teague, G. S. Noland

EVIDENCE

Harriet Hall being sworn testifies that she left baby in bed at half past six in the morning. Child had awakened at this time and had gone back to sleep. Child had seemed well during the night and had nursed as usual. Left the child in bed and apparently well when she went to her work. Child had been a little sick during the previous week from cold but had taken no medicine since Saturday when she had given her some croup syrup oil. Left the child in care of her sister. Had had a bottle of laudanum in bed the night before and this was left in the bed in the morning with the child.  About 10 o'clock her sister came to her and told her the baby was dying and on getting home found the baby insensible and lying on a neighbor's lap. The laudanum bottle was under the mattress and as far as she can tell no laudanum was missing from the bottle. Bottle was stopped up.            Harriet Hall

   Lucy Gary being sworn testifies: Baby slept an hour after mother left. Then woke up. Cried a little. She took the child out of bed and put it on the floor and it vomited about a teacupful of watery stuff. She then picked it up and rocked it. It went back to sleep and never awakened afterwards. Gave the baby no food or medicine. When she put it in the cradle it grunted and stretched so that she became frightened and called in a woman who said it was dying. She had not left the house but had been with the baby all the time. Laudanum bottle was lying in bed with the baby but was stopped up.            Lucy (X) Gary

   Martha Jones being sworn says: Lucy Gary called her in about half past nine to the baby. Baby was groaning and appeared to be dreaming. Shook it well but could not wake it up. Told Lucy to go and call the mother at once. The child was perfectly limber when she picked it up. It opened its eyes a little but never 'roused' it at all.  Martha (X) Jones

   Emma Lewis being sworn says:  Martha Jones called her to come in and see the baby and see if she could tell what was the matter with it. Baby was in the cradle and was apparently deeply asleep. Could not arouse it. She picked and held it till Harriet Eddington came in and took it from her. Her baby was breathing deeply. Could smell no laudanum about the child.  Emma (X) Lewis       Harriet Eddington being sworn says: Martha Jones sent her here and found the baby in Emma Lewis lap. Took it but could not arouse it. Had it till its mother got here. Could find out nothing as to what was the matter with it.  Harriet (X) Eddington

J. H. McIntosh being sworn says: Dr. McIntosh Sr. first reached the child about half past ten o'clock and found the child deeply under opium. Could not arouse it at all. Dr. McIntosh Jr. reached her at half past eleven and at the time the baby was deeply under opium and was dying. Used all the usual remedies but the child never aroused and died at 6:10 pm from opium poisoning.  J. H. McIntosh MD

Harriet Hall, colored, lost a 10-month-old child to an overdose of laudanum. Newberry Observer, 11/15/1893

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 16 November 1893

An inquisition indented taken at the residence of J. S. Bedenbaugh near Prosperity in Newberry County the 16th day of November A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Pettus Benjamin Bedenbaugh then and there being dead by the oaths of Luther Fellers, Mack Dominick, John McCullough, George Cook, John Kinard, Pink Wicker, Monroe Wicker, Jeff Wicker, Ben Cook, Dan Cook, George Long, J. L. McCullough being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Pettus Benjamin Bedenbaugh came to his death upon their oaths do say that the death of the said Pettus Benjamin Bedenbaugh was caused by burns of accidental origin and that the said Pettus Benjamin Bedenbaugh in matter and form aforesaid came to his death by misfortune or accident. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County  

Luther Fellers Foreman of the jury, A. M. Dominick, J. D. McCullough, G. A. Cook, J. D. Kinard, H. P. Wicker, J. M. Wicker, S. J. Wicker, J. B. Cook, D. V. Cook, George A. Long, James L. McCullough             

EVIDENCE

John S. Bedenbaugh being sworn testifies: I am the father of Pettus Benjamin Bedenbaugh. I was in (my) lot doing my feeding when a Negro woman called to me to come to the house. On getting here I found the child at the dining room door with its clothes on fire. I caught it in my arms and put out the fire. Brought it into the house and put it to bed and went for Dr. Hunter. Child was conscious at this time but became unconscious after 9 o'clock and died about 6 am the next morning November 16, 1893. I was with the child previous to going to the lot and had only left it about ten minutes.  John S. Bedenbaugh

   Alice Jackson being sworn says: Was about 200 yards from the house gathering wood when looking up I saw Pettus Benjamin Bedenbaugh running up and down the back piazza with his clothes all on fire. Throwed down my wood and ran up through the cotton patch to the house and met Mr. Bedenbaugh who ran up the steps and picked up the child and tried to put out the fire. Then took the baby and ran for Mr. Bedenbaugh's mother who lives near.        Alice (X) Jackson

James H. McIntosh being duly sworn testifies: I have examined and viewed the body of Pettus Benjamin Bedenbaugh and find that he has on his  (body) burns of sufficient extent and depth to have caused death and that in my opinion his death was caused by his burns and nothing else. The burns cover more (than) one half of the body of the child.         James H. McIntosh MD

John S. Bedenbaugh's 3-year-old child died from burns obtained by playing too near the fireplace. Newberry Observer, 11/22/1893

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 17 November 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Helena in Newberry County the 17th day of November A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Nellie Bluford then and there being dead by the oaths of James F. Glenn, W. D. Diver, W. A. Pitts, L. W. Jones, R. H. Greneker Jr., R. H. Greneker Sr., Sim Counts, Jesse Wilson, Jim Scott, John Williams, George Gary, Richard Sligh being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Nellie Bluford came to her death upon their oaths do say that she came to her death from accidental burning. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

James F. Glenn Foreman of the jury, W. D. Diver, W. A. Pitts, L. W. Jones, R. H. Greneker Jr., R. H. Greneker Sr., Sim (X) Counts, Jesse  (X) Wilson, Jim  (X) Scott, John  (X) Williams, George  (X) Gary, Richard  (X) Sligh

EVIDENCE

Ella Bluford being duly sworn says: I am the mother of Nellie Bluford. There was no one with Nellie when she was burned. She was in my room in my mother's house alone. There was some fire in the fireplace when I left her. The first I knew of her burning was when I heard her hollering. When I heard her cry I came. She was sitting on the floor in front of the fire when I first saw her. The broom was lying by her and it was burning. Her clothes were nearly all burnt off when I saw her. I got a bucket of water and threw on her and put the fire out. I called Emmeline Counts to help me. I was pulling the burnt clothes off when Mrs. Counts came in. I then gave the child to her. I was not accustomed to leave the child alone in the room. I had been out a good while when I heard the child cry. I left the child in the hall. My cousin, Lilla Connor, was in the house when I left. Tiller had her baby with her.    Ella Bluford

   Emmeline Counts being duly sworn says: I was at home when the child caught fire. A little boy called me. When I got here Ella Bluford was taking the clothes off the child. I took the child from her and sat down and held it and put it in the bed. I did not do anything for it. I did not know what to do. Ella had poured water on it. The clothes were nearly all burnt. Ella had gotten them off when I got here.  Emmeline (X) Counts

This certifies that Nellie Bluford came to her death from the effects of a burn.  J. M. Kibler MD

Ella Bluford, colored, lost her 2-year-old child to burns obtained when the child was playing with a broom at the fireplace. Newberry Observer, 11/22/1893

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 22 November 1893

An inquisition indented taken at place of estate of Dr. D. W. Patton in Newberry County the 22nd day of November A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of an infant of Sallie Champion then and there being dead by the oaths of John L. McKittrick, M. W. Wheeler, N.P. Abrams, W. A. Workman, L. B. Harmon, C. W. Senn, J. M. Workman Jr., J. C. DeHart, W. F. Chappell, D. Holland, W. Wallingsee, J. R. Sligh being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said infant came to her death upon their oaths do say that the infant of Sallie Champion was born dead on Dr. D. W. Patton's place in Newberry County November 16, 1893. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County  

John L. McKittrick Foreman, M. W. Wheeler, N.P. Abrams, W. A. Workman, L. B. Harmon, C. W. Senn, J. M. Workman Jr., J. C. DeHart, W. F. Chappell, D. E. Holland, W. V. Wallingsee, J. R. Sligh     

EVIDENCE

Rhody Byrd being sworn says: Mr. Champion came after me on Thursday night November 16, 1893. He said Mrs. Jane, his wife, and Miss Sallie, his daughter, were very bad off. I told him I couldn't go. He said yes, you must. He offered me his mule to ride if I would go. I live about two miles from Mr. Champion's. He came for me about suppertime 7 o'clock. It was 8 o'clock when I got to Mr. Champion's. My old mother in law came with me. We walked. Her name is Louisa Byrd. He said Sallie was sick. She had lost her monthlies about 10 months and a little had just come and that was what was the matter with her. Said she had eaten a right heavy bite of turnips at dinner and that may have colicked her some. Sallie kept getting in and out of the bed. She would come to the fireplace and sit in the rocking chair. Her mother and father told her and kept telling her she would ruin herself forever if she didn't quit worrying herself. She began to holler for the mug (chamber pot). After having the chamber (Pot) she would do nothing but pass a little water. After awhile she said she wanted Dr. Smith. Her papa said that Dr. Smith could do no more than what she was doing. She kept calling for the doctor and her father went after him. I thought she was having a baby and went to assist her by holding her by the shoulders. Her mother kept after her to get up. Sallie said she couldn't get up. She called for some rags. Her mother got some and handed them to her. She wiped under her gown. Her hands were bloody when she took them out. All this time she was on the mug (Chamber pot). When I went to help her she was standing up against the bed. She soon called for the chamber and sat on it. When I raised her up from the mug she looked down and said, "What is that?" The cord was hanging from her. She had the chamber and the contents were covered with the rags she had. The baby didn't cry. I smelled the odor, like a newborn baby but heard no cry. I fixed her in the bed and Sallie began to tease me to carry out the mug. Finally she began to cry. Said she wanted the mug carried out before her father came. Mrs. Jane got a candle and I took the mug and set (it) behind the stove room door. Mrs. Jane held the candle close and I took off the rags one by one till I came to the baby. She said, "Aunt Rhody, what is that?" I said, "A baby". She said Lord have mercy upon me -what shall I do - I have lost all of my character and principal and nobody will have anything to do with me. When Mrs. Jane got most back to the middle door she said, "Aunt Rhody, that child denied that thing to me about 5 minutes before Mr. Champion went after you. I think Dr. Smith came about 12 o'clock. The clock had struck 11 before the child was born. I saw her before the child was born and thought she was pregnant. It was common talk that she was pregnant. Dr. Smith said the time was faster than his.  Rhody (X) Byrd

   D. Champion being sworn says: I am the father of Sallie Champion. She denied being pregnant all the time. I think she was made to do it by J. D. Amick. Last Thursday evening before sundown when I came to the house Sally was complaining and said she had the colic. About dark I went after Rhody Byrd. When I came back she was complaining so she said she wanted me to go after Dr. Smith. I went after him. I thought she was pretty bad off. I asked the doctor after we had got a little piece from his house to ride on fast as I was riding a mule and he could get home before I could. Dr. said he got to my house 25 minutes before me. When we got there they said the child was born. Dr. Smith was the first to tell me about it. The rest told me about it afterwards. I didn't know what was the matter with Sallie when I went after Rhody Byrd. J. D. Amick was at my house a day or two before the child was born. I don't think my wife knew that Sallie was pregnant. When I came Rhody or the doctor or both told me the baby was at the storehouse door with a tub turned over it.   D. (X) Champion

   Doctor Van Smith being sworn says:  Mr. Champion came to my house last Wednesday or Thursday night between 10 and 11 o'clock. I got to his house at 12 o'clock. Said he had a very sick child. He wanted me to come and see. Said she was suffering with something like colic. I came on ahead of Mr. Champion and reached his house first about one half hour before him. I found Miss Sallie in bed and asked what was the matter. Mrs. Champion said, "Ask Rhody, she knows better than I do". I asked Rhody. She said, "I don't know. She is just sick". Rhody went into the piazza. I followed and asked what is the matter here. Where is that baby. She said in a whisper, "It is out yonder in the yard, but they don't want anybody to know it." I told her I must see it. She led the way and I examined it. I found it in a chamber - dead. I told them it must be taken out and washed and dressed which was done. When I first went in and asked Sallie what was the matter she said her back hurt. I asked to examine her. She objected. She asked me to give her something to make her rest. I refused and insisted on an examination to which she finally consented. When I made an examination I delivered her of an afterbirth (placenta). When I left she asked me not to say anything about it. I made no reply except to ask her whose child that was. She said, "It is not the one you think it is". I asked whose I thought it was. She refused to say whose it was. She said it was not J. D. Amick. I found the child in the chamber with its head underneath - the umbilical cord was lying loosely on top of the child. My opinion is the child was born that way in the chamber. It certainly could not have lived with its head in fluid as I found it. The chamber was full of bloody fluid. The child being in it. The whole child was in it doubled in the chamber a small portion of the thigh was out of the fluid but very small. It was my opinion that the child had never breathed. I think that it was a fully developed child. My opinion is the child could have been born in the chamber and in the position I found it - very easily. My reason for saying it had not breathed is - its mouth was filled with mucus and not the fluid of the chamber.  Van Smith

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I examined an infant of Sallie Champion and made a dissection. I found the lungs non-inflated and stomach empty. It had never breathed.         

W.G. Houseal MD  

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 27 November 1893

An inquisition indented taken at G. Burt Reagin's place in Newberry County the 27th day of November A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of G. Burt Reagin then and there being dead by the oaths of John R. Spearman, E. M. Evans, L. F. Hendrix, Albert Schroder, W. H. Long, D. Pink Bouknight, E. H. Longshore, John W. Davenport, F.S. Paysinger, John S. Hutchison, L. C. Longshore being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said G. Burt Reagin came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said G. Burt Reagin came to his death by his own hand during an attack of mental aberration at his place in Newberry County on Nov 27, 1893.  In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

J. R. Spearman Foreman, E. M. Evans, L. F. Hendrix, Albert Schroder, W. H. Long, D. P.  Bouknight, Levy F. Longshore, John W. Davenport, F. S. Paysinger, J. S. Hutchison, E. H. Longshore, L. C. Longshore

EVIDENCE

Mattie Piester being sworn says: I live on Mr. Burt Reagin's place. I saw Mr. Burt Reagin coming through the cow lot this morning November 27, 1893 when I was straining milk. It was before sun up. Mrs. Janie asked me if I saw him. I told her I saw him go behind the smoke house. After I brought the milk in the house I went home. Mrs. Janie called me. I and Joe Piester came to the house. We met Mrs. Janie Reagin between the house and well. She said she believed Mr. Reagin was dead as he had cut his throat. I and Mrs. Reagin and Mars Reagin then went and looked at Mr. Reagin's body. Mr. Reagin was dead. I was so struck that I don't know the position of the body.              Mattie (X) Piester

   Mrs. Janie Reagin being sworn says:  I am Mr. G. B. Reagin's wife. I saw Mr. Reagin last this morning sitting by the fire. When I went to get breakfast I rang the breakfast bell and he didn't come and I rang again and he didn't come. I went to the lot and he was not there. Marcee found him by the meat house dead. Mr. Reagin went out on the back porch yesterday. Came in with a wine glass. I asked him what he had been taking. He said he had a glass half full of Laudanum and touched it to his lips but for the sake of me and Marcee he would not take it. I saw a razor case that was sent to the house. I would not know his razor or case if I would see it.  Janie Reagin

   L.F. Longshore being sworn says: I and Mr. Fred Long and one or two others more found Mr. G. B. Reagin dead body by his meat house this morning, November 27, 1893. His throat was cut. I searched his pockets and out of his right hand pocket I got a razor case, pocketknife, pocket book. A razor was lying three feet from him open with blood on it.  Levi F. Longshore

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I examined the dead body of G. B. Reagin today November 27, 1893. His death was caused by an incised wound of the neck made by some sharp instrument. Two cuts were made and the windpipe and jugular veins were severed.  W. G. Houseal MD

Reagin, G. B. married to Janie Counts, both of Newberry on 12/1878 by Rev. J. A. Sligh. Newberry Herald 12/25/1878

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 4 December 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Spence's place in Newberry County the 4th day of December A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Rosella Bouknight (colored) then and there being dead by the oaths of W. W. Willingham, Luther S. Darby, Grant Porter, Sam Fair, Newton Darby, Nath Moseley, Luther Brown, Pink Porter, George Jackson, Green Davenport, Calvin Span, Lewis Hunter being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Rosella Bouknight came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Rosella Bouknight came to her death by accidental burning on December 4, 1893 on the Spence place in Newberry County.  In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

W. W. Willingham Foreman, Luther S. Darby, Grant Porter, Sam (X) Fair, Newton  (X) Darby, Nath  (X) Moseley, Luther  (X) Brown, Pink  (X) Porter, George (X) Jackson, Green  (X) Davenport, Calvin (X) Span, Lewis  (X) Hunter

EVIDENCE

James Bridges being sworn says: I live on Brown & Moseley's place half a mile from the Spence place. I had the wagon going after wood today December 4,1893. I saw a fire and knew it was Lee Bouknight's house. I stopped the wagon and unhitched the mules and passed Abram Hartie's and hollered fire! fire! I came on in a hurry. When I got to the house I found Lee's wife and baby in the cotton patch on fire about 25 yards off. I saw Lee Bouknight on fire. I pulled his vest off and threw it aside and outened the fire from him. About that time Charlotte Span and Charlotte Bouknight came up screaming. It was between 2 and 3 o'clock when I saw the house on fire and went up. I didn't see the child Rosella till the house was burnt down nor the other child. Lee said he had heated a rock and wrapped some old rags around it and put it at his wife's feet and the bedclothes caught on fire. He put the bed on the floor and tried to put it out but could not. He said he could not get the children out.  James (X) Bridges

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I examined the dead body of Rosella Bouknight. Her death was caused by being burned. Her body being burned to a crisp.                W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 4 December 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Spence's place in Newberry County the 4th day of December A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of the infant of Lee Bouknight (colored) then and there being dead by the oaths of W. W. Willingham, Luther S. Darby, Grant Porter, Sam Fair, Newton Darby, Nath Moseley, Luther Brown, Pink Porter, George Jackson, Green Davenport, Calvin Span, Lewis Hunter being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said infant of Lee Bouknight came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said infant of Lee Bouknight came to her death by accidental burning on December 4, 1893 on the Spence place in Newberry County.  In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

W. W. Willingham Foreman, Luther S. Darby, Grant Porter, Sam (X) Fair, Newton  (X) Darby, Nath  (X) Moseley, Luther  (X) Brown, Pink  (X) Porter, George (X) Jackson, Green  (X) Davenport, Calvin (X) Span, Lewis  (X) Hunter

EVIDENCE

James Bridges being sworn says: I live on Brown & Moseley's place half a mile from the Spence place. I had the wagon going after wood today December 4,1893. I saw a fire and knew it was Lee Bouknight's house. I stopped the wagon and unhitched the mules and passed Abram Hartie's and hollered fire! fire! I came on in a hurry. When I got to the house it was pretty well on fire all over. I found Lee's wife and baby in the cotton patch on fire about 30 yards from the house. I saw Lee Bouknight on fire. I pulled his vest off and threw it aside and outened the fire from him. About that time Charlotte Span and Charlotte Bouknight came up screaming. I didn't see the youngest child or Rosella till the house was burnt down. Lee said he had heated a rock and wrapped some old rags around it and put it at his wife's feet and the bed clothes caught on fire. He put the bed on the floor and tried to put it out but could not. He said he could not get the child or Rosella out.             James (X) Bridges

W. G. Houseal being sworn says: I examined the dead body of infant of Lee Bouknight. Its death was caused by being burned to a crisp.  W. G. Houseal MD

Lee Bouknight, colored, his dwelling on the old Spence Place, belonging to Alan Wyse, 6 miles from Newberry was burned to the ground and 2 of his children burned to death on 12/4/1893. His wife was sick in bed and he placed a hot rock at her feet, which set fire to the bed. He got his wife and baby out of the house but could not reach the other two children aged 6 years and 18 months. Newberry Observer, 12/6/1893

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 17 December 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Helena in Newberry County the 17th of December A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Jimmie Wright then and there being dead by the oaths of W. C. Lindsay, Alfred Stuckman, J. L. Clarke, Mack Jackson, J. W. Wilson, Burley Hunter, Elija Waller, Benson Cook, L. F. Finney, App Smith, John A. Wilson, Anthony Williams being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jimmie Wright came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Jimmie Wright came to his death from natural causes at Helena SC in Newberry County on December 17, 1893. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County
J. A. Wilson Foreman, W. C. (X) Lindsay, Alfred (X) Stuckman, J. L. (X) Clarke, Mack (X) Jackson, J. W. (X) Wilson, Burley (X) Hunter, Elija (X) Waller, Benson (X) Cook, L. F. (X) Finney, App (X) Smith, Anthony (X) Williams

EVIDENCE

Weston Wright being duly sworn says: I am the mother of Jimmie Wright. He was six months old. I put him on the backside of the bed last night when I went to bed and this morning when I got up he did not move. He (was) used to getting up every morning when I get up. I looked to see what was the matter with him and he was dead. I called my husband and woke him up and told him I believed our baby was dead. He got up and told his uncle it was dead. He examined it before he told him. The baby was lying with his face towards me. I don't know whether he was covered or not, it frightened me so. I noticed nothing peculiar about the baby. He just looked like he was asleep. He had not been sick no more than a bad cold. He had a cold two or three weeks. No doctor had been to see him. I don't know whether he had any fever or not. He was lively before we went to bed last night. I didn't suckle him through the night. I was accustomed to suckle him through the night. I was lying with my face towards him. We went to bed late and I didn't wake up. I fed him before I went to bed. Gave him meat and bread. The baby was not close to me at all. I was in the middle of the bed. My husband was in front of the bed. The baby was not between us. Baby was never sickly much, no more than a bad cold. Bowels acted well. I had given it no medicine.  Weston Wright

   Lewis Wright being duly sworn says: I am the uncle of Lewis Wright Jr., the father of the dead baby, Jimmie Wright. Jimmie Wright was found dead this morning December 17, 1893. Just about 3 o'clock or a little after I heard the child whining. I didn't get up to come to see what was the matter with the child. The mother commenced crying when she waked. It was about 5 or 6 o'clock. Her husband asked her what was the matter and she said, "I believe my baby is dead". Lewis Wright Jr. came to my room. I got up and came into the room where the dead child was. When the baby whined it whined about like always. It did not whine like it was cold or smothering. I caught hold of it when I came into the room and it was cold.   Lewis (X) Wright

W. G. Houseal being sworn says:  I have examined the dead child Jimmie Wright. I found no marks of violence. In my opinion he came to his death from natural causes.  W. G. Houseal MD

Lewis Wright, colored, his 6-month-old child died, having been sick with a cold for some time. Newberry Observer, 12/20/1893

Louis Wright, aged colored man, died last week in Helena. Newberry Observer 5/6/1896

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 18 December 1893

An inquisition indented taken at G. Z. Pitts Place in Newberry County the 18th day of December A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Harriet Ruff then and there being dead by the oaths of L.L. Reeder, J. L. Reeder, W. J. S. Dobbins, G. Z. Pitts, Mark Clark, Henry Clark, Edmund Clark, George Reeder, Jeff Williams, Pink Henderson, Abner Mangum, Ned Elisor being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Harriet Ruff came to her death upon their oaths do say that Harriet Ruff came to her death from natural causes December 18, 1893 on Mr. G. Z. Pitts Place in Newberry County. In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

W. S. Dobbins Foreman, L.L. Reeder, J. L. Reeder, G. Z. Pitts, Mark (X) Clark, Henry  (X) Clark, Edmund  (X) Clark, George  (X) Reeder, Jeff  (X) Williams, Pink  (X) Henderson, Abner  (X) Mangum, Ned  (X) Elisor

EVIDENCE

Harriet Ruff being sworn says: Harriet Ruff, the little dead child, was found dead this morning December 18, 1893 at four o'clock. I and its mother slept in bed together. The baby was lying between us. The baby was one week old today. Carrie Ruff, the child's mother, woke up at 4 o'clock this morning and raised up the child and said, "Aunt Harriet, my child is dead". We had been awake and talking before she looked at it. It cried last night in the first part of the night and she tried to nurse it. It was alive a little after 1 o'clock when she nursed it. It cried a great deal before it nursed. It cried that way every night. Did the same thing in the daytime. The child never looked right since it was born.  Harriet (X) Ruff

W. G. Houseal being sworn says:  I examined Harriet Ruff this day December 18th, 1893. I found no marks of violence. In my opinion she came to her death from natural causes.         

W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 26 December 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Mr. G. T. Reid's plantation in Township No. 7 Newberry County the 26th of December A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Henry Campbell (alias Common) colored of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of Z. F. Schumpert, Columbus Jones, T. B. Starns, Gilbert Brown, G. M. Steven, Elihu Coleman, W. H. Betts, Allen Boyd, T. M. Schumpert, Harrison Garner, John Robertson, Ransom Hailstock being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Henry Campbell, alias Common, came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Henry Campbell, alias Common, came to his death from a pistol shot wound in the head on Mr. G. T. Reid's plantation in No. 7 Township Newberry County on the 25th day of December 1893 by the hand of James, alias, Dick, Watts and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Henry Campbell alias Common in manner and form aforesaid James alias Dick Watts then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid. In witness whereof  I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County

Z. F. Schumpert, Columbus Jones, T. B. Starns, Gilbert Brown, G. M. Steven, Elihu Coleman, W. H. Betts, Allen Boyd, T. M. Schumpert, Harrison Garner, John Robertson, Ransom Hailstock

EVIDENCE

Robert Coleman being sworn says: James (alias Dick) Watts was shaking dice and Henry Campbell (alias Common) was betting. Henry held a bill of money in his hand. Dick or James Watts claimed he owed him four dollars but Henry said it was only three dollars. Henry then took the money from the board in his hand and put it in his pocket. Dick says, "Henry, pay me my money." Henry said, "You squabbled. I won't pay you." Dick says, "I'll have my money or die and go to hell". Dick then jerked out his knife. Some of the boys said don't have no fuss. Then Henry picked up two rocks. Then Dick pulled out his pistol and ran back a few steps and fired. Then Henry - who was standing just jumped into the air and fell. Then Dick said, "God damn you", and cut through the woods. Henry never moved or spoke after the shot was fired. As Henry picked up the rocks he said, "I got no knife nor no pistol. Dick, you got both your knife and your pistol. You can kill me but I won't pay you no money." Henry had stepped back when he picked up the rocks but was standing still facing Dick when the shot was fired. There were eight men and boys in the crowd.  Robert Coleman

   T. B. Burton being sworn deposed:  James (alias Dick) Watts was shaking dice. Henry Campbell (alias Common) was betting. He had a bill of money. I don't know the amount. Got to squabbling in the game. James (alias Dick) says, "Henry, I am four dollars in your money". Henry says, "You ain't but three". Henry picked the money up off the board and walked away just about three steps. James says, "Henry, I want my money." Henry walked off about 6 steps. James pulled out his knife. Henry picked up two rocks. James stepped back about 2 steps, jerked out his pistol and fired and broke and ran off a hundred yards and when came back to the yard I heard them say Henry was dead. I made no effort to interfere or stop the fight.           T. B. Burton

   George Farrow being sworn says:  James (alias Dick) Watts was running his 'chuck bank'. Henry Campbell (alias Common) was betting. Dick Watts said, Henry, I am four dollars in that bill." Henry Campbell says, "You ain't but three". Henry got up and put the bill in his pocket. Dick Watts says, "Henry, I want my money". Henry says, "You get no money here because you squabbled in the game". Dick says, "I'll have my money or die and go to hell". Dick pulled out a knife. Henry stepped backward, about six steps and said, "Dick, you can kill me if you want to. I ain't got no knife nor pistol." Henry Campbell stooped down and picked up two rocks and as Henry straightened up Dick fired. I saw Henry fall. Dick did not have his pistol out until Henry picked up the rocks.            George (X) Farrow

   Thomas Lindsay being duly sworn says:  Dick Watts running his chuck bank. Henry was betting. Dick says, "Henry, I am four dollars in your bill." Henry says, "You ain't but three". Henry picked the money up and put it in his pocket. Dick says, "Henry, I want my money. Henry says, "Dick, you will not get it. You made a squabble in the game". Dick pulled out his knife. Henry stepped back about six steps and picked up rocks. Dick fired. Henry jumped right straight up and fell. Dick ran and me too.  Thomas (X) Lindsay

   Hamp Thomas being duly sworn says:  Dick Watts running dice bank. Henry had a piece of money on the board. He and Dick was betting. Dick claimed to have four dollars in money. Henry said, "You ain't but three". Henry picked up the money and put it in his pocket and Dick pulled his knife. Dick says, "Henry, I want my money and Henry walked off and picked up rocks and I ran.    Hamp (X) Thomas

Dr. J. H. McIntosh sworn testifies: I have examined the body of Henry Campbell and have performed an autopsy on the same. I find on the body no weapon of any kind but only some money amounting to six dollars and a half. The body has, with the exception of the gunshot wound to be afterwards described, no other marks of violence. In the middle line of the forehead about one and a half inches above the eyes is a wound of a pistol ball. The ball pierced the skin and the frontal bone and entered the brain in the upper portion of the frontal lobe; passed directly with the left lateral ventricle, traversing this and lodging in the posterior bone. I extracted the bullet and here exhibit it to you. The wound is amply sufficient to produce instant death and in my opinion Henry Campbell died instantly from the effects of this wound. The direction of the ball would show that both Henry Campbell and the man who shot him must have been standing almost on the same level and directly facing each other.  James H. McIntosh MD

Dick Watts, colored, shot and killed Henry Cannon, colored, 12/25/1893. Watts is a fugitive. Newberry Observer, 12/27/1893

James Watts, alias Dick Watts, COURT OF SESSION, murder, true bill. Newberry Observer, 3/21/1894

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 27 December 1893

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in Newberry County the 27th of December A.D. 1893 before F. M. Lindsay Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Henry Auton of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of G. A. Langford, Y. J. Setsler, W.F. Timmons, G. S. Timmons, M. L. Gauntt, William Bedenbaugh, James Bishop, J. W. Swindler, Calla McWhirter, U. J. Stuck, J. R. Maddox, J. R. Starling being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Henry Auton, came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Henry Auton, came to his death from a blow on the side of the head from some hard substance thrown by the hand of Henry Werts at Newberry Court House in Newberry County on the 26th day of December 1893 and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid H. N. Auton in manner and form aforesaid Henry Werts then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid. In witness whereof  I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. F. M. Lindsay, Coroner of Newberry County
G. A. Langford Foreman, J. T. Setsler, W. F. Timmons, G. S. Timmons, M. L. Gauntt, W. J. Bedenbaugh, J. M. Bishop, J. W. Swindler, C. McWhirter, U. J. Stuck, J. R. Maddox, G. R. Starling

EVIDENCE

W. H. M. Adams being sworn says:  I left Charles Tidwell's last night about 6 or 7 o'clock. I heard someone talking over about Mr. McGowan's front yard and saw Mr. Henry Auten standing against the fence and two or three others on the ground in a pile. I heard one say, "Let my finger go". The other say, "Get off of me". I walked up and Henry Auten pulled Henry Werts away and the two was on the ground together and got up. Mr. McGowan and Henry Werts went inside McGowan's yard and Henry Auten was trying to quiet them and then Werts or McGowan hit Auten on the nose and made it bleed. Auten then told them that if they would come out one at a time he would whip them both. Henry Werts then picked up a brick or rock - I don't know which - and threw it at Auten and struck him on the side of the head, the left I think. The lick could have been heard 25 - 30 yards and then Auten staggered across the street - I think three times - and then went in the direction of town - and Frank Smith asked that we go and see about him and we met him coming back and Auten said to us that he thought his skull was broke.              

W. H. W. Adams 

   F. M. Smith being sworn says:  Yesterday evening between 6 and 7 o'clock I was sitting at home by my fire and my wife said she would go over to Mr. McGowan's to supper and was gone 4 or 5 minutes and returned. She said Mr. McGowan was drunk and had run his wife out of the house and soon after I heard my little boy crying. I met him at the door and asked him what was the matter. He said he asked Miss Mattie Werts for an apple. He said Mr. McGowan shoved him from the dining room, out at the front door and slapped him. I went over to see Mr. McGowan to see what he did it for. He said he did not slap him or push him. I told him it was all right then if he did not slap him. Then I started back home. Mr. McGowan came as far as the gate with me and we stopped there to talk over the matter. He caught me by my coat and jerked me. I pushed him down. He got up and came back to me again. Henry Werts begged him to go in the house and behave himself and then grabbed me in the face with his hands and got his fingers in my mouth and said to Henry Werts to make him turn me loose. I then told him if he would go in the house I would turn him loose and he said he was not going in. Trying to get loose from him we fell on the sidewalk. Henry Auten then kicked McGowan twice in the face. I then turned McGowan loose. McGowan said to Auten, "I have been a friend to you. What are you kicking me in the face for". Henry Werts then taken McGowan inside of his yard. Auten followed on towards his gate. Auten said to McGowan that he could whip him and his whole damn family. Henry Werts said, "You are a damn lying son of a b__", and stooped down. When he arose I heard a lick. Auten then said, "I am struck", and ran. I said to Werts as he was going up the steps, "You have hurt this man". He gave me no answer. Mr. Auten came back to me and asked me over in town with him for an officer to have Werts arrested. I asked him to wait until morning and he said he would. Myself and Auten and Alewine stood and talked for some ten minutes. I left and went in my house.  F. M. Smith

   Charles Tidwell being sworn says:  Mr. Adams was at my house and left and I went out to the well and while going to the well I saw some one on the sidewalk. I thought they were drunk. I taken my water in the house and came back out to see what they were doing and I heard them quarreling and found that it was Auten and McGowan. I stood at my yard fence until the crowd started to McGowan's gate. I thought the fuss was over. I turned to go to my woodpile. I heard them start again. McGowan on someone. One spoke in a low tone. Don't know what they said. Auten said, "I can whip you and your whole damn family," and Henry Werts cursed him for a lying s__ of a b__ and then I heard a blow. Auten said, "I am hurt", and came staggering towards my gate and turned the corner at the well and someone said, "I will shoot", and my wife (Heard) it and called me in the house and I went back out and Auten (was) at the Chaney tree near my house. Mr. Alewine and Frank Smith were standing in the road talking. They stood there for a few minutes and left. I went back in the house.  Charles B. Tidwell

   William Alewine being sworn says:  I saw Henry Werts throw and when he threw called Henry Auten a lying son of a b__. I heard the lick strike something, can't say what and myself, Auten and Frank Smith left. Auten told me that Werts had killed him. We were coming in the direction Smith's house. I was on the street and heard Werts cursing at or near McGowan's house.

William Alewine

O. B. Mayer and W. G. Houseal being sworn says:  We this day, December 27th 1893, made a postmortem examination of H. N. Auten. His death was caused by a blow upon the left temporal bone causing fracture of the bone, rupture of the middle artery, hemorrhage, formation of a clot and pressure upon the brain.          O. B. Mayer MD/W.G. Houseal MD

Henry Werts killed Henry Auton by a blow to the head with a brick. Details page 3, column 3, Newberry Observer, 12/27/1893; Henry Werts has left for parts unknown. Newberry Observer, 1/3/1894; HenryWerts, COURT OF SESSION, murder, true bill, defendant at large. Newberry Observer, 3/21/1894; Henry Werts, wanted for killing Henry Auton of West End ten years ago came to town yesterday and surrendered. The newspaper account of the incident from 12/27/1893 was included in the column. Mr. Werts was discovered living in Columbia with a wife and family. He is 30 years old and consumptive, in very poor health. Page 8, Newberry Observer 8/11/1903; He was granted $1500 bail, Page 8, Newberry Observer 8/18/1903; COURT OF SESSIONS, continued, Page 8, Newberry Observer 11/10/1903

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School