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Colonial Cases

1888-1889

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 1 February 1888                                     

An inquisition indented and taken at Josh Henderson's Place in Newberry County on the 1st of February AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Josh Henderson of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of A. J. Gibson, William H. Mudd, S. S. Cunningham, Joseph Caldwell Jr., William Chaplin, Gabe Singleton, Godfrey Rice, Albert Nance, Hack Suber, Zack Martin, Brack Rice, Alf Renwick, Butler Rice, Henry Shelton, being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Josh Henderson came to his death - upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Josh Henderson came to his death by a gunshot wound in the hands of Tom Sims on the 1st day of February AD 1888 in his house in Newberry County and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Tom Sims in manner and form aforesaid Josh Henderson then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.    John N. Bass, Coroner

A. J. Gibson (Foreman), William H. Mudd, S. S. Cunningham, Joseph Caldwell Jr., William Chaplin, Gabe (X) Singleton, Godfrey (X) Rice, Albert (X) Nance, Hack (X) Suber, Zack (X) Martin, Brack (X) Rice, Alf (X) Renwick, Butler (X) Rice, Henry (X) Shelton

EVIDENCE                                              

Isabella Henderson being duly sworn says: I live on Carrie Caldwell's place in Newberry County. Yesterday I was at home until 12 o'clock. I left my husband Josh Henderson at home. Last night I was in Fairfield County. Josh was well when I left home. I know nothing about his death. I know of no difficulty he has had nor do I know that anyone had any spite against him or had threatened him. When I left he was mending shoes. He was a shoemaker by trade. He had money - nine or ten dollars. Have found no money since I came back. He carried his money in his pocket. At night he was accustomed to putting it in his pocketbook under his pillow. He would play cards. He quit for a while when the earth shook but since Christmas has been at it again. To my latest knowledge he played on Monday night. I don't know whom he played with Monday night. I don't know where he went. Don't know how much money he had Monday. When I left he had paper money. I gave him fifty cents in silver when I left. He never slept on a palate so I don't think he made the palate. The bedclothes of which the palate was made were mine. I left the bedclothes folded up on which the palate was made.          Isabella (X) Henderson      

   Charlie Nesbitt being sworn says: I live on Mrs. Della McCant's land in Newberry County. I came from home this morning to get Josh to mend my shoes. When I arrived I saw his body lying across the fire, I think on his left side. The door was open. When I saw him I went to him and snatched him out of the fire for his clothes were burning. I put out the fire of his clothes. I live about a mile away. Heard no gunfire. I don't know where Josh was Monday night. I don't know that he was naturally warm. Don't know whether he was stiff or not. I arrived a little after sun-up. The fire was not burning much. I did not put out the fire. I know of no difficulty Josh has had. After I left I reported Josh's death to Howard Brennan. I started to let it be known and then went to Mrs. Caldwell's. There I met Mr. Cunningham and told him. Mr. Cunningham told me to go to the Coroner. When I first saw the deceased it was my intention to go to Town to report it. I walked here this morning. I found the house open. A chair was before the fire, which I moved back. I did not know that the deceased was shot. Did not examine him. Saw nothing to make me think he was shot. Saw blood.                C. H. Nesbitt   

Howard Brennan being duly sworn says: This morning I got up late. Went after chips for the fire. When I went back I heard talking over at Josh's. It was Nesbitt and my two boys. They told me Josh was dead. I rode over and looked at him. I live in the first house from here. Heard no report of gun. I did not see Josh yesterday. I was not at his house last night. Heard no noise last night nor did I hear or see anyone pass my house. I saw no light in Josh's house last night. My dogs did not bark last night. My boys had been to their rabbit gum.  H. P. Brennan                                               

   Billy Greenwood being duly sworn says: I saw Josh yesterday three hours by sun in his yard. I live half a mile from Josh. Heard no report of a gun. I saw no one with a gun this morning.

 Willie Greenwood

   Lawrence Williams being duly sworn says: This morning I went to my rabbit gum when the sun was nearly up. I met Mr. Nesbit. He told me Josh was dead. He met me at the road, which goes to our house. I heard no gunfire this morning or last night. Saw no one coming this way. Last time I saw Josh was Sunday evening.        Lawrence Williams                                                             

   Lavinia Sims being duly sworn says: I live at Mrs. Carrie Caldwell's. Saw Josh Monday evening. It was not dark. Don't know who was in the empty house on Monday night. I saw or heard no one there. Heard Josh call Gus Douglas Monday evening. I saw no light in the empty house on Monday night. Josh was by himself when I saw him on the bank by the shop. I don't I know that Josh played cards in the empty house on Monday night. Tom, my husband, was not at home on Monday night. He was at home the time someone was calling. He went out afterwards. I don't know when he came back. It was after daylight.  Lavinia (X) Sims                                                            

   Gus Douglass being duly sworn says: Monday I was in Town. Got back after dark. Saw Josh at the old shop on Mrs. Caldwell's place. He came from the empty house calling me. I would not let it be known that it was I. I was sober. I saw Josh coming from the empty house. Saw light in the empty house. I don't know that Josh played cards in the empty house. I did not go there.              

Gus (X) Douglass

   Tom Sims being duly sworn says: I live on Mrs. Carrie Caldwell's place. Monday night I was a t home all night in my own house. Josh was at my house Monday night. I don't know the time he left. Was talking with Josh.  It was 10 o'clock when I lay down. I saw Josh last Monday night. Today I started over to tell Nias Henderson of Josh's death. Nobody was with Josh when he came Monday night. Milligan Nance came over and went back home. He left soon. I heard no report of a gun in the direction of Josh's today. Heard no one call Gus Douglass Monday night. I know nothing about the light in the empty house. Heard someone in a wagon calling Monday night. My wife was at home when Josh called me. I have a shotgun, No. 5's. My gun was used last on Monday. I shot at a squirrel between Mr. Gibson's and Mrs. Caldwell's at the line fence. I was at Josh's last on Monday night at 12 o'clock. I came down to get my shoe fixed. I told my little girl this morning to go to Josh's to get her shoe fixed. I took a game of cards with Josh at his house Monday before dinner. Nobody else was present. I heard no one but Judge Gilliam and Manuel Kinard say they were going to Josh's Tuesday night. I was at Josh's Monday. I left and went home by the big road. Judge Gilliam told me he was a t Josh's last night (Tuesday night). Monday night I was at home sitting down talking. On Monday Josh and I played for pinders. We had no money up. Monday when I was at Josh's Bella was not at home. She passed my house and said she was going to Carrie Reid's.         Thomas Sims        

   Manuel Kinard being duly sworn says: Monday night I was at Tom's house and left about 8 o'clock. Tom and Josh were there. They were in Tom's house. Brooks Griffin was there. I have not been to Josh's house this year. I was at Tom's house last night, just before dark. No body else was there but Tom and his wife. Josh and Tom played cards Monday night. I don't know that they played for money, saw none. Judge Gilliam went in the direction of Josh's house Tuesday night. I saw no light in the empty house.  Manuel (X) Kinard                                       

   Judge Gillam being duly sworn: Monday night I was at Alf Renwick's house, my uncle. Last night I was at Albert Nance's house and then stayed all night at Tom Caldwell's house. I told no body that I was going to Josh's house last night nor did I tell Tom Sims that I was there this morning.  Judge (X) Gilliam

Doctor W. G. Houseal being duly sworn says: I hereby swear that I have this day, Feb. 1, 1888 examined the dead body of Josh Henderson and find a gunshot wound through his right temporal bone entering the brain which wound is sufficient to have caused immediate death.                

W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 4 February 1888                                     

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry South Carolina on the 4th of February AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Ike Boozer of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of R. T. Caldwell, W. H. Folk, W. C. Hayes, J. D. Nance, J. H. Goree, W. W. Caldwell, R. C. Maybin, Isaac Sherer, Tobe Franklin, Judge Gilliam, Noah Wilson, Jeff Wilson, and William Carter being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Ike Boozer came to his death - upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Ike Boozer came to his death from a blow by an axe or some blunt instrument, probably in the hands of Patience Chalmers and that her daughter Margaret is an accessory to the fact, on or about January 28, 1888 at her house in Newberry County and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Ike Boozer in manner and form aforesaid Patience Chalmers then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid, Patience Chalmers the said Ike Boozer contrary to his will and in manner and form aforesaid did kill and slay. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.     

John N. Bass, Coroner

R. T. Caldwell (Foreman), W. H. Folk, W. C. Hayes, J. D. Nance, J. H. Goree, W. W. Caldwell, R. C. Maybin, Isaac (X) Shearer, Tobe Franklin, Judge (X) Gilliam, Noah (X) Wilson, Jeff (X) Wilson, Jack (X) Kibler and William (X) Carter

EVIDENCE                                              

Willie Franklin being sworn says: I live in Newberry County. I know nothing but that this morning (Feb. 1, 1888, when I passed by saw the deceased lying in the woods. Did not go to the body. When I went home I reported it to Mr. Willie Caldwell. I went and showed Mr. Caldwell where the deceased lay. Saw him Saturday before last. His name is Ike Boozer. I do not know nor have I heard of the deceased having had a difficulty. Have not heard of anybody threatening him. Do not know that he gambled.                 Willie Franklin                                     

Patience Chalmers being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County at Archie Sloan's. I know nothing about the death of Ike Boozer who was at my house last Saturday morning. He told me he was going to his uncle Col. Wilson's. I don't know that h had any difficulty nor have I heard of any one having threatened him. I have not heard of him since. Saturday he left my house at about 9 o'clock. I never knew him to gamble. He went in the direction of Caleb Buzhardt's when he left my house. He has relatives living at Willie Chalmer's. I do not know of him having had money. He lived at John Spence's. He did not make it a regular practice of coming to my house. Patience Chalmers

   Jim Brown being duly sworn says: I live at John P. Sloan's in Newberry County. I had just got up from a spell of measles and would see Ike going down the road week before last. Yesterday evening, Feb. 3, 1888, I went to Patience Chalmer's house and saw blood on the door facing and the door peg, which fastens the front door. Saw some on the bedstead, some on the stud of the house near the window at the head of the bed, some on the plank, which runs from the front door down. I took it for blood. Also looked like blood. Had been in the back door and it looked freshly scoured. No other portion of the house looked like it had been scoured. I saw two axes this morning, an old and a newer one. I examined the axe, which looked like it had blood on it, but could not swear it was blood. What I scratched up on the axe stuck together. I can't say when I saw Ike last. It was last week. Can't say what day. I don't know that Ike was in the habit of visiting Patience Chalmers. I saw Ike go along the road some mornings. Have not known him to have a difficulty. Saw no one following him with an axe. I heard his body was found Wednesday morning Feb. 1, 1888.   James H. Brown

   Archie Sloan being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. On Tuesday last I was sowing oats on my grandfather's place. I was informed on Wednesday morning by Jake Sherer that Ike Boozer was dead. I last saw Ike Monday one week ago. I do not know that Ike was in the habit of visiting Patience Chalmers. I saw blood at Patience's house in different places. I examined the plank at the back door, which runs down towards the steps. There was blood on it. On the inside near the back door was blood. Some was on the bedstead, some on the stud of the house near the window, some on the peg, which fastens the front door. The floor looked freshly scoured, so did the plank outside the front door, so did the head board of the bed. I looked under the house at the back door. It looked like water had been dripping from the house through the floor. This was the only place I noticed which appeared so. I saw blood on the bed tick. When I went to Patience's house W. Caleb Buzhardt, Col. Wilson, and Abe_ whose full name I don't know and Job Goree were there. Job Goree told me he wanted me to go to Patience's house with him. I told him I would and I went. Patience was not there at that time. She came afterwards. She did not say to me why she left. I heard her say she left because she was afraid. She has a daughter. I can't say that she lives with her mother. Can't say when Patience left. Don't know whether it was before or since Ike's death.  H. A. Sloan

   Caleb Buzhardt being duly sworn says: I saw blood at the door and blood on the stick used to fasten the front door. I saw blood on the outside of the house near the back door. Nothing being dragged out of the house by a cat could have caused it. I saw blood on the bed and on the stead. I could not have gotten up there accidentally. It was three or four feet up. Saw axe, which appeared to have blood on it. Saw axe scraped and the scrapping stuck together like blood. When the axe was scrapped it appeared bright. Rust so scrapped would not stick together nor would the axe appear bright. I am satisfied that what I saw was blood.  I did not look underneath the house. I knew Ike Boozer. I last saw him about 9½ o'clock last Saturday morning on my brother-in-law's land. He was going in the direction of Darcus Means' house. This was about ½ mile from Lizzie Caldwell's. Ike was coming from Lizzie Caldwell's. I did not speak to him. My wife said she saw Ike about 10 o'clock passing along by my house. I don't think he gambled. He was not fussy and generally attended to his own business. When I saw Ike he was coming towards Town. I know of no intimate relations between Ike and Patience but heard that he visited her. When he lived with me last year he did not sleep on my place and I heard that he spent a great deal of his time at her house.  Caleb D. Buzhardt   

   Billy Franklin being duly sworn says: I don't know what is Patience's name besides patience.

   Archie Sloan: Patience's name is Patience Chalmers.

   Lizzie Caldwell being sworn says: Ike Boozer had a contract for him and me to work for Asa Oxner. Ike was to marry me on Wednesday. I was living on Ben Cannon's place until then. Ike was there on Saturday morning tolerably early. I gave him breakfast and he ate it. We had a conversation. Emma and Neely Harmon were there. Ike said he was going to Town and buy a bed and bring it back on Mr. Buzhardt's wagon. He was preparing to marry me on Wednesday. Ike, they say, was in the habit of visiting Patience Chalmers. I don't know from what direction he came to my house. He left going in the direction of Newberry. He said not a word to me about Patience Chalmers that morning. He gave me no money on that day. He had three or four bills. He wrapped them in a brown paper and put them in his pocket. He wore a reddish hat. He was not of a fussy character. I know patience Chalmers. We have never had a difficulty. I have not seen her since Wednesday 'til this morning.             Lizzie (X) Caldwell                                               

   Neely Harmon being duly sworn says: I live at Ben Cannon's in Newberry County. On Saturday I was at home. Ike Boozer passed through the yard that morning and when he left he went in the direction of Newberry. I talked to him. He asked me where was my husband. He said he was going to Newberry. I saw Patience Chalmers Wednesday at 1 o'clock at the dead body of Ike Boozer. I saw her Tuesday and she asked me for some salt. She said nothing about Ike Boozer. I don't know that Ike Boozer visited patience Chalmers but it is generally rumored that Ike was intimate with her. I knew nothing about Ike's getting married. Lizzie Caldwell aid to me, " Ike is dead and he was going to marry me on Wednesday".. She told me this Wednesday (when) going up to where Ike lay dead. He ate breakfast at Emma Harmon's on Saturday morning.Neely (X) Harmon

   Emma Harmon being duly sworn says: I live on Ben Cannon's place. Ike Boozer ate breakfast at my house early Saturday morning. He and Lizzie Caldwell were to be married on Wednesday. They talked it over at my house on Saturday morning. He went in the direction of Newberry. I haven't seen him since. I heard Caleb Buzhardt saw him afterwards. I heard he - Ike - was intimate with Patience Chalmers.  Emma (X) Harmon               

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says. I hereby certify that I have, this day Feb. 1, 1888 examined the body of Ike Boozer and find that he came to his death from the effects of puncture wounds of the left parietal and the occipital bones of the skull.           W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 15 February 1888                                  

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry South Carolina on the 15th of February AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Charley Owens of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of J. J. Suber, T. B. Starns, J. R. Sligh, Preston Dominick, G. H. Nates, T. H. Davis, Le. Britt, Fed Wyatt, Fed. Colwell, John Burton, Fed Cleland, A. W. Longshore, J. B. Collands, J. B. O. Waldrop, who being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Charley Owens came to his death - upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Charley Owens came to his death from a gun shot wound inflicted the 25th of December 1887 and he died Feb. 14, 1888 at his home in Newberry County and the wound was caused by the hands of Dick Wyatt by accident and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Charley Owens in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by accident and misfortune. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.  John N. Bass, Coroner 

J. J. Suber (Foreman), T. B. Starns, J. R. Sligh, Preston Dominick, G. H. Nates, T. H. Davis, Le. Britt, Fed Wyatt, Fed. Colwell, John Burton, A. W. Longshore, J. B. Collands, J. B. O. Waldrop, B. W. Slyght                                              

EVIDENCE

Adeline Wyatt being sworn says: I live in Newberry County. Charley was shot the 25th day of Dec. 1887. I was in the house. I heard the gun when it shot and thought it was a cracker and my son Charley said to me Dick did not do it on purpose. My son Charley was cutting wood at __ cut in the yard and he said Dick and he were going to shoot at a spot on a pine tree and Charley had his pistol in his hand and it went off accidentally and I know that is the way that __ for Dick and Charley were always good friends. All of their time Dick came to spend Christmas with Charley and I know that Dick did not shoot him on purpose for Charley told me all the time after he was shot that Dick did not aim to shoot him. He walked Monday. He was as well as we thought. He died the 14th of Feb. 1888. That is all I know about Charley's death.     Adeline Wyatt     

   Dick Wyatt being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. I came to my uncle's the day before Christmas and stayed all night and the next morning me and Charley were out in the yard. He was splitting some wood and we were going to shoot at a spot on a tree and I had the pistols in my hands and pulled the hammer back to fill a cap and it did not stand cocked and it went off and shot him in the side and he said, "Oh my God, You have shot me." And then he said, "I know you did not mean to do it." I never had a fuss with Charley in my life.  We were like two brothers. We were always together when we could get together. He told everybody it was an accident. He was at work Monday of this week. I had nothing against him in the world. He was my own cousin. That is all there is about it.           Dick (X) Wyatt                                                      

   Noah Wyatt being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. I was not at home when Charley got shot and I do not know only what Charley told me himself and he said it was done accidentally and he did not want anything done to Dick. He did not aim to do it. I am satisfied of it. I know in my own mind it was an accident. I got Dr. Smith to wait on him. He (Dr. Smith) never found the ball. He (Charley) worked this week Monday. He said all the time it was an accident and he told this, the last thing he said about it, sitting before the fire yesterday evening in a chair and he got up and he called his uncle who was in the house with him at the time and said to him, "My God". And then went and lay down on the bed and died in a minute. He has not been sick. I know he died from the effects of the shot. Dick and Charley have always been good friends. They never had a fuss in their lives.         Noah (X) Wyatt                                    

This is to certify that I have this day, Feb. 15, 1888 examined the body of Charley Owens and that he came to his death from the effects of a gun shot wound of the left side said to have been received Dec. 25, 1887.  James M. Kibler MD                                     

This is a case that I have bound the boy that had the pistols in his hand over for Court. So that the matter can be fairly investigated as everything goes to show that it was an accident and I was of the opinion in that it was a clear case of an accident and I think it best to make this statement.

 John N. Bass, Coroner

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 3 March 1888                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Maria Boozer's in Newberry County on the 3rd day of March AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Maria Boozer of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of John Kenner, Charlie Gilliam, Henry Turner, Thomas Renwick, D. Renwick, Fed. Gilliam, Ned. Renwick, Thomas Gise, Jack Colands, Ed. Austin, David Renwick, Tom Boozer who being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Maria Boozer came to her death - upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Maria Boozer came to her death from some cause to the jury unknown and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Maria Boozer in manner and form aforesaid came to her death. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.             John N. Bass, Coroner

John Kenner, Charlie Gilliam, Henry Turner, Thomas Renwick, D. Renwick, Fed. Gilliam, Ned. Renwick, Thomas Gise, Jack Colands, Ed. Austin, David Renwick, Tom Boozer                                              

EVIDENCE                                              

Sallie Boozer who being duly sworn says: I live in the County of Newberry. I was at home this morning the 3rd day of March 1888. I sent my little daughter up to my mother's, Maria Boozer, the dead woman, to see if she was gone as she had told me she was going to Town today and she said that the door was fastened on the inside and she could not get it open and then I came to the house and called her but she did not answer me. I knew she was in her house for she always fastens her door inside with a piece of plank. Then I broke the door open and found her in her bed dead on her side, as she was when you came. She was at my house last evening and told me she was going to Town. She was as well as she is all the time. She had good health. She was not sick as (far as) I knew of. She would sometimes say that her side would pain her back. She didn't have any trouble with her heart that we ever knew of. She was as healthy as she could be. She walked to Town and back by dinner time any time she wanted to. I didn't think she killed herself for she did not have anything to take to kill herself with and I know nobody killed her. She was about 80 years old. No one lived with her since her husband died. Nobody was here with her when she died. That is all I know about it. It was about 5 o'clock when she was at my house. It is about 150 yards to my house from hers. She could always call to us when she wanted us from her own house. I cannot write.  Salley (X) Boozer                 

I hereby certify that I have this day, March 3, 1888 examined the dead body of Maria Boozer and in my opinion she came to her death from natural causes.            W. G. Houseal MD                                               

This is a case I could not find out anything about before I left Town and for this caused me to take a doctor with me at _. I did not know what trouble I might have to get one. I did not take one with me.       John N. Bass, Coroner

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 8 June 1888                                             

An inquisition indented and taken at Prosperity in Newberry County before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of the infant child of William Young then and there being dead by the oaths of A. L. Sheetz, J. D. Beacham, J. R. Watts, Francis Bobb, J. H. Cannon, L. E. Schumpert, J. S. Wheeler, J. L. Wise, D. S. Maffett, J. T. Hawkins, L. A. Enlower, W. P. Crumpton being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said child to its death - upon their oath do say that the aforesaid child came to its death by accidentally let fall out of the arms of the 6 year old little girl, the sister of said child, to the floor and dislocating its neck on the 8th day of June 1888 in the Town of Prosperity in Newberry County and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid child in manner and form aforesaid came to its death. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.              

John N. Bass, Coroner

A. L. Sheetz, J. D. Beacham, J. R. Watts, Francis Bobb, J. H. Cannon, L. E. Schumpert, J. S. Wheeler, J. L. Wise, D. S. Maffett, J. T. Hawkins, L. A. Enlower, W. P. Crumpton                  

EVIDENCE                                              

Jane Young being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. I was out in the yard at the back end of the house yesterday washing clothes.  My little daughter was nursing my baby and about 10 or 11 o'clock I heard the baby fall. I ran as soon as I could to it. When I got to my little girl who had picked it up and it was bleeding at the nose and mouth. I called to my sister who lived next to me to come - that the girl had killed my baby - and she ran as soon as she could get here and took and we got the camphor and rubbed it but it was dead. I know that my little girl would not have dropped it if she could have helped it. She always thought genteelness to the baby. I sent for Dr. McFall. He came soon after but it was dead before he got here. This is all about the case of its death. It was the 8th of June 1888. My child was 3 months old.                Jane (X) Young     

   Alice More being sworn says: I live in Newberry County Newberry. I was called by the mother of the child who said come here - Hattie has killed my baby. When I got to it I took it but I think it was dead. We rubbed it with camphor but it did not ? respond to? it. We sent for the doctor McFall but I knew it would not do any good. It was 10 or 11 o'clock, the 8th day of June 1888. This is all I know about it.          Alice (X) More               

I and the jury thought that it was best to let the little girl make a statement, as she was too young to be sworn.              John N. Bass, Coroner for Newberry Co.                                

   Hattie Young's statement: Don't know how I dropped the baby. I was in the house at the bed and had it in my arms. Went to put it on the bed. It fell out of my arms onto the floor. The head was under the bed. I did not let it fall on purpose. I loved the little thing.                                   

   Billie Young sworn says: Hattie Young is my daughter. I was not at home when my child got hurt. Don't know of my own knowledge anything about it. I know Hattie would not have done it if she could have helped it. She thought a heap of the baby and am sure it was not done on purpose.  Billy Young                          

This is to certify that I have examined the body of the infant of William Young and am satisfied that death was caused by dislocation of the neck this 9th day of June 1888.      J. D. Bruce MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 5 May 1888                                             

An inquisition indented and taken at W. A. Chalmer's in Newberry County on the 5th of May AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of William Schumpert then and there being dead by the oaths of W. A. Chalmers, J. M. Wilson, W. G. Houseal, John Williams, A. Williams, Frank Wilson Jr., Frank Wilson, D. Gallman, J. Ruff, Matt Wilson, Jesse Wilson, Cal Wilson, being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said William Schumpert came to his death - upon their oath do say that the aforesaid William Schumpert came to his death by a stroke of lying at his house the 4th day of May AD 1888 in Newberry County in manner and form aforesaid. Willie Schumpert came to his death by misfortune and accident and so the jurors aforesaid and the coroner aforesaid have interchangeably have put their hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.               John N. Bass, Coroner

W. A. Chalmers (Foreman), John M. Wilson, W. G. Houseal, John Williams, Albert Williams, Frank Wilson Jr., Frank Wilson, Drat. Gallman, Jack Ruff, Jesse Wilson, Cal Wilson, Wert Williams                                       

EVIDENCE                                              

Angie Schumpert sworn says: I live on our W. A. Chalmers place in Newberry County. Was at home yesterday. Lightening struck the house about 4 o'clock. My two sisters and two children were in the house at the time. My child was killed. I was sitting on the trunk. I was shocked and when I came to myself I was lying on one of my children in the cradle. All was gone but me and the one in the cradle and one killed. I know that he was killed by lightening. The house was torn all to pieces. He was sitting in front of the fireplace. He fell in the fireplace but did not fall in the fire.  Angie (X) Schumpert 

I have examined the dead body of William Schumpert May 5, 1888 and I certify that he came to his death from a bolt of lightening.  W. G. Houseal MD

                                               

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 23 June 1888

An inquisition indented and taken at Tom Burton's Place in Newberry County before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Henry Teague then and there being dead by the oaths of W. G. Houseal, P. M. Miller, Burt Satterwhite, Walter Suber, J. J. Gary, Humphrey Gary, James Teague, Lewis Reeder, John Kinard, Lewis Burton, John Burton, M. G. Teague, Lewis Johnson, Pink Suber being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Henry Teague came to his death - upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Henry Teague came to his death by a pistol shot wound in the left side on the 23rd day of June AD 1888 and they do say that it was inflicted on the 23rd day of June 1888 by his own hands accidentally and so the jurors aforesaid and the  Coroner aforesaid have to this inquisition interchangeably put their hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.   John N. Bass, Coroner

W. G. Houseal (Foreman), P. M. Miller, Burt Satterwhite, Walter Suber, J. J. Gary, Umphrey Gary, James Teague, Lewis Reeder, John Kinard, Lewis Burton, John Burton, M. G. Teague, Lewis Johnson, Pink Suber                                      

EVIDENCE                                              

Lewis Reeder sworn: I live at Tom Burton's in Newberry County. Was with Henry Teague. He was shot 3 or 4 o'clock. When he was shot Jim Reeder was walking in front of Henry and had his pistol in his hip pocket. Henry snatched the pistol out of his pocket of Jim Reeder and started to run and fell and shot himself. He was shot in the left side. Henry died Sunday morning. Was shot Saturday 3 or 4 o'clock. They had no difficulties with each another. Jim and Henry were not scuffling when Henry Teague was shot. Henry just wanted to shoot the pistol for Fern. 

Lewis (X) Reeder                                                 

   Jim Reeder sworn says: I live on Dr. Gary's place in Newberry County. I was walking in front of Henry. He asked me to let him shoot my pistol. It was in my hip pocket. The handle was out and he slipped up and tried to take it out and ran and fell and shot himself in the side. We did not have any fuss. We had always been good friends. He was shot Saturday and died Sunday. We were not scuffling when he was shot, nor had been that day. Henry was about six feet away from me when he fell. This was on the 23rd day of June 1888. He walked to the house with my help.

 J. J. Reeder                                                                                            

I hereby certify that I have this day, June 25, 1888, examined the dead body of Henry Teague and find a gunshot wound in the left side, three inches below the nipple, which wound is sufficient to have caused his death.            W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 28 June 1888                                          

An inquisition indented and taken at J. W. P. Brown's Place in Newberry County on the 28th of June AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Charley Wilson of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of B. B. Hair, J. W. P. Brown, R. E. Brannon, Andrew Boland, S. S. Bridges, W. H. Blease, W. T. McFall, O. E. Maffett, Richard Gallman, James Kinard, Henry Railford, S. W. Hawkins being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Charley Wilson came to his death - upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Charley Wilson came to his death by some unknown cause to them on the 27th day of June AD 1888 at his house in Newberry County and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Charley Wilson by some means to the jurors unknown against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid in witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.    John N. Bass, Coroner

B. B. Hair (Foreman), J. W. P. Brown, R. E. Brannon, Andrew Boland, S. S. Bridges, W. H. Blease, W. T. McFall, O. E. Maffett, Richard Gallman, James Kinard, Henry Railford, S. W. Hawkins

EVIDENCE                                              

Fancy Jackson: Tuesday night he was sick. Complained of his head and stomach. I went up to Mr. Brown's yesterday morning to work and found him lying down under the shade foaming at the mouth. I mean Charley who is here dead. I sent two of my boys to bring him home and he did not get in the house. I did not have a thing to give him. Did not give him camphor before he died. I called someone to come before he died but no one came. He died about 1 o'clock on the 27th of June 1888.  Fancy (X) Jackson        

Newberry County State of South Carolina. After being duly sworn, I have examined the body of Charley Wilson who died yesterday 27th June 1888. I find no marks or bruises on any part of the body, therefore believe that he came to his death from some unknown cause.  W. T. McFall MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 13 July 1888                                            

An inquisition indented and taken at Wadlington's Place in Newberry County on the 13th of July AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Betsy Lominick of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of W. G. Houseal, Joseph Caldwell, P. S. Brooks, B. McGowan, G. W. Feltman, A. J. Darby, A. F. Campbell, J. O. Brennan, J. H. Brown, J. F. Cromer, S. J. McCullough, S. S. Cunningham, A. J. Gibson being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Betsy Lominick came to his death - upon their oath do say that that on the 11th of July 1888 Betsy Lominick came to her death from organic heart disease at her home in Newberry County. That in manner and form aforesaid came to her death by misfortune or accident. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.    John N. Bass, Coroner

A. J. Gibson (Foreman), W. G. Houseal, Joseph Caldwell, P. S. Brooks, R. McGowan, G. W. Feltman, A. J. Darby, J. F. Campbell, J. O. Brennan, J. H. Brown, J. F. Cromer, S. J. McCullough, S. S. Cunningham

EVIDENCE                                              

G. E. Campbell being sworn says: I came from plowing day before yesterday July 11th. Saw something wrong with Mrs. Lominick. She complained of misery in her breast. We went to supper. Said she was afraid to eat. My wife said she took two mouthfuls of food. She fell over and died immediately. She had one of her spells a month or so ago. She had smothering at the heart. I am certain nothing she could have eaten caused her death. I think she was at the table about four minutes before she died. She had been up all day. The doctor (Robertson) had seen her about six weeks before and said she had neuralgia of the heart.                G. E. (X) Campbell                               

I hereby certify that I have this day July 15, 1888 examined the dead body of Betsy Lominick and in my opinion she came to her death from organic heart disease.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 13 October 1888                                    

An inquisition indented and taken at James Boozer's Place on the 13th of Oct. AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Annie Boozer then and there being dead by the oaths of W. G. Houseal, J. A. McCullough, John Kenna, Posey, G. Glenn, Daniel Wells, John Toland, W. W. Smith, Jesse Gary, Douglass Renwick, Fed Coleman, Thomas Renwick, Louis Boozer who being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Annie Boozer came to her death - upon their oath do say that that on the 13th of October 1888 Annie Boozer came to her death from hemorrhage of the lungs by misfortune and accident and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that in manner and form aforesaid Annie Boozer came to her death by misfortune or accident. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.    John N. Bass, Coroner

W. G. Houseal (Foreman), J. A. (X) McCullough, John (X) Kenna, Posey G. (X) Glenn, Silas (X) Wells, John (X) Toland, W. W. (X) Smith, Jesse (X) Gary, Douglass (X) Renwick, Fed (X) Coleman, Thomas (X) Renwick, Louis (X) Boozer

EVIDENCE                                                                                              

Jesse Boozer being sworn says: My daughter Annie Boozer died between 11 am and 12 today October 13, 1888. She was in her usual health this morning. She has been sick since July. She had a bleeding from the mouth today and fell out of the door. Her grandmother and Mandy Renwick carried her into the house. She complained no more than usual this morning. When I came to the house she was lying on the floor dead. Dr. Renwick examined her last week. He said she had consumption and her left lung had been infected for some time. She was not confined to her bed.   Jesse (X) Boozer

   Dora Boozer being sworn says: My sister was sitting in the door. Began coughing up blood and fell out of the door. She gasped twice and was dead. I did nothing. Grandma came up the hill when she was dying. I went to tell my father and told Jack Toland. Just me and the little children were at home. I am thirteen (13) years old.   Dora (X) Boozer                                                   

   Sallie Boozer being sworn says: I was at home this morning and left about 9 o'clock am. My daughter was well as usual when I left. She told me to go to Town and buy certain things for her. I had no idea of death today. She never bled from the moth before.                  Sallie (X) Boozer                  

W. G. Houseal MD being duly sworn says: I have this day October 13 AD 1888 examined the dead body of Annie Boozer and certify that she came to her death from pulmonary hemorrhage caused by consumption.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 13 July 1888                                            

An inquisition indented and taken at L. K. Vance's Place in Newberry County on the 13th of July AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Coleman Renwick then and there being dead by the oaths of W. G. Houseal, F. Z. Wilson, W. E. Merchant, W. D. Johnson, J. M. Chalmers, F. Brooks, John Suber, Charles Johnston, Lawrence Dudley, William Swindler, Newton Wheeler, Robert Rutherford being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Coleman Renwick came to his death - upon their oath do say that that on the 22nd day of October 1888 Coleman Renwick came to his death accidentally from fracture of the skull being struck by the freight train on the Laurens RR in Newberry County  And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Coleman Renwick in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by misfortune or accident. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.    John N. Bass, Coroner

F. Z. Wilson (Foreman), W. G. Houseal, W. E. Merchant, J. W. D. Johnson, J. M. Chalmers, F. Brooks, John (X) Suber, Charles (X) Johnston, Lawrence (X) Dudley, William (X) Swindler, Newton (X) Wheeler, Robert (X) Rutherford

EVIDENCE                                              

Rachel Renwick being sworn says: I went to the RR and saw my two children on the track, were on a curve. I tried to wave the train down but could not. I was sitting in my house when I heard the train. The little girl dropped flat on the track. The little boy stood and looked back. I did not hear the train blow. My little boy was dead when I reached him. I had sent my children after trash for fuel. This happened yesterday Oct. 22, 1888.  Rachel (X) Renwick                                               

   W. H. Hammond being sworn says: On the afternoon of October 22, 1888 while running schedule #2 West between 3 and 4 mile board, on a rounding sharp curve and heavy down grade, I saw two children in the middle of the track, ages about 3 and 6 years. They were about 100 feet in front of my engine. I called for brakes and did all in my power to stop my train but failed to do so until the entire train of six cars and cab had passed over them. Upon examination I found the youngest Negro was killed and the other unhurt. I was running about twelve miles per hour.      W. H. Hammond                                                 

W. G. Houseal MD being sworn says: I have this day October 23, 1888 examined the dead body of Coleman Renwick and certify that he came to his death from a fracture of the occipital bone of the skull.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 29 November 1888                                

An inquisition indented and taken at Neill Caldwell's Place in Newberry County on the 29th of November AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Neill Caldwell then and there being dead by the oaths of J. M. Kibler, George Pressley, Charner Gilliam, Hampton Robinson, William Sligh, A. M. Miller, James Wilson, Frank Hair, Melain Butler, George Stewart, Milton Johnson, Shed. Suber, Walter King and M. Suber being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Neill Caldwell came to his death - upon their oath do say that that the said Neill Caldwell came to his death on the 29th of November 1888 from a gunshot wound that was inflicted the 28th day of November 1888 by his own hands by accident. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Neill Caldwell in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by misfortune or accident. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.   John N. Bass, Coroner

J. M. Kibler (Foreman, George Pressley, Charner Gilliam, Hampton Robinson, William Sligh, A. M. Miller, James Wilson, Frank Hair, Melain Butler, George Stewart, Milton Johnson, Shed. Suber, Walter King and M. Suber

EVIDENCE                                              

William Sligh being duly sworn says: Was at home just before Neill Caldwell was shot. He was shot in __ near the house. I was about two hundred yards from him. I heard the gunfire and ran to him. When I reached him his wife was there. He said he shot himself accidentally with his gun, when getting down from a stump. He was shot November 28, 1888 about 2 ½ o'clock pm I brought him to the house in a wagon. Sent for a doctor immediately.  William Sligh                  

   Sinah Caldwell being duly sworn says: I was picking cotton. Neill ran after a rabbit. I heard the gunfire. In a minute he hollered. I ran to him and he was running round and round. He said, "Dear wife, I am ruined. I was getting down from a stump and my gun shot me." There was made a rising from him. I sent for the doctor right away.  Sinah Caldwell                                                

I hereby certify that Neill Caldwell came to his death from the effects of a gunshot wound of the abdomen, received Nov. 28, 1888.                 James M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 17 December 1888

An inquisition indented and taken at the residence of J. Ward M. Simmons on the 17th of December AD 1888 on the dead body of Nelson Worthy, the following was the verdict of the Coroner's jury:

VERDICT

State of South Carolina, Newberry County

We the jury of inquest find our verdict, that Nelson Worthy came to his death from the effects of a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of J. Ward M. Simmons against the peace and dignity of the State. Dec. 17, 1888  C. B. Buist, Coroner

George McWhorter, J. L. Kennedy, F. A. Schumpert, O. McR Holmes, W. H. Hunt Sr., W. T. Tarrant, T. E. Epting, J. Dunbar, A. F. Count, T. G. Williams, J. A. Burton, R. H. Wright                                  

EVIDENCE                              

First witness, Lotta Chalmers being duly sworn says: I am Nelson Worthy's wife but not married to him. The shooting took place between eight (*) and Nine (9) o'clock. I was standing in the door. Mr. Simmons told Nelson get out of the yard. Nelson started, turned back, and then Mr. Simmons commenced shooting, shot three times. I went to Mr. Simmons and pulled him on the arm and begged him not to shoot again for my sake. Then Mr. Simmons said he did not want to shoot. Then Mr. Simmons went towards the house. Then Mr. Simmons went to where Mr. Hunt Jr. was on the fence. Mr. Hunt asked what was the matter. We went out of the yard. Mr. Hunt came and asked what was the matter. Asked if he was shot. Said he did not know. Felt wet all over. Went to Mr. Hunt's yard and examined him. Mr. Hunt took lightly to see if he was shot. Mr. Simmons was present. I then brought him out of the yard and put him to bed in a room in Mr. Simmons yard. Dr. McIntosh came to examine him and hunted for the ball.

Cross-examination by Foreman, George McWhorter:

No one present except myself and Mr. Simmons and Nelson. Do not know whether first shot hit him. Nelson had a walking stick in his hand. Nelson kept walking. I do not like fussing in my yard said Mr. Simmons. If you and your wife were fussing, I would not go and ask what it was about. Mr. Simmons said, "If you do not go out I will shoot you." He was using profane and abusive language at Mr. Simmons. Told Mr. Simmons he would not go out of the yard twice. Nelson) was standing eight or ten feet from Mr. Simmons with stick in hand. Mr. Simmons was going behind him. Nelson was walking toward the gate. Nelson turned and came towards Mr. Simmons. Nelson was half drunk. Mr. Simmons told him to go out and he turned around and said he would d-d, he was as good as any white or black man and was not going out. Then Mr. Simmons shot three times. What did Nelson do after he turned on Mr. Simmons? Mr. Simmons fired and he kept coming towards Mr. Simmons. After the last shot Nelson came to me. I was standing at the door. I went to Mr. Simmons and asked him not to shoot anymore. He said he would not. He was sorry he had to do that. Moon was shining bright. Nelson and Reuben Harrington came from down the street with him. Reuben said Nelson threatened to kill me. He did not strike me. Never heard Mr. Simmons say a cuss word to him. Not even that night. Thought Mr. Simmons liked him. Then stick on me and ordered me back to my house. I went out of the yard to stop Nelson from quarrelling in Mr. Simmons yard. Nelson drove me back in the yard and followed me himself. Then Mr. Simmons came out and asked what was the matter. I went out to keep from having a fuss in the yard.  Lotta (X) Chalmers

Dr. James McIntosh being duly sworn says: I got here about 9 o'clock. Found him in bed. He was making considerable complaint of pain. But he was so much under the influence of whiskey that I could not tell whether it was pain of the wound or from the whiskey. Found him with wounds, difficult wounds. One over the short rib, but did not enter, glancing shot on the right side and a wound on the left arm entered on the outside of the arm, passed in under the skin and came out from the inside arm about 3 inches above the joint. One wound was about the left nipple, ball passing on towards the breastbone, appears as the same ball that had passed through the arm and entered the breast. Another wound outside of the left hip. All of the wounds I found being in bed when I came in. He was about 6 feet high and about 200 pounds in weight, 45 years of age and very much more muscular and ?__? Than Mr. Simmons. James McIntosh MD

James M. Kibler MD: This is to certify that Nelson Worthy came to his death from the effects of a gun shot wound about one inch above the left nipple, the ball passing towards the right side and lodging in the sternum, opposite the attachment of the fifth rib. And caused internal hemorrhage.

 James M. Kibler MD

South Carolina, Newberry County. I, John M. Kinard, Clerk of Court for the aforesaid County and State do hereby certify that the foregone six pages represent a true and just transcript from the original Inquest on file in my office. Witness my hand and seal this 17th Dec. 1888,                 John M. Kinard, Clerk of Court

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 26 December 1888

An inquisition taken and dented and at Mary Baxter's House at Helena in Newberry County on the 26th of December AD 1888 before C. B. Buist Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of William Baxter then and there being dead by the oaths of W. S. Mann Foreman, T. A. Williams, Moses Burton, John Jackson, Orange Maffett, Casah Stuckman, R. A. Bragg, A. Wilson and J. H. Shell being a lawful jury of inquest and being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, find that the said William Baxter on the night of 24th December 1888 was shot by a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of Fern Gary and from the effects of said wound died on the night of December 25th December 1888 about 6 o'clock pm.                  

C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. S. Mann Foreman, R. E. Williams, T. A. Williams, Moses (X) Burton, John (X) Jackson, Orange (X) Maffett, R. A. Bragg, J. A. Williams, Alfred (X) Shutmaine, Caesar (X) Cannon, Anthony (X) Glenn, John (X) Pitts and J. H. Shell

EVIDENCE

James Floyd sworn: Lives at Leonard Floyd's, next to Mary Baxter's house. William Baxter was shot on Monday night 24th December 1888. Was present in the house when shot. Did not know the man personally who shot him. John Waller had a pistol in his hand. William Baxter knocked Fern Gary down and took the pistol from him, John Waller, to keep Fern Gary from killing John. Another man jumped from a wagon and broke a gunstock over his head. William Baxter dropped the pistol. Then Fern grabbed the pistol before Baxter could use and recover from the effect of the blow from the gunstock. Fern shot him with the pistol he had taken from Baxter. Fired three times. Shot Baxter while he was on the ground. Swapped the pistol again and put the pistol in his pocket and then ran off in the wagon.

CROSS EXAMINED:

Three persons including Fern were fighting against Will Baxter. Fern hit Baxter first. John Waller started the fuss. When I saw the beginning I did not know who struck first. It was John Waller's pistol. John Waller drew first weapon. John Waller drew it on Fern Gary. Fern Gary had got out of the wagon. Fern Gary was coming to Will Baxter and Will Baxter had a pistol in hand ready to shoot him.     James (X) Floyd    

Dr. James McIntosh sworn: Came up to the Baxter's on the night of the 24th and found him with a scalp wound on the head, 3 inches long but no injury to the bone. Found a gun shot wound in the right groin, ball passed across the abdomen and lodged in the left side just under the skin passing through the bowels several times and was the cause of his death.               James McIntosh MD

   Aetta Hunter sworn: Was present at the shooting. It took place at Zobel's store. Had hold of Baxter when first shot. Did not know the man who shot him. Baxter was shot three times. Heard the name of the man who shot Baxter was fern Gary. The man I saw shoot Baxter was a light colored man, a thin man. When you were going to Zobel's what did you see? I saw a man strike Baxter (Who is my brother) with a whip and then saw another man strike him with a gunstock and broke it from the effects of the blow. When I had hold of my brother I said, "Do not strike him". When a man in a wagon in front to Zobel's store said, "Shoot him".  Then the man who I afterwards heard was Fern Gary shot three times. Then this man put the pistol in his pocket and drove off in the wagon.  Aetta (X) Hunter 

    John Waller sworn: Was present at the shooting in front of Zobel's store. Fern Gary cursed me and another man holding Fern. Baxter said turn the gun loose and he turned him loose. When let loose Fern made for Baxter. Then someone knocked Baxter down with a gunstock. Then Fern picked up the pistol and shot Baxter on the ground. Then those that had knocked Baxter down and shot him went off in a wagon. There was two on me and two on Baxter. Two on me had nothing to do with Baxter after they left me. It was my pistol. Had my pistol in a side pocket when it was snatched away. Had three wads in the pistol. Fuss occurred from Fern cursing me - looked like they were drinking.  John (X) Waller        

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 12 February 1889

An inquisition taken and dented in Newberry County on the 12th of February AD 1889 at the house of J. R. Leavell at Newberry Court House and then adjourned to the office of the County Commissioners before C. B. Buist Coroner for said County on view of the dead body of John Benson Tarrant by E. M. Evans, W. Johnson, B. M. Dennis, W. T. Guilliard, W. A. Fant, J. W. Coppock, W. M. Lane, L. W. Floyd, G. A. Langford, W. J. Lake, R. B. Lyons and C. C. Davis a lawful jury of inquest sworn and being charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said John Benson Tarrant came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said John Benson Tarrant came to his death at Newberry Court House on the afternoon of the 11th of February 1889 from fractures and bruises caused by machinery to couple cars on the Richmond/Danville RR on the morning of the 11th of February 1889. Witnessed our hands this 12th day of February 1889.  C. B. Buist, Coroner

D. M. Evans (Foreman), W. Johnson, B. M. Dennis, W. T. Guilliard, W. A. Fant, J. W. Coppock, W. M. Lane, L. W. Floyd, G. A. Langford, W. J. Lake, R. B. Lyons and C. C. Davis                       

EVIDENCE                                              

J. McIntosh sworn: The deceased, John Benson Tarrant, came to his death on the 11th of February 1889 from a fractional bruise of his right arm, a bruise on his right side, and a [??] of his right leg and foot. These wounds were received from cars running over him from his accounts.  J. McIntosh MD

Adjourned to the County Commissioners office at 10 o'clock am on Tuesday 12th February 1889.

J. A. Meredith Jr. sworn: I am a conductor of the freight train on the Laurens RR. On the 11th of February 1889 the train came from Laurens. J. B. Tarrant was a train handyman and came down on the same train. When we arrived at Newberry I shifted the train. Tarrant started to make couplings. I hollered to him not to go. He would go his work in between the cars. When I next saw him he was laying down between the tracks. I went to the river then and told some Negroes to take him out. Tarrant was employed by the company. Two wheels ran over his arm. The train was a little late. Tarrant's business was to couple cars. I told him not to go in because the cars were coming too close together and came too close. J. A. Meredith Jr.

   Willis R. Jones sworn:  I was standing in the cotton shed on the 11th of February. I saw Mr. Tarrant as he was between the cars for the purpose of coupling when the cars came together. He disappeared and when the cars moved back and opened I saw him sink down between the rails. I saw the truck move over him. I could not tell where it ran over him. The distance - we were 75-100 yards from him.  Fell down after the train opened.  Willis R. Jones                                                         

Samps Boatner sworn: I was at the depot on the 11th of February 1889. Am employed at the depot. I was there on the arrival of the Laurens train. I heard the alarm and came up to the cars and saw Mr. Tarrant being pulled out.  Samps (X) Boatner

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 3 May 1889

An inquisition taken and dented on the 3rd of May AD 1889 at the residence of Eso R. C. Chapman before C. B. Buist Coroner for said County on view of the dead body of R. C. Chapman by M. Foot Foreman, W. F. Ewart, J. S. Russell, C. C. Davis, W. A. Kinard, A. P. Pifer, G. M. Giradeau, D. W. Reid, J. N. Gary, R. C. Perry, L. M. Speers a lawful jury of inquest charged and sworn inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said R. C. Chapman came to his death, on the 3rd of May 1889 at Helena, by being run over on the track by the cars of the Laurens RR of the Richmond/Danville RR.                                           

C. B. Buist, Coroner

M. Foot Foreman, W. F. Ewart, J. S. Russell, C. C. Davis, J. B. Fellows, W. A. Kinard, A. P. Pifer, G. M. Giradeau, D. W. Reid, J. N. Gary, R. C. Perry, L. M. Speers

EVIDENCE

J. O. Meredith sworn: A few minutes after 5 o'clock the train stopped at the Helena. The train moved off track. Saw R. C. Chapman laying on the track. I was the first to reach him. Found his legs outside the track. Body lying on the inside of the rails. Both legs crushed. I got some of the bystanders to help me get him off the track. The doctor examining then took charge of the case. I spoke to him as the train rolled up. The train stopped there long enough for a person to get on safely.          James O. Meredith

Dr. G. W. Garmany sworn: I am a practicing physician. Held a post mortem examination of the case - died from the shock of the train passing over him. Left thigh broken off, close up the hip joint and the thighbone crushed to the knee. Right leg mutilated below the knee and also crushed off below the left ankle. I saw R. C. Chapman sitting against the register house before it happened.  G. W. Garmany MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 18 June 1889

An inquisition indented and taken 8 am on Paysinger's Place on the 18th of June AD 1889 at the before C. B. Buist Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Love Counts by William Dawkins, Silas Boyce, Brooks Sanders, Ed Hall, Thomas Palmer, T. S. Sligh, Simon Williams, T. S. Dawkins Jr., Young Sanders, E. Lee Hayes, J. P. Blair, Clinton Anthony, who being a lawful jury of inquest and charged and sworn inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Love Counts came to her death, on their oath  do say that the said Love Counts died on the 17th of June 1889 on Larson Paysinger's Place from congestion of the stomach and liver. In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands and seals this 18th day of June AD 1889.              C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. M. Dawkins, Silas (X) Boyce, Brooks (X) Sanders, Ed (X) Hall, Thomas (X) Palmer, T. S. Sligh, Simon (X) Williams, William (X) Dawkins, Young (X) Sanders, E. Lee (X) Hayes, J. P. (X) Blair, Clinton (X) Anthony

EVIDENCE                                              

Adeline Livingston: I knew Love Counts. Saw her on June 17, 1889 laying down on the doorsteps. Said she was very, very sick. I told her to go to bed but she said no. I started to take her to bed but she seemed to be dying. I left her and went for my brother, but by the time I returned she was cold. I then put her to bed. This was in the morning about 8 o'clock am. She died about 2 o'clock pm. She told me she felt very sick. When Mr. Hayes called for her to go to work. She was up all day on Sunday. She complained of her stomach. She was a healthy woman, quite stout, middle aged woman. Adeline (X) Livingston

   Florence Wilson sworn: Knew Love Counts for a long time. Saw her about 11 o'clock in the morning. She was complaining and was in bed, appeared to suffer considerably. She died about 3 o'clock in the day - appeared to die easily. Complained of her stomach and was vomiting and complaining of a sour stomach. Felt as if she was burning in her stomach.       Florence (X) Wilson

E. Lee Hayes sworn: I was with Love Counts when she died. Saw her during the day. She complained of pain in her breast. She was a healthy woman - was working on my place.                                
E. Lee Hayes

James M. Kibler MD sworn: Certificate. This is to certify that I have examined the body of Love Counts deceased and find that she came to her death from congestion of the stomach and liver. James M. Kibler MD Newberry, SC   June 18, 1889

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 12 August 1889      

An inquisition indented and taken on John Rice's Place in Newberry County on the 12th of August AD 1889 at the before C. B. Buist Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Rachel Green by Julius Wallace, W. F. Byrd, Griffin Byrd, Spencer Burton, Alex Green, Alex Byrd, Gabriel Green, Gilliam Johnson, Mayson Cheek, Paice Hill, John Rice and Albert Anderson who being a lawful jury of inquest and charged and sworn inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Rachel Green came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Rachel Green came to her death from natural causes. In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands and seals this 12th day of August AD 1889.    

C. B. Buist, Coroner

Julius Wallace (Foreman), W. F. Byrd, Griffin (X) Byrd, Spencer (X) Burton, Alex (X) Green, Alex (X) Byrd, Gabriel (X) Green, Gilliam (X) Johnson, D. M. (X) Cheek, Paice Hill, John Rice and Albert Anderson                                       

EVIDENCE                                              

James Green who being duly sworn deposed: That he is the husband of Rachel Green. She had been sick since last Sunday a week ago. Was a sickly woman. She was walking about on the 11th - just was complaining. She retired to bed after a prayer meeting about 11 o'clock. She laid on the bed and talked. I went to sleep. (I) was so used to her struggling in the bed. I called and she did not answer. I then called for aunt Green. Her son ran in and she was breathing heavily. He called her and she did not answer. He said she was dead. I then looked at her and thought her dead. All the rest of her family ran in and all thought her dead.  James (X) Green                                          

   John Rice sworn deposed: When James Green gave the alarm, I ran in and found Rachel Green dead. Had known Rachel green a long time and always knew her to be a sickly woman.

John Rice

   Banny Rice sworn deposed: After Rachel Green was dead I ran in and found the situation and that she was dead. Had known her a long time and thought her to be a sickly woman.                  

W. G. Houseal MD: I hereby certify that I have this day August 12, 1889 examined the dead body of Rachel green and in my opinion she came to her death from natural causes. 

W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 28 August 1889      

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry Court House at Newberry County Jail before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Hamp Mitchell on the 28th day of August 1889 by J. L. Kennerly Foreman, R. C. Williams, J. C. Myers, J. H. Hunt, C. M. Evans, James Singleton, Proctor Todd, W. F. Gaillard, W. H. Eddy, W. J. Rikard, H. E. Todd and T. E. Epting, a lawful jury of inquest and charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Hamp Mitchell came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Hamp Mitchell came to her death from organic heart disease and apoplexy of the brain. In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands and seals this 12th day of August AD 1889.         C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. E. Kennerly Foreman, R. C. Williams, J. C. Myers, J. H. Hunt, E. M. Evans, James Singleton, Proctor Todd, W. F. Gaillard, W. H. Eddy, W. J. Rikard, H. E. Todd and T. E. Epting

EVIDENCE                                              

Watt Holman sworn deposed: I saw Hamp Mitchell at 7 or 8 o'clock this morning. Brought him from his cell. He appeared to be ill. He did not complain. Brought him down to work about 9 o'clock. I went to feed the prisoners and found him in the outhouse sitting down. I went in there and he said to me, "Pop, I want to lay down". These were his last words. I and another prisoner brought him to the jail. He was living then. Hamp Mitchell then died in 10 minutes after bringing him in.

CROSS EXAMINED: He did not say anything to me that anything was the matter with him. He did not complain of any pain when he said he was blind. He said he felt his head was full of blood. His eyes looked yellow. He talked naturally. Had no shortness of breath. He looked as if he was worried to walk. He vomited when death appeared to strike him. As soon as we raised him he commenced to vomit.    Watt (X) Holman                                 

   Fencher Rutherford sworn deposed: I saw Hamp Mitchell at 9 o'clock. Saw him plowing at 9 o'clock. After that he and I came to breakfast and he returned and right back to plowing. He plowed one row and told me to take the plow and Hamp went and sat down. He said he had an awful pain under his left arm. He told me to plow on and if he felt better he would come back and plow again. He went with the guard. Howell and I heard him making a noise. And I called to Watt Holman to come and see about it. Watt Homan called me to come and help him bring Hamp Mitchell to lay down. I went and brought him to lay down. After breathing about 10 minutes he then died.              Fench (X) Rutherford

James M. Kibler MD sworn: This is to certify that Hamp Mitchell came to his death from organic heart disease and apoplexy of the brain.                Newberry SC, August 28, 1889, James M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 2 September 1889

An inquisition indented and taken at John Miller's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Jim Suber on the September 2, 1889 by J. B. Riser, W. L. Waters, Henry Querns, Julius Dominick, H. P. Dominick, Watt Guinn, James Cannon, Anthony Young, Ben Turner, John Bowers, John Dowd, Neil Renwick, a lawful jury of inquest and charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Jim Suber came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Jim Suber came to his death on Monday the 2nd of September 1889 at John G. Miller's place from the effects of a wound received from a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of Bill Davis at Cedar Grove Camp Meeting on Sunday 1st September 1889.  C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. B. Riser, W. L. Waters, Henry Querns, Julius Dominick, H. P. Dominick, Watt Guinn, James Cannon, Anthony Young, Ben Turner, John Bowers, John Dowd, Neil Renwick

EVIDENCE

Jane Turner sworn: Was at the Camp Meeting at Cedar Grove on Sunday September 1, 1889. Saw Jim Suber there. Had known him for a long time. He appeared to be in good health. There was a young man near. At 4 o'clock I heard a pistol fire. (I was) about 5 feet from the pistol when fired. I did not get up when I heard the pistol fire. About five minutes after the pistol fired I got up from my seat. Heard that Jim Suber was shot. Heard that Bill Davis had shot him. (I) saw Jim Suber after he was shot. He was sitting down on a chair. He sat down and held his head down. He was perfectly quiet. There were not many around him. Myself, Sarah Coleman, Boyce Clark, and Joicey Kibler. They were sitting down talking to each other. Some men lifted him up and put him in Cal Buford's wagon. Saw him again when Dr. Duckett was in the wagon, searching for the ball. Saw him when they took him out to the wagon and put him in a buggy and then took him out of the buggy as he could not sit down in the buggy and put him back in the wagon. And they brought him to John G. Miller's place. I saw afterwards in the house, he appeared to be in great pain and died at 7 or 8 o'clock.           Jane (X) Turner

   Sarah Coleman sworn: Was at the Camp Meeting at Cedar Grove on Sunday the 1st September 1889. Saw Jim Suber there. Was passing by when Jim Turner was sitting when the pistol was fired. Went to Mr. Miller's wagon. Heard Jim Suber was shot by Bill Davis. Helped to get Jim Suber on the wagon. He lay very still. They changed wagons at Mr. Buford's and put him in Alice Turner's wagon and then changed him to Mr. Miller's wagon and brought him to Mr. Miller's place. Did not see him again until after his death.              Sarah (X) Coleman                              

   Bill Davis sworn: Was at the Cedar Grove Camp Meeting on Sunday 1st September 1889.Met Jim Suber there. Knew Jim Suber before. Was raised with him. Was with him when I first got there. Saw him afterwards standing up. He spoke to me and said, "Have you wine". And I said, "I am here but late in getting here". I then went to Mr. Buford's wagon and stayed at the wagon. I have a pistol in my pocket, not concealed. All of a sudden the pistol went off and I did not know anyone was shot. Twenty minutes after the pistol went off I heard Jim Suber say he was shot and pointed to the place he was shot. I was astonished when I heard he was shot. He said, "Bill Davis, I am shot". I said he was not shot. He said it was done accidentally and could not be helped. The pistol had five chambers in it. Four were loaded with 38 cartridge. It had been waded for sometime. I was so shocked and astonished. I came home to Sheriff Riser's place where I live.

CROSS EXAMINED: Leaned down and Jane Turner said to me, "Put that pistol in another pocket". I took hold of it to put it in another pocket when it went off in my hand.             Bill (X) Davis
   Joicy Kibler sworn: Was at Cedar Grove Camp Meeting on Sunday 1st September 1889. Saw Jim Suber there. Was next to him when the pistol was fired. Jim Suber put his hand on his rib and stooped over. He was standing up when shot and then sat down. People came to him and offered to assist him. About a quarter of an hour after he was shot they put him in a wagon. The shot came from a pistol in Bill Davis'  pocket. Could not tell how it was done. Cannot tell whether it was an accident or not. There had been no quarrelling between Bill Davis and Jim Suber. Bill Davis had the pistol in his hand when it was shot.  Joicy (X) Kibler                

W. G. Houseal MD:  I hereby certify that I have this day September 2, 1889 examined the dead body of Jim Suber and find that he came to his death from a pistol shot wound, 4½ inches to the left of the navel and 2½ inches below, passing through the sigmoid flexure of the colon and striking the crest of the ileum.          W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 3 September 1889

An inquisition indented and taken by C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Calvin Graham on the 3rd September, 1889 at Wheeler's Bottom on the Columbia/Laurens & Newberry RR by C. B. Buist, Coroner and John E. Schumpert Foreman, J. W. Bowers, E. M. Matthews, A. H. Hawkins, S. J. Kohn, W. H. Dickert, J. W. Cannon, J. H. Kinard, A. P. Dominick, B. B. Schumpert, Alfred Jackson, Walter Sligh, a lawful jury of inquest charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Jim Suber came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Calvin Graham came to his death on their oaths do say that the said Calvin Graham came to his death on the 2nd of September at Wheeler's Place from the effects of a wound inflicted by a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of Lang Bowers.     C. B. Buist, Coroner

John E. Schumpert Foreman, J. W. Bowers, E. M. Matthews, A. H. Hawkins, S. J. Kohn, W. H. Dickert, J. W. Cannon, J. H. Kinard, A. P. Dominick, B. B. Schumpert, Alfred (X) Jackson, Walter (X) Sligh

EVIDENCE              

D. B. Baker sworn:  Knew Calvin Graham well. He was about 38 years of age. Was a peaceful, quiet man. I saw him on Monday the 2nd of September 1889. Saw him on Mr. Wheeler's bottom. Saw him at a little before 5 o'clock on the afternoon before he was shot. He was helping me to pick up some corn where the hands were working. I was in two steps of him when he was shot down. Lang Bowers shot him down. Lang Bowers shot him with a pistol. About 10 minutes before the shooting we heard them disputing. Calvin Graham came to me and said, "I have him out of the five dollars in marbles. I answered him, "The lucky man wins, if you won it, it is yours." He came up the ditch and sat down between me and Sampson Singley. In about 5 minutes up came Lang. Lang got within 50 yards of him. Lang said, "Give up the money or a fair game". Calvin said, "We have had it fair. It is my money". Lang said, "I am going to shoot you Calvin. Then made one or two steps towards me when Lang fired his pistol". The ball struck Calvin. He immediately fell. He did not move. He was dead. The ball had struck him in the head near the ear. Mr. Luther came up and I said I will report it to Judge Hair. I went and reported it. Hill Cromer said to Lang, "Why did you kill that man Lang?" Lang cocked his pistol and said, "If any man says anything I will go for him". Hill started toward him. Lang went 50 steps from us and fired again and that was the last I saw of him. Lang was within 4 or 5 steps of Calvin when he fired.  D. Baker

   Lawson Singley sworn: I knew Calvin Graham and Lang Bowers. Saw both on Monday 2nd September 1889. Saw Calvin Graham and Lang Bowers on Wheeler's bottom. I heard them disputing a little before 5 o'clock. They were disputing about a game of cards. I saw Lang Bowers shoot Calvin Graham. He advanced towards him and fired. Calvin fell and was shot in the head. He was four or five steps from Calvin when he fired. Lang went off after firing and I have not seen him since.  Lawson Singley                                   

   Logan Singley sworn: Did not see the shooting. Heard the shooting and saw Calvin Graham fall. Saw Lang Bowers after he had shot. He went and shot again and have not seen him since.      

Logan (X) Singley

   Hill Cromer sworn: After the shooting I saw Lang Bowers. Jesse Bowers said something about shooting Calvin Graham - and he said he would shoot him if he said anything. I saw him shoot Calvin Graham. (I) had my face towards Lang and back towards Calvin when Lang fired.                

Hill Cromer

James M. Kibler MD sworn: This is to certify that I have examined the body of Calvin Graham deceased and that he came to his death from the effects of a gun shot wound of the right side of the neck, the ball passing precisely across and entering the medulla oblongata.  James M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 10 September 1889

An inquisition indented and taken at Dr. Clark's Place on Tuesday September 10, 1889 before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Pink Clark by W. H. Eddy, A. G. Wilson, W. E. Sligh, W. T. Williams, H.K. Wilson, Richard Duckett, Allen Clark, George Miller, Pink Wilson, M. J. Fowler, John Brooks, Jim Caldwell, a lawful jury of inquest and charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Pink Clark came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Pink Clark came to his death on the 10th of September 1889 at the plantation of Dr. Clark from the effects of a wound received from a load of shot fired from a gun in the hands of Tom Butler on August 29, 1889.In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seals this 10th day September 1889.                

C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. H. Eddy (Foreman), A. Z. Wilson, W. E. Sligh, W. T. Williams, H.K. Wilson, Richard (X) Duckett, Allen (X) Clark, George Miller, Pink Wilson, M. J. Fowler, John Brooks, Jim Caldwell

EVIDENCE

Anne Butler sworn: Tom Butler was my husband. (We were) married about two years and happily. Saw Tom Butler on Thursday Aug. 29, 1889. Saw Tom Butler at sundown. Saw him going to Helena. Saw him Sunday night when he came home at 10 o'clock. Saw him at my house. Was in bed. No one was in bed with me. The door was not open. He pushed the door open and came in. He told me to strike a light. I did so and he then fired a gun and the first time - then fired a gun a second time and hit Tom Clark. He was standing up. Pink Clark ran out. Tom Butler started to go after Pink and then came back. He struck me and I went out. Pink Clark was not in bed with me. Pink Clark came to see me. Had known him for a long time. Tom Butler fired from jealousy. I knew when he said he was going to Helena he was coming back. Never knew he wanted to shoot Pink. Tom Butler shot as soon as he saw Pink Clark. Pink had never stayed at my house all night.                Anne (X) Butler

W. G. Houseal MD sworn: I hereby certify I have this day September 10, 1889 examined the dead body of Pink Clark and find that he came to his death from a gunshot wound of the right inguinal region middle of ___ ligament, the wounds ranging from the right to the sigmoid flexion of the colon - the small and large intestines.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 13 September 1889

An inquisition indented and taken at Mary Senn's on - 13th September, 1889 before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Maria Julia Green. The following indictment given by: C. J. Purcell, J. W. Gary, A. D. Smith, W. J. Lake, James Mann, R. C. Perry, B. B. Hunter, A. A. Parham, J. H. Chappell, G. S. Noland, H. Mitchell, C. Cabanas Jr. a lawful jury of inquest and charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Maria Julia Green came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Maria Julia Green came to her death on the 13th of September 1889 at the house of Mary Green at Newberry Court House from natural causes. In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seals this 13th day September 1889.  C. B. Buist, Coroner

C. J. Purcell, J. W. Gary, A. D. Smith, W. J. Lake, James Mann, R. C. Perry, B. B. Hunter, A. A. Parham, J. H. Chappell, G. S. Noland, H. Mitchell, C. Cabanas Jr.

EVIDENCE

Mary Green sworn: I am the mother of Maria Julia Green, the dead child, about 8 months old, a sickly child. Put it to bed on 10o'clock Thursday 12th September 1889. Was quiet when put to bed. (I) was up with it at 12 o'clock. It was fretting and then went to sleep. About 2 am the alarm bell of the factory ringing woke up Ann. The child was in the cradle. It was laying on its face. I put a red light count--- on it when I put it to bed. The cradle was on the right side of the bed. I reported the child smothered when I woke up. My husband is in the penitentiary.        

Mary (X) Green                                                                                                   

   Lucy Higgins sworn: I was here when the alarm was going. I thought the child smothered. The eyes were bloodshot and blood running out of the eyes. When I saw it was laying on the bed. Mary green had a stillborn child once.  Lucy (X) Higgins

   Margaret Nance: Live under the same roof with Mary Green. I came in when Mary Green was screaming. The child was on the bed. Blood was running from its eyes. The child fell out of bed three weeks ago and the mother said she was going to put the child hereafter in the cradle. It was a sickly child. The mother slept sound and had to be called after when the baby was crying. Margaret (X) Nance

   John Abney sworn: I was here at 10 o'clock. Left the same hour. Stayed at Mary Green's house last night. Stayed at Mary Green's all night. Child was lying on the bed when I came in from the next room.  John (X) Abney

   Howard Franklin sworn: Mary Green has a rowdy character. (She) is often drunk, was 11 o'clock in front of the house. Heard a man and woman talking.  H. Franklin

James M. Kibler MD sworn: This is to certify that I have thoroughly examined the body of Maria Julia Green deceased and that she shows the appearance of dysentery and chronic bronchitis which were sufficient to cause death.               Newberry SC, September 13, 1889,                 James M. Kibler MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 20 September 1889

An inquisition indented and taken at Mary Senn's on 20th September, 1889 at William Robertson's house at Newberry Court House before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Louisa Gray by: C. C. McWhirter, J. B. Suber, John M. Eddy, J. C. Chapman, Paul Johnstone, W. M. Shackleford, Gustavus Werber, W. S. Goodman, J. W. Kibler, R. T. Caldwell, B. M. Dennis and J. T. Watson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Louisa Gray came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Louisa Gray came to her death on the 20th of September 1889 at William Robertson's house in Newberry Town from hemorrhage of the lung. C. B. Buist, Coroner

C. C. McWhirter (Foreman), J. B. Suber, John M. Eddy, J. C. Chapman, Paul Johnstone, W. M. Shackleford, Gustavus Werber, W. S. Goodman, J. W. Kibler, R. T. Caldwell, B. M. Dennis and J. T. Watson

EVIDENCE              

Caroline Robertson sworn: I am the sister of the deceased Louisa Gray. She was a sickly woman. She was picking cotton all day on Thursday 19th Sept 1889.She came home at sundown in her usual health. When she came home I went to church and returned at 2 o'clock and talked with her in my room. She was in bed when I returned. . She did not complain. Spoke to her concerning church. I went to bed. She called me, "Caroline", in the morning, jumped out of bed and ran to my bed and commenced vomiting blood and did not speak again. She died in my arms and I laid her down on the floor. She had eaten nothing during the night. When I laid her on the floor she was dead. She had had no difficulty with anyone. I sent for Dr. Houseal and he came. I sent my husband William Robertson for the coroner as I had no idea of her sudden death and did not know the cause.  Caroline (X) Robertson

   William Robertson sworn: I am the brother-in-law of the deceased. She was a sickly woman. Saw her at 8 o'clock. (She) complained as usual of shortness of breath. My wife sent for a doctor this morning and when I came Louisa Gray was dead. My wife sent me for the coroner.

William (X) Robertson

   Ben Cannon sworn: (I) slept in the same house with mother and Louisa Gray. Saw Louisa at 9 o'clock last night. She was complaining. When I saw her this morning she was not yet dead, was in my mother's arms.       Ben Cannon

W. G. Houseal MD sworn: I hereby certify that I have this day Sept. 20, 1889 examined the dead body of Louisa Gray and find her death was caused by hemorrhage of the lungs. W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 12 October 1889

An inquisition indented and taken at J. M. Livingston's Place on 12th October, 1889 before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of David Butler by: John C. Goggans, David Wertz, J. W. Counts, D. G. Livingston, H. A. Moon, Larkin Boozer, Ben Lake, M. Spearman, S. Matthews, A. Parmore, W. Wheeler, G. Boyd a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said David Butler came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said David Butler came to his death on the place of J. M. Livingston on the 12th of October 1889 from natural causes. In witness whereby we have hereunto set our hands and seals this October 12, 1889. C. B. Buist, Coroner
John C. Goggans, David Wertz, J. W. Counts, D. G. Livingston, H. A. Moon, Larkin (X) Boozer, Ben (X) Lake, M. (X) Spearman, S. (X) Matthews, A. Parmore, W. Wheeler, G. Boyd

EVIDENCE

J. M. Livingston sworn: David Butler worked with me. He was 70 years old, a healthy man. Saw him about 6 o'clock this morning. He came to the gin house and said he was going to pick cotton and wanted a wagon to haul wood. Saw his dead body at 5 o'clock in the woods where he was working, ½ mile from the house. There were no marks of evidence on his person.                                

J. M. Livingston

This is to certify that I have examined the body of David Butler and am satisfied that he came to his death from natural causes.  James K. Gilder MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 19 November 1889

An inquisition indented and taken at the Town of Prosperity on 19th day of November October, 1889 before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of James Young by: J. J. Feller Foreman, Johnson A. Long, S. A. Bridges, D. C. Graham, R. G. Lowell, James G. Keitts, James Jackson, Robert Abrams, Levi Denson, Simon Wheeler, Peter Feagle, General Jackson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said James Young came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said James Young came to his death on the 19th of November 1889 at John A. Boland's cotton gin from accidentally being caught in the belt of the cotton gin. In witness whereby we have hereunto set our hands and seals this 19th day of November 1889     

C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. J. Feller Foreman, Johnson A. Long, S. A. Bridges, D. C. (X) Graham, R. G. (X) Lowell, James G. (X) Keitts, Levi (X) Jackson, Robert Abrams, Levi Denson, Simon (X) Wheeler, Peter (X) Feagle, General (X) Jackson

EVIDENCE

John D. Boozer sworn: I am the engineer. (I) was at the cotton gin at Prosperity on Tuesday 19th November 1889. James Young came to the gin at 9 o'clock am with a bag of cotton to be ginned. He unbound the cotton and placed it in the gin in use. I was at the well draining water at 12 o'clock and heard someone holler and saw James Young twirling around the shaft. I then ran and stopped the engine. When James Young was loosed from the shaft he was dead.              JohnD. Boozer     

   Ben Schumpert sworn: I am employed at the gin to pick cotton. Was at the gin on the day 19th November 1889. Saw James Young when he drove up to the gin with bales of cotton. He unloaded the cotton, drove around to the other platform. Saw him once after that. Did not see him again until I saw his dead body. Saw James Young before the accident happened. I saw him near the belt and told him not to put the belt on. Did not see him again until I saw his dead body. Ben (X) Schumpert

W. M. Schumpert (?) sworn: I hereby certify that I have this day the 19th day of November 1889 examined the dead body of James Young and find that his death was caused by compound fractures of the skull.  W. G. Houseal MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 27 November 1889

An inquisition indented and taken on 27th day of November October, 1889 before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County at Bluford Griffin's Place on view of the dead body of Nathan Griffin by: Calvin Williams, B. M. Gilliam, Sam Gilliam, C. J. Barre, W. D. Reeder, Walter Cain, Humphrey Adams, John Peyster, W. Chalmers, S. Suber, T. P. Paysinger a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said James Nathan Griffin came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Nathan Griffin came to his death on Tuesday the 22nd of November 1889 at Bluford Griffin's from the effects of a wound from a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of John Caldwell on Sunday 27th November 1889.  C. B. Buist, Coroner

S. (X) Suber (Foreman), Calvin (X) Williams, Bill (X) Gilliam, Sam (X) Gilliam, C. J. (X) Barre, W. D. (X) Reeder, Walter (X) Cain, Humphrey (X) Adams, John (X) Peyster, W. (X) Chalmers, T. P. (X) Paysinger, William Sligh

EVIDENCE

D. S. Greenwood sworn: You are acquainted with John Caldwell and Nathan Griffin?
Answer: They both lived on Bluford Griffin's place. Saw both of them on Sunday 27th November 1889.Saw them before the shooting happened. Was not present at the shooting. Heard that Nathan Griffin was shot on Sunday the 24th November 1889 at ½ past 12 o'clock. Saw Nathan Griffin after he was shot. (He) said he was shot accidentally by John Caldwell. (He) said John Caldwell was not to blame. Said he and John Caldwell were in the same room together. He asked John Caldwell to let him have two cartridges out of John Caldwell's pistol. (John) was drawing the cartridges when the pistol fired off and shot him in the stomach. They have always been friendly.  D. S. Greenwood

   G. W. Greenwood sworn: Knew both Nathan Griffin and John Caldwell. Saw Nathan Griffin 10 minutes before he died. He said he and John were in the same room and he asked John Caldwell for two balls to load his pistol. John was in the act of doing so when the pistol went off and shot him in the stomach.             G. W. Greenwood

   S. Gillam sworn:  Know both Nathan Griffin and John Caldwell. Saw Nathan Griffin on Monday 25th of November 1889. (He) told me that John Caldwell shot him accidentally. (He) said he was praying when I saw him. Both were friends. I live on Bob Welch's place. 

S. (X) Gillam

James M. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that Nathan Griffin came to his death from the effects of a gun shot wound of the abdomen, the ball passing from before backwards through the stomach.  Newberry SC, Nov. 27, 1889              James M. Kibler  

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 22 December 1889

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry Court House at the house of Hart Caldwell on Sunday 22 December, 1889 before C. B. Buist, Coroner of Newberry County on view of the dead body of Hart Caldwell by: Dan Henderson Foreman, Hawkins Benjamin, Elijah Phillips Jr., Mark Scurry, Lawrence Goggans, P. Bonds, Jack Jones, Josh Duncan, Albert Summers, David Barnet, Levi Heller, Robert Williams a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Hart Caldwell came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Hart Caldwell came to his death on Sunday the 22nd of December 1889 at his house at Newberry Court House from natural causes. Witness our hands and seals this 22nd December 1889               C. B. Buist, Coroner

Dan Henderson Foreman, Hawkins Benjamin, Elijah Phillips Jr., Mark Scurry, Lawrence Goggans, P. (X) Bonds, Jack P. (X) Jones, Josh P. (X) Duncan, Albert P. (X) Summers, David P. (X) Barnet, Levi P. (X) Heller, Robert P. (X) Williams

EVIDENCE

Minnie Caldwell sworn: I am the wife of Hart Caldwell. Saw him at 6 o'clock when he went to bed. He got up at ½ past 10 o'clock, went to bed again. Saw him this morning at daylight. He was dead. No one was in the room with him during the night. He had been sick sometime. (He) was out on the street the 21st. Just was complaining yesterday and last night.               Minnie (X) Caldwell            

   Sarah Davis sworn: (I) live in the same house with Hart Caldwell. I saw him on the 21st past. He went out on the street. Saw him at 5 o'clock on yesterday afternoon. Saw him in his room this morning. He was dead.  Sarah Davis                                        

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  From my knowledge of the physical condition of Hart Caldwell, he being under my treatment several weeks ago, and from the examination of his body today, I am satisfied that he died from natural causes.  W. G. Houseal MD

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School