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Colonial Cases

1881

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 19 January 1881

An inquisition taken at Mount Olive in Newberry County on the 19 day of Jan 1881 Before E. C. Longshore Coroner of aforesaid County upon the view of the dead body of Elizer Kinard then and there being dead by the oaths of W. A. Barre, C. Guir, O. B. Reeder, J. C. Gary, J. S. Gary, H. E. Lewis, George Bowers, Jordan Gary, Isaac Summers, Sam Goodman, Sam Williams, Glenn Suber, Being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the state of South Carolina where and by what means the said Eliza Kinard came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Eliza Kinard came to death from Apoplexy on the 8th of Jan 1881 in witness whereof E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.
E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County.

W. A. Barre, Foreman of Jury, C. Guir, P. B. Reeder, J. C. Gary, J. S. Gary, H. E. Lewis, George Bowers, Jordan Gary, Isaac (X) Summers, Sam (X) Goodman, Sam (X) Williams, Glenn (X) Suber

   Charley Kinard being duly sworn: (I am) husband of Eliza Kinard deceased. On the morning of Saturday Jan 8, I and wife was sitting talking together. The deceased was going to the cupboard and came near falling I caught her in my arms and she died in about half hour. Mr. H. Ohenson advised that Ferguson to have the Coroner summoned but I had Dr. Speaks called in. He came and advised me that he did not think it necessary to have an inquest. Charley (X) Kinard
   Steve Jones being duly sworn makes oath that: On Saturday morning Jan 8th I heard a hollering up to Charley Kinard's house. I ran to his house and seen Eliza Kinard in bed and supposed she was dead.  Steve (X) Jones

   Kate Ferguson Being duly sworn makes oath: On Friday Jan 7th Eliza Kinard and Martha Suber was disputing but passed no blame or threats. On Saturday morning Jan 8th I heard Charley Kinard hollering and I ran to his house and he told me that Eliza his wife was dead. We put her in bed and tried to warm her but she soon died. Her kinsman from Dr. Jim Williams place came and advised she be buried with out an inquest. Dr. Speaks came and stated if she was without an inquest she might be dug up and an inquest be held. Kate (X) Ferguson

Dr. J. Wm. Folk being duly sworn states that: I examined the Body of Eliza Kinard. I performed dissection and that I believed that the deceased came to her death from Apoplexy in as much as I found hypervenous[?] condition of the arteries and the deceased being and resembling those in statue and weight most hale to Apoplexy.  J. Wm. Folk

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 21 January 1881

An inquisition taken at Newberry C. H. in Newberry County on the 21 day of Jan 1881 before E. C. Longshore Coroner of aforesaid County upon the view of the body of an unknown colored man there and then being dead by the oaths of L. K. Vance, P. M. Linzer, W. W. Lane, John D. Brown, J. E. Johnson, W. L. Lake, W. S. Robertson, Samuel Veil, A. C. Counts, Noah McKenzie, Osca Jones, Robert Simkins, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the state of South Carolina where and by what means the said unknown person came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said unknown person came to his death from the affects of ardent spirits and exposure to the weather on the 20 day of Jan 1881 in witness where of I, E. C. Longshore Coroner of afore said County and the jurors Aforesaid to inquisition have interchangeably put our hand and seals the day and year above mentioned. E. C. Longshore Coroner of Newberry County

L. K. Vance, foreman of jury, P. M. Linzer, W. W. Lane, John D. Brown, J. E. Johnson, W. L. Lake, W. S. (X) Robertson, Samuel (X) Viel, A. C. (X) Counts, Noah (X) McKenzie, Oska (X) Jones, Robert (X) Simkins

   S. W. Teague, being duly sworn says: I went on the passenger (train) on Tuesday Jan 20th from Newberry to Prosperity and about half way between the train was stopped and the conductor went to see and found a man lying on the side of the track. The conductor said the man was not dead that there was no blood. Conductor said the man was drunk. The impression was the man was knocked off by the train. Samuel W. Teague

   Dr. G. W. Garmany and Dr. J. K. Gilder, being duly sworn say we made a postmortem examination. We found no serious injury connected with the skull after dissection and it is our opinion that he came to his death from the affects of ardent spirits and exposure to the wether.
                                                                                                                G. W. Garmany, M.D. & J. K. Gilder, M.D.

   Charlie Sims being duly sworn says: I went home from Town to Gravel Town. There was a man lying near Lloyd's store about dead or dying. I helped to put him in the wagon and carried him to the guardhouse. Did not know the man.  C. M. Sims

   Simm Cannon being duly sworn says: On Tuesday evening Jan 20th I went down the rail road below Gravel Town where it was reported there was a man lying near the track. Think he was drunk. Did not know the man. I helped to bring him up to Lloyd's Store. While at Lloyd's Store I thought he was dying. The man tried to talk but could not understand what he said.

Simn (X) Cannon

   Albert Jones being duly sworn says: On Tuesday evening Jan 20th about 9 pm I heard there was a man lying on the side of the rail road holding some bushes in his hands. He tried to talk but I could not understand what he said. Except I asked him where he did come from he said salt water but did not say anything else that I could understand. He was helped upon his feet and with the assistance of two men walked about seventy five yards There was no bruise on his person as I could see.  Albert (X) Jones

 

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 15 February 1881

An inquisition taken at Tom Lane's plantation in Township No. Six in Newberry County on the 15th day of Feb 1881 Before E. C. Longshore Coroner of aforesaid County upon view of the dead body of Lucinda Davis there and then being dead by the oaths of G. W. Senn, H. B. Senn, C. S. Cleland, L. C. Johnston, J. S. McClung, Abner Mangum, Bob Mangum, Sam Alston, Alfred Shell, James Teague, William Burton, Aaron Rook Being lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the state of South Carolina where and by what means the said Lucinda Davis came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Lucinda Davis came to her death by fire accidentally on the 14th day of Feb 1881 in witness whereof I E. C. Longshore Coroner of aforesaid County and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County.

G. W. Senn, foreman of jury, H. B. Senn, C. S. Cleland, L. C. Johnston, J. S. McClung, Abner (X) Mangum, Bob (X) Mangum, Sam (X) Alstan, Alfred (X) Shell, James (X) Teague, William (X) Burton, Aaron (X) Rook

   Mrs. C. C. Pitts being duly sworn says: I was in the house. Could smell cloth burning. Thought it was fire. I went as quick as I could and when I got to door she was lying on right side. Don't know whether she was dead or not. I smothered the fire out with my hands and picked her up and ran out in yard with her. By that time Frannie had got there with a bucket of water and I poured that on her the child Lucinda Davis was three years old. Her mother was in the field in back of the plantation. I then went in put out the fire in the bed about 4 o'clock the 14th day of Feb 1881. My husband John Pitts was the first one got there after the accident.  C.. C. Pitts

   John Pitts being duly sworn says: I was in the field and my little girl Frannie came running and told me Lucinda Davis was burnt and that the house also was on fire. I came to the house and found her dead lying in the yard where my wife had laid her. My wife had put out the fire by the time I got there. The child's mother was in the field where I was cutting sprouts. I don't think it was carelessness on the part of the child's Mother.              J. S. Pitts

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 8 March 1881

An inquisition indented taken at J. A. and P. B. Workman place Township No. Six in Newberry County the eight day of March AD 1881 before E. C. Longshore Coroner upon view of the dead body of Fieldin McDowell, there and then being dead by the oaths of J. E. Cooley, J. A. Workman, Preston Dominick, Joe Davenport, Slandmore Davenport, Elijah Floyd, J. M. Workman, J. H. Davenport, D. P. Champion, Richard Cavil, Lee Pitts, Scott Suber being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Fieldin McDowell came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Fieldin McDowell came to his death from a gun shot wound at J. A. and P. B. Workman place on Monday night march 7th AD 1881 discharged from an infield rifle in the hands of Simon Johnson, and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths do say that aforesaid Simon Johnson in manner and form then and there feloniously did kill and murder against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid in witness whereof I E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  E. C. Longshore Coroner of Newberry Co.

J. E. Cooley, foreman of jury, J. A. Workman, Preston Dominick, Joseph Davenport, S. C. Davenport, Elijah (X) Floyd, J. M. Workman, D. Champion, Richard (X) Cavil, J. H. Davenport, Lee (X) Pitts, Scott (X) Suber

   P. B. Workman being duly sworn testifies: I overtook my wagons, which had been to Town on Monday March 7th 1881 near Job Jenkins house. About dark there I found Cath. McDowell, Alice McDowell, Wash McDowell, with Fieldin McDowell. I said Fieldin what do you mean by the manner in which you have treated my mules and what does all this fuss mean. He said Job had tried to kill him and them there have come to defend me. I said, "Stop and I will see what all this fuss means", and he stopped. I told Wash to go to the lot and put up Fieldin's mules. They carried Fieldin home. Wash came and said Fieldin was worse than I supposed and for me to let him go for the Doctor. Fieldin said Job had struck him in the head with a piece of plank. He went for the Doctor. While we were in the house dressing Fieldin's wound Mark and Wash went to Simon's house to find out the particulars of the fuss between Fielding and Job that day. They said they asked Job what they fussed about and Simon took it up and said get out and get away or he would bore more holes through them than they could carry. They then came. I had not been in my house long until Simon came and called me out and said he wanted me to see Wash and Mark and make them behave. They threatened to shoot him. His gun was not loaded but now I have my gun well loaded and if they trouble me I will hurt somebody. I said go home and rest easy, they shall not come to your house any more tonight. You must not say anything to them as I will manage everything. Simon said I will say something to him as he has threatened to shoot me. I am going to keep my gun loaded until this thing is settled. Wash, Mark, and Fieldin went by Jack's house. Fieldin said, "Go into your holes. We are here." Then I heard Simon say, "I am here too." Simon said to Mark, "You came to my house awhile ago and wanted to shoot me. I am ready for you. I am not afraid of you nor your gun." Mark said this to Simon. Wash said come on home we don't want any fuss. Simon following said, "God d--n you. You came to the house and wanted to shoot me. I am ready for you." Mark said, "Simon you need not be following me up with your gun. I am not afraid of you nor your gun either. " Mark said, "There is no use of getting behind that tree. If you will come out here I will fight you a fair fight or if you will let me go to the boss and get his pistol I will shoot with you now if you want to shoot me, shoot me. I have no pistol." Simon said god--n you - shoot me. About then I heard the gun fire and saw some one drop after the gun shot. I heard a cap bust but no explosion. Everything was perfectly quiet for a few seconds, then I heard someone say that, "You have killed my brother."  I then went down there and found Fieldin McDowell upon the ground. I caught hold of Fieldin and he had no pulse and I pronounced him dead. There was no one there except Chattie and Alice McDowell and Cath. McDowell. I said where are the other boys. They said Simon and Job had run and Mark and Wash followed after them. Said Simon had killed their brother. In a few minutes Mark and Wash came up through the cotton patch. Mark said, "Boss, I followed them so close that Simon dropped his gun. Here it is." I said are you certain that Simon dropped the gun?" He said, " I am certain. (I) was in three feet of him and he dropped the gun and I picked it up and I called Wash and said lets go back. I have Simon's gun." I said are you certain which of them did the shooting. Mark said yes sir, Simon shot at me and he caught the load. Then Job bursted a cap at me. He, Job, had a pistol. Said god-d-- you I will kill you. I never saw Fieldin after twelve o'clock until I got home. He was sober when at Town but was under the influence of whiskey when I got home. This was about 9 or ten o'clock last night and about one hundred yards from my house back in Fieldin's yard. Simon and Fieldin were not quarreling in Fieldin's yard but Mark and Simon were. P. B. Workman




 

   Mark McDowell being duly sworn testifies: Last night about 9 or 10 o'clock Monday March 7th 1881 I was carrying Fieldin McDowell home. Simon was at Jack Leak's house and I was passing. He said I allow to kill you. I said if you allow to kill me go ahead. I am not afraid of you. I have done you nothing. Don't dodge behind a tree to kill me. Then Fieldin was drunk, staggered in front of me just as Simon shot and was killed. Then Job bursted a cap at my brother Wash. Job said look out, God d--n you I mean to kill you. Job's weapon[?] I could not see whether a gun or pistol it was after dark. The moon was shining. I was about 4 feet from Fieldin when Simon shot. Simon then broke and run. Job ran also. I ran after Simon. I said you have killed my brother. You had as well kill me too. He did not answer but kept running. I followed him about 200 yards. As Simon jumped the ditch he dropped his gun. Then I picked it up. Job kept his weapon. We were in Fieldin's yard. I asked Job what he and Fielding had had a fuss about. Job did not answer me but Simon said to me, "I am going to shoot your brains." This was at Job's house.  Mark (X) McDowell                                                                                                                                  

   Wash McDowell being duly sworn testifies: Last night about 9 or 10 o'clock as I was carrying my brother home March 7th 1881 Simon Johnson and Job Johnson were at Jack Leak's gate. Simon said to Mark, " I am going to shoot you Mark," and myself walked on carrying Fielding's home as he was drunk. Mark said to Simon, "Well shoot me. I am not afraid of you." Simon said just stand out then and as he said this Fielding staggered in front of Mark and Simon shot and killed Fielding and Job said yes and God d__n you Wash I am going to kill you. He then burst a cap on a pistol at me. The pistol did not fire. Simon and Job broke and run and Mark and myself ran after them about 200 yards and Simon dropped his gun and Mark said he had Simon's gun and that we would go back home. Simon jumped the ditch and went on toward his house. I lost sight of Job. Mark gave me the gun and I gave it to P. B. Workman. Simon's gun was an Enfield rifle. The reason we stopped was because we were in Fielding's yard and Simon run up on us and said he was going to shoot Mark. Then Mark and myself turned Fielding loose and Mark said to Simon, "I'd then get from behind that tree if you are going to shoot me." We did not have any weapons. I then went in Fielding's house and Mark went away.  Wash Holmes (X) McDowell
   Chattie McDowell being duly sworn testifies: about 8 or 9 o'clock last night March 7th 1881 Simon said to Mark, "I am going to shoot you God d--n heart out of." This was at Jake Leak's gate. He followed on in our yard and got behind an oak tree. I am Fielding's wife. I had been up to Catherine's house and was going to my house and Mark and Wash were carrying Fielding home. Fielding was drunk. Mark said to Simon, "If you are going to shoot me come from behind that tree." Then Fielding staggered in front of Mark and Simon shot and killed Fielding. Then Job Johson said to Wash, "God d--n you I am going to shoot you," and snapped a cap at Wash. Then Simon and Job ran across the cotton patch. Wash and Mark ran after them. Mark said he had Simon's gun that he had dropped it.Chattie (X) McDowell

   Catharine McDowell being duly sworn testifies Monday night March 7th 1881 about 9 or 10 o'clock as I got to the corner of Jack's yard I saw Fielding fall. I was not more than 40 feet from Fielding and Simon Johnson when Fielding fell. Simon shot him in his own yard. He shot him with a gun. This was in Fielding's yard. Then I saw Job Johnson point his hand with a pistol in it at Wash and said, "Look out God d--n you soul," and I heard a cap burst. Then Simon and Job ran and Mark and Wash ran after them.  Catharine (X) McDowell

   Alice McDowell being duly sworn testifies: About 9 or 10 o'clock last night as I was going from my house to Fielding's I saw a man fall in Fielding's yard near an oak tree. I saw Simon Johnson shoot and when I went up to the man who I saw fall I found my brother Fielding McDowell dead upon the ground. Then I heard Job Johnson say to my brother Wash to look out and heard a cap explode. I did not hear Simon say anything after he shot. In a few minutes after I heard the gun shot I saw Wash and Mark coming back toward Fielding's house with a gun which they said was Simons this was Monday March 7th 1881. Alice (X) McDowell

John Simpkins being duly sworn testifies: Last night about 9 or 10 o'clock I was in Jack Leak's house. I heard a gun shot before this. I saw Simon with a gun in his hand at Jack's gate. He had been to Mr. P. B. Workman's house and I heard him say to Mr. Workman, "Boss I want you to decide this fuss." Mr. Workman said, "Boys do you all go home and have no fuss and you Simon come to me in the morning and I will decide this fuss."  John (X) Simpkins                

   Mack Spearman being duly sworn testifies: Monday night March 7th 1881 I was at Mr. P. B. Workman's house and Simon Johnson came up with a gun in his hand. Simon went to Jack Leak's house ahead of me. Then I left Mr. Workman's house and went to Jack Leak's house and Simon was at Jack's gate when I got there with a gun in his hand. I heard Mr. Workman tell Simon and Job to go home and have no fuss and he would rectify everything in the morning Job Johnson had no gun.               Mack Spearman

Dr. D. W. Patten being duly sworn testifies: In compliance with the order of E. C. Longshore Coroner of Newberry County I examined the body of Fielding McDowell. I found that the said Fielding McDowell came to his death from a gunshot wound in the upper part of the chest just below the left clavicle. From the character of the wound and it locality it must have proved instantly fatal.              D. W. Patten

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 4 April 1881

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry, C.H. in Newberry County on the 4th day of April 1881 AD, Before E. C. Longshore Coroner of aforesaid County upon view of the body of George H. Bowers then and there being dead, by the oaths of Pat. H. Duckett, H. Singleton, L. Y. Vance, Thomas Cook, J. W. Bass, S. J. Wooten, J. B. Leonard, 0. P. Saxon, P. G. Williams, D. G. Dorroh, H. H. Killian, L. F. Longshore, Being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said George H. Bowers came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said George H. Bowers came to his death from some organic disease of the heart on the 4th day of April A.D. 1881 in witness where of I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County

Pat. H. Duckett, foreman of Jury, H. Singleton, L. Y, Vance, Thomas Cook, J. W. Bass, S. J. Wooten, J. B. Leonard, 0. P. Saxon, P. 0. Williams, D. G. Dorroh, H. H. Killian, L. F. Longshore
   O. B. Butler duly sworn April 4th 1881 says: I came to the mill door this morning. Mr. Robinson says there is a man dead or he thought was dying, our Yankee. I believe I went over to where he was - called Dr. Simpson to him. I thought he was dying. I told the doctor if he could do anything for him to do it. He opened his mouth and said, "Butler, I think he is dead". I went to the chief of police and he sent me to Mr. Pool, Mayor of the Town, and ordered the body carried to the guardhouse. One hour before the deceased Mr. George Bowers was found dead in the street. He, Bowers, was in my mill and seemed to be in as good health as I ever saw him. He fell dead about twelve o'clock today.  O. B. Butler.

   Easter Johnson being duly sworn April 4th 1881 says: Mr. Bowers, the deceased, was walking near Mr. Leavell's Brick building and fell very suddenly and groaned as if he was dying and after a little some one went for Mr. Butler and he came to him.      Easter Johnson

Dr. J. K. Gilder, being duly sworn: I have this day examined the body of Mr. George L. Bowers and believe that he came to his death from some organic disease of the heart. \J. K Gilder, M.D.
April 4th 1881

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 18 April 1881

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry C. H. in Newberry County on I8th day of April AD, 1881 before E. C. Longshore Coroner of aforesaid County upon the view of the body of Hamp Sanders then and there being dead by the oaths of O. B. Butler, B. B. Schumpert, J. B. Chambers, James H. Henderson, C. D. Henderson, J. S. Daniel, Jess. Beasly, Albert Jones, George Benson, Wash. Golding, Ivy Lesone, Silas Preston, John Boyd, Early Golaway, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Hamp Sanders came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Hamp Sanders came to his death from a shock being effects of a crushed arms under the car wheel accidentally on the I8th day of April AD I88I. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.               E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County.

O. B. Butler, foreman of jury, B. B. Schumpert, 1. B. Chambers, James H. Henderson, C. D. Henderson, J. S. Daniel, Jess (X) Beasly, Albert (X) Jones, George (X-) Benson, Wash (X-) Golding, Ivy (X-) Lesane, Silas (X) Preston, John (X) Boyd, Early (X) Golaway

   George Pressley, Being duly sworn testifies: Hamp Sanders was coupling the cars about two o'clock am I8th day of April 1881. He fell and his arm was caught under the car wheel. I went to him, carried him to the ticket office. This occurred about one hundred yards from the ticket office. It was not the carelessness of the engineer or any one. He (Hamp) told me that his foot slipped and he fell in the ditch. The car ran over his left arm. He wanted me to go for the Doctor.  Dr. McIntosh, Garmany, Gilder and O. B. Mayer Jr. were all summoned and all came to see him before he died. The conductor's name was John Folk. Smith was the engineer.  George Pressley

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 14 May 1881

An inquisition indented taken at A. J. Longshore Plantation in Township No. 6 in Newberry County the 14th day of May AD 1881 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon the view of the body of Hettie Glenn then and there being dead by the oaths of J. C. Stewart, W. E. Higgins, G. P. Hendrix, S. R. Reeder, J. F. Smith, John Longshore, Joe Christie, Silas Dewalt, Ace Longshore, Ben Reeder, Press. Turner, Mack Spearman being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Hettie Glenn came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Hettie Glenn came to her death from heart disease the 13th day of May AD 1881 in witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.       E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County.

J. C. Stewart (Foreman), W. E. Higgins, G. P. Hendrix, S. R. Reeder, J. F. Smith, John Longshore, Joe (X) Christie, Silas (X) Dewalt, Ace (X) Longshore, Ben (X) Reeder, Press. (X) Turner, Mack (X) Spearman

   Willis Glenn, being duly sworn testifies: I called Hettie in the night. The baby was crying. I called her but she did not answer. It was about 12 o'clock in the night she was well as common when she went to bed. When I found her she was dead. I sent for Israel and he and his wife came. There were no threats whatever. Her health had been good as usual. She died the 13th night of May AD 1881. Willis (X) Glenn

   Israel Ebo being duly sworn testifies: I went to Willis' house about 12 o'clock and called and Hettie answered. She talked as well as common as she ever did. I asked if they had seen my mule and she said not. I went home about one o'clock. Willis sent for and said his wife Hettie was dead. I went on over there and found her. She was dead. It was the 13th of May AD 1881.                            Israel (X) Ebo        

Dr. John M. Thompson, being duly sworn: I certify that Hettie Glenn came to her death from disease of the heart.   John M. Thompson, M.D.

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 5 July 1881.                                                                                             

An inquisition indented and taken at Abner Reeder plantation in Township No. 5 in Newberry County on 5th day of July AD 1881 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for aforesaid County upon the view of the dead body of John Smith then and there being dead by the oaths of F. H. Schumpert, J. K. Schumpert, A. W. Reeder, Hillery S. Ruff, Coleman Reeder, George Conner, Alfred Adams, Sam Roberson, Morg. Davis, Perry Underwood, Humphry Adams, Harry Clark, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said John Smith came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said John Smith came to his death from natural causes on the 4th day of July AD 1881. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry Co

F. H. Schumpert (Foreman), J. K. Schumpert, A. W. Reeder, Hillery S. Ruff, Coleman (X) Reeder, George  (X) Conner, Alfred  (X) Adams, Sam  (X) Roberson, Morg. (X) Davis, Perry  (X) Underwood, Humphry  (X) Adams, Harry  (X) Clark

   Harriet Smith, Being duly sworn testifies: We all ate supper together. The boys went off. John and I sat in the room until we smoked. John went to one side. He had prayer. Then he came in the other room and shut the window and then he opened it and stood there a few minutes and then fell back on the bed. And then I asked him what was the matter and he said nothing. I went there then and put him entirely on the bed and at that time he was limber and I seeing him commence to throw up. I raised him up so he could throw up without doing it on the bed. I then sent Willis over to Mr. A. W. Reeder's house for some Camphor and when he returned John was dead, which was about 9 o'clock pm 4th day of July 1881.                Harriet Smith

   T. S. Reeder, Being duly sworn testifies; I suppose it was about 9 o'clock when Willis Brown came over to the house and called and by this time he did not know which. I jumped up out of bed and came over to John's house and when I got to the door Harriet Smith was standing at the fireplace. I asked her where John was and she said he was in the little end of the house. There was a boy standing there. I did not know who he was. I went to John and took hold of him and he was perfectly cold and I turned to Harriet and said, "Harriet, he is dead." No threats heard of by anyone.  T. S. Reeder

I, James McIntosh, MD a practicing physician in Newberry Co. S.C. on this July 5th 1881 certify that I have examined the body of John Smith deceased and find no mark of any external violence nor external cause to account for his death and in my opinion the deceased came to his death from natural causes.          James McIntosh

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 18 September 1881

An inquisition indented and taken at Elizabeth Spearman's plantation in Township No. six in Newberry County on the 18th day of September AD 1881 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for aforesaid County upon the view of the dead body of Eugene Harris then and there being dead by the oaths of T. F. Hendrix, W. T. Hendrix, H. B. Hendrix, J. H. Hendrix, G. P. Hendrix, J. S. Longshore, Mack Spearman, Mack Kibler, Ben. Reeder, Gen. Boyd, John Butler, A. W. Longshore, Ben Stewart, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Eugene Harris came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Eugene Harris came to his death from bruises and contusions in the abdomen caused accidentally on the 17th day of September AD 1881. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  

E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County

T. F. Hendrix, Foreman of jury, W. T. Hendrix, H. B. Hendrix, J. H. Hendrix, G. P. Hendrix, J. S. Longshore, A. W. Longshore, Mack (X) Spearman, Mack (X) Kibler, Ben. (X) Reeder, Gen. (X) Boyd, John (X) Butler, Ben Stewart

   Ned Wilson being duly sworn testifies: Eugene Harris was standing on the inside of the cogwheel and cut at the mules when the cogwheel and trundle head caught him around the body. He said to me, "Ned stop the mules". I did so. He then fell upon the ground and said, "I am dead .Oh Lord." He was standing upon the sweep in order to keep the rain from blowing in upon him I pulled the sweep backward in order to get him unfastened. Then Silas Dewalt came from upstairs and carried him to the house.              Ned (X) Wilson

   Silas Dewalt Being duly sworn testifies: I was up on the gin house ginning cotton when I heard Eugene call out to Ned to stop the mules. I then went down under the gin house and saw Eugene lying upon his right side resting upon his elbow. I asked him where he was hurt. He said, "I am hurt in my stomach." He was standing upon the sweep and went to cut the mules. The cogwheel caught him before he could dodge. He told me this when I asked him where he was hurt. I carried him to Ben Reeder's house. He could not stand up. This was on Saturday Sept. 17th I881. He lived about two hours after being carried to Ben's house.  Silas (X) Dewalt

   John Spearman, being duly sworn testifies: I was up in the gin house assisting Silas Dewalt in ginning cotton when I heard Eugene Harris say to Ned Wilson to stop the mules. I went down after Silas and saw Eugene lying upon the ground under the cogwheel. Silas Dewalt carried him to Ben's house. He lived about two hours after being carried to Ben's house. John (X) Spearman

               

Dr. J. M. Thompson being duly sworn testifies: I certify that Eugene Harris came to his death from bruises and contusions in the abdomen.   John M. Thompson, M.D.

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 4 October 1881

An inquisition indented and taken at F. M. Dominick's plantation in Township No. 5 in Newberry County on the 4th day of October AD 1881 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for aforesaid County upon the view of the dead body of Mary Suber then and there being dead by the oaths of G. S. Sligh, T. H. Chalmers, J. M. Chalmers, W. L. King, T. W. Davis, J. M. Glymph, T. H. Davis, Pet. Gillam, William Gillam, Albert Gillam, Newton Wilson being a lawful jury who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Mary Suber came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Mary Suber came to her death on the 3rd day of Oct AD 1881 from injuries received from the hands of her father Seaborne Suber on the 15th day of Sept. 1981 in witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County

G. S. Sligh, Foreman of jury, T. H. Chalmers, J. M. Chalmers, W. L. King, T. W. Davis, J. M. Glymph, T. H. Davis, Pet. Gillam, William Gillam, Albert (X) Gillam, Newton (X) Wilson
   Jim Ruff the father of Sebe Suber being duly sworn testifies says: He was in Sebe Suber's on Thursday night the 15th Sept and no one was in said house but Sebe Suber, and Mary Suber, and myself and Mary Suber. The deceased Sebe Suber wanted to whip Mary and she ran. Sebe caught her and brought her back I was lying down on my bed. I rose up and saw Sebe and heard the blows. I counted as many as 280 blows and he kept on whipping her bad. He tied (her)up with a rope to the joist. I heard hard blows. I am an old man. I know I could not have stood the blows she received. I saw her limping next morning. I did not hear her complain. Before the whipping when Sebe had whipped Mary the deceased he went out and I fell asleep. He had often whipped her very bad. Sebe whipped all his children. One Willie (was beaten) very bad and he soon after died and he was older than the deceased.            Jim (X) Ruff

   Jim Shepard being duly sworn testifies: I was in the yard some 100 ft from Sebe Suber's house. I heard some one in Sebe's house sulking blows. I heard some one hollering as if they were being whipped. I saw Mary Suber next day after whipping early in the morning. (She was) very stupid and unable to milk her cow. I could tell how many blows I heard but they were very hard as if some one was beating on bed cloths. I saw cotton plastered on her shoulders on some sores. I heard Mary say to Sam Chapell that her daddy had beat her so bad. I heard no complaint of her being sick either that morning or before. I heard Sebe say before that his children should not rule him. He would kill them first.  Jim (X) Sheppard

   Hanna Young being duly sworn testifies: I was at home on Thursday night Sept 15th. I heard no blows or whipping that night. I saw Mary Suber next morning. She asked me to milk her cow as she could not stoop down as she was so sore where her daddy had beat her. She showed me sores on her stomach side & back they looked like fresh bruises. I saw her every day. She was up before whipping. She had measles after whipping.  Hannah (X) Young

   J. F. Miller being duly sworn testifies: I know Sebe Suber I knew him, Sebe Suber, to be cruel to his daughter the deceased, whipping her unmercifully some times with a plow line. I saw the deceased after the whipping hobbling, trying to get to the well. A day or two after the whipping she held her cloths out as if trying to keep them from touching her. I called Dr. Folk to go to see her and if she needed any help in his power for him to give what help he could. I believe she was badly beaten.      J. F. Miller

   J. W. Folk being duly sworn testifies says: I was called on Tuesday October 4th 1881 by the Coroner to see the body of a colored girl said to be Mary Suber. I saw scars on shoulders, back, bowels. I made incisions of the bowels, abdomen, and thorax exploring the bowels, liver, lungs, and heart. I found the bowels inflamed as if from bruises. The liver was also to some extent enlarged and not in a healthy condition. Both lungs were engorged, also the stomach and diaphragm. The condition of the lungs were such as would produce death and I believe injuries received from whipping caused death. J. W. Folk Dr of Med

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 7 October 1881

An inquisition indented and taken at Sam Davenport's Plantation in Township No. 8 in Newberry County on the 7th day of Oct AD 1881 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for aforesaid County upon the view of the dead body of Ophelia Davenport then and there being by the oaths of L. H. Dennis, Harrison Werts, William Williams, Johnson Williams, Rush Gary, John William, Ferman Jones, Luis McMorris, Jeff Wheeler, Joe Stephens, Simon Galman, H. J. S. Langford being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ophelia Davenport came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Ophelia Davenport came to her death from a pistol shot wound from the hands of Joe Davenport accidentally, he being only eight years old. The wound was inflicted on the 6th day of August AD I88I in witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.   E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County

L. H. Dennis, foreman of jury, Harrison (X) Werts, William (X) Williams, Johnson (X) Williams,

Rush (X) Gary, John (X) Williams, Ferman (X) Jones, Louis (X) McMorris, Jeff (X) Wheeler, Joe (X) Stephens, Simon (X) Galman, H. J. S. Langford.

   John M. Thompson being duly sworn testifies that: Ophelia Davenport came to her death from inflammation of the brain caused by a bullet wound that entered over the left eye and passed around beneath the skin and was cut out three inches behind the left ear. John M. Thompson, MD
   Pallis Davenport being duly sworn testifies: On Friday morning Aug 6th I88I on John Long's Place, I was picking cotton next my house. I left two children at my house and my baby was on the bed. I heard a pistol shot fired from the direction of my house. Then my little girl called me and said Joe had shot the baby in the eye. Joe is my child, a boy about eight and half years of age. I went to the house and found the baby in Joe's arms and I took it from him and saw it was shot over the right eye. I sent for my husband, William Davenport, and he went for the Doctor who then cut the ball out. Joe acknowledged that he did shoot the baby but was only playing with the pistol. The Doctor came to see it twice after it was shot. It died in fifteen days after it was shot. I did not know that I had to notify the Coroner of its death.               Pallis (X) Davenport

   William Davenport being duly sworn testifies: I am the father of four children. I live on Mr. John Long's place. When I got home from where I was working, about a quarter of a mile from my house, I found my wife Pallis with the baby in her arms shot over the right eye. She said Joe had shot it. I then went for Doctor Thompson who got to my house in the afternoon about half hour by sun and cut the ball out of my baby's head, which was behind the right ear. This was on the 6th day of Aug 1881 on Mr. John Long's place. She lived until Sept 9th 1881. We buried her on Sept 10th 1881 at Mr. Sam Davenport's graveyard. Joe got the pistol out of the box and was playing with it. Joe is about eight and half years old. I did not know that the Coroner had to be notified of the death of my child, as the shooting was accidental.                 William (X) Davenport

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 11 October 1881

An inquisition indented and taken at Barney Floyd plantation in Township No. Six in Newberry County on the 11th day of Oct 1881 AD before E. C. Longshore Coroner for aforesaid County upon view of the dead body of Henry Neal then and there being dead by the oaths of J. F. Burton, C. D. Burton, Charley J. Floyd, G. P. McEntire, Jim Wright, William Burton, Jim Lake, Gus Davis, Charley Allen, Wash. Burton, Aaron Thomas, Edward Boatwright being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Henry Neal came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Henry Neal came to his death from the affects of a kick from a mule on the I0th day of Oct AD I88I in witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County.

J. F. Burton, Foreman of jury, C. D. Burton, C. J. Floyd, G. P. McEntire, Jim (X) Wright, William (X) Burton, Jim (X) Lake, Gus (X) Davis, Charley M Allen, 'Wash (X) Burton, Aaron (X) Thomas, Edward Boatwright
   J. B. Floyd being duly sworn testifies: On Sunday morning before breakfast Henry Neill came up to the yard for the keys and fed mules and called my little son & said for them to tell me to come there. I went to the lot where I found lying on the right hand side of the stable door. I asked him what was the matter. He said that bad mule had kicked him. I asked him where had the mule kicked him. He said right on navel. I saw he was very pale in the face. I stooped down by his side and felt his pulse. I discovered that it would beat and omit. I then said to Barney, my little son, go in the house and bring me a phial of pain alleviator and so bring me a glass with a little water in it. While Barney was gone to the house I asked Henry how he got out of the stable. He said he crawled out at that time. Barney got there and I gave Henry a drink of the Alleviator that stimulated his pulse and he became better. By this time Billy Floyd, a hand that I had hired, came to the lot. I said to him was Lem Suber down in his house. He said he was. I said go tell him come up here. I had them carry Henry in my stove room. He seemed to be suffering greatly and I gave him a small portion of morphine. I then said to him, "Cash you are pretty badly hurt. Don't you want me to send for a Dr? He said he did. I sent for the Doctor. Doctor Patten came and I (asked) him to visit Henry. This was Sunday Oct 9th I88I. He died on Monday about 4 o'clock after being carried from my storeroom on Sunday to Billy Floyd's house.               J. B. Floyd

   Lem Suber being duly sworn testifies: On Sunday morning Oct 9th 1881 Mr. Floyd sent for me to come to the house. I went and Mr. Floyd was in the lot. I saw Henry Neill lying on the ground on right side of the stable door. Mr. Floyd said for me and Billy Floyd to carry Henry in his cook room. We did so.  Lem (X) Suber

   Tom Burton being duly sworn testifies: Sunday morning I went to Mr. J. B. Floyds, he having sent for me and I found Henry in the stove room. I said to him how do you come on. He said, "Brother Tom I am badly hurt. I was kicked by bad mule and he liked to have killed me." He died on Monday Oct 10th AD 1881 in Billy Floyds house. Tom Burton and Sam Tribble carried him to Billy's house on Sunday about eleven o'clock.  Tom (X) Burton                                                       

   Dr. D. W. Patten being duly sworn testifies: I was called to see Henry Neill on Sunday morning about I0 o'clock. Found him suffering a great deal. Complaining of a severe pain in the abdomen. Pulse very feeble and his extremities cold. He told me that a mule had kicked him that morning - had hit him immediately over the navel. I examined his abdomen and found no bruises or tumefaction or any evidence of violence. I next visited him Monday Oct 1881 the 10 he was then irrational and moribund. He died in about an hour after my arrival. I might add that on my first visit the deceased was entirely rational and made a clear and satisfactory statement as to the misfortune that has befell him. Its all as my opinion that the immediate cause of the death of the deceased was internal hemorrhage. D. W. Patten, MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County. 23 Octobrt 1881

An inquisition indented taken at Richard Satterwhite's Plantation in Township No Six in Newberry County on the 23rd[?] day of Oct 1881 AD before E. C. Longshore Coroner for aforesaid County upon the view of the body of Charley Jackson then and there being dead by the oaths of N. F. Johnson, J. E. Cooley, T. P. Pitts, W. R. Johnson, H. S. Ruff, Boyce Rook, James Dorroh, Noah Griffin, Mack Rook, Henry Teague, Frank Peister, Ben Gauntt being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Charley Jackson came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Charley Jackson came to his death on the 21 day of Oct AD 1881 at Richard Satterwhite's plantation from a pistol shot wound from the hands of Green Owens and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Charley Jackson in manner and form aforesaid Green Owens then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid in witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County.

N. F. Johnson, foreman of jury, J. E. Cooley, T. P. Pitts, W. R. Johnson, H. S. Ruff, Boyce (X) Rook, James (X) Dorroh, Noah (X) Griffin, Mack M Rook, Henry (X) Teague, Frank (X) Peister, Ben (X) Gaunt

   Peter Miller being duly sworn says: We all got ready to go home. After supper Tom Mason stepped out of the door first. Warren Hairston right after Tom. Charley Jackson after Warren Green. Owens said to Charley Jackson, "God d_m your soul. What was you toten a pistol for me last Sunday for." Charley asked him who said so. Green said, "I say so." And I was standing in the door and then stepped round comer of house. When I got to the corner of the house Green shot Charley and Charley did not try to shoot Green and Green struck him with a stick and then Charley shot at him and then Charley broke and ran about one hundred yards and fell. He was not dead when I got there but died shortly afterwards. I heard him tell Charley he would burst his d__n brains out. He had his pistol right against him. Do not know what they fell out about.

Peter (X) Miller

   Warren Hairston being duly sworn says that: We all came over here and ate our suppers together. Wen we got through eating our suppers Charley Jackson asked me how long before we would go up the road I told him I was ready to go now. (He) say lets go. Tom Mason came out of the door and me behind him. Charley Jackson behind me. After Charley got outdoors Green Owens standing at corner of house says, "Charley what was you carrying your pistol after me Sunday for. Charley says, "I was not carrying no pistol after you". Green said, "You are a d__n liar." By that time Tom Mason walked up between them and said, "Come Green lets have no fuss here." Says Charley is not carrying no pistol after you." Me and him has been together about a month ginning cotton. He has been carrying His pistol about a month ginning cotton. Green had a club drawn on him. Says, "Yes, you were carrying your pistol after me and I am going to frail the hell out of you." Charley said, "Frail away". Green Owens said, "Have you got your pistol now?" Charley says, "No I have not." Green said, "Oh yes god d_m you, yes you have." Charley asked him. "Have you got yours? Never mind god d_m you. You have been talking about shooting me. Now shoot." (Green) fired away and shot Charley. Charley then turned and shot and broke and run. Green struck him as he went off. Went up the road about 100 yards and fell. Tom Mason said, "Green Owens, you have killed Charley". Green said, "I don't give a d_m. I aimed to kill him." Green shot him. He lived about 15 minutes. I heard him make threats against him. I heard Sunday, was a week ago, that he would kill him.  Warren Hairston

   Tom Mason being duly sworn says: I was in there. Charley was on the box. I asked him what he wanted me to go home with him for he said Green was trying to kick a fuss with him. I came to the door. Green Owens was standing at the corner of the house. I got outside of the door and Charley came out and stood behind Warren. Green said to Charley, "What were you carrying your pistol for me Sunday?" Charley said he was not carrying any pistol for him Sunday. Green said, " You are a god d_m liar, you are." Charley said, "I have not - Green - been carrying no pistol for you".  Then I stepped between them. Green told Charley that he was done with_?_ to take her and go. Green asked Charley if he had his pistol and Charley told him no. Green pulled out his pistol and cocked it. Had a club drawn back. Said he was going to frail him to hell. Green ran up to him and said, "You have been talking about shooting now God d_m you, shoot." Put his pistol against his breast and shot. He turned and ran. Green struck him with a stick. I told him, "You ought not to of shot him." Green said, "God d_m him. I shot him and I aimed to killed him." Charley run about one hundred yards and fell. Lived about fifteen minutes. Oct 21st 1881. Tom (X) Mason

Dr. D. W. Patten being duly sworn I have examined the body of Charley Jackson deceased and find that the said Charley Jackson came to his death from a gun shot wound, the said shot entering the chest between the first and second ribs of the left side passing horizontally and to the right and lodging in the lung structure which form the back wall of the chest. D. W. Patton MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 25 October 1881

An inquisition indented taken at Poor house in Township No. 4 in Newberry County on the 25th of Oct AD 1881 before E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid County upon the view of the body of Jesse Smith then and there being dead by the oaths of H. W. Bowls, J. C. Spence, George Davis, Dave Williams, Aaron Wilson, Edmond Irvin, William Schumpert, John Williams, Edmond Glymph, Henry Greg, Adam Ring, R. S. Caldwell being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jesse Smith came to his death on the 24th day of Oct AD 1881 from the affects of a gun shot wound entering the left breast over an inch below and a little to the left of middle and penetrating the heart and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Jesse Smith in manner and form aforesaid then and there voluntarily and feloniously himself did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid in witness where of I, E C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County

H. W. Bowls foreman of jury, J. C. Spence, George (X) Davis, Dave (X) Williams, Aaron (X) Williams, Edmond (X) Irvin, William (X) Schumpert, John (X) Williams, Edmond (X) Glymph, Henry (X) Greg, Adam (X) Ring, R. S. Caldwell

   Minervy Smith being duly sworn testifies: He, Jesse Smith, took the gun off and said he was going to kill himself. I told him not to do it. He said he was tired of living. I heard the gunfire. I was not there. I was in my room. I did not go down there until Antine Buzzard came. Then I went down there and took a bucket of water and found him dead. I went over to the field and sent for Mr. Wilson. Minervy Smith

   Antine Buzzard being duly sworn testifies: I met a Negro woman. She told me that Mr. Smith had shot himself. I came to the gate and the old lady told me to light. Seemed to be in a heap of trouble. Told me that Mr. Smith had shot himself. I went down to the house where he was lying. He was on fire. I hollered back to Mrs. Smith to bring some water. I taken my hands and put out the fire and found that he was dead and a flint and steal shotgun near his side. He had both shoes off, one sock off and one on. I heard say about two months ago that he bereaved sometimes that he would kill himself. He was in an old out house at the Poor house on the 24th October 1881. Antine Buzzard

This is to certify that I have examined the body of Jesse Smith deceased and find he came to his death from affects of a gun shot wound entering the left breast one inch below and a little to the left of middle and penetrating the heart.                 October 25th 1881                James K Gilder, MD

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School