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Colonial Cases

1880

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 19 May 1880

An inquisition indented at J. J. Gallman's Plantation in Township No. 10 the 19th day of [May] 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Laura Ruff then and there being dead by the oaths of Perry Halfacre, Benjamin Halfacre, Maybin Moore, Jno. C. Wilson, Daniel Henderson, Warren Gallman, Robt. Jones, Pressly Williams, Reubin Tompson, Thomas Baxter, Jno. C. Neel, Lambert L. Moore being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Laura Ruff came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Laura Ruff came to her death on the 18th day of May A.D. 1880 by a Pocket Knife wound from the hands of Minervy Foster and so the jurors aforesaid do say that the aforesaid in manner and form aforesaid then and there feloniously did kill against the Peace and dignity of the Same State aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

E. C. Longshore. Coroner for said county.

Perry Halfacre Forman of jury, Benjamin Halfacre, Maybin Moore, Jno C. Wilson, Daniel (X) Henderson, Warren (X) Gallman, Robt. (X) Jones, Pressly (X) Williams, Reubin (X) Tompson, Thomas (X) Baxter, J. C. Neel, Lamber L. Moore.

George Boyd being sworn: Last Saturday evening as Nervy Foster came from Prosperity I met her in the road and asked her for some tobacco that Mr. Gallman sent for. She said did Mr. Gallman say so. I said it would be all right. About that time Laura Ruff came up and they hitched and Nervy said,  'Let me alone. I will call Mr. Gallman.' But they rolled in the Cotton Patch and Nervy said get up and and Laura said come on and I will let Mr. Gallman see me whip you and they started to the house and they got up to fussing again and Nervy Foster called her a dammed whoring bitch and they went to fighting again and Nervy cut her. After She cut her, she ran. Laura called Umphrey Ruff and said Nervy has cut me. It was Saturday night the 18th day of May. It was done at the Forks of the road known by as Shugar tit. She was fixing to give me the tobacco when Laura came up. I started to part them but Laura said let me alone and I let her loose. She then called me to carry her home. I did not see the knife that day. I saw it next morning. She said, 'Take me home, for I am cut. I want some camphor.' Umphrey Ruff and Mariar Roberson was the first ones that got there.

Mariar Roberson being duly sworn when I heard the alarm I went there as soon as I could and George was there and she said George had hold of her when Nervy cut her. Umphrey came up then and asked her where she was cut and she told him. They sent for Dr. Halfacre as soon as we got her to the house. I was four hundred yards from them when I heard Laura say Nervy has cut me. Umphrey carried her to the house in his arms. She said, 'Don't cross no ditches with me.'  Mariar (X) Roberson

Umphrey Ruff being duly sworn: When I got there Laura was on the ground and her head in Georges lap and she said my guts is cut out. She told me Nervy did the cutting. When I got there I did not see Nervy at all.  Umphrey (X) Ruff

J. C. Halfacre being duly sworn She was cut in the abdomen on the right side with intestines protruding wound as the cause of her death.                  J. C. Halfacre M.D.

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 26 May 1880

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in Newberry County the 26 day of May A.D. 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Elliot Harris then and there being dead by the oaths of W. H. Dickert, Jno. S. Spearman, W. J. Langford, J. O. Havard, H. A. Burns, J. H. Coulter, Washington Golden, Calvin Cromer, Charles Stawther, Willie Hains, Silas Piester, John Davis being a lawful Jury of inquest who being Charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Elliot Harris came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Elliot Harris on the 25 day of May A.D. 1880 came to his death from the effect of an over dose of laudanum given through ignorance by its mother that Elliot Harris on the 25 day of May A.D. 1880 in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by misfortune or accident.

In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

                                                                                                E. C. Longshore. Coroner for Newberry County.

W. H. Dickert foreman of Jury inquest, John F. Spearman, W. J. Langford, J. O. Havard, H. A. Burns, J. H. Coulter, Washington (X) Golden, Calvin (X) Cromer, Charles (X) Stother, Wm. Hayen, Silas (X) Piester, John (X) Davis

Hester Harris being duly sworn testified as follows: Monday all day the child was fretful with his stomach. Monday night about dark he got worse. I asked Ma to give him kettle tea. Drank it and then threw it up. Very fretful. Got up with him myself and rocked him till 12 o'clock. Kept so fretful. I asked ma if I gave him a little laudanum would it hurt him. Se said she didn't think it would. She gave me a little and I put one drop of it in a spoonful of breast milk and thus gave it. This was after 12 o'clock. He went to sleep and slept till about 7 A. M. I turned him over on his side and he commence crying. Ma asked me what the matter with him and I said he was crying because I turned him over and then went to sleep and slept till about 8 o'clock. When I awoke he was sleeping so I got scared. I asked ma to give me some right strong coffee without any sugar in it and I got him waked up enough to pour coffee in his mouth. Ma went to Mrs. Smiths and got some sweet milk. I gave it to child. This was about 9 o'clock and she went for Mary Read. I called Hester Brown to stay with me till Ma got back and the child in a short while looked like it was dying and I shook it about in my lap and it seemed to revive. I then got the camphor and rubbed on its face. When Ma returned the child was again asleep. Mary Read stripped the child and bathed it in cold and warm water for about one half hour and when she quit it had another spell and she said she thought it was gone. Hester Brown held the child till Mary Read got back. Hester melted a little lard and scraped off a little alum and gave some to the child put some lard on its chest. The child died on 25th inst about 3 or 4 o'clock. Hester (X) Harris

Margaret Harris being sworn testified as follows: Child was sick and fretful all day Monday. Monday night Hester gave the child one drop of laudanum in a spoonful of breast milk. Hester has had five children. This child was four days old when it died. All of her children are dead. All died young. The oldest having been seven months old when it died. Hester is not married and has never been. I saw Hester drop one drop of laudanum and give to the child.          Margaret (X) Harris

Mary Read being sworn testified as follows: I got to Hester's about 10 o'clock on the morning of 25th inst and the child seemed to be reviving when I got there. I took the child and bathed its head and neck in cold water and then bathed all over with warm water then gave it a spoonful sweetened milk. Worked with the child about an hour. The child continued to have spasms till it died in my lap. Hester has had two stillborn children. Child never got entirely awake while I was with it.  Mary (X) Read

Hester Brown being sworn testified as follows: I stayed with Hester while Margaret was away on Tuesday morning. I gave the child some lard and alum, wet a cloth with camphor and held it to child's nose a little while and then laid it on its head. Thought the child was most dead when I held the camphor rag to its nose. The child was very fretful all Monday. The child seemed to have a cold from the time it was born. Hester (X) Brown

Dr. James K. Gilder being duly sworn testified the following affidavit This is to certify in my opinion Elliot Harris an infant son of Hester Harris came to its death from the effects of an over dose of laudanum.  James K. Gilder M.D.

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 1 June 1880

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in Newberry County the 1 day of June A.D. 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body of L. E. Folk then and there being dead by the oaths W. W. Houseal, B. F. Griffin, Jr., Pat. H. Ducket, R. H. Wright, G. G. McWhirter, J. F. Todd, A. J. McCaughrin, W. H. Hunt, J. W. Gary, B. H. Cline, R. W. Davis, J. H. Gillard being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said L. E. Folk came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said L. E. Folk on the 31 first day of May A.D. 1880 came to his death by a pistol from his own hand and so the jurors aforesaid do say that the said L. E. Folk in manner and form aforesaid then and there himself did kill against the Peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

                                                                                                                E. C. Longshore. Coroner for said County.

W. W. Houseal foreman, B. F. Griffin, A. J. McCaughrin, W. H. Hunt, J. W. Gary, G. G. McWhirter, R. H. Wright, James F. Todd, B. H. Cline, Pat. H. Ducket, R. H. Davis, J. H. Gaillard

John S. Carwile Being duly sworn says that on yesterday morning about 11 o'clock am he went down to the Privy and heard a noise as if some one breathing hard. He called upon Dr. Renwick to go in with him and see what it was, so he opened the door and looked in and saw L. E. Folk sitting in there with a pistol in his hand having shot himself.  I went and got the Police & the Police took him out.         John S. Carwile

Dr. M. A. Renwick being duly sworn says that: On Monday morning he passed through the lot and in passing the privy he met John S. Carwile. Mr. Carwile said some one had shot and went and got the Police. (He) found the Police and stated to him that some one had shot himself. Did not examine him. M. A. Renwick

H. T. Fellers Being duly sworn says: On yesterday morning about half past 9 o'clock he was going down the street toward the guard house and Judge Carlisle called him and told him that some one down at the privy had shot himself. He went down, pushed opened the door & saw Mr. L. E. Folk and that he had shot himself, his right hand resting on his groins and the pistol lying in his lap, not grasped by the hand - that he had been shot in the forehead above the eye and his hand was resting on the pistol. H. T. Fellers

Dr. O. B. Mayer, Jr. being duly sworn says: On yesterday morning - He examined Mr. Folks head last night at 10 o'clock pm - also said found a wound over right eye which had fractured the skull for some distance around the wound - also the plate of head which separates from the brain the brain pond  - was very much injured. The wound was sufficient to cause his death. O. B. Mayer, Jr.

Dr. P. B. Ruff being duly sworn says that: When he was called to see Mr. Folk he was sitting in a little privy. Saw a man holding him and told them to bring him in the house and put him on the counter. I examined the wound and found it cut in the manner of a knife cut. The death of Mr. Folk was caused by the effects of a ball discharged from his pistol by his own hand. P. B. Ruff MD

D. N. Lane Being duly sworn says that: He recognizes the pistol as the one he sold Mr. Folk on yesterday morning Monday 31st May.  D. N. Lane

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 8 July 1880

An inquisition indented taken at J. D. Hornsby Plantation in Township no 8 in Newberry County the 8 day of July A.D. 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Ike Boston then and there being dead by the oaths of D. M. Ward, W. A. Reid, L. F. Longshore, J. D. Boozer, W. E. Longshore, G. B. Reagin, James Waldrop, Sam Stephen, Neal Stephen, Sam Spearman, William Williams, John Williams being a lawful Jury of inquest who being Charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ike Boston came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Ike Boston came to his death on the nigh seventh night of July A.D. 1880 by a gun shot wound in the hands of Ely Franklin and the said Ely Franklin fired said shot in self defense

In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.
E. C. Longshore Coroner.

D. M. Ward foreman, W. A. Reid, L. F. Longshore, J. D. Boozer, W. E. Longshore, G. B. Reagin, J. B. Waldrop, Sam (X) Stephen, Neal (X) Stephen, Sam (X) Spearman, William (X) Williams, John (X) Williams

H. T. Fellers being duly sworn says: Last night between 11 and 12 o'clock me and Mr. Franklin left Town to go to Mr. Goree's to meet Mr. Wm. Langford for the purpose of arresting Ike Boston, charged with various crime: grand larceny and house breaking. I came on to Mr. Goree's and Mr. Langford was not there. We waited about one hour and half. He did not come and it was then about half past one o'clock we left and came on over here. Mr. Goree, Ely Franklin and my self came on to this place, Mr. Hornsby's Plantation. We came until we got in about one hundred yards of the house. Then we stopped and held a consultation. The understanding we had then was we had two dark lanterns. Mr. Goree should take one lantern and go to the corner of the house on back side and open the light to shine along side of the house and I take the other lantern and to front door. Placed Ely Franklin at the corner of the house in front so as to come to see me when I motioned to him he was to follow in side beside of me in order to prevent Ike Boston from taking any advantage of me as I had the lantern in one hand and gun in the other. I knocked at the door and someone from inside asked who it was and I asked if Ike Boston was in there. He told me he was not. I asked where he was. He told me whose house he was in. I do not remember the name. I said that is you Ike, open the door. After stirring a little in the house he came and opened the door just enough so he could poke his head out. Then he stepped back from the door. When he did that I then motioned Ely Franklin to come to me. He did so come right up to the door when I was standing. I shoved the door open with my left foot. We both stepped up in the door and at same time I opened the lantern throwing the light in the direction I had seen him. Just as the light fell on Ike Boston he shot and at the same time I saw he held in his hand a double Barrel shot gun and immediately after he shot Ely Franklin shot. Ike Boston staggered and fell across the pallet and died in a few minutes. I showed the gun that Ike Boston shot to Cary Williams and Jeff Wilson. I had a warrant for his arrest. Also same one was in the house with Ike Boston but ran off immediately after the shooting. I did not recognize him. Also that when I went in the house before the shooting I recognized him and told him he was Ike Boston he said he was not.         H. T.

Fellers

W. O. Goree being duly sworn says: Mr. Feller & Franklin came to my house about 12 o'clock the 7 night of July. We waited for Mr. Wm. Langford about one hour and half and then we came on over here. Then according to instruction I was to take my stand on the corner at the back of the house. I did so and remained there until after the shooting was heard. Mr. Fellers ask if Ike Boston was in the house. He said he was not. Heard the door open, heard two gun reports. I then came round to the front door. Just as I got there some one ran out - liked to run over me. I hollered to him to halt but he ran on. I saw the place in the floor where a load of shot had been discharged. Also saw the bedding a fire. I also noticed one Barrel of the gun was discharged.         W. O. Goree

Cary Williams being duly sworn says that: On the night of the seventh at or near about two o'clock.  I know nothing about the shooting until I was called by Mr. Goree I came down and looked at Ike Boston after he was dead. I saw the gun and recognized it as being the same gun belonging to Ike Boston, one barrel of same being empty the other one loaded. I know the gun as Ike Boston's for I have hunted with him while he had it. Mr. Fellers told me to notice about the fire as the bed had been on fire. I did not see any fire. Ike Boston brought the gun with him when he came here about three or four weeks ago. I did not know Ike Boston was in the house as he was slipping about first in and out.  Cary (X) Williams

Jefferson Wilson being duly sworn says that on the night of seventh of July 1880 at or near about between two and three o'clock I saw Mr. Feller Goree and Franklin nearly opposite the barn. Mr. Fellers asked me to examine a gun was a double barrel shot gun. I recognized it as being Ike

Boston's gun. One barrel was loaded and one empty. Last night when Mr. Fellers handed me the gun it was the second time I had it in my hands. He brought the gun with him when he came up here about 3 or 4 weeks ago.          Jefferson (X) Wilson

Ely Franklin being duly sworn says: On the night of the seventh of July 1880 at or near about 12 o'clock I was at Mr. Goree's house. Waited about one hour and a half for Mr. Wm. Langford. Mr. Langford never came and we came on. We stopped in about two hundred yards of the house on Mr. Hornsby Plantation. We (were) consulting how we would manage my self and Fellers and Goree.  We had two dark lanterns. Mr. Goree was to take one and go in rear of the house and shine along the side and see if he run out. I was to go to corner of the house. I could watch the end of the house and when I could see Mr. Fellers at the front door. Mr. Fellers knocked at the door and asked if Ike Boston was in there. Some body answered no he was not in here. He asked where he was then. He said he was at a house, I forgot the name. Mr. Fellers said then, "Ike that is you. Open the door." Ike opened the door about six or eight inches. Mr. Fellers called on me to come and I went on up to the side of him. He took his foot and pushed the door open, I and Mr. Fellers. Then he, Mr. Fellers, a little in front stepped in the door. Mr. Fellers then opened his dark lantern at that time. Ike Boston fired and after Ike Boston fired I fired. Just before either one of us fired I saw in Ike Boston's hand a double barrel shot gun in his hand. Mr. Fellers says, "Ike that is you. I recognize you." When Ike Boston fired I thought he had killed Fellers and intended to kill me with the other barrel. I did not look to see what had become of Mr. Fellers as I expected him to shoot me next. When I shot he staggered and fell and then there was another man run out of the house. I did not know him. We stayed in the house some short time. We left then and went up to a colored man's house and (showed) him Ike Boston's gun and told him what we had done. We started off and met another black man about 50 or 60 yards from the house showed him the gun and told him what we had done. I came with Mr. Fellers deputized to make the arrest of Ike Boston. Ely (X) Franklin witness.  W. O. Goree

James K. Gilder being duly sworn says I have examined the body of Ike Boston and that he came to his death from a gunshot wound at lower border of ribs. James K. Gilder July 8th 1880

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 2 August 1880

An inquisition indented taken at J. B. Floyds Plantation in Newberry County the 2d day of August A.D. 1880 before me E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Bluford Workman then and there being dead by the oaths of H. D. Hendrix, T. G. Williams, J. J. Stilwell, J. S. Floyd, D. G. Dorroh, Daniel Burton, Wade Longshore, Wash Burton, Andrew Burton, Leonard Glassco being a lawful Jury of inquest who being Charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Bluford Workman came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Bluford Workman came to his death on the 29 day of July A.D. 1880 at J. B. Floyds Plantation in Township no. 6 in Newberry County by a pistol shot from the hands of Charles D. Burton and so the jurors afore said do say that the said Charles D. Burton did the Shooting in Self defense.

In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands seals the day and year above mentioned.                                                                                                                                       E. C. Longshore Coroner

H. D. Hendrix foreman of Jury, L. P. Williams[should be T. G.], J. J. Stilwell, Jno. S. Floyd, D. G. Dorroh, Daniel (X) Burton, Wade (X) Longshore, Wash (X) Burton, Andrew (X) Burton, Austin (X) Dewalt, Thomas (X) Burton, Leonard (X) Glassco

J. B. Floyd being duly sworn says: Last night, I judge about 9 o'clock, I was lying in my bed. I was aroused by too men going up stairs. They went up there and was up there some time when my son Charley came down into my bedroom and asked for a lamp and match. His mother asked him what he wanted with a lamp and match and replied he was fixing to go to Greenville on the excursion train. I told him I did not want him to go. About that time I heard Griff Williams in my entry and another man I did not know who he was. I knew Griff by his voice. Griff and Charley came out I think and got Griff's mule during this time. I heard some person up at the gate. I heard Charley and Griff I take it to be open the lot gate. About that time I heard a pistol or gunfire up at the gate at the big road and Bluff Workman hollered three times. I knew Bluff by his voice. Griff about 8 o'clock this morning caught his mule and started home. Came back and told me Bluff was lying in the cotton Patch. I and him and Charley went up there and found him dead.     J. B. Floyd

Griffin being duly sworn says: I left the Church yesterday to come up here to see Charley Floyd. I got company with Eldrige Simkins, Mc Simkins, Dr. James Dickert and Doug Burton. They said they were going on the excursion tomorrow. They said we will go by and get Charley and make him go home with us and we will take the train at Chappells depot. I told them that if Charley would go I would go with them. When we got up to the big gate Eldrige Simkins and myself came on down to the house and left those other boys up at the gate. Simkins and I went up stairs in Charley's room and asked him if he would go up to Simkins and take the train at Chappells. He said he could not, that he and I had made arrangements to take the train at Silver Street. Simkins kept insisting on him to go. Then Charley came down stairs, went in his Pa's room to get a light. He came back up stairs and said his Pa did not want him to go. I told him if he did not go I would not go and then he, Simkins, and my self came downstairs. Charley came down to help me put up my mule. As we walked out we found Doug Burton at the little gate. He asked me if we were going. I told him no, we could not go. He and Eldredge Simkins went back to the big gate. Charley and I put up my mule. Whilst we were at the lot we heard the report of a pistol or gun and immediately after that we heard some one holler once or twice. Charley said it hollered like old Bluff. He said to me let's walk to the gate and see if it is him. I told him it was no use. Nobody had shot Bluff. He was just up there hollering. Charley said we would [go] up that way anyhow. We walked up the big road seventy five or a hundred yards, saw nothing, turned round, l came back went up in Charley's room and went to bed. This morning, I suppose about 8 o'clock, I caught my mule and started home. As I got into the big road I saw someone lying in the Cotton Patch. I took it to be Bluff and came and told uncle Barney. He, Charley and myself went up there. Uncle Barney started me for the Coroner.  T. G. Williams

Charley Floyd being duly sworn says: Last night about 9 o'clock I recon, Griffin Williams and Eldredge Simkins came up to my room, woke me up and asked me if I was going as far as Eldrige to Greenville with them. Said they were going as far as Eldredge's last night and take the train at Chappells this morning. I told them I did not know whether I could go or not but they insisted and I finally told them I would go. I then cam downstairs to get a lamp. Ma asked me where I was going. I told her I was fixing to go to Greenville. Pa told me he did not want me to go. I then went back up stairs and told Griff and Eldrige I did not reckon I could go. Griff said if I did not he would not go. I told Griff we would go and put up his mule and he would spend the night with me. All three of us then came out the front door. I turned and went to the lot. Griff and Eldrige went to the little gate. Griff then brought his mule round to the lot. As we were at the lot I heard the report of a gun or pistol in the direction of the big gate at the road and heard Bluff holler three times. I know it was Bluff Bluff from his voice I told Griff Bluff hollered like he was hurt and let's go and see. We then went to the road and walked seventy-five or a hundred yards up the road but saw nor heard nothing more. We came back then and [went] to bed. This occurred on the night of 29th of July. About 8 o'clock this morning Griff started home, got to the road, turned and came back and told Pa and myself that a Negro was lying up yonder in the cotton patch. He took it to be Bluff. We three went up there and found him dead. Bluff was in my employment. He had got his hand cut had so had not done any work for me in a week.                                                                                                C. J. Floyd

Joe Shepard being duly sworn says: I was going down to the Scott Place last night and met three men at the big gate. The one talking to me was on a mule. They were all riding. I did not know any of them. They asked me where I was going. I told them I was going down to the Scott Place and they asked me who I was. I told them Joe Shepard was my name. They said Joe that lives with old Frank? I told them yes sir and they said now by God if you are going down to the Scott Place go on. I have got enough of you. James F. Boozer was with me. I went on and left them sitting there. I met Bluff about a quarter of a mile up the road. Joe (X) Shepard

James F. Boozer being duly sworn says: I saw three men over at the big gate. They were white men. I did not know them. One of them drew his pistol and laid it down by his thigh. They asked Joe where he was going. He said he was going down to the Scott Place. They asked him what was his name. He told them Joe Shepard. They asked him where he stayed, if he stayed with Mas Barney. They asked him if he was not Frank's son. They told him they had enough of him to go on to the Scott Place if he was going. Me and Joe went on. We met Bluff about a quarter of a mile up the road. Bluff was deaf and dumb. We asked him by signs to go back with us to the Scott Place. Joe said that he was hungry and wanted to go home. James (X) Boozer

Willis Rook being duly sworn says: As I was going from Joe Burton's yard to Aunt Jane Wilson's house I met three men or four men riding. They were going towards the river. This was on the night of the 29th.  Willis (x) Rook

S. McGowan Simkins being duly sworn says: all I know is we came along here myself. Dr Dickert, Eldredge Simkins and Doug Burton I had been drunk that day and been up on an average of 11 o'clock for the week. We stopped there and I went to sleep. The next thing I knew someone put me on my horse and I rode away. That was in front of Mr. Barney Floyds house at the big gate. It was on the night of the 29th of July. I do not know what time a night it was.               S. McG. Simkins

E. C. Simkins being duly sworn says on the 29th of July I left the barbecue in company with several other gentlemen. We stopped at Mr. Petersons and called on him for a speech as he is a candidate for county Senator and Judge Peterson came out and made some excuse and did not speak. Dr Dickert asked me to go to Doug Burtons. I said it was out of my way that I had said some engagements to take my mother and some other ladies to Greenville the next day. I did decide to go with him. As I accompanied him that morning Burton told Dickert to go by with him and he would go to Greenville with him. Griffin Williams was one of the party I proposed to Griff to go home with me and Griff said we would go by and if Charley would go he would. Between Mr. Floyds and Mr. Burtons me and Griff rode together about 25 yards ahead of the rest. As we approached Mr. Barney Floyds gate Griff called back to the other parties behind and said if they would hold on at the gate he and myself would come in and get Charley. They agreed to it and we came in, hitched our horses at the front gate and we went up to Charley Floyd's bedroom where he was sleeping. We woke him up he got up and said he would go down to his fathers room and get a lamp which he did, came back up stairs and lighted it. After he lit the lamp he said he didn't reckon he could go. I asked the question why. He said his father did not want him to go. Griff said if Charley did not go he would not go but he and Charley would take the train at Silver Street next day. Insisted on me staying all night with them. I told them it was impossible for me to stay. I had an engagement at home to go with my mother and some other ladies to go to Greenville. Griff and I left the room leaving Charley on the bed. Griff and I came down stairs and met Doug Burton. Half way between the gate and steps Doug asked why we stayed so long, that he came after us. I said we were fooling with Charley and Griff said he and Charley had concluded not to go. Doug and I went towards the big gate and Griff took his mule and went towards the lot when in about seventy yards of the big gate we heard an alarm as if somebody was in danger. We heard someone say, "Help, come here some body is trying to rob or kill me." Doug Burton ran immediately ahead of leaving me behind leading my horse, which was hard to get on. Before I got to the big gate I heard in the road a scuffling as if two person were struggling together when in ten or fifteen feet of the big gate I heard the report of fire arms. When I got there I asked what is the matter. Dr Dickert spoke and said some body was trying to rob or kill me I told him there is nothing of that. Get on your horse. I am in a hurry, let's go. I helped Mack Simkins on his horse and we rode for home. E. C. Simkins

J. O. Dickert being duly sworn says when we got to the gate E. C. Simkins and Griff Williams came up to the house to see Charley Floyd to get him to go up to our house to go to Greenville next day. Doug Burton, McSimkins and myself remained at the gate. McSimkin's was very tight. (He) said he was very sleepy. He would get down off of his horse lie down and take a nap. I got down and lay beside of him. McSimkins fell a sleep. Immediately I remarked the boys stayed very long. I wanted to go on to make preparation to go to Greenville. Doug Burton said he would go up to the house and hurry them up and left. I too being alone soon fell a sleep. Before Doug left he gave me his mule to hold. I had dismounted. I was holding my own horse too. I went to sleep with the reins in my hands. I don't how long I had been a sleep but I was awaked by some one stepping in my face wakening me up. When I woke up some one was standing over me and McSimkins just having woke up it frightened me. I hollered out who is that. He said nothing. Stayed in the road. Someone hollered from about the gate what was the matter. From his voice I took it to be Doug Burton, who asked me the question. I answered some one is standing here over. I and Mack this man who I took to be Burton by his voice asked, 'Who are you. What are you doing here?" He gave no answer and the licks commenced very soon there was a struggling in the road and I heard licks pass. Very soon they both seemed on the ground in the dark. I tried to get up and got tangled in the bridles. While I was endeavoring to extricate myself I heard a report of a firearm and immediately I heard one holler. In the mean time Eldrige Simkins came up asked me what is the matter. I told him some body had been trying to steal or rob Mack and me whilst we were a sleep. He said oh no. I have not seen anyone. You must be mistaken. Said come get up, onto your horses. Let's go. We got on our horses and left the scuffling. Seemed to be about 12 feet from me. The firing was where the scuffling was. One of the parties scuffling I supposed to be Doug Burton, the other was the one that had been standing over me and Mack Burton did not start exactly when we did. When Doug Burton came up he said, "I believe I hit that fellow." But in the mean time he gave me a severe blow. I said oh no, I think not. Why Doug was behind was because when I got up I let the mule loose.        J. O. Dickert, M.D.

Dr. Jno M. Thompson being duly sworn says Bluford Workman came to his death by a bullet that entered his back between the seventh and eight rib passing inward and upward through the right lung and heart and cartilage of third rib and was found imbedded in the tissues beneath the skin.    Jno. M. Thompson, M.D.

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County. 24 August 1880

An inquisition indented taken at Mrs. J. B. Leonard's Plantation in Township No. 6 in Newberry County the 24 day of August A.D. before E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body Dorse Greir then and there being dead by the oaths of A. J. Langford, J. A. Wallace, W. E. Longshore, J. W. Boozer, L. L. Hendrix, Mart Adams, Allan Andrews, Wiley Henderson, Whit Andrews, Anty Griffin, John Spraggin, Taylor Spraggins being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Dorse Greir came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Dorse Greir came to his death by a gun shot wound on or about the 16 day of August A.D. 1880 and that said shot was inflicted by some person or persons unknown to the jury and against the Peace and dignity of the Same State aforesaid.  In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. E. C. Longshore Coroner.

A. J. Langford, foreman of jury, W. E. Longshore, J. A. Wallace, J. W. Boozer, L. L. Hendrix, Mart (X) Andrews, Allan (X) Andrews, Wiley (X) Henderson, Whit (X) Andrews, Anty (X) Griffin, John (X) Spraggins, Taylor (X) Spraggins

Henry Greir being duly sworn says: I goes off yesterday morning a week ago and I have not seen my boys to say I know them until Sunday morning. And then Saturday evening I goes fishing and I saw something moving in the water and then I left and went back home and got to talking about it from one to an other and they said it may be your boys there in that creek. And I went and spoke to my brother Fed Pitts and Peter Williams and Jerry Ducket and Lem Suber and we went to the river on Sunday morning between 8 and 9 o'clock and looked at the boys in the water and I swear it was my boys Dorsy and Prue that was in the river about three or four hundreds yards below the Floyd Bridge it was on Sunday the 22 of August.      Henry (X) Greir

Lewis Pitts being duly sworn says: Me and Fed Pitts, Jerry Ducket and Peter Williams, Sam Philson, Dan Wheeler, went to the river on Sunday morning about 10 o'clock and saw Dorse Greir's body in the river about 300 hundred yards below the Floyd Bridge and pulled him up to the bank and then felt for the other one who was his brother because we thought he was in there also. And we felt him in the water and we pulled some of rags from him with a hook and then left because we could not get him out without more help. We then went home and sent after Mr. Vance the trial Justice in Laurens County and I swear the man I saw in the water was Dorse Greir because I knew him by his clothes and when we drew the body to the bank a rock was fastened to his neck and tied to his body by a leather string. The rock would weighed about 25 or so pounds. I never heard no threats about the boys.             Lewis (X) Pitts

Jerry Ducket being duly says: The old man said he was down there Saturday fishing and saw something on the water and when I got there I saw Dorse Greir on the water. We took a hook and pulled him to the bank and found who he was. We began to look for the other as he was missing too. Then I striped off and went in. Found him. I pulled at him but could not get him and I come out and left him and pulled Dorse to the bank. We found a string to his neck with a rock to it. The rock under his right arm. It was about 300 yards below the Floyd Bridge. We found him on Sunday the 22 day of August. Tom Greir told me Dorse and Mr. Hugh Workman had had a difficulty on last Saturday night the 14 of August as Mr. Workman thought he was trying to get in his mother's house.                Jerry (X) Ducket

Lem Ducket being duly sworn says on Sunday morning the 16 of Aug. Mr. Hugh Workman measured mine and Dorsey's and Prue's feet because someone had tried to get in his house and he said the measure fitted Prue's track. Mr. Hugh Workman told me that Mrs. Kate Johnson saw some one come to the window of her room on the night of the 14 of Aug. and that she jumped and ran up stairs to Mr. Workman and he came down the stairs and shot and that she thought the person was Dorse.  Lem (X) Suber

Mary Glenn being duly sworn says: I live at Mrs. Nellie Workman's. I cook for her. I cook for all of her wages hands, five in number. I left Dorse in the kitchen on last Tuesday night Aug. the 17. He was eating supper with Prue. I missed Dorse on Wednesday morning. Dorse went to Clinton with Mr. Workman on Tuesday morning and came back on the same evening early. I asked Coleman and Jim if they had seen Dorse and Prue and they said no. Mrs. Workman told me after I had given the boys supper to go on to my house. She was not accustomed to tell me to go. I never stayed any later than usual. Mr. Workman measured Prue's and Dorsey's track as some one tried to get in the window on Saturday night and said it was Prue's track. Prue denied to me it was his track or that he tried to get in the window.                 Mary (X) Glenn

Emmaline Greir being duly sworn says: I saw Dorse on Tuesday morning and on Tuesday night I left home to go to see Dorse and Prue and on the road in a small patch of pines this side of Mrs. Workman I saw a number of horses & men about 40 or 50 I suppose. I could not see as it was dark. I met Lem Suber on this side of the horses and he went as far as the branch with me and then went back towards Mrs. Nellie Workman's saying he would go back as he was afraid they might get after him.  Emmaline (X) Greir

Susan Greir being duly sworn says: On Wednesday morning Lem Suber asked me if my boys had come home last night and said that he saw a crowd of men in the pines this side of Mrs. Workman's house and that three men rode inside of the fence and turned around and went back.
                                                                                                                                                                 Susan (X) Greir.

W. H. Workman being duly sworn says: Dorse Greir was in my employment up till the and Prue Greir was in my employment up till the 17 of Aug. There was no company at my house that night. I was at home. I had heard no threats of his life. I saw nor heard no body pass my house that night. Mrs. Johnson was not at home on the 17 of Aug. 1880.                W. H. Workman

Dr. D. W. Patton being duly sworn says: I proceeded on the 23rd of Aug. 1880 at the request of Coroner E. C. Longshore to examine the dead body of Dorse Greir. I found the deceased came to his death by 2 gun shot wounds one near his left nipple the other on the back between the scapula. Either wound would necessarily have proved fatal without the other on account of the close proximity of vital organs. Appearances of mutilation were the result of decomposition.

                                                                                                                                                                D. W. Patton.

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 24 August 1880

An inquisition indented taken at Mrs. J. B. Leonard's Plantation on Little River in Township No. 6 in Newberry County 24 day of Aug. A.D. 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body Prue Greir then and there being dead by the oaths of A. J. Langford, J. A. Wallace, W. E. Longshore, Jim Boozer, L. L. Hendrix, Mart Adams, Allan Andrews, Wiley Henderson, Whit Andrews, Anty Griffin, John Spraggins, Taylor Spraggins being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Prue Greir came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Prue Greir on or about the 16 day of Aug. came to his death by a gun shot wound and that said wound was inflicted by some person or persons unknown to the jury against the Peace and dignity of the Same State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  E. C. Longshore Coroner.

A. J. Langford, foreman of jury, J. A. Wallace, W. E. Longshore, James W. Boozer, L. L. Hendrix, Mart (X) Andrews, Allan (X) Andrews, Wiley (X) Henderson, Whit (X) Andrews, Anty (X) Griffin, John (X) Spraggins, Taylor (X) Spraggins.

Henry Greir being duly sworn says I goes off yesterday a week ago and I have not seen my boys to say knows them until Saturday morning and then Saturday evening I goes a fishing and saw something moving in the water and then left. And I went from one to another and they said it may be your boys and saying to me you had better get a company of men and see what it is. It might be your boys there in that river and I goes and speaks to my brother Fed Pitts and Peter Williams and Jerry Ducket and Lem Suber and we went to the river. And on Sunday morning between 8 and 9 o'clock and then looked at the boy in the water and I swear it was my boys Dorse and Prue that was in the river about three or four hundreds yards below Floyds Bridge. It was on Sunday the 22nd of August.       Henry (X) Greir.

Lewis Pitts being duly sworn says: Me and Fed Pitts, Jerry Ducket, and Peter Williams, Sam Philson, Dan Wheeler went to the river on Sunday morning about 10 o'clock and saw Dorsey Greir's body in the river about 300 yds. below Floyds Bridge and pulled him up to the bank and then felt for the other one who was his brother because we thought he was in there also. And we felt him in the water and then we pulled some rags from him with a hook and then left because we could not get him out with out more help. We then went home and sent after Mr. Vance the Trial Justice in Laurens County and I swear that the man I felt under the water was Prue Greir because I know him by the clothes. I never heard no threats about the boys.  Lewis (X) Pitts.

Jerry Ducket being duly sworn says: When I went to the river to look for Prue I could not pull him up. Then I went off and left him. This was on Sunday the 22nd of Aug. A.D. 1880 The body I hooked I could not swear was Prue but supposed it to be him as he was missing.
                                                                                                                                                                Jerry (X) Ducket.

Lemuel Suber being duly sworn says: The last time I saw Prue Greir was on last Monday and on Tuesday the 17 day of Aug. at night I saw a man on horse back about 200 hundred yards from Mrs. Workman's house and he shot his pistol one time and rode down the road from her house and I never saw him any more.  Lem (X) Suber

Mary Glenn being duly sworn says: I left Prue in the kitchen on Tuesday night in company with Dorse Greir and I have not seen Prue nor Dorse since. This was the 17 of Aug. I never heard any shots on Tuesday night Aug. the 17, 1880.    Mary (X) Glenn

Tom Greir being duly sworn says: I heard some one come from Mr. Asa Workman's lot and go in the yard. Could not tell who it was nor whether they went in the house or not. This was on Tuesday night Aug. 17th 1880. I live in Mr. Asa Workman's kitchen.                            Tom (X) Greir
Emmaline Greir being duly says: on Tuesday night I was to Mrs. Workman's to see if Dorse and Prue had come from Clinton and on the road side in some pines I saw some horses and men. I was afraid and turned around and went back Lem Suber. Lem Suber going as far as the creek with me a man rode behind us down the road and shot off his pistol. I could not tell who it was.
                                                                                                                                                                Emmaline (X) Greir
Dr. D. W. Patton being duly sworn says: I also examined at the same time and place the body of Prue Greir. I found that he came to his death from a gunshot wound near the right nipple, which ranged towards the left nipple necessarily fatal. The body was in quite an advanced state of decomposition and appeared to have been dead for several days.                          D. W. Patton M.D.

 

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 16 September 1880

An inquisition taken at the jail in Newberry County in said State this 16th day of September A.D. 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner upon view of the body of Herbert Swittenburg then and there being dead by the oaths of J. D. Smith Livingston, Edward W. Stoddard, Warren M. Feagle, S. Jefferson Wooten, John B. Chambers, Manuel P. Probst, Spencer P. Beard, Caleb Gray, Washington G. Golden, Alvin L. Sneed, Robert Simpkins, Robert Boozer, Munson S. Long being a lawful jury of inquest, who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Herbert Swittenberg came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Herbert Swittenberg came to his death from an incised wound of the throat, partially severing the trachea or windpipe with a case knife in his own hands. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the said Herbert Swittenberg in manner and form aforesaid, then and there voluntarily and feloniously himself did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition have put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  E. C. Longshore Coroner Newberry County.

J. D. Smith Livingston foreman of jury, E. W. Stoddard, Warren M. Feagle, S. Jeff Wooten, J. B. Chambers, M. P. Probst, Spencer P. Beard, Caleb (X) Gray, Washington G. (X) Golden, A. L. Sneed, Robert (X) Simpkins, Robert (X) Boozer, M. S. Long

Henry T. Fellers being duly sworn says: On Friday last I went to the restaurant of Mahalie Swittenberg in Newberry Town and as I went in (there was a small room partitioned off in the back corner) I saw deceased coming out of that room with one hand holding his neck and with the other cutting himself with a knife on the throat. He was bleeding and as I got nearly to him he threw the knife away. His throat was cut nearly two thirds through. The knife is in the guardhouse. It was a case knife. I did not hear him say any thing at the time.  H. T. Fellers

Charles Strother, being duly sworn says: One day last week I heard a police whistle and went to Mahalie Swittenberg's restaurant. I saw deceased coming from rear end cutting at his throat with a knife. I saw his throat cut.         Charles Strother

James K. Gilder being duly sworn says: I am a practicing physician and examined the deceased and certify that Herbert Swittenberg died from an incised wound of the throat partially severing the trachea or windpipe. The incision being made by some sharp or cutting instrument.

                                                                                                                                                                James K. Gilder M.D

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 28 October 1880

An inquisition taken at Saluda Old Town in Township No. 7 in Newberry County in said State this 28th day of October A.D. 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner upon view of the body of W. H. Boozer then and there being dead by oaths of J. W. Reeder, W. H. J. Sanders, N. W. Gregory, L. T. Longshore, George A. Ropp, P. M. Schumpert, J. W. Davenport, J. M. Sanders, G. F. Schumpert, J. W. Sanders, Joseph Sanders Davenport, W. W. Davenport, being a lawful jury of inquest, who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said W. H. Boozer came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said W. H. Boozer on or about the 28 day of Oct came to his death by a general congestion induced by a protracted debauch and exposure. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. E. C. Longshore Coroner Newberry Co

   John W. Reeder foreman of jury, William H. J. Sanders, Nathan W. Gregory, Levi T. Longshore, George A. Ropp, Peter M. Schumpert, John W. Davenport, James M. Sanders, G. F. Schumpert, John W. Sanders, Joseph Davenport, Wilson W. Davenport

   A. K. Tribble being duly sworn testifies: On last Tuesday 26th Oct I was at Newberry and met Mr. Boozer and he spoke to me and wanted me to lend him 25 cts. I did so, he showed me his wife's daguerreotype and I never saw him any more until yesterday the 28th Oct when he came upon the freight train. He passed me and came back and spoke to me. This was at Saluda Old Town. He came in my store and asked me for a drink. I said I had none. He then left and went up the road toward Mr. Wills's house. This was about one o'clock. I never saw him any more until about eight o'clock. He was in the road between Mr. Wills and Saluda Old Town. He was then dead. When he came to this place his face was badly bruised. He was much intoxicated when he got off the train.  A. K. Tribble.

   T. L. Harp being duly sworn testifies: On yesterday I was coming to Old Town. I saw a person lying in the road between Mr. Wills and Saluda Old Town, which I could swear, was the same W. H. Boozer. He was lying on his back rolling from side to side and as I went back from Saluda Old Town he was on his face. He was moving slowly from side to side and was groaning. This was between three and four o'clock at the same place where he was found dead.    T. L. Harp

   J. D. Wills being duly sworn testifies I saw this man whom I suppose to be W. H. Boozer yesterday evening about four o'clock lying in the road about 200 yards this side of my house. I was coming to Old Town I spoke to him but he never spoke. He was groaning when I spoke to him. I never saw him when I went home last night. This morning about half hour before sun up I saw him at the same place where I saw him yesterday evening. He was dead when I saw him this morning. He was lying on his face. He was unconscious when I spoke to him yesterday evening.                                 J. D. Wills

   Tony Cannon being duly sworn testifies: This morning about half an hour before sun up I was going to the yard. Chess says that man is dead. I went to cutting wood and Mr. Wills told me to come go with him down to where the man was dead. I told him that the man was dead. I suppose that this is the same man I saw this morning. He was lying on his face with his right hand turned to the pit of his arm.      Tony (X) Cannon.                   

   C. B. Buson being duly sworn testifies: This morning between daylight and sun up Chess and myself was firing Mr Holts engine I went from the gin down the road towards where Tony Cannon said he had seen a man lying beside the road yesterday evening. I saw him about 200 yards this side of Mr. Wills' house toward Saluda Old Town. He was dead as I suppose he was lying on his face. John Pickens was in company with me. C. B. (X) Buson                                       

   John Pickens being duly sworn testifies: Yesterday morning between daylight and sunup Chess and myself was firing Mr. Holts engine. Tony told Chess that there was a man down the road towards Saluda Old Town. He was dead. I never went nearer than a few yards. I said to Chess that he may be asleep. He was lying on his face. After we looked at him we went back to the house. Chess, he told Mr. Wills the man was down in the road.   John (X) Pickens

   J. S. Russell being duly sworn testifies: On the 28 Oct about an eighth of a mile from Silver Street I met W. H. Boozer on the G&C railroad track. He was walking. I was going toward Silver Street. He was coming toward Little River when I first saw him. He pulled his hat off and said several times, "For Gods sake, carry me to Old Town, I am dying." At first I did not recognize him. He then told me his name and said, "I am dying for the want of a drink of whiskey. I have been drunk for about ten days." I gave him about two spoonfuls of Balsam apple black pepper and whiskey, mixed all the stimulants I had and about the same of camphor. He then took the camphor bottle and drank nearly half pint of camphor while I was gone out of the room. He left Silver Street on the freight train to go to Old Town. The train left Silver Street about two o'clock Mr. J. T. Peterson said he would pay the conductor of freight for his passage to Old Town.                J. S. Russell

Dr. J. M. Thompson being duly sworn testifies that: W. H. Boozer came to his death from general congestion induced by a protracted debauch and exposure.  Dr. John M. Thompson.

 

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 4 November 1880

An inquisition indented & taken at Cromers Store in Newberry County the fourth day of November A.D. 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner upon view of the body of Warren Williams there and then being dead by oaths Nathan Johnson, Walter Cromer, J. A. Mars, David Hipp, James Gordon, Jacob Richy, John Willingham, George Denson, C. W. Buford, Morris Oxner, W. C. Davis, R. M. Bartie, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Warren Williams came to his death upon their oaths do say that Warren Williams came to his death at Cromers Store in Newberry County state of South Carolina on the second day of November A.D. 1880 from the effect and by the cause of a gun shot wound inflicted by some person or persons unknown to the jury and so the jury afore said upon their oaths afore said do say that the afore said Warren Williams in manner and form afore said Warren Williams said unknown person or persons then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the state aforesaid. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

E. C.  Longshore Coroner Newberry Co

   N. F. Johnson, foreman of jury, Walter Cromer, James A. Mars, John D. Hipp, J. H. Gordon, Jacob (X) Richie, J. W. Willingham, George Denson, Carvous W. Bluford, G. M. Oxner, W. C. Davis, R. M. Bartie

Testimony taken at Coroners inquest at Cromer's Store in regard to death of Warren Williams.
   Dr. R. C. Carlisle sworn says: I am a practicing physician, graduate of New York College. Was in Mrs. Cromer's House on the day of eletion [election] Heard a noise and went to window. Some 9 or 10 men coming down the road by Cromer's gin house. I got my hat and came down toward the men. Had passed Will Jackson's house. 1 or 2 where in road opposite store. I ran to Jackson's house. Saw men there with pistols in hand on horse back. Saw M. M. Buford holding bridal reins of two horses calling on those men to stop the row. Saw other men doing same. As Buford's men stopped and we thought had stopped the fuss one man wheeled on his horse and rode toward the well. Others followed as if row was stopped. I went toward Mrs. Cromer's house. One of the party dismounted and I begged him to stop this matter. I begged him to get the boys to stop the fuss. He raised a pistol and said I would see what I would get. Saw four men at the well where there was confusion. Not so very great. Saw one rock the size of a double fist fall over into the road within twenty feet of the four men alluded to. Saw a rock fall in ten feet of the same party. Both rocks coming South from Cromer's well. Just afterwards heard 3 or 4 pistols shots. Don't know who did the shooting. All was over in 1 or 2 minutes. I was ordered into line by Buford to stop the fuss and resist those men. I did fall into line. These parties went up the road. There was firing from these parties and from parties on the South. Every body here regretted the difficulty. Heard many white men say shoot the rowdies out. Cried in 10 minutes, "Some body killed." I asked who. Nobody answered. Afterward learned it was Warren Williams. I went to the body and left Went to the well and a colored man named Luis Holmon said he shot first and they began and repeated in succession twice. J. R. Swindler said shoot or stop them. Swindler and several men of this precinct had guns and pistols inline to stop the row. I never saw a more quiet election up to the time of disturbance. I knew the secret of the campaign and no man knew of the rowdies nor the men who indulged in the row. Thought it was party on ___________ were to keep the peace, which was done until the disturbance. Many white men run risks of their lives in trying to stop it.  2 men had their hands badly hurt trying to stop it. One white man said that he got a lick on his head from one of those rocks. Votes had pretty well closed by time of the row. Great confusion prevailed. The last shooting from these parties was from the gin house. It was impossible to have shot the deceased from either well or gin house. All arms here was for self protection. I had been informed there would be attempts to take (the ballot) box. Asked two colored men to help in keeping peace. They promised to do it. It was proposed by republicans that he and others would put cards in papers approving condi....... of whites at this box. Fifty or seventy five men in road when party came up and refused to give road. All was pleasant up to difficulty. R. C. Carlisle.

   Samuel Atchison sworn says: I was here on election day. All was quiet till 12 or one o'clock when some unknown parties came dashing up in noisy way and one of the party come nearer riding over me. All of us as a general thing at once tried to stop them. When they dashed up toward the well where was where a crowd of colored people the shooting began. I grabbed one of their pistols. I tried to take it away. I hurt my hand so that I let (go of) it. He threatened to shoot me. We quieted them again and they went to gin house. Then there was firing from gin house and all ____ from back of gin house by other parties. Then the unknown party was ordered out by Capt. Buford to preserve the peace and there ended the difficulty. Don't know who shot Warren Williams. Would not have been shot from gin house and there are houses between well and where body lay dead. Luis Holman said he shot twice from behind well. Asked me if they did not shoot first. Guns here were to keep peace. I heard before that (the ballot) box would be taken by republicans I was Marshall of the day and I know the intention was to keep peace.                                            S. L. Atchison.

   Thomas Ray sworn says: Was here on election day. Saw crowd at house with sticks cursing crowd from here. Caught their bridals to stop them I thought had done so when crowd went up to well and shooting began. I saw two rocks thrown from well toward store house. 8 or 10 of their party did not look for difficulty. Was surprised Warren Williams was killed. Great difficulty to tell who shot him on account of excitement. Was ordered by Capt Buford to get guns and stop difficulty I hurt my hand in so doing. Pretty much all white men and several colored men engaged in resisting parties. All quiet between the races up to time of row. Do not (know the) cause of trouble but know that party lines about here.  Thomas Ray

   Luis Boyd sworn says: Was at Cromers on Tuesday last. Every thing went on well till 12 o'clock when I saw some men coming down road. One of the men hit me twice with a stick did not expect any difficulty on that day. He passed and I went into store. He went to the well and hit others with sticks and shooting began. Do not know who hit me. When shooting began I ran as did many others. I saw Warren Williams fall. A large crowd of colored men about well saw one man fall. Don't know whether it was Warren Williams or not. Saw what I did from a window in store. I saw white men here trying to stop difficulty. Buford caught the bridal of one and a club was drawn over him. I saw white men that I knew were to stop the row. Do not know any of them. I am 60 years old and it is strange I do not know any of them. Luis (X) Boyd

   Milton Sanders sworn says: Was here on Election Day. Saw a  crowd of red shirt men come up with sticks and began to beat a colored man. Next saw one of them shoot. A great deal of shooting was done. Don't know whether any shooting was done from the lot where the colored were saw one red shirt man in the lot. All quiet till this party came up. White men here did their best to keep the peace. Williams was dead when I saw him. I know the red shirt men who came here do not live about here. Williams had a little stick in his hand all day. Saw a rock thrown. Don't know who threw it. Milton (X) Sanders

Dr. W. M. McCarley being sworn says: I certify to the best of my knowledge that the deceased Warren Williams came to his death by a gun shot wound entering the mouth at the right side breaking out a tooth then ranging upward and backward severing several blood vessels and lodging near the base of the brain just above the sphenoid bones and was sufficient to be fatal

W. M. McCarley, MD.

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 18 November 1880

An inquisition indented taken at Mount Olive Church in County aforesaid on the 18 day of November A.D. 1880 Before E. C. Longshore Coroner upon view of the body of Jim Rook there and then being dead by the oaths of C. Guir, Seth Williams, J. C. Gary, John S. Gary, J. W. Guir, M. C. Coppock, Jacob Gary, Paris Simson, Lighne(?) Conner, Isaac Miller, Stephen Kinard, Prince Busby, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jim Rook came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Jim Rook came to his death from a pistol shot wound by the hand of J. W. Duckett accidentally on the 14th day of November AD 1880 and so the jurors afore said do say that the afore said Jim Rook came to his death by a pistol shot wound from the hand of J. W. Duckett accidentally contrary to his will. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.  E. C. Longshore Coroner

   C. Guir, foreman of jury, Seth Williams, J. C. Gary, John S. Gary, J. W. Guir, M. C. Coppock, Jacob (X) Gary, Paris (X) Simson, Lighne(?) (X) Conner, Isaac (X) Miller, Stephen (X) Kinard, Prince (X) Busby.

   Thomas Smith being duly sworn: On Saturday morning Nov 13th while James Rook was going to turn out the cow he met myself and Wesley Ducket and Jim asked Wesley to show him how his pistol revolved. (It was) at Mr. Barruch Duncan's 'low place' near the barn early Saturday morning. Rum McMorris and George Lyles was present.

Dr Carlisle (said) there was no need to hold an inquest but said go on and bury Jim Rook and that Jim Rook died on Sunday.     Thomas (X) Smith

   George Lyles being duly sworn: On Saturday morning Tom Smith, Rum McMorris, Wesley Ducket was standing near Mr. Barruch Duncan's barn on his 'low place' and Jim Rook came up and asked Wesley Duckett to show him how his pistol revolved and the pistol went off and the contents hit Jim Rook and he Jim Rook prayed and died on Sunday and was buried on Monday after dinner.  George (X) Lyle

   Rum McMorris Being duly sworn: On Saturday morning while George Lyles, Tom Smith, Wesley Duckett and myself was standing near the barn on Mr. Barruch Duncan's 'low place' Jim Rook was going to turn out his cow and came up and asked Wesley Duckett to show him how his pistol revolved and in showing him the pistol, a cartridge shooter and self cocker, the pistol went off and hit Jim Rook and he said, "Lord Wess, you shot me." Wesley did not reply. Jim said, "Wess I don't believe you meant to shoot me." Wesley Duckett's pistol was a new one.                 Rum (X) McMorris

   Thomas Harrington being duly sworn: I live on the place where Jim Rook lived. Did not see him shoot. Saw Dr Carlisle on Saturday during the middle of the day standing over Jim Rook and learned he was shot. Did not see him until Sunday when he said he was shot by Wesley Duckett accidentally and he was as much in fault as Wesley and hoped none of his folks would intend or interfere with Wesley Duckett. Jim Rook died on Sunday and was buried on Monday evening. 

 Thomas (X) Harrington

   Dove Wallace Being duly sworn: Did not see Jim Rook shoot. Dr Carlisle called myself and Spence Burton to him and advised us to go and bury Jim Rook as he said when a man was shot and good witness to it there was no need of an inquest.  Dove (X) Wallace

   Louis Ducket Being duly sworn: I did not see Jim Rook shot. I saw Jim Rook Saturday morning between 7 and 8 o'clock in the arms (of)Wesley Duckett and George Lyles and I said to him, "Jimmie how did this happen?" and he said, "West did not go to do it and don't go to wearing about it."  I ordered Jim Rook to be carried to his bed. After undressing him to be put to bed Fielding Boyd examined the wound and found the ball embedded under the ribs of his left side near the hip. I sent for Dr. Carlisle and he came between 9 and 10 o'clock Saturday morning. I saw Jim no more until the evening of the same day. I hired a man to stay with him Jim and to see he was properly attended to. On Sunday morning about 6 o'clock I went to see him and asked him how he felt. Said very well. Wanted a cup of coffee and I sent it to him. About 9½ o'clock Dove Wallace said Jim Rook was worse and I sent at once for Dr Carlisle. He came and remained until Jim Rook died, which was about 11 o'clock on Sunday morning. I asked Dr. Carlisle what was best to be done and he said to Spence Burton and Dove Wallace that to go on and bury Jim Rook.             Louis (X) Duckett

   Wesley Duckett Being duly sworn: On Saturday morning Jim Rook left his house, came to lot where myself, Tom Smith, Rum McMorris, and George Lyle was and asked me to let him see my pistol, which was a self cocker and the pistol went off when it was not known to be loaded and hit Jim Rook. On Friday night I went with some others opossum hunting and shot off my pistol twice. After a time I again shot twice and snapped several times thinking all the load had been discharged. I then went home and went to bed and did not load the pistol that night nor no time up to the accident. I loaded the pistol on Saturday night and it is now at home in my trunk. I heard Dr Carlisle say on Sunday when Jim Rook was dead that his advice was to go and bury Jim Rook.  John W. Duckett

   J. W. Folk being duly sworn: I was called on Thursday morning Nov 18th to hold a post mortem on Jim Rook at Mount Olive Church. The said Jim Rook was buried on Monday Nov 15th. I found a round wound inflicted about an inch above the naval and made its exit near the left hips where it appears that it was extracted. I made a long free incision from the exit to the entrance of wound and found the intestines or bowels pierced in two places and one of these injuries were sufficient to produce death. J. W. Folk, MD

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 26 November 1880

Newberry C.H. in Newberry. An inquisition indented taken at county on the 26th of November 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner of aforesaid county upon view of body of J. W. Johnston then and there being dead by the oaths of J. B. Leonard, Young Starks, L. K. Nance, Paul Johnston, J. C. Myers, W. L. Boozer, J. N. Bass, Robert Davis, H. M. B__ger, H. D. McCullough, Jim Young, J. Chambers, Geo. Wilson Being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said J. W. Johnston came to his death upon their oaths do say that the J. W. Johnston came to his death by being knocked off the car by the over head bridge about 4 o'clock PM on the 25th of Nov 1880. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid do and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.

E. C. Longshore. Coroner of Newberry County

   J. B. Leonard, foreman of jury, Young (X) Stark, L. K. Nance, Paul Johnston, J. C. Myers, W. L. Boozer, J. N. Bass, Robert Davis, H. M. B__ger, H. D. McCullough, Jim (X) Young, J. Chambers, George (X) Wilson

   N. B. Mazyck being duly sworn: I was notified that the conductor of the freight train was lying dead on the track. I went down and found him dead four hundred and twenty feet below the overhead bridge on C&G. RR His head badly crushed, his brains were scattered along the track for one hundred yards from the Newberry Depot. By permission of the deputy Coroner I removed the body to the Newberry Depot. It was about 4 o'clock pm. on 25th 1880.                           N. B. Mazyck

   H. S. Walker being duly sworn testifies: I was standing on the platform and looking down the railroad. I seen the said J. W. Johnston running along on top of the cars. Seen the bridge strike him and knock him down and thought that he was lying down on top of a car until some fifteen minutes after when I heard some one say that he was lying dead on the track. I went down and saw that it was Mr. Johnston. It was about 4 o'clock pm on the 25th of Nov 1880.        H. S. Walker.

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 31 December 1880

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry C.H. in Newberry County on the 31 day of Dec 1880 before E. C. Longshore Coroner of aforesaid County upon view of body of Rosa Brown then and there being dead by the oaths of Rube Harrington, Edward Simpkins, Ike Roberson, Richard Owens, Douglas Garmany, Abner Gary, Charley Sims, Ned Austin, Andrew Thompson, Wes Simmons, Sam Henderson, P. Fair Being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Rosa Brown came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Rosa Brown came to her death from old age and the severe cold weather on the 31 day of Dec 1880. In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.        E. C. Longshore, Coroner of Newberry County.

Rube (X) Harrington, foreman of jury, Edward (X) Simpkins, Ike Roberson, Richard (X) Owens, Douglas (X) Garmany, Abner (X) Gary, Charley Sims, Ned (X) Austin, Andrew (X) Thompson, Wes (X) Simmons, Sam (X) Henderson, Pleas Fair

   Rosa Wilson being sworn says: She, Rosa Brown, went to bed as usual last night and as she did not get up as usual. I went to see what was the matter and found her on the floor dead. She was perfectly cold when found. She slept in that room usually.                                         Rosa (X) Wilson

   Richard Wilson being sworn says; When I got up in the morning she always gets up as soon as I do and not hearing her walk I told my wife to see what was the matter. I found her first as cold as ice she was over one hundred years old.      Richard (X) Wilson

   Suss Wilson being sworn says: I always get up as soon as the fire is made and when I got up not seeing her I told mother to see what was the matter and she was on the floor dead.    

Suss (X) Wilson

Newberry Co. So. Carolina Dec - 31 - 1880 I hereby certify that I have carefully examined the body of Rosa Brown and find thereon no marks or indices of external violence and am of the opinion that the deceased came to her death from natural causes, old age and the extreme severity of the weather.  James McIntosh, MD.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School