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Colonial Cases

1825-1879

CATAWBA JOURNAL (Charlotte, N.C.), 15 February 1825

We learn from Waltersborough, that Mr. BROWN, Butcher, of that neighborhood, was shot on Friday last by Mr. WM.  BIVEAU, also of that vicinity, with a gun, loaded with buck shot, and expired soon after.  A jury of inquest was summoned, who returned a verdict of wilful murder.  Mr. B. surrendered himself to the Coroner of the District and was committed to jail, for trial.  We have heard some of the circumstances which led to this melancholy result, but refrain from publishing them. - Ch. Courier.

 

CATAWBA JOURNAL (Charlotte, N.C.), 13 September 1825

CAMDEN, S.C. AUGUST 27. - On Wednesday morning last, information was received in this town of the death of Mr. JOHN ADAMSON.  A Jury of inquest was immediately empannelled to enquire into the cause: And the following appears to be the substance of the verdict:--- Upon examination , a large hole was discovered in the right side, between the seventh and eight ribs, supposed to have been occasioned by the discharge iof a gun, with buck shot - the head also exhibited wounds apparently inflicted by the breech and cock of a gun.  The Jury have been unable to attach the crime to any particular person, but are left under the impression, that the gun was fired by Mr., Lewis Ciples: He (Mr. Ciples) having been seen, armed with a double barrel gun, in the neighborhood where the deed was perpetrated, and short time before the report of a gun was heard.  Why, how, and by whom this outrage was committed, time will determine. - The case now rests between him and his God. Chronicle.

 

CATAWBA JOURNAL (Charlotte, N.C.), 27 September 1825

SUICIDE.

CHERAW, SEPT. 16. - On the 10th inst. in this place, a man by the name of James Dow, a native of Perth in Scotland, aged about 30 years, was found dead, and was hanging by a rope that was suspended in the room where he slept.  It is supposed that he was in a state of insanity at the time he committed the act - as he was quite warm when first discovered an attempt was made to restore him.  A jury of inquest was called, and on examination of the body, their verdict was "that he came to his death by hanging."  Gazette.

 

CATAWBA JOURNAL (Charlotte, N.C.), 17 April 1827

MURDER.

YORKVILLE, S.C. APRIL 14. - On Wednesday night last John and M'Kinney M'Coy, were committed to Jail in this place, charged with the murder of Richmond Kendrick, a Constable of this District.  The circumstances, as near as we can learn them from report, and as we would be authorised to state them at this time, are as follows:

   Kendrick had an execution in his hand against the M'Coys, and, by virtue of that execution, had gone to their tan-yard and was proceeding to sell the Leather in the vats - owing to the unwillingness, or the inability of the purchasers, to pay the money, he was obliged to sell it a second time.  The last purchaser demanded the delivery of the leather.  Kendrick commenced throwing it out of the vats, when M';Kinny M'Coy came up and began to throw it back again.  Upon this, a quarrel ensued between them, in which some blows were exchanged.  John M'Coy came up to the assistance of his brother, and the quarrel was confined to him and Kendrick.  In the midst of the combat, John M'Coy seized a large tanner's fork, and struck Kendrick a severe blow on the head, which brought him to his knees, and cui a large gash in his head. After this fatal blow, which was given on Tuesday about 2 o'clock, he rode half a mile to a friend's house, where he soon sunk into a stupid and insensible state, and expired on Wednesday morning.  An inquest was held upon his body, and they returned a verdict that his death was caused by the blow inflicted by John M'Coy.

   Abstaining from all remarks upon the unfortunate persons now in the custody of the Law, we cannot forbear expressing our regret at the unexpected death of poor Kendrick.  His heart was warm and kind, and he was growing in the esteem of his friends - but the grave now conceals all his frailties and his virtues. Advocate.

 

THE CORRECTOR (Sag Harbor), Saturday 26 January 1839

We learn with deep regret says the Augusta Chronicle, from a highly respectable gentlemen, who arrived in this city on Saturday evening from the upper part of South Carolina, that General William S. Bull, of Abbeville district, has been shockingly murdered.  The horrid deed is supposed to have been perpetrated by his own negroes, seven of whom had been lodged in jail, upon suspicion.

 

THE LINCOLN COURIER (Lincolnton, N.C.), 29 September 1849

Suicide. - The Chester Observer of the 19th inst. says: "On last Monday a Coroner's inquest was held over the body of Mr. James Douglas Adams, who was found hanging to a tree, near the mill of Mr. Peter Wylie.  No cause is known for this act, unless as is conjectured, being a very poor man, of weakly constitution, and much in debt, he found it impossible to keep pace with the wants of his family, in a moment of despair, perpetrated the melancholy deed."

 

Fayetteville Observer (Fayetteville, N.C.), 28 November 1853

FOR THE OBSERVER.

ATROCITY OF SCUFFLETOWN.

On the evening of the 21st inst. an outrageous murder was committed on the person of J. C. McCormick, who lived about 12 miles from Lumberton, near Scuffletown.   On the 23d the body was found in a branch, and a jury of inquest was held ion the 24th, whose verdict was murder, and by a post mortem examination his cranium was found broken into half a dozen pieces.  Supposed to have been done by Enoch Cummings and two of his sons; the former and one son are in prison, the other one ran off.  It was made to appear that his head was laid on a large root and mashed into pieces with clubs, like common people would do a viper.  Respectfully yours, J. F. H.  Lumberton, Nov. 25, 1853.   [This inquest also recorded under N. Carolina.]

 

Fayetteville Observer (Fayetteville, N.C.), 3 March 1859

Horrible Affair at Bennettsville. - The postmaster at this place received yesterday a note, from Bennettsville, containing the following:

   "Three men killed here yesterday by poison, supposed to have been in the whiskey.  John W. Graham, Annanias Graham and John B. McCallum were the victims.  John C. Terrel has been arrested and lodged in jail - circumstantial evidence very strong against him."

   Another gentleman here also received a letter stating that a Coroner's inquest had been held and a verdict rendered that the three men came to their death by poison, administered by the hands of John C. Terrel. - Sheraw Herald.

   Serious Occurrence. - A difficulty occurred in this place on Thursday, between Robert Lewis and Henry Williams, in the course of which, Lewis struck Williams a blow on the head with a bottle, wounding him so severely that Williams died. Cheraw Herald,

 

THE SOUTHERN WATCHMAN (Athens, Georgia), 18 June 1862

RAILROAD ACCIDENT. - A soldier named M. G. Pettijohn, from Jackson County, Ga., was killed on the South Carolina Railroad while walking across the track at Branchville yesterday, being run over by the train to this city.  His body was brought here for interment.  He belonged to Company C, 18th Georgia Regiment.  An inquest was held by Coroner Baker, and a verdict rendered in accordance with the above facts. - Chron. & Sent.

 

THE NEW SOUTH, 9 January 1864

Execution of a Deserter at Beaufort.

On Wednesday last, the 6th inst., JOSEPH STROBEL, of Co. I, 55th Penn. Vols., was shot for desertion, at Beaufort, S.C.  All the military on duty at the fort were ordered out to witness the execution; also all the prisoners in the jail, among whom are others charged with the same crime.  The regiments were each drawn up in double lines, and the sentenced man, the other prisoners and the guards, marched between.  STROBEL rode in a buggy under charge of Lieut. SAUPP, Assistant Provost Marshall, and accompanied by the Rev. S. L. Harris, Post Chaplain, at whose request the execution had been postponed by General Gillmore for 24 hours, and read and knelt in prayer with the unfortunate man in his last moments this side of eternity.  On the way to the place of execution the prisoner bowed and smiled on recognizing his acquaintances, and told the Chaplain that he should not feel better if he were going to a ball.  At the place of execution he marched with firm step to his coffin, and standing beside it, the troops drawn up on three sides of him, and he, the cynosure of all eyes, read in a loud, firm voice, an address in the German language acknowledging his guilt and declaring his repentance; stating that he was not a thief or a murderer; that, although he had not lived  a man, he should die like a man; that he had not been a christian, but he trusted he should reach heaven, where he hoped to meet all his comrades, and his wife, for the latter of whom alone, he felt sorry.  An English translation of this address he handed to the Chaplain, who read it aloud.  On parting with the Chaplain and the Marshall, Captain METCALFE, he shook hands with them, and then drawing off his over-coat and deliberately stepping forward, his eyes unbandaged, he faced the file detailed to shoot him.  He requested the men not to fire at his head, and when the command "ready" was given, he threw up his hands and cried "hold on! hold on! Shoot me good!" to those pointing apparently at his face - the guns involuntarily fell for an instant, then rose again, and Joseph STROBEL lay a bleeding lifeless corpse pierced by six balls, beside the black coffin destined to contain his body.  Pity that a man so brave should suffer a fate so ignominious!

   STROBEL was born at Solfingen a town in Wirtenberg, Germany, and came to this country six or eight years since.  He claims to have been in the service in the 8th N. Y., from which, while a sergeant, he deserted, as he confesses, and having been caught, was reduced to the ranks.  He entered the 55th Pennsylvania as a substitute.  He is twenty-one years of age and has been married eight months.  He was a tall, fine looking, soldierly man.  While in the jail under sentence one of the guards offered him a chance to escape, but he refused to avail himself of it and the next morning told the jailer what had taken place.  In deserting this last time he left his post while on guard, and paid a negro $5 to land him and a comrade on the main, but the negro, instead of taking them there, took them to St. Helena Island, where they were accidentally discovered by a colored man a few days after.

FATAL ACCIDENT. - JOHN ROSS, a deck hand on the steamer Fallon had both legs broken below the knee by the parting of a hawser, attached to a steam-tug.  He was carefully conveyed to the General Hospital, and died from the effects of his wounds on Wednesday morning last.  He leaves a large family in New York, for whom a liberal subscription was made.

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 4 March 1879

An inquisition indented at Dawkin's graveyard in county aforesaid the fourth day of March A.D. 1879 before Euclidus C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Solomon Boozer of said County then and there being dead by the oaths of B. B. Hair, O. P. Harris, J. W. Leapheart, J. W. Dominick, J. S. Nichols, J. P. Dawkins, Godfrey Harmon, J. Bedenbaugh colored Hilliard Kinard, John Davenport, Alfred Boozer, Sam Harmon, Lewis Hipp being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Solomon Boozer came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Solomon Boozer did come to his death by the falling of plank out of a tub to be used as well curbing at the residence W. P. B. Harmon on the twenty fifth day of February 1879.

In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.
E. C. Longshore. Coroner County aforesaid. B. B. Hair Forman of Jury of Inquest, O. P. Harris, J. W. Leapheart, J. W. Dominick, J. S. Nichols, J. P. Dawkins, Godfrey Harmon, John Bedenbaugh, Hilliard (X) Kinard, John (X) Davenport, Alfred (X) Boozer, Sam (X) Harmon, Dennis (X) Hipp.

W. P. B. Harmon has been duly sworn: We were letting a plank down into the well for curbing. The rope come undone and the curbing keeled over and the plank went on down. I called him and said are you hurt. He said nothing. I then sent John Fisher down to see if he was hurt. He told me he was dead. I sent some camphor down and told John to rub him. I thought perhaps he was just knocked senseless and would come to again. After rubbing him his pulse beat and he drew a breath while down in the well. I drew him up immediately but he never breathed after I got him out of the well. I am satisfied that killed him. There was no ill feeling among the hands whatever. If was, was not known while at work. The plank fell thirty-eight feet.

John Fisher has been duly sworn: I was holding the windlass. We put the plank in the tub and was letting them down into the well and the rope came undone and the plank went on down. I went down into the well. When I got there he was lying on his side and the plank on his head. I rubbed him with camphor and picked him up. He said, "Lord." I told them to bring me and him out of there. It was done at Burr Harmon's house on the twenty fifth of February 1879. There was no ill feeling whatever.

James Stockman has been duly sworn: He said, Jim I want you to go down with this curbing."  I said,"No Saul, you show me how to wrap it, he said, "Now you wrap it the way I show you." I said, I will do it, when the curbing started. I said Saul, Here they come. He said, Let them come. I am here, and when they got a piece down in the well it began to come undone. We hollered to Saul to look out, and the moment we got him out on land I went to where they were rolling logs and told them that we thought Saul was killed. We had always been friendly as two brothers.

Dr. A. F. Langford have been duly sworn: At a point one inch back and one inch above the eye the skull is broken. The fracture is one inch and a half wide and three inches long, the extent of injury was sufficient to produce instant death.                                                                                 A. F. Langford M. D.

 

State of South Carolina, County of Newberry, 17 September 1879

An inquisition indented at Silver taken Street in County afore said the 17 day of Sept. A. D. 1879 before Euclidus C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Jeff Cannon of said County then and there being dead by the oaths of Henry Hendrix, J. S. Butler, John Davenport, J. S. Longshore, W. T. Hendrix, J. H. Hendrix, G. P. Hendrix, Colored Press Turner, Silas Dewalt, David Harp, Green Pitts, Lewis Spearman, John Butler, Hamp Counts being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jeff Cannon came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Jeff Cannon came to his death by the caving in of a well through his own carelessness at Silver Street on the sixteenth day of Sept 1879

In witness where of I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. 
E. C. Longshore. Coroner for County afore said.

Henry Hendrix Forman of jury of inquest, J. S. Butler, John Davenport, J. S. Longshore, W. T. Hendrix, J. H. Hendrix, G. P. Hendrix, Silas (X) Turner, David (X) Harp, Green (X) Pitts, Lewis (X) Spearman, John (X) Butler, Hamp (X) Counts.

Ambus Williams having been duly sworn: Yesterday morning me and Jeff went down into the well to work I saw the curbing give way. I told him I was coming out for it was going to fall in on us and I did come out. I told him he had better come too. He came up and stayed about 3 minutes and he said we had the well to fix and he went back. I said,  Jeff I will help you." He said nothing but went on down. There was no hard feeling whatever.

Taylor Garlington having been duly sworn: When the well first started to cave there were two in the well. I told them to come out for it was going to fall in on them if they stayed down there. They came up out of the well and stayed a little while and Jeff went back and he said to me the platform was swaging down he took a shovel with him I said to him he had better not go down now. He said that was nothing. "Let me down. " He took a shovel with him knocking the tub full of dirt as he went down. After filling two or three tubs the striping was coming loose. He said, Send me the rope, after the curbing was all done loose and we could not get the rope down before the curbing and all went after he spoke to us.

Calup Gray having been duly sworn: We had the tub on the plank when he hollered, "Send me the rope." And we all were in a strain and could not get the rope down after he hollered before it all fell in. The curbing was most to him and to the water when I saw him.

O. P. Saxon having been duly sworn: I heard the well cave in on him I was in the store at the time and I was in the store when it happened. I went over there as soon as I could get there and Ambus started down but did not go, for it was sill falling in and he came back. Jeff was covered up when I got there.

John T. Peterson having been duly sworn: I heard the well cave in on him. I was in the store at the time and not more than fifteen minutes before it fell. I was out there and there were two in the well then but one of them had come out. They had just drawn a tub of dirt out when it caved and fell in. He was covered up when I got there I saw the blubblers. I told one of the boys to go down. He started down but it still continued to cave and fall in and he came back out of the well.

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 26 September 1879

An inquisition indented taken at Newberry Court House in said county the twenty sixth of day September AD 1879 before Euclidus C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Jesse Grayser the bastard male child of Anna Ruff then and there being dead by the oaths of A. C. Jones, J. O. Havard, J. W. Coppock, J. E. Johnson, J. A. Sinsy, J. H. Ruff, J. M. Crawford, Z. W. McMorris, Simeon Young, Scott Thompson, Washington Golden, Charlie Brown, Green Barre being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jesse Grayser came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Jesse Grayser the bastard child as afore said came to it death from the rupture of one of the blood vessels of the brain produced by strangulation or convulsions and the jurors aforesaid on their oaths do aforesaid that the said Jesse Grayser came to his death in the manner aforesaid by misfortune.

In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner as aforesaid and the jurors afore said to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year afore mentioned. 
E. C. Longshore. Coroner for said County.

A. C. Jones foreman jury of inquest, J. W. Coppock, J. O. Havard, J. A. Sinsy, J. H. Ruff, J. M. Crawford, J. E. Johnson, Simeon Young, Z. W. McMorris, Charlie (X) Brown, Scott (X) Thompson, Washington (X) Golden, Green (X) Barre

Edney Emeridge being sworn says: I live in this house. My niece was with me when she had the child. She has been with me ever since the child has been suck and she has carried it to Dr. Mayer.  She gave it some medicine and it six or seven weeks ago. It began to improve. Last night the child was well, very pert, playful and playing till late. I heard the child cry in the night. This morning its mother called me to her and said come quick I believe my baby was dead. It was dead, not yet cold. Sent for the Dr. and Dr. Mayer came. I told him the child was dead.  She called me about good daylight. The child had bad bowels when it was sick. Fed the child but gave no medicine yesterday. She said on a pallet on the floor. Its nose was running with milk. The mother of the child is named Anna Ruff.  She is about 18 years old and she has never been married. Maston Grayser, she has said, was the father of the said child. She was mostly hired out previous to the birth of child.      Edney (X) Emeridge

Anna Ruff being sworn says: Jesse Grayser is the name of the child now dead. About 11 o'clock pm last night I went to bed with the child. Was then asleep. It woke me up in the night wanting to nurse.  I let it nurse and went to sleep while it was nursing. I woke up this morning and thought it was asleep. The milk was running out of its nose and its head was down under my breast I called my aunt and told her I believed my baby was dead. I could not hear it breathe but it was warm the child was born Dec the 15 1878. I have never been married. I know who was its father, Maston Grayser. Child last night was very lively. Did not seem to be sick. I have had spells of swimming in the head. I can't stand them. I have them every month. Had one of those spells last week. I did not have a spell last night. Don't feel as though I had one. I think the child must have died by being strangled. Don't think it was far enough under me to have been smothered. Child always had its hands up to its head. I gave milk freely.  Anna (X) Ruff

Kate Harrington being sworn says: I was called in about 5 o'clock Anna was crying and said her baby was dead. I picked it up and jerked it up. Something like milk was running out of its nose. It was warm all over except one hand. It looked to me as it might have been smothered. Have known Anna and her baby since she had it. She always appeared to be very fond of it. Kate (X) Harrington

James K. Gilder being sworn say: I am a practicing physician. Have examined the dead body now present from the examination. I cannot determine the manner of the child's death with certainty that the child might have come to its death from the rupture of one of the blood vessels of the brain. It might have had convulsions from over feeding. No mark or indication of violence of any kind. I am inclined to believe that the child was strangled because of the absence of any signs of the child being overlaid. Don't think the mother's breast would have smothered it. It having been sick was more likely to come to such a death.            J. K. Gilder, M. D.

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 6 October 1879

An inquisition indented taken at J. J. Pasinger Place in County aforesaid the sixth day of October AD 1879 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon [view] of the body of Luther Kinard then and there being dead by the oaths of M. M. Coppock, L. F. Longshore, F. S. Paysinger, J. H. Dennis, P. N. Livingston, Mack Coppock, A. M. Teague, Ealand Miller, Alfred Wilson, Alf. Long, Ben King, Bill Dawkins being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Luther Kinard came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Luther Kinard on this sixth day of October AD 1879 at the plantation of J. J. Pasinger in Township no. 8 in the County of Newberry and State aforesaid came to his death by a gunshot wound and that said shot was fired from a pistol in the hand of Bill Boozer and so the jurors aforesaid do say that the aforesaid in manner and form aforesaid then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same Sat State aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. 
E. C. Longshore. Coroner for said County.  M. M. Coppock foreman jury of inquest, L. F. Longshore, F. S. Paysinger, J. H. Dennes, P. N. Livingston, Mack Coppock, A. M. Teague, Ealand (X) Miller, Alfred (X) Wilson, Alf. (X) Long, Ben (X) King, Bill (X) Dawkins.

John Boyce having been duly sworn: Mr. Boozer rode in the field and said, 'How you do. I said I am well' and he rode on by me and said, 'Luther, I have a warrant for you Luther.' He began to pull off his sack. He said, 'Don't you run. I will shoot you. He said, 'Take my hat.' By that time Mr. Bedenbaugh ran up and said, 'Don't shoot him.' He said, 'You told me to head him yes, but don't shoot him' and he run to the fence to get over. Mr. Boozer shot him. The shot killed him. When he shot the second time, the boy was lying down groaning. Bill Boozer shot Luther Kinard. Boozer never shot until he ran. Mr. Bedenbaugh ran up in about five minutes. Boozer never presented no warrant at all. He drew his pistol as soon as he rode up. It was about twenty yards from where he was shot where he fell. He said, "What is the warrant about?"  I been knowing Bill Boozer about two years. I tried to keep from between them. John (X) Boyce

Dave Liles having been duly sworn: Mr. Boozer rode up and said, "Luther Kinard I have a warrant for you." He begun to walk off and said, "What about?" He ran to uncle John to give him his hat and then he ran to the fence and Mr. Boozer shot him on the fence and he ran to the fence and shot at him again. Mr. Bedenbaugh ran to him and said don't not to shoot him and after Mr. Bedenbaugh got there he went to him and said. " Boozer you have killed him. What are you going to do about it. I will go to Town with you." He started but did not go. When they got to the road they parted. It was Bill Boozer. I knew him as soon as I saw him. Bedenbaugh said, "Don't shoot him." I saw no one but Mr. Bedenbaugh. He rode up immediately. Boozer told him he had a warrant for him. I was by him when he rode up. He drew his pistol after he rode up. Boozer told him not to run. "If you run, God d__n you, I will shoot you." I never knew him to hurt anyone before. I never knew him to get into a fight with no one. I worked with Mr. Boozer one year. He never quarreled with me at all.              Dave (X) Liles

Cirus Boyce having been duly sworn: About half past two o'clock Mr. Boozer rode up to me and asked where Mr. Paysinger's hands were at work. I told him my father was over there behind some Pines. He said, 'Is Luther Kinard over there?" I told him he was. He said, "Can I get there through the field?"  I told him yes and just before Mr. Bedenbaugh rode up I went to where they were and went with them, me and Mr. Bedenbaugh. Stopped in the Pines and Boozer rode up to Luther and told him he had a warrant for him Mr. Bedenbaugh hollered, "Don't shoot him." He shot him on the fence and his mule throwed him. He jumped up and run to the fence and shot again but he had done fell. Mr. Bedenbaugh went to him and called him but he was dead. He said, "Bill I told you to head him but not to shoot him." He said, "I will have to go to Town and report to the Coroner."  Mr. Bedenbaugh got on his horse and started to Town and told us to stay there. We told him we would not stay and we come on to the house. I know it was Bill Boozer. I have been knowing him about three years. Mr. Bedenbaugh told him before he got there not to shoot him. He said, you go up there and I will stay here and try to catch him if I can, but don't you shoot him. Me and Mr. Bedenbaugh was together when Boozer shot Luther. Cirus (X) Boyce

Elijah Bedenbaugh having been duly sworn: James Wicker swore out a warrant before Andrew Wheeler against him for stealing watermelons. I have run him out of the field before. I heard he was at Mr. Paysinger's. I saw him at Mr. Ramage's and told him I would have to take him away from him. Bill Boozer said I will go with [you] if you go now. I said all right I will be glad of it for he will run from me. I will get you to arrest him for me. I gave him the warrant and told him how to do. Cirus was in the field. I stopped at the fence and told Bill to go in. I thought he was the one. I saw him point over the field. I went over and told him. I would get any horse. Bill went on over. I told him if he found him to take hold of him and holler when I heard him holler. When I heard him holler I whipped up but he shot before I got in sight. Then I hollered, "Don't shoot." When I got there the mule was running up the fence. I never saw him shoot the first time but I saw him shoot the second time. I went to the fence and looked across the fence and saw him there. I went to where he was and saw him draw the last breath. I went to Boozer and took the pistol away from him. It was my pistol, I gave it to him. Before we left Town I told him not to shoot him, before we got there. I never heard him and the Negroes talk. I was a hundred and fifty yards from them. I told him I was going to Town he said, "What must I do?" I said, "Do as you please. I am going to Town before the coroner leaves there." I saw him in Town today. Eligah Bedenbaugh

Jas. K. Gilder having been duly sworn I examined the body of Luther Kinard and found where one ball penetrated the body between the tenth and eleventh rib. On probing found the ball had penetrated the liver and ranged towards the stomach. Considers the wound sufficient to produce death.              Jas. K. Gilder

 

State of South Carolina, Newberry County, 8 October 1879

An inquisition indented taken at William Langford Plantation in Township No. 6 the 8 day of Oct A.D. 1879 before E. C. Longshore Coroner for said County upon view of the body of Lucinda Harp then and there being dead by the oaths of S. F. Longshore, Henry Hendrix, M. C. Longshore, W. T. Hendrix, J. S. Longshore, George Spearman, H. H. Evans, A. J. Langford, Jeff Buzzard, Sam Cannon, Harper Wilson, Isaac Dickerson, J. H. Hendrix being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Lucinda Harp came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Lucinda Harp came to her death from heart disease the 7 day of Oct A.D. 1879.

In witness whereof I, E. C. Longshore Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned. 
E. C. Longshore. Coroner for said County.

S. F. Longshore, foreman jury of inquest, Henry Hendrix, M. C. Longshore, W. T. Hendrix, J. S. Longshore, George (X) Spearman, H. H. Evans, A. J. Langford, Jeff (X) Buzzard, Sam (X) Cannon, Harper (X) Wilson, Isaac (X) Dickerson, J. H. Hendrix.

Susan Harp having been duly sworn: When I went to milk she was playing in the floor. I went to milk about sundown. No body was in the house but two little children. She ate and nursed at dinnertime. Seemed hearty as common. It was dark when I found out it was dead. Its mother fed it meat and bread at dinner. It was playing when I went off.  I tended to it when its mother went off from it. I stayed long enough to milk and saw its mother got to the house before I did me and Katy never had no hard feelings when she found it was dead. I went to it. We had given it no medicine lately. Susan (X) Harp

Katy Harp having been duly sworn when I come to dinner she was playing. She ate and nursed hearty. I found her just before seven o'clock. I took the light and went to the bed after supper to get her to give her supper. I thought she was well at dinner. I give her three tomatoes at dinner, when I went to work. Me and Susan have been friendly all the year. Bill Harris was in the house and Susan and all the chaps. When I found she was dead I left it sitting up in the bed. At dinner it was lying across the bed, when I come in at night. Katy (X) Harp

David Harp having been duly sworn: When its mother was sick I give her some calomel. I told Katy not to let it nurse but she did and it took sick afterwards but it got so it would crawl and play over the floor. Monday after dinner I was making baskets. It was playing where I was. She didn't go to the field at all Tuesday. Katy came to the house before Susan came from milk and went to the child and felt its feet and they was cold and she covered them up and went after fire. She fixed my supper and I was eating. I said sit down and Katy got a light and went to the bed and found it was dead. I laid my hand on its head. I told Bill Harris to go to the houses and tell them that Katy's baby was dead. I don't know whether she always takes a light to the bed or not on nights when she goes after it.  David (X) Harp

Cathon Cannon having been duly sworn: Bill Harris came after me last night and said that Dave Harp said come over there - Katy's baby was dead. I heard Susan say Katy had no business with the baby. Some body gave it some blue stone this year. Cilva Buzzard told me it throwed up bluestone and so did Katy.           Cathon (X) Cannon

Bill Harris having been duly sworn: Last night after supper I came to Dave Harp's to get him to go with me to Jim Waldrop's with me. He said I can't go, it is raining. Then Katy went to the bed after her child with a light and said it is dead. Dave said, "Is it? ' Katy picked it up. Dave said, 'It is dead. 'You can't do anything for it now. Susan went and looked at it and said nothing. She went away from the child. I saw Susan give it water and wipe its mouth as many as three times this year. Bill (X) Harris

Ophelia Allan having been duly sworn: I went to Katy's house and took the child and it threw up some thing like blue stone but it was in the night.  Ophelia (X) Allan

Dr. Jas. K. Gilder having been duly sworn: The child might have come to its death by over loading of the stomach with corn and tomatoes. We find the heart diseased and think the most probable cause of death was some affliction of the heart. Jas. K. Gilder M.D.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School