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Colonial Cases

Louisiana

SETTLER AND PENNON (Smethport, Pa.), 23 September 1841

ROASTING A MAN TO DEATH.

We copy the following account of an abominable outrage from the N. O. Picayune of Aug. 14:

   Some four weeks ago, a young man, named Riley, a member of the Marion Rifles, and employed by a merchant in Commune street, left this city for the purpose of seeing some friends in Bayou Sara.  He made an agreement with the officers of the U. States, going up to St. Louis to assist in 'wooding.'  On the first night that he started, he was called up; but having indulged rather freely in liquor with his friends in New Orleans previous to embarking, he felt sick and fatigued, and refused to obey the summons.  The mate and engineer of the boat swore that he should so as he promised, and he still refusing, they took him by his heels, and dragged him somewhere near the mouth of the oven, or at least so near that he fell by the fire.  Being much intoxicated, he laid there until his back and neck were burnt in a horrible manner.  Some one or two of the passengers, seeing him in this situation, removed him to his berth where, despite of their treatment he died in three or four hours afterwards. - The officers then wished to bury the body on shore, but the passengers insisted upon having him taken up to Natchez, where an inquest was held and a verdict given in accordance with the above facts.  Yesterday, a letter was received by his friends in this city, informing them of the nature of his death.

 

New Orleans Inquests:
Unknown Man Drowned

Teamster Found Dead on Schooner

The Southerner

New Orleans, Louisiana

June 2, 1847

http://theoldentimes.com/inquests06021847orl.jpg

 

The Planers' Banner, 21 June 1851

   A case of infanticide created some little excitement yesterday in the upper part of the city.  A number of boys, while playing in the street, discovered the body of an infant thrust into one of the covered gutters on Triton Walk. - A coroner's inquest was immediately held on the body, and a verdict returned of "maliciously drowned" against some person or persons unknown.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 17 January 1852

FROZEN TO DEATH. An inquest was yesterday held on the bodies of three white men found dead in a skiff at the lake end of the New Canal.  The names of the deceased were as follows: John Engleton, aged about fifty years, a native of Switzerland; John or Jack -----, aged 40 years, a native of France; Charles or Charley ------ aged about 35 years, a native of Spain. It appeared from the testimony adduced that these men belonged to the schooner General Worth, which was wrecked on the Lake during the storm on Monday night last, and the poor fellows were frozen to death.  Engleton was Captain of the schooner, and the two others formed the crew.  The verdict of the Jury was rendered in accordance with the facts.

ANOTHER INQUEST. A Coroner's Inquest was held yesterday on the body of a slave named Anthony, aged 80 years, found dead in a house on Robertson street, near Main street.  The jury rendered a verdict that the old man had come to his death by suffocation produced by the burning of his floor and the communication of fire to his blanket.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 21 January 1852

CITY INTELLIGENCE.

INQUESTS. - The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the bodies of two white men, found dead on board the schooner Eagle, Captain Buisson.  The names of the deceased were Clifton Boon and Reuben Brooking, the former a native of Missouri, aged twenty-three years, and the clatter a native of Switzerland county, Indiana, aged fifty-one years.  The testimony showed that the men died of Chagres fever, and the jury rendered a verdict accordingly.

   A second inquest was held yesterday at the house of N. Holmes, corner of Gravier and St. John streets, on the body of a female slave named Mary, aged seventy-five years, the property of Mr. Holmes.  Verdict: Died of inflammation, &c., produced by intemperance.

MURDER CHARGE.'

   Henry Clinton was arraigned yesterday before Recorder Caldwell, on an affidavit made by Margaret Kathman, charging him with the murder of her husband, Alexander Kathman, some two months ago, in a coffee-house in Tchoupitoulas street.  The accused was committed for examination on Saturday.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 30 January 1852

MURDER. - A Coroner's inquest was held yesterday on the body of Manuel Cutino, a native of Gibraltar, aged about forty years, found dead at the Coffee-house of F. Sancho, on Levee street, between St. Ann and Madison streets. Several wounds were found upon his body, one of which was in the abdomen, penetrating the liver and stomach, and producing a hemorrhage which caused his death.  The wounds were inflicted with a dirk, by a man whose name we suppress for the ore sent.  The verdict was rendered.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 31 January 1852

INQUESTS. - The Coroner yesterday held an inquest at the Charity Hospital, on the body of a man named Hugh Hickey, aged 35 years, who was brought to the Hospital on Thursday evening, by a man named Flinn, and died some twelve hours afterward.  Flinn said that he had brought him from Kurohy's Coffee-house, corner of Tchoupitoulas and St. Joseph streets.  Verdict - Died if a rupture of a blood vessel of the brain. [See 2nd February, letter from M. W. Murphy of the Coffee-house.]

   A second inquest was held on the body of Francis Poet, aged 21 years, a native of Franklin Parish, La., who died on board the steamboat Sarah Gordon of phthisis pulmonaris.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 2 February 1852

                INQUEST. - A Coroner's Inquest was held on Saturday on the body of a white man named Jean Baptiste Wallaue, aged 42 years, and a native of France, found dead in a house in Orleans street.  Verdict, died of dropsy.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 3 February 1852

INQUESTS.

   A Coroner's inquest was held, on Sunday evening, in the Charity Hospital, on the body of a white boy aged 12 years, named Vicenzo Briasco, who had died in consequence of injuries received from the cars of the Pontchartrain Railroad passing over him about a week ago.  The jury rendered a verdict accordingly.

   A second inquest was held at the Chariot Hospital on the same evening, on the body of Robert McKee, a native of Ireland, aged 31 years, the verdict in which case was - Died of contusion on the head, and intemperance.

A third inquest was held on the same evening, at a house in Live street, Third Municipality, on the body of Eugenie Boudreau, f. w.  c. a native of New Orleans, aged 40 years.  Verdict - Died from congestion of the brain, produced by intemperance.

   A fourth inquest was held yesterday morning at the California Saw-mill, Third Municipality, on a young German named Henry Maure, aged 22 years, who had hanged himself in a  fit of  disappointment in love affairs.  Verdict accordingly.

   A fifth inquest was held yesterday, at the Charity Hospital, on the body of Joseph Hayne, a native of Ireland, aged 20 years, who had committed suicide, by throwing himself from a third story gallery of the hospital into the yard.  Verdict accordingly.

   A sixth inquest was held at a house in Gironde street, between Poydras and Perdido, on the body of Matthew Furlong, a native of Ireland, aged 26 years, who died from the effects of injuries received last week, by falling from a scaffold, while at work on the St. Charles Hotel building.  The verdict was  rendered in accordance with the facts.

   A seventh inquest was held on the body of a white man named James Cullian (or Coulin,) a native of Ireland, aged 23 years, who died from the effect of wounds received in the affray in Hevin street, noticed in our paper of yesterday morning.  The jury rendered a verdict, that deceased came to his death by a wound in the breast, penetrating the left lung, inflicted by a small sword in the hands of some person unknown.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 21 February 1852

INQUEST. - A Coroner's inquest was held yesterday on the body of Tobiah Smith, a f. w. c. found dead at 13 Casacalvo street.  The evidence showed that the deceased came to her death  from inflammation, etc., and a verdict was rendered accordingly.  The deceased was a native of New York, and aged 36 years.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 19 June 1852

RESOLUTION OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN.

Resolved, That the treasurer of New Orleans pay, on the warrants of the Comprtoller, the following bills:

   Dr. Thorp, attendance to two inquests, twenty dollars.

   Dr. Durel, attendance to thirty-three inquests, three hundred and thirty dollars.

   Coroner Wilkinson, inquests held in May, seven hundred and fifty dollars.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 22 June 1852

INQUEST. - An Inquest was held yesterday, by Deputy Coroner Loze, on the body of an Irishman named George Boyle.  Boyle had been a boarder in a house on the corner of Hospital and Levee streets.  It is supposed that, having gone to sleep on the gallery of the house, which is about forty feet high, he rolled off during the night.  The inquest found that his spine, lower jaw, left wrist and left thigh were fractured.  The deceased was a seaman, 24 years of age, and was to have  sailed for New York yesterday.  Verdict in accordance with the facts.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 23 June 1852

INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday by Deputy Coroner Loze on the body of a man named Wm. Conners, who died suddenly in a house on the corner of Delord and Magazine streets.  Deceased was a native of Ireland, and aged thirty-five years.  Verdict, Died of Apoplexy.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 24 June 1852

INQUESTS. - An inquest was held yesterday by deputy Coroner Loze on the body of a white man, name unknown, found floating in the Bayou St. John, near the Lake.  The deceased appeared to have been about thirty years of age.  The body was dressed in flannel drawers and undershirt, cotton shirt and cloth vest.  No marks of violence were discoverable on the body.  It appeared to have been in the water four or five days.  The deceased, it is thought, was a man who fell from a schooner a few days ago into the Old Basin.  Verdict accordingly.

  Another inquest was held on the body of a man, name unknown, found floating in the river on the opposite side. Verdict, Found Drowned.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 28 June 1852

MAYORALTY OF NEW ORLEANS, JUNE 28, 1852   .

   Coroner Wilkinson, inquests held in May, seven hundred and fifty dollars.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 15 July 1852

INQUESTS. - An inquest was held yesterday at the plantation of Mr. Ducoigne, about five miles below the city, on the body of a white boy, aged about ten years, found floating near the right bank of the river.  The boy was dressed in blue cottonade pantaloons, and appeared to have been in the water about ten days.  The body is probably that of a boy who fell into the river at the foot of Canal street about ten days ago.  Verdict, found drowned.

   Another inquest was held yesterday by Coroner Wilkinson on the body of a white man found floating at post No. 17, First District.  The body was dressed in a white cotton shirt, duck pantaloons, black silk cravat, black satin vest, common brogans, and had upon it a figured silk pocket handkerchief.  The deceased was apparently about forty-five years of age.  Verdict, died by drowning.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 27 July 1852

FUNERAL OF CAPTAIN WEYMOUTH. - A very large procession of citizens and members of the orders of Odd Fellows and Masons, turned out yesterday to the funeral of Captain J. M. Weymouth, who died yesterday morning of wounds received during the affray on Wednesday night in Theatre Alley. .  .  .  The deceased was a native of New York, and about fifty years of age. .  .  .  . 

INQUEST ON CAPTAIN WEYMOUTH.- The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the body of Captain Weymouth, who died at the Charity Hospital, at 6 o'clock in the morning.  Several witnesses were examined.  It appeared from the testimony, that the deceased was not a party to the quarrel that resulted in the affray, but that when the row commenced he rushed into the Coffee-house to part the combatants, whereupon he was knocked down by a blow  from a slung shot, and held down by George Thompson, while, with the slung shot, he was beaten by John Duffy on the head until he was senseless.  He never spoke afterwards, but lingered in great agony up to the moment of his death.  Verdict of the Coroner - Died of contusions of the head, inflicted by a slung shot, in the hand of one Duffy.

INQUESTS.

   Deputy Coroner Loze held an inquest yesterday on the body of a free colored boy named Luke, aged 12 years, who fell into the river and was downed, at the foot of Bienville street, on Friday last.  Verdict, Died by drowning.

   Another inquest was held on the body of a man named Christian Chuder, found dead in a skiff at the Lake.  The deceased was 38 years old, and a native of Germany.  Verdict, Died of pernicious fever.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 16 August 1852

INQUESTS. - An inquest was held yesterday by deputy Coroner Loze, at No. 25 St. Philip street, on the body of Baptista Casabagio, aged forty years, a native of Genoa.  Verdict, died of delirium tremens.

   An inquest was held on Saturday, on Main street, between Burgundy and Rampart streets, on the body of a man named Vider, forty-five years of age and a native of France.  Verdict, died of asphyxia.

   Another inquest was held on the body of a white man named Michel Alcide,  found drowned in the Canal Carondelet.  He was a native of France, and aged about twenty-niche years.  Verdict, died by drowning.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 1 September 1852

INQUESTS. - An inquest was held yesterday ay post No. 20, foot of Race street, on the body of a negro man named Lewis, slave of Mr. Littleton.  He drowned on Sunday while bathing in the river.

   Another inquest was held on the body of a man in a state of decomposition, found in the river at the foot of Julia street

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 3 September 1852

INQUEST. -  An inquest was held yesterday, at the foot of Jefferson street, on the body of a negro man, name unknown, aged about forty years, found in the river opposite Customhouse street, between the steam-boats.  The body appeared to have been in the water about  eight or ten hours.  Had on blue cottonade pantaloons,  hickory shirt, two brass rings on the small finger of the right hand.  The tip of the right ear had been cut off.  Verdict - Died by drowning.

MYSTERIOUS MURDER. - A most atrocious crime, involving the death of a boy nine years old, named Theodore George Wolfley, was committed on Tuesday evening last at the store No. 6 Front levee, between Hospital and Ursuline streets, kept by a man named Ambroise Dartigue.  The following affidavit led to the arrest of the suspected parties:

   August Grabig made oath before Recorder Genois, that on yesterday morning at about 4 o'clock,  deponent was watching some fire wood deposited on the bank of the river, between Ursuline and Hospital streets, when he observed a negro man, who was carrying a flour barrel on his shoulder, advancing towards the wharf, distant from where deponent stood about fifteen paces, and threw into the river the aforesaid barrel.  About an hour afterwards, deponent having brought the barrel close to the shore, discovered that it contained a dead body, wherefore he left the same, and immediately went in quest of the Coroner, intoned the police, etc.

   Captain McGovern, of the Second District police, being informed of the fact, proceeded to an investigation of the circumstances.  It appeared on opening the barrel, that it contained a human body, which had been packed in with a quantity of hay, and other trash taken from the floor of as stable.  The Coroner held an inquest on the body, but decomposition had taken place to such an extent that the immediate cause of death could not be ascertained.  There were two bruises on one of the thighs, and the sutures of the cranium had  separated.  The attending physician was of opinion that the opening of the sutures had been caused by the heat in the barrel, or by the generation of gases in the damp hay.  It was clear, from appearances, that the death had been caused by violence,

   The mother and two brothers of the deceased - the latter severally twelve and fourteen years of age - were present and identified the body.  The Coroner's verdict was that the deceased died by violence, by the hands of some person or persons unknown.

   Capt. McGovern having proceeded to the scene of the murder, ascertained the following facts: He was informed that the boy had resided with his mother and two brothers, on Moreau street, and that the three boys had been in the habit of playing about the Tow-boat Office, and a hay and feed store near Ursuline street, kept by Ambroise Daritgue.  On Tuesday last, the 31st ult., the boy had been seen by his brother, about 3 o'clock, P.M., playing about the feed store.  The three brothers had been playing the game of "hide and go seek" in and around the store, and in and among the bales of hay, where the deceased had disappeared, and could not be found.  From the evening of his disappearance up to yesterday morning, the opinion became prevalent that the boy, in venturing too near the river, had been drowned.  The men about the store, to all questions concerning the boy, answered "he was drowned."  Further search about the store had been given up. 

   Captain McGovern, in examining the barrel, selected from it some springs of hay and grass, which on comparison were found exactly to compare with the hay and grass in the store.  He found too that the hay had been trampled upon by a horse and on examination found a stable in the rear of the premises with a horse in it, when exactly the same kind of hay with that in the barrel was found in the stall under the horse.

   A number of barrels, with round hoops. That had formerly contained flour, and corresponding exactly with that in which the body was concealed, were found about the store.  Searching further, he ascertained that a window in the stable had been lately broken and that some of the glass was lying about the floor.  This glass corresponded exactly with some pieces found in the barrel with the body.

   From suspicion created by these facts, the persons concerned with the store, four in number, were arrested early yesterday.  Their names are  Ambroise Dartigue, Jean Tapie, Jean Despard and Francois Cazento.

   They were taken before recorder Chamois, and after having been warned that they were not bound to answer any questions tending to criminate themselves, and having been also instructed by counsel to the same effect, the three first made voluntary statements.  Nothing was elicited to criminate either of them, but one of them - Tapie - after the examination was closed, made a voluntary statement,. Underneath, to the following effect:

He said: That on Tuesday evening last, between four and give o'clock, the three boys were playing around the store, the two elder ones being out of sight at the time, when Dartigue, the owner of the store, becoming enraged at the younger one, struck him on the side of the neck with an iron instrument used by flour inspectors for boring into flour barrels.  The boy fell alongside of a high pile of sacks of bran, where he lay motionless and apparently dead.  Without examining him to see whether he was really dead, Dartigue immediately pulled down a number of the bran sacks, and oiled them ion the body so as to entirely conceal it.  The body lay in this situation the following two nights and day.  On yesterday morning, about four o'clock, Dartigue arose from his bed, and getting a barrel - the same exhibited at the recorder's office - and having lifted the sacks from off the body, proceeded to put it in the barrel, with a quantity of hay and trash.  Tapie saw the legs of the body sticking out of the barrel, and recognized the body by its clothing.  Dartigue then headed up the barrel, and exhorting  deponent and the other men in the house to say nothing about it, rolled the barrel to the river bank and into the water, to which last act he was seen by the man who made the affidavit.

The accused were all committed to prison to await further examination.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 8 September 1852

City Intelligence.

INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday by deputy Coroner Loze, at the foot of Custom-house street, on the body of a mulatto man named George, aged about twenty-two years - slave of Mathias Geranovitch - who fell from the steamer Magnolia yesterday.  Verdict, Died by drowning.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 26 October 1852

INQUEST. - Coroner Wilkinson held an inquest on the body of Robert Weaver, a native of Portland, Me., aged about 69 years.  He was found in a house on the corner of Roman and Cypress streets.  Verdict - died of delirium tremens.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 5 November 1852

THE LATEST MAN-KILLING. - Antoine D'Angelo and Andre Cutino, both Italians, who, during the last year have been frequently before the public as offenders in various bloody transactions, got into an altercation last night which resulted in the death of Cutino.

   Between seven and eight o'clock, the parties met in Circus street, at the end fog Poydras Market.  D'Angelo threw a dagger at Cutino, which wounded him in the side.  Cutino then drew a stiletto, which he carried ordinarily upon his person, and attempted to stab his assailant.  D'Angelo ran, and being closely pursued, drew a pistol and shot Cutino through the heart.  He fell dead immediately.  D'Angelo was arrested and confined in the First District Lock-up.

   The Coroner held an inquest on the body of the deceased, the result of which was in accordance with the above recited facts.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 19 November 1852

Local Intelligence.

FIRST DISTRICT COURT - Judge Larue - Murder Trial.

   Vicenzo Vichionio was put on his trial yesterday for the murder of Manuel Cutino on the 29th of January last.  Cutino was killed in a coffee-house kept by Antonio Samcho, on Old Levee street, between St. Ann and Main streets.  .  .  .  . 

   Deputy Coroner Loze, for the State, sworn - Was present at the time the inquest was held on the body of Cutino; proved the proces verbal of the inquest, showing that the homicide took place at the house laid down in the indictment, and that the deceased received two wounds, one in the breast, not penetrating, and the other, a penetrating wound, in the abdomen, which cut the liver and caused death.

   Dr. Durel, for the State, sworn - Was present at the post mortem examination held on the body of Cutino; the body had two wounds; the one in the left side, in the lower part of the abdomen, was an incised wound six inches deep, and was sufficient to produce death.

   Hernandez, for the State, called.  The witness spoke in the Spanish language.  He testified that he was present when Cutino was killed.  Saw the prisoner kill him.  He was killed with a knife (cuchillo.) [The knife was a small kitchen knife, with a white handle.] .  .  .  . 

   After an hour's absence, they brought in a verdict of "Guilty, without capital punishment."

INQUESTS.

   Coroner Rice held an inquest yesterday on the body of an unknown man found floating in the river, in the Fourth District.  Verdict - Found drowned.

   Another inquest was held yesterday at 87 Royal street, on the body of a colored girl named Margaret, fifteen years old  salve of Richard Murphy. Verdict - Died of an epileptic fit.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 2 December 1852

FIRST DISTRICT COUNT, JUDGE LARUE - Trial for Murder.

   Michael Purcel was yesterday put on his trial for the murder of Perry Kiwan, on the 2d day of August last.

   The homicide was committed on Mandeville street, between Moreau and Victory streets, in the Third District.  The deceased received two wounds and a bruise on the left temple.  One wound, of a triangular shape, was inflicted on the upper part of the breast bone.  A second wound was in the left side, penetrating the cartilages of the fifth and sixth ribs, and cutting the right ventricle of the heart. .  .  .  . 

   The case was given to the jury at half-past 2 o'clock.  They retired about ten minutes, and brought in an unqualified verdict of guilty.  The penalty is death by hanging.  The prisoner on being hand-cuffed, to be taken to prison, said he didn't care a d-n !

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 17 March 1853

INQUEST. - An Inquest was held yesterday by Coroner Wilkinson at  Algiers on the body of a colored woman named  Catherine, aged [60], and a native of New Orleans.  Verdict - Died of intemperance.

   A second inquest was held on the body of Elizabeth O'Kaughy, aged 32 years, a native of Ireland.  The inquest was held in Chapel alley, near Delord street, First District.  Verdict - Died of apoplexy.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 19 April 1853

Local Intelligence.

INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday by Deputy Coroner Wm. C. Terrell on the body of a man named Louis Musha, aged about 40 years, found dead on the pavement in Tchoupitoulas street, between Natchez and Gravier street.  Verdict - Died of apoplexy caused by intemperance.  The deceased had been a deck hand on board the steamer Henry Choteau, and being unwell, attempted to go to the Charity Hospital.  On his way he fell dead in the street.

ANOTHER HOMICIDE. - At a ball given on La Harpe street on Sunday night, at a late hour, about 5 o'clock, a free colored boy named Edward Mayence, aged about eighteen years, was fatally stabbed.  The deceased had just left the ball room when he was heard to say murder.  A number of persons  rushed to the spot and found him in a dying condition.  He was immediately removed to the house of his brother, where he died, without being able to give the name of his assassin.

   An inquest was held on the body of the deceased by deputy Coroner Wm. C. Terrell, who, after obtaining strong circumstantial evidence against several suspected persons, issued warrants for their arrest.  The jury of inquest returned the following verdict: Came to his death from a wound in the left side severing the intercostal artery, inflicted with a sharp pointed instrument in the hands of some person or persons unknown.

   Two dirk  knives were picked up by the police near the spot where the murder was committed.  No arrests have yet been made.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 23 April 1853

Local Intelligence.

INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday, by deputy Coroner Wm. C. Terrell, on a white man, name unknown, aged about thirty years, found drowned in the river at the foot of St. Peter street, Second District - supposed to have been in the water about three weeks.  Verdict, "died by accidental drowning."  Description - white cotton short, blue cottonade pants, and common brogans.  No marks of violence could be discovered on the body.

GRAND JURY FINDINGS.

   In the case of James Hagan, charged with driving an omnibus over a child named Mary Theresa, causing her death, the bill of indictment was ignored.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 25 April 1853

Local Intelligence.

BOY KILLED. - At a late hour last evening some boys who were playing together on the wharf in the Second District, near the Meat Market, threw one of their number, a lad named Kelly, and about  four years old, into the river.  Some by-sanders seeing the danger in which the child was placed, threw a plank into the stream to his assistance, which striking him on the head so stunned him that he sunk.  He was immediately rescored, but when brought to land it was discovered that from the combined effects of strangulation and the blow, life was extinct.  The Coroner was sent for, who, we presume, found a verdict in accordance with the facts as above stated.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 26 April 1853

INQUESTS. - An inquest was held yesterday, by Deputy Coroner Wm. C. Terrell, on the body of a white boy named John Kirby, aged four years, and a native of Ireland - found dead in a house on Suzette street, near the levee, First District.  Verdict, "Came to his death by a spar accidentally rolling over him on the evening of the 24th inst., at Post 7, First District."

   A second inquest and post mortem examination was held on the body of Theresa Hernandez, aged thirty-two years, a native of Louisiana - found dead in the Cemetery St. Vincent de Paul, First District.  Verdict, "Died from congestion of the brain, caused by intemperance." [When Deputy Coroner Terrell was sent for in this case to the house where the deceased died, he found that the body had been removed and buried - a physician having certified, without seeing the corpse,. That the death had been caused by intemperance.  The fact that the body had been thus hurriedly removed, after a certificate from the physician, so manifestly wrong, created a suspicion that there might have been foul play in the case, and accordingly the body was ordered to be disinterred in order to be subject to a post mortem examination.  Nothing, however, was elicited to justify suspicion, and a verdict was rendered as above.]

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 5 May 1853

INQUEST. - Deputy Coroner Wm. C. Terrell yesterday held an inquest on the body of an infant child named Mary Corcano, aged six months.  Verdict : Died from neglect, consequent on abandonment by her mother.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 9 June 1853

KILLING A RUNAWAY. - - Their Hiding-place.

It is well known that in all slave-holding sections, our people are more or less annoyed by desperate and troublesome runaway negroes - that they often hide themselves in caves convenient to the town during the say, and, after all is quiet at night, enter the busy thoroughfares of life, robbing and carrying off what they can lay their hands upon.  A haunt of this description, about two and a half miles below Natchez, was discovered on Saturday last in the following manner:

   A Mr. Pierce, as we are informed, who had been engaged at work near the place, missed a gun, etc., supposing them to have been stolen he resolved, if possible, to discover the thief, by laying in wait or discovering his track.  On Saturday, he came across the trace of a runaway negro, who, he had reason to believe, was the thief; and, after pursuit, came near him at the mouth of a den.  The negro was ordered to surrender, but showing signs of resistance, by reaching, as it was supposed, for a weapon within the cave, he was shot dead at the mouth of his nefarious haunt. .  .  .  . 

   Since writing the above, we have been kindly favored with the following memorandum from the Acting Coroner:-

   An inquest was held on Sunday morning, near the residence of Mr. Gilbert, in this county, on the body of a runaway negro man, who had been shot by a man named Pierce.  The verdict of the jury was justifiable homicide.  He was a large, powerful negro; had the left side of his head shaved; 5 feet 8 or 10 inches in height, and about 30 years of age.

 

The Opelousas Courier, 8 October 1853

DREADFUL TRAGEDY. - On Saturday evening last, the 3d instant, an altercation took place between Mr. Sidney Kerley and Mr. Thomas Givens, at the residence of the former, about three miles from this place.  It appears that Mr. Kerley fired a shot gun, loaded with shot, at Mr. Givens, and inflicted a mortal wound - but before Mr. Givens expired, he fired a revolver several times at Mr. Kerley, which took effect, and he also expired in two and a half hours afterwards.  A coroner's inquest was held over both bodies on Sunday, and a verdict in accordance with the above facts rendered.

   Thus inconsiderately, and through the effects of sudden passion, (for they had just conversed friendly) two citizens have been prematurely launched into eternity. - South Western Shreveport.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 1 February 1854

NEWS OF THE CITY.

STEAMBOAT EXPLOSION - A Negro Killed.

On Monday morning the steamboat (or rather mud-scow) Escatampa, while near the half-way House, met with an accident by which a slave of the captain lost his life.  It appears the boilers were considered very old in the early days of steamboating, and had experienced such a long term of service that they were worn to a wafer-like thinness, and were withal mended and patched and pasted together in all sorts of ways and with different degrees of ingenuity, according to the respective skills of the numerous tinkers who had operated upon them,.  One of the patches blew off at a time, the engineer testified, when the boiler was sustaining a pressure of only fifty pounds of steam, and the negro fireman was scalded to death. Deputy Coroner Terrell held an inquest over the body, and a proper verdict was rendered.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 20 February 1854

Inquest. - An inquest was held yesterday upon the body of a Scotch woman named Ann Hanton, aged about 55 years, found dead in a ditch near the corner of Poydras and Johnston streets.  A verdict was rendered attributing her death to apoplexy.  It appears deceased had come out on the night previous to obtain some groceries, and had stumbled into the ditch, either under an attack of apoplexy or under the influence of liquor, and, being unable to extricate herself she perished.  The fact that he head was above the maid and water led the jury to believe that she had neither drowned nor smothered.

Murder.

   A man named Frank Smith was arrested last evening on Common street charged with having beaten his wife so severely as to preclude the possibility of her recovery.  They lived in a shanty on Common street, far out towards the swamp, and it is said the deed was  committed while Smith was laboring under a fit of drunkenness.  The woman was conveyed to the Charity Hospital in a dying condition, and Smith was locked up in the First District police jail.

Examination on the Charge of Murder. - It will be [recollected] that a man named John Morton was arrested in the First District a few days since, charged with the murder of a free woman of color named Nancy Davis, who lived in a house in Philippa street, between Girod and Julia.  The evidence of several woman living in the immediate neighbourhood of deceased went to show that on the 6th inst. Morton, who was in the habit of visiting her, quarrelled with her because she refused to give him a small sum of money; he finally threw some water, and becoming enraged by the language she used towards him, knocked her down, stamped upon and kicked her, inflicting such severe injuries that she died on the 11th inst.  A coroner's inquest and a post mortem examination were held on the body, and it was found that death was produced by inflammation of the stomach, caused by the blows and kicks she had received.  Morton has been sent before the Criminal Court for trial on the charge of murder.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 27 March 1854

MURDER OF A POLICEMAN.  - John Mocler, of the First District Police, was killed at about five o'clock yesterday morning, on Poydras street, near Philippa, on the upper side of the market.  We have learned everything connected with the affair so far as made known to the Coroner's jury and to the police.  A difficulty had arisen between deceased and a man named C. Holstead, we are told, in Louis's Coffee-house, near the corner of Poydras and Philippa streets; the parties came to blows, and Holstead was knocked down.  One of the bar-keepers informed us that he entered the room at the moment when deceased knocked Holstead down, and believing the latter to be drunk he pushed him out upon the sidewalk and Mocler soon  after followed him.  A few moments subsequent to this Mocler entered an adjoining coffee-house, on the corner, with his hands pressed against his side as if in pain; he leaned his elbows upon the counter, and some one present noticing blood upon his clothes, asked him if he was hurt.  He replied in an incoherent manner that "it was nothing," and, almost in the act of peaking, staggered and fell upon the floor, dying in a few moments.  Four persons, Thos. Wheelin, Wm. Conway, Elijah Harper and C. Holsted, have been arrested and are at present in the lock-up of the First District awaiting examination; but so far as we can learn, there is nothing to cast suspicion upon any of the parties except the circumstances related above.  A Coroner's inquest was held upon the body yesterday, and it was ascertained that deceased had received five wounds, a deep one in the left side of the breast, in itself mortal, two in the back and two on the left arm.

   It is to be hoped that something more may come to light in regard to this dreadful affair and the murderer or murderers brought to punishment. Mr. Mocler, we understand, leaves a family.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 3 April 1854

News of the City.

INQUEST. - An inquest was held at the Charity Hospital, on Saturday last, upon the body of Peter Rohrnacher, a German, aged twenty-two years. Verdict - Died of injuries received in consequence of having been run over by the cars of the Carrollton and Lake Pontchartrain Railroad on the evening of the 30th ultimo. Deceased had a leg broken and received other severe injuries; he was considered insane at the time of the accident.

FIRST DISTRICT COURT.

   Adam Slater, tried for killing Jacob Kuntze, and convicted of manslaughter, was sentenced to the Penitentiary for fifteen years, and to pay a fine of $1 and costs of proceeding.

   Ernst Saubistwal,  found guilty of manslaughter in killing John Deutsch, was  sentenced to the penitentiary at hard labour for five years and a fine of $1.

EXAMINATION OF HOLSTEAD. - Gustavus Holsted was arraigned on Saturday last .  .  .  .   After hearing the evidence, the Recorder discharged the accused.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 5 May 1854

News of the City.

FATAL ACCIDENT. - A man named Michael Cochlane, aged about 35 years and a native of Ireland, while driving his cart through the  yard of the Gas-works yesterday, lost his balance and fell upon the ground, and the wheels passing over his body inflicted such severe injuries that he died a short time after while on his way to the Charity Hospital.  An inquest was held on the body and a verdict rendered in accordance with the circumstance.

DEAD. - An inquest was held yesterday, at No. 63 Bourbon street, upon the body of John B. Day, a native of Pennsylvania, aged 42 years.  Verdict, "came to his death from gangrene of a pistol-shot wound in the right thigh, inflicted by one Edward Outlaw on the 27th of April."  After the inquest had been held deputy Coroner Terrell made an affidavit before Recorder Ramos against Outlaw, and  a warrant was issued for his arrest.

MELANCHOLY SUICIDE. -Deputy Coroner Bowen yesterday morning held an inquest at the cxiorner of Live and Louisa streets, in the Tghird Dustrict, upon the biody of Louis H. Vedran, a native of rabce, aged about 40 years.  Deceased, we understand, had been a school teacher in the parish of St. Charles not long ago, and had lately lost his situation; and it is supposed that extreme dejection from pecuniary embarrassment and want of employment operated so strongly upon his mind as to produce temporary aberration, and led him to the act of self-destruction.  On Wednesday afternoon he purchased an ounce phial of laudanum at the drug-store of Mr. Goldmann, corner of Greatmen and Louisa streets, returned to his house and  swallowed it in the presence of his wife, without giving her any previous warning of his intention or any information in regard to the matter except that he did not want a physician.  Suspecting that he had taken poison, she went to the drug-store for assistance, and after some time a physician was procured and a stomach-pump applied to the unfortunate man; but it was too late; he expired a short time afterwards.  Deceased left a wife and three children.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 9 May 1854

Inquest. - An inquest was held yesterday, by Deputy Coroner Terrell, on the body of a man named James Finley, found dead on St. Charles street, between Julia and St. Joseph.  It appears that deceased fell from his coal cart upon the pavement, and one of the wheels passed over him, dislocating his neck and crushing it in a horrible manner.  Verdict accordingly.  Deceased was 30 years of age, and a native of Ireland.

Sent before the Criminal Court. -The man, Wm. Dibbs, who mortally stabbed the  slave Bob Miller on board the steamboat America on the night of the 21st of April last, was yesterday examined before recorder Summers and sent before the First District Court for trial on the charge of murder.  It will be remembered that Miller died two or three days after the occurrence.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 15 May 1854

INQUEST. - The Coroner held an inquest on Friday evening on the body of a white man, name unknown, aged about forty years, found dead in the river opposite Adams street, Third District.  The jury returned a verdict of Death from drowning.  The deceased was about six feet high, and wore a hickory shirt, corduroy pants and coarse boots.

INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday upon the body of a negro man, aged about 40 years, found dead in the river at Algiers.  Verdict, Death from drowning.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 27 May 1854

Coroner's Inquest. - An inquest was holden yesterday on the body of a free man of color named Henry Ellis, aged 35 years, a native of New York (sailor), found dead on board the ship Roger Stewart, lying in the Third District.  Verdict - Came to his death by falling sown the forward hatchway and breaking his neck.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 10 June 1854

INQUEST. -0 The Coroner held an inquest yesterday on the body of Louis Pinac, aged 46 years, a native of France, found dead at No. 85 Charters street.  Verdict, Apoplexy.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 15 June 1854

News of the City.

INQUESTS. - The Coroner held an inquest yesterday at the Pelican dry dock on the body of a slave named Foster, aged about 50 years.  Verdict, Accidental drowning.

   Another was held on Carondelet street, between Hevin and Poydras streets, on Charles Selman, aged 85 years, a native of England.  Verdict, Apoplexy.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 22 June 1854

   A man named James Carlisle was shot by one George Transfield in a difficulty at Sanchez's Rancho on the night of the 27th May.  The verdict of the Coroner's Jury was Justifiable Homicide, on the ground that Transfield acted in self defence.  Carlisle leaves a widow and child in Missouri.

News of the City.

THE LATE RAILROAD ACCIDENT. - Our readers will recollect that we have already reported a man having been run over and killed by the Carrollton cars, near Greenville, about eight o'clock on Sunday night last.  The body was taken to Carrollton and inquest was held on it by Coroner Mank; and a young man named James Fitzgerald having been missed by his relatives here, Mr. Fitzgerald and his four daughters on Monday repaired to Carrollton and identified the body of the young man as the lost son and brother.  He had a watch and considerable money in his possession when he met with the accident that terminated his existence; and there was considerable excitement, it is said, in Carrolton, originating out of a refusal of the Coeur to surrender the effects to the relatives of the deceased.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 27 June 1854

MANSLAUGHTER. - On Sunday evening last the Coroner held an inquest upon the body of a child found dead in a house on Bourbon street.  A verdict was returned that the child came to its death from ill-treatment and neglect on the part of its mother.  Yesterday the mother, who  goes by the name of Maria Bacona, was arrested and examined before recorder Filieul.  It appeared from the evidence that she had been continually drunk for about two weeks, and during that time had beat and maltreated and neglected the child, which was about 28 months old, in a most shameful and brutal manner.  The Recorder committed her for trial before the Criminal Court on a charge of manslaughter.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 30 June 1854

News of the City.

INQUESTS. - The Coroner held inquests on the following dead bodies yesterday and the previous night:

   On the body of Sarah Thompson, a native of England, aged 30 years, at No. 121 Greatmen street, Third District.  Verdict, Sun-stroke.

     On the body of John Byrne, aged 42 years, a native of Ireland, at the Police Station, Third District.  Verdict, Apoplexy, caused by intemperance.

   On Francis Fachoz, aged 26, a native of France, at No. 170 Hospital street.  Verdict, Apoplexy.

   On the body of William Lusk, aged 28 years, a native of Ireland, at 133 Casacalvo street, Third District.  Verdict, Sun-stroke.

   On the body of Margaret McNamara, aged 35, a native of Ireland, at 37 Barracks street.  Verdict, Intemperance.

   On the body of I. H. L. Hendricks, aged 35 years, a native of Norway, at the ship-yard in Algiers.  Verdict, Sun-stroke.
   On the body of a man named Henry, a native of France, aged 45, at No. 71 Chartres street.  Verdict, Sun-stroke.

   On the body of a white man, named unknown, about 24 years, found dead on the sidewalk,  corner of Giron and Tchoupitoulas streets.  Verdict, Sun-stroke.

   On the body of Fred Joachinsen, aged 37, a native of Denmark, found dead in Lafayette Aquaria.  Verdict, Sun-stroke.

   On the body of a slave named Dennies, aged about 11 years, found dead in a house on Esplanade street.  Verdict, Came to his death by drowning, having accidentally fallen into a well on the premises.  The deceased was the property of Arthur Andrews.

FIRST DISTRICT COURT.

   Dr. S. G. Ladd was tried in this Court yesterday for the murder of B. Schlessinger, on the 9th inst., by shooting him in a room over the Orleans House.  The trial occupied the entire day, and the case was submitted to the jury at 6 o'clock, but to a late hour, 9 o'clock, a verdict had not been agreed.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 1 July 1854

SUICIDE ON  A GRAVE. - A Coroner's inquest was held at Union Cemetery yesterday, by Coroner Hanford, on the body of a German named Andrew Goetz, who committed suicide the day previous by blowing out his brains with the contents of a pistol.  From the facts elicited, it appears that deceased was a resident of New York, and a wheelwright by trade.  About three weeks since he buried his wife, and a short time previous his only child.  This so preyed on his mind that on Wednesday, while laboring under aberration of mind, he went to the Union Cemetery, and after writing a letter to a relative, destroyed his life while seated on the newly made grave of his wife.  The following note, addressed, under care of A. Leizer, of this city, to his brother-in-law, in Flushing, was found on the person of the deceased:

Excuse me for doing so; misfortune came over me so great.  God knows the reason better than I can tell.  My beloved wife and child are taken from me, and the longer I live the more I feel the loss.  I would like to sleep with them.  I write this on the grave of my beloved wife.  Take care of my step-son; he is a good child.  Take every thing I have - debts I have none. You will find $30 in my trunk at my brother-in-law's, at Honesdale.  John Relf will owe me $30 on the 1st of July.  Don't let my step-son out of your care; I go from him with a heavy heart.  My family are in New York; you will find out at the "Harmony," by Fromm, next the railroad depot.  Good bye.  Your unhappy brother-in-law and brother.  [N. Y. Times.]

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 4 July 1854

News of the City.

INTERMENTS.

[for the week ending at 6 o'clock on Sunday morning, July 2} .  .  .  The great increase over the last report, when there was only 170, is to be attributed, in a great measure, to the heat of the weather, more than one hundred deaths having occurred from sun-stroke alone.

DROWNED. - A man, whose name is not known, fell from a wharf at the foot of Spain street, yesterday evening, in the Third District, and was drowned.  The body as not yet been recovered.

   A man named William Gray, who has been employed as a deck hand on one of our trow-boats, accidentally fell into the river on Sunday evening, while attempting to get aboard of the Third District ferry-boat, which was leaving the landing to cross to Algiers.  He leaves a wife and child.  The body has not been recovered; but it is supposed that he was drowned.

      The Coroner held an inquest on the body of a little girl, a German emigrant, apparently about  12 years of age, found dead in the river at the foot of Josephine street, Fourth District.  Verdict, Accidentally drowned.

   A woman named Ellen Barnett died on Sunday, from an attack of the delirium tremens, while on her way in a cab to the Charity Hospital.  She resided on Barrack street, and had long been a disciple of the bottle, which she followed, with marked devotion, to the grave. The Coroner held an inquest on the body, and a verdict of Death from Intemperance was rendered.

FOURTH DISTRICT.

   SUN-STROKE. - An unknown man was found lying dead on the Levee of the Fourth District last night, having died, it is supposed, from the effects of sun-stroke.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 6 July 1854

NEWS PF THE CITY.

ANOTHER PROBABLE MURDER. - About nine o'clock on the night of the 4th, a brute named Owen Doyle, residing on St. Joseph street, near Levee, (a place known as "Connaught Corner,") returned home slightly drunk, after being absent all day celebrating the 4th.  His wife upbraided him in no gentle terms, a slight quarrel was the consequence, when the cold-blooded scoundrel drew a knife and stabbed his unfortunate wife in the back; the knife penetrated to the lungs, she fell mortally wounded, and the murdered fled.  The alarm was given, and the police were on the spot almost immediately. .  .  .  .   He is now safely lodged in the lock-up.  His wife was not dead up to a late hour last evening, but the probabilities are strongly against her recovery.

FATAL FALL. - A young man named Patrick Kelly, about ten o'clock on Tuesday night, fell from the balcony to the sidewalk of his residence on Common street, opposite the Chaiborne Market, and had his neck dislocated.  He was taken to the Hospital and died yesterday morning; an inquest was held on the body and a verdict of Accidental death returned.  The deceased bore an excellent reputation for sobriety, and was perfectly sober when the accident occurred.  It  appears there was no railing around the balcony, and he got up in the night to go out and refresh himself in the cool air when he stumbled and  fell.

DROWNED. - The Coroner held an inquest yesterday on the body of Charles William Hopkins, late mate of the bark Diana, found dead in the river at post 4, Third District.  Verdict, Accidentally drowned.  The deceased was 35 years of age.  He fell into the river on last Saturday, while engaged in casting off the line, preparatory to the Diana's leaving port, and was drowned.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 15  July 1854

News of the City.

INQUESTS. - The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the body of a free colored woman named Eliza Soda, found dead in Perdido street, near Baronne.  Verdict, Apoplexy.  The deceased was about fifty-two years of age, a native of Maryland.  She had followed the occupation of vender of coffee in Poydras Market and was on her way to the market with her coffee at the time she fell down and expired.

   Another was held on the body of an unknown man found dead in the river, at the foot of Lafayette street.  Verdict, Came to his death by drowning.  The deceased was apparently about twenty-five years of age, 5 feet 5 inches in height, light hair, blue eyes; had on a hickory shirt, cottonade striped points, and blue stockings.

'

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 19 July 1854

ATTEMPTED SUICIDE. - Ablaut 12 O'CLOCK ON Monday night a man named John Doyle jumped from the third story window of a house at No. 1912 Poydras street, with the intention of destroying his own life.  It is supposed that he was laboring under a fit of temporary mental aberration.  He was taken up by Lieutenant Hand of the police in a dying condition, and  sent to the Charity Hospital.

DROWNED. - The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the body of an unknown white boy, aged about fifteen years, found dead in the river at the foot of Bienville street.  Verdict, Drowned.  The deceased had blue eyes, light hair, was very short, had no shoes, had on blue cottonade pants and whore shirt.

   Another inquest was held on the body of a negro boy unknown, found dead in the river at Algiers.  Verdict, Came to his death by drowning.  The deceased was about thirteen years of age.

KILLED BY A FALL. - An inquest was held early yesterday morning on the body of John Copland, aged thirty years, a native of New Castle, England, found dead on the banquette opposite No. 115 Tchoupitoulas street.  Verdict, Died from injuries received by falling while intoxicated from the third story balcony of Bill Nelson's boarding-house.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 21 July 1854

BLOWED HIS BRAINS OUT. - Yesterday morning at a very early hour a young Frenchman named Eli Lucas, aged thirty-five years, committed suicide by placing the muzzle of a pistol in his mouth and blowing the top of his head off.  It seems that he had for a long time been suffering severely from the liver complaint, and having tried all known remedies except the last without succeeding in alleviating his sufferings, he concluded to try that sure and effectual remedy, and accordingly, purchasing a pistol, he hid himself beneath the wharf in front to the red Stores, near the Second District market, where he accomplished the cure, doubtless to his own satisfaction.  A loud explosion beneath the wharf attracted the attention of the crowd, and, on making search, his body was found with the whole top of the head blown off and his brains scattered in every direction.  In his right hand he grasped a new pistol - the instrument of death.  The Coroner held an inquest upon the body, and a verdict of "Suicide, by shooting himself in the mouth with a pistol," was returned.  The deceased had long been employed in a foundry on Julia street, and was a great favorite with his employers and brother workmen

."MORE NOISE THAN WOOL." John Hinds was yesterday examined before Recorder Summers, on a charge of having murdered Charles Greenhill on Tuesday night last by beating him over the head with the butt-end of a carriage-whip till he was dead. The charge was brought by Deputy Coroner Terrell, and was based on the verdict of the jury of inquest.  A number of witnesses were examined for the prosecution , but there was n o evidence produced to establish the charge, and the Recorder, therefore, discharged Hinds, stating that it appeared from the evidence that Greenhill had been killed by a fall on the banquette while intoxicated. .  .  .  . 

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 28 July 1854

SUPPOSED MURDER. - About 10 o'clock in Wednesday a cart drove up in front of the Charity Hospital, and two men were seen to get out of the cart, lift out a man who was apparently insensible, and lay him in front of the gate, and then ringing the bell to call the attendants of the hospital, they got into the cart and drove off again at full speed.  On repairing to the gate the hospital attendants found a man lying there with his skull factored and apparently dying; he was taken into the building and about 10 o'clock yesterday expired without having spoken a word. The Coroner held an inquest on the body and a verdict of "Death  from a fracture of the skull, caused by a blow inflicted with a blunt obstruent by  some person unknown."  This is the second murdered man who has within a short time been smuggled into the hospital.  The deceased was apparently German, about fifty years of age.

INQUESTS. - The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the body of a free colored woman named Ellen Robinson, aged 23 years, a native of New York, found dead in the river at the wharf of the Third District.  Verdict, Accidentally drowned.  The deceased had been acting in the capacity of stewardess of the ship Heidelberg, and yesterday accidentally fell into the  river and was drowned.

   Another inquest was held early yesterday morning by Coroner Forshee on the body of a woman named Mary Ann McGovern, aged 23 years, a native of Ireland, found dead in a house on Perdido street near Baronne,.  Verdict, Death caused by intemperance and neglect.  It appears that the wretched woman had been very sick for more than three weeks, during which time she had no medic al attendance whatever, and about three days ago a woman who was residing in the same house with her,  removed  from the house; since which time up to the hour of her death she had no attendance of any kind whatever.

LEG CUT OFF. - A man named Christian Wohringer, in very foolishly attempting to cross the Pontchartrain Railroad in front of the cars, was knocked down by the cow-catcher, and the wheels of the locomotive passing over his left leg, entirely severed that very useful member from his body.  He was placed in a carriage and conveyed to the Charity Hospital in a dying condition.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 3 August 1854

Break in paper; names not accessible.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 4 August 1854

INQUEST. - The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the body of an unknown man found floating in the river at the foot of Jefferson street, Second District.  Verdict, Found Drowned.  The deceased was about 35 years of age.

DIED FROM INJURIES RECEIVED. - Mr. James McLellan the conductor of the train on the Mexican Gulf Railroad, who was so badly injured by being run over by the cars on Sunday last, died on Wednesday evening at his residence in the Third District, after suffering four days of torment.  The deceased was a worthy,  exemplary young man, who leaves a widow and several children totally unprovided for.  We are informed that the accident by which poor McLellan lost his life was in no way attributable to him, but was owing entirely to the miserable and shackly condition of the road and cars. [See 8 August.]

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 7 August 1854

INQUESTS. - The Coroner held an inquest last Saturday at the Opelousas Railroad company in Algiers, on the body of a man who had just arrived in the cars from the bayou des Allemandes, supposed to be named O'Rourke,  aged about 32 years.  The jury returned a verdict of Death from congestion of the brain.

   Another, at No.             60  Camop street, on the body of a woman named Catherine Reval, a native of Ireland, aged about 30 years, who died very suddenly on Friday night.  Verdict, Apoplexy.

   A third, at the corner of Penn and Perdido streets, First District, on the body of Mary Ann Warren, aged 19 years, a native of Louisiana, who committed suicide by taking laudanum.  The jury returned a verdict accordingly.

   A  fourth, at No. 141 Magazine street, on the body of Wm. O'Connell, aged 35 years, a native of Ireland, who was accidentally killed by falling  from the hatchway of the third story of said premises.  The deceased was carrying water to the roof of the house, and leaned against the railing around the hatchway, which was open, and the railing giving way he was precipitated to the ground floor.  Verdict accordingly.

   The Coroner held an inquest yesterday on the body of Robert Fowler, aged 48 years, a native of Scotland, found dead at the police station  of the Second District.  Verdict, Apoplexy.  This man, the Coroner informs us, was one of the jurors who held an inquest on the body of a drowned man the previous day.

   Another was held on the body of Charles, a Polander, aged 48 years, found dead at the corner of Moreau and Mandeville streets, Third District.  Verdict, Apoplexy, caused by intemperance.

   A third inquest was held on the boldly of Mary Kelly, aged 35 years, native of England, found dead at 42 Barrack street, second District.  Verdict, Died of congestion of the brain, caused by intemperance.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 8 August 1854

DROWNED. - A negro man on Sunday evening fell overboard from the Second District ferry boat and was drowned.  His body has not been recovered.

INQUESTS, DROWNINGS, ETC.

   The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the body of an unknown German woman, aged about 19,  found floating in the river, near Seldon's saw mill, Third District.  Verdict, Found Drowned.  The deceased was about five feet four inches on height; had dark hair, wore a green dress, black silk cape,  blue cotton stockings, and fine brogans.  This might be a suicide, and it might be a murder.  Quien sabe ?

   Another inquest was held on the body of Bridget No tame, aged 30 years, a native of Ireland, found dead at the corner of Gironde and Hevia streets.  Verdict, Death from Apoplexy.

   A third was held on the body of Christian Hatting, aged 27 years, a native of Switzerland, found at No. 6  Poydras street.  Verdict, Died from Apoplexy.

   Another inquest was held by deputy Coroner Terrell on the body of James Mclelland, aged 28 years, a native of England, found dead (exhumed) at the Cypress Grove cemetery.  Verdict, "Died of injuries received caused by the render common into contact with the locomotive of the Mexican Gulf Railroad company, on Sunday, the 31st ultimo.  Said accident being the result of the cars running off the track owing to the bad condition of the road and neglect of duty on the part of the managers thereof.

  

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 9 August 1854

DROWNED. - An inquest was held yesterday, by the Coroner on the body of an unknown man found dead in the river at the foot of hospital street, supposed to be a native of Ireland, and about 50 years of age.  Verdict, Found drowned.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 12 August 1854

INQUEST. - The Coroner held an inquest yesterday at No.           160 Poydras street, on the body of Julius Simmons, aged nine years, a native of Prussia.  The Jury returned a verdict that the deceased "Died of tetanus, produced by injuries received from being  run over by the Carrollton Railroad cars, on the evening of the 6th inst., said accident having been caused entirely by the carelessness of the deceased, in leaping from the cars while they were in motion.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 16 August 1854

SUICIDE. - An old discharged soldier who had done his  country some service in the Florida War, named Henry Blumenberg, yesterday morning committed suicide by shooting himself with a pistol in the abdomen, just under the navel, while in a fit of delirium tremens. The Coroner held an inquest on the body, and the above is the substance of the verdict retuned by the jury.  The deceased was a native of Germany, and was about thirty-four years of age.

INFANTICIDE. - The body of a small child, which was so much decomposed that its sex could not be ascertained, was found yesterday lying in one of the gutters of Mauinsel street between Thalia and Melpomene.  When found it had a string around its neck, and the skull of the poor thing was badly fractured.  Every thing indicated that the child had been murdered; but there is no clue to the detection  of the fiendish perpetrator of this foul deed, which, we hope, will rise  some day to men's eyes.  The Coroner held an inquest on the body, and a verdict of Infanticide was returned.

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 17 August 1854

CURIOUS CASE. - The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the body of a child named Julia Engel aged five days, found dead at the house of the parents in the Third District.  The jury after hearing the evidence returned a verdict of "death from convulsions, caused by the mother having been greatly frightened, and her breast-milk thus poisoned, by her husband."  The husband, whose name of Theophile Engle, and who is a notorious character, it appears had assaulted and brutally treated his wife, threatening to kill her, and all that sort of thing; the fright she experienced from these threats,  the physician who examined the child stated, had operated as a poison on her milk, which being imbibed by the child, convulsions and death ensued.  On the strength of this verdict  Engel has been arrested and awaits an examination on a charge of having caused the death of his own child.  The mother, too, is not expected to live.

INQUEST. - The Coroner held an inquest on the body of a woman named Elizabeth Eckmeyer, a native of Ireland, aged 38 rereads, at the cemetery of St. Vincent de Paul.  Verdict, Death from apoplexy caused by intemperance.

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT.

   A Friend in Assumption furnished us twitch the following particulars of a most melancholy accident, which took place in that parish during the past week.  Mr. D. Lewis, a carpenter and engineer engaged on the Texana farm of Col. W. W. Pugh, while employed in sawing lumber with a circular  saw, stooped down, for the purpose of ascertaining whether the saw was heating, which generally occurs when sawing heavy timber.  While in this attitude, it so happened, that the teeth of the saw caught the rim of his hat and jerked his head sideways in contact with the saw,  severing a piece of the skull-bone 2 ½ inches in  depth by about 3 ½ inches in length, tearing away at the same time a part of the brain.  Most singular to relate that in  this satiation he lived for nearly thirty-six hours, and most of the timer in his perfect senses. .  ,.  .  .  [Thibodeaux (La.) Minerva, 12th inst.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 19 August 1854

FATAL ACCIDENT. - Night before last an aged Englishman, named Edward Haynes, fell from the fourth story window of the boarding-house of Mrs. Flouns, on New Levee street, and was instantly killed.  The Coroner held an inquest on the body yesterday and the jury returned the following verdict: "came to his death by falling from the fourth story window of a house, fracturing his skull and breaking his shoulder."  The deceased was sixty-five years of age.  The people of the house state that he retired to bed about 10 o'clock, and it being very warm, partly undressed himself and took a seat on the table near the window to enjoy the fresh air, but forgetting himself he fell asleep and rolled out of the window.

INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday evening by the Coroner on the body of John Yawahor, who died very suddenly on Baronne street.  A verdict of Apoplexy was retuned.  The deceased was thirty-eight years of age - a native of Bohemia, in Denmark.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 22 August 1854

FATAL ACCIDENT. - A German lad, aged about fourteen years, named Charles Raiker, residing in the Fourth District, while in the woods at the foot of Third street, on Sunday evening, shooting at a mark with an old horse pistol, accidentally shot and killed himself.  He had  loaded the pistil, cocked it and was in the act of taking aim to fire, in doing which he threw it back in a quick manner and the muzzle rested on his right shoulder; in this position if went off, the contents lodged in his body, and he died instantly.  An inquest was held on the body by the Coeur, and the jury returned a verdict of Death caused by having accidentally shot himself.

KILLED BY THE KICK OF A MULE. - A man named Peter Ganety, residing in the Third District, while engaged in cleaning one of his mules on Sunday morning, was kicked in the abdomen by the animal.  He was so seriously injured, that he had to be conveyed to the Charity Hospital, where he died yesterday morning. The Coroner held an inquest on the body, and a verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.  The deceased was a native of Ireland, and about twenty-three years of age.

INQUEST. - The Coroner yesterday morning, was called to hold an inquest on the body of a man named John Coyne, who died the day before yesterday in the Chastity Hospital, as was supposed,  from the effects of a severe beating he had received about a month since from a man named George Doherty, who is now in the Parish Prison.  After a thorough investigation of the case, a post mortem examination, etc., the jury came to the conclusion that the death of Coyne was not the result of injuries received from Doherty, and they rendered a verdict accordingly.  Deceased was a native of Ireland,. And twenty-eight years of age.

LOCKJAW. - A German woman named Rosalie North died yesterday morning in Toulouse street, of lockjaw, caused by a knife-blade having been accidentally passed through her hand, some three or four days ago.  She was about fifty-four years of age.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 25 August 1854

INQUEST. - The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the body of Patrick Mullin, aged 30 years, a native of Ireland, found dead on New Levee street.  Verdict, Death from apoplexy caused by intemperance.

...

The man who murdered Mr. Blackburn, an overseer on the Henderson and Nashville Railroad, has since died in the Elkton jail.  It will be remembered that he jumped off the bluff and injured himself seriously.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 28 August 1854

SUICIDE - At daylight yesterday morning the body of a young German, named Henry Schurenberg, was found suspended by the neck to a tree in the center of Rampart street, naked and lifeless.  The Coroner repaired to the place, cut down the body, and held an inquest. It appears from a statement made by the brother of the deceased, that he had been for a day or two laboring under an attack of the  yellow fever.  His brother had sat up with him at a house on rampart street, the pervious night, until 4 o'clock in the morning, when Henry requested him to lay down and refresh himself with a few hours repose, stating that he would get along very well.  The brother did so, and slept about an hour.  When he awoke Henry was missing; he immediately instituted search, and found him as above stated.  He had doubtless, while his brother slept, become delirious, left the house,  and anticipated the dire disease by shuffling off his mortal coil, using his undershirt for that purpose.  When found, his feet were resting firmly on the ground, and he did not appear to have been strangled.  The jury returned a verdict of suicide by hanging, while in a delirium, produced by yellow fever.  The deceased was eighteen years of age.

INQUESTS. - The Coroner on Saturday held an inquest on the body of Bryan Burns, aged seventeen years, a native of Ireland, found dead in the Charity Hospital.  Verdict, "Came to his death from injuries received by the Carrollton cars accidentally passing over his body on Sunday evening, 26th inst."  This case was reported by us last Monday.  The lad was taken to the Hospital with one of his legs horribly mutilated.  It was amputated very skilfully and  every effort was made to save his life, but in vain; and after suffering the greatest agony for six days, he died on Saturday morning.

   Another inquest was held on Saturday at the engine house of No. 10, on the body of a German named Martin Heisler, aged 24 years.  Verdict, congestive fever. This young man was one of the twenty-six who were arrested by the police on last Monday night, and committed to prison  the following day by acting recorder Filleul.  The Coroner was sent for in this case because there was reason to believe that Hailer's death had been caused by blows inflicted upon him in the lower part of the abdomen by the police with their club s when he was arrested.  But after a thorough  examination the jury were convinced that his death was the result of congestive fever.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 29 August 1854

INQUEST. - The Coroner held an inquest upon the body of P. Oliver, aged 29 years, a native of France, who died very suddenly yesterday at a plantation  on Hancock street, near the Mexican Gulf Railroad.  Verdict, Death from cholera.

ACCIDENTALLY DROWNED - A seaman belonging to the crew of the Spanish ship Julia, lying at the foot of Jackson street, fell overboard yesterday evening and was drowned.  His body has not been recovered.

PROBABLE MURDER - We learned that the body of a man was discovered, on Sunday, lying on the line of the Opelousas Railroad, some miles from Algiers.  The body appeared to be that of an Irish laborer, and to have met with some foul play.  One of the employees on the cars said it had been there for two or three days

A SPANISH ROW. - A grand row took place, on Sunday evening, among the curfew of the Spanish ship Julia, during which knives were drawn but not used; one of the persons engaged in the fight, however, fell overboard and was drowned. .  .  .  . 

INQUEST. - The Coroner held an inquest yesterday on the body of a man supposed to be an English sailor, who was drowned about five months since, from aboard the British ship Lady Seymour. The body was found embedded in the sands, in a good state of preservation, in an upright position, the only part that protruded above ground being the head.  The verdict of the jury was Found drowned.

SECOND DISTRICT.

MANSLAUGHTER. - At a late hour in Sunday evening a little child aged twenty-one months, named James Jacoti, was run over by an omnibus and immediately killed on Conde street, between Main and St. Philip.  An inquest was held on the body and the Coroner's jury returned a verdict attribution the child's death to carelessness and recklessness on the part of the driver of the omnibus, one Dennis Hurley,.  An affidavit was made based on the verdict. charging Hurley with manslaughter.  A warrant was issued, ands Hurley is now in jail awaiting an examination.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 31 August 1854

ANOTHER MURDER. - About nine o'clock on Tuesday night a free colored man named Michel Honore, was brutally assassinated by another free colored person named Dutriel Barjon, (both natives of this city, and well known) near the corner of Ursuline and Romain streets, in the Second District. The circumstances as we could gather them, are substantially as follows:-

   About five months since the parties had a quarrel one evening in the Globe ball room, since which time they have been deadly foes.  Last night Barjon, accompanied by two friends, Xavier and Baptiste Jourdain, repaired to the residence of Michel Honore, on Ursuline street, and remaining on the banquette, sent a small boy into the house to call him out.  He came out, walked up to Borjon and asked him what he wanted.  The latter, it is said, made no reply, but struck him over the head with a stick, when Honore drew a pistol and fired at him.   Barjon then attacked him with a dagger, and killed him, stabbing him thirteen trims - six times in the breast, four in the back, and three in the left arm.  Honore fell dead on the banquette - the murderer and his accomplices fled, and have not since been heard of.  The Coroner held an inquest on the body of the murdered man, and after investigating the matter, the jury rendered a verdict t that deceased came to his death from wounds inflicted by a short pointed instrument in the hands of one Dutriel Barjon, f. m. c., on the evening of the 29th inst. .  .  .  .   Although the report of a pistol was heard by several persons about the time of the murder, yet the statement that Honore fired at Barjon is not much credited, as the only weapon found near the spot was A small pistol and that was loaded. .  .  .  . 

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 8 September 1854

INQUEST. - The Coroner held an inquest last evening, on the body of a man named Thomas Hayes, who fell down and suddenly died while walking along Jackson street, near Romain.  Verdict, Death from Apoplexy.  The deceased's a native of Ireland, aged 27 years.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 9 September 1854

THAT SUICIDE. - We published an article a day or two since, in relation to the suicide of a woman  named Ann McGovern, in which it was stated that she had been driven to the act by the bad treatment of a man named Spriggins.  We have since been informed that in this particular we were mistakes, and that if Mr. Spriggins was connected with the matter in any way, it was only through an idea the lady had conceived that he was unfaithful to her. .  .  .  . 

INQUEST. - The Coroner held an inquest yesterday, on the body of a man, named Richard Jackson, who died very suddenly at the Police Jail of the First District, where he had been brought and locked up for drunkenness.  The Jury returned a verdict of Death from disease of the heart, caused by intemperance.  His liver was so large that it filled up all the cavities of the chest.  He was about 38 years of age, a native of Ireland.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 11 September 1854

ANOTHER HOMICIDE. - On last Saturday evening, about half past four o'clock, an ex-policeman, named James Byrns, who shot and almost instantly killed by a man named S. S. Smith, at a grocery belonging to the latter, situated at the corner of Gironde and Perdido streets. Smith used to be a notorious thief, and has served one term in the penitentiary, and Byrns was discharged from the police a short time since, for kicking a female prisoner in one of the cells.  The two had had a previous quarrel and parted deadly enemies.  On Saturday evening Byrns entered the grocery of Smith with his right hand in his left breast pocket.  Smith ordered him to leave the grocery, but Byrns said he would not, as it was a public house.  Smith replied that it was not a public house, and that if he didn't leave he would make him.

   Byrns then went into the street, drew a pistol, cocked it, and after calling Smith a d----d thief, and making use of other opprobrious epithets, said, ""If you're a man you'll come out and stand before me."  Smith then took down a large five-shooting pistol, went to the door and discharged it at Byrns.  The ball took effect in his breast.  He staggered a short distance towards home, when he fell exhausted from the loss of blood, and was put on a dray and conveyed to his residence, where he died in a few seconds. The Coroner held an inquest on the body and the jury returned a verdict that he had come to his death by a pistol shot wound, penetrating his right side to the liver, and causing internal hemorrhage, said wound having been inflicted by a pistol in the hands of one Sam. S. Smith on the evening of the 9th inst. .  .  .  . 

DROWNED. - The body of a small German boy named Benjamin Waburg, aged 7 years, was found on Saturday in the river at the foot of Clouet street, Third District.  The body was in a state of perfect nudity, and did not appear to have been in the water very long. The lad very likely had been in bathing, and either taken the c ramps or became exhausted, and so drowned.  The Coroner held an inquest, and a verdict of found drowned was returned.

RAILROAD ACCIDENT. - A man named Michael Colley, in endeavoring to get into the Opelousas cars last Saturday, as the train was passing Kermin's plantation, missed his footing and fell on the track, the wheels of one of the cars passing over his feet and crushing them in a most horrible manner.  He is not expected to survive, as these cases generally terminate in tetanus.

DROWNED. - The body of a little girl, aged 13 years, named Mary Boney, a native of New York, was found yesterday in the river, opposite the Third District, she having fallen in on the previous evening, and got drowned.  It was conveyed to the residence of her parents, 147 Love street, where an inquest was held, and a verdict retuned in accordance with the facts above stated.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 14 September 1854

HORRIBLE MURDER IN THE FOURTH DISTRICT.

There was a good deal of excitement prevailing in the Fourth District yesterday originating in the fact that a child two years and four months of age had been inhumanly murdered by a man named William Young.  The child was dead and the Coroner had been called upon to hold an inquest.  The child's name was Christian Rhom, it was born in Germany and had been adopted by Young and his wife.  The witnesses before the Coroner's Jury testified that Young had been in the habit of beating the child most cruelly, hanging it up by the neck and then beating it with a cane, besides starving it for  days at a time, and finally on Monday last injuring it by blows on the head so badly that it died the same night.  After hearing the testimony the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the above facts.  The parties, Young and his wife, were arrested and yesterday were brought up for examination before recorder Jackson.  The testimony substanciate the charge of this fiendish murder in all its horrible details, and as the evidence of the witnesses was given, so horrible were the circumstances that it was feared the people would take the law in their own hands.  The recorder finally committed the accused for trial before the First District Court.

INQUEST. - Deputy Coroner Terrell yesterday held an inquest on the body of Patrick Gillmartin, aged about  19 years, a native of Ireland, who was shot in the head and mortally wounded during the disturbance last Sun day evening in front of Fasnaht's Coffee-house, and who died last evening.  The verdict was that "he came to his death by a gun-shot wound in the head inflicted during a riot by some person unknown."

   Another inquest was held on the body of James Porter, a native of Ireland, aged 35 years, found dead at the corner of Tchoupitoulas and Suzette streets.  Verdict, "Come to his death from a gun-shot wound in the head inflicted by some person unknown, on the night of the 13th inst., at the corner of Tchoupitoulas and Suzette streets."

   Another was held on the body of a man named David Dyster, found at No. 22 Jefferson street.  Verdict, Death from Apoplexy caused by intemperance.  The deceased was a native of France, aged 28 years.

   A fourth was held on the body of Louisa Irwin , age 21 years, a native of Ohio, found lying dead in the back yard of a house on the corner of Philippa and Perdido streets, where she had suddenly fallen down and expired.  Verdict, Apoplexy caused by intemperance. [See 15 Sep.]

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 15 September 1854

INQUESTS. - An inquest was held yesterday on the body of a man named John Skelly, aged 32 years, a native of Ireland, found dead on board the steamboat Gipsy.  Verdict, Apoplexy caused by intemperance.

   Another was held on the body of Henry P. Feuerbach, a native of France, aged 28 years, at 86 Philip street, Second District.  Verdict, Congestion of the brain.

   A third inquest was held on the body of Pierre Joseph, a free colored man, aged 45, a native of this State, found dead at 225 Dauphin street.  Verdict, Apoplexy caused by heat.

   MAL-PRACTICE. - We have already noticed that an inquest was held on the body of Louisa Irwin, aged twenty-one years, a native of Ohio, found dead in a yard on the corner of Philippa and Perdido streets, First District. Verdict, Death from yellow fever and apoplexy caused by intemperance.  The inquest was held by Deputy Coroner Mitchell, who gave a certificate in accordance with the above facts.  Shortly after, Deputy Coroner Terrell passed that way, and upon examining the body discovered a serious bruise upon the head, just over the left eye.  This, together with the appearance of the body, which in his opinion did not at all resemble one who died from yellow fever excited his suspicions, and he sent for a physician who was visiting a patient next door,  and without empanelling a jury proceeded to make a post mortem examination, and was of opinion that her death had been caused by concussion of the brain.  Several witnesses testified that nine or ten days since she was struck on the head with a brickbat, by a man who is now absent from the city, and others stated that she had been attended by a man named Lockwood, who calls himself a physician, but has no diploma or license to practice.  Mr. Terrell caused Lockwood to be arrested for mal-practice, and he was arraigned yesterday before Recorder Summers on the charge, and was remanded to the Parish Prison for examination on the 20th inst,

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 16 September 1854

SAD ACCIDENT. - We regret to announce that Mr. Louis Sere, receiving teller of the Citizens bank, while stepping from the Third District ferry boat on Thursday night, lost his forting, and falling into the river, was drowned.  .  .  .  .   Guns were being fired all day yesterday over the place where he fell in, with a view to the raising of his body, but as yet it has not been recovered.

NECK BROKEN.

   The Coroner yesterday held an inquest on the body of a man named John O'Brien, aged 30 years, a native of Ireland, found dead at Mrs. Barry's boarding-house on  Delord street.  Verdict, "Came to his death by dislocation of the neck from falling out of bed while in a state of delirium caused by yellow fever."

DISCHARGED. - S. S. Smith was examined yesterday evening before Recorder Summers on a charge of behaving murdered James Byrnes on the 9th inst. by shooting him at the corner of Girond and Perdido streets.  .  .  .   After the examination of four witnesses for the State, whose testimony made out a justifiable homicide, the prisoner was discharged.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 18 September 1854

INQUEST. - The Coroner held an inquest Saturday morning on the body of Louis Sere, which was found the same morning near the Lower Cotton press.  It was immediately removed to his late residence, No. 162 Hospital street, where the inquest was held.  The jury returned a verdict of Accidental drowning.  Mr. Sere was a native of Louisiana, and 38 years of age.

 

New Orleans Daily Crescent, 19 September 1864

HONOURABLY DISCHARGED. - Dr. James Lockwood, who was arrested a few days since, on the affidavit of Deputy Coroner Terrell, charging him with malpractice and practicing medicine without a license, was examined yesterday and honorably discharged by the Recorder.

 

WINONA DAILY REPUBLICAN, MN., Saturday 31 October  1868 (2)

THE NEW REBELLION.

Murders of Union Officials.

Massacre of republicans in Louisiana.

 

WINONA DAILY REPUBLICAN, MN., Monday 2 November  1868 (2)

Murders in Louisiana; several named.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School