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Colonial Cases

1870-1889CI

SINGAPORE

AND

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS INQUESTS

TO

1900.

 

P. J. Bullock

 

 

 

PENANG, 1870.

 

"CORRECTING" VERDICTS.

 

"What !" said his astonished  interrogators, "do you mean to say you have been in the habit of altering Coroner's Jurors' verdicts for the last ten years?"

 "Yes," replied the imperturbable clerk, "I thought they were not proper according to the evidence !"

Source: STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 23 September 1870 (3); From the Straits Times, September 17th.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 4 January 1870 (2)

CHINESE FEMALE SLAVES.

Repeat of story in Straits Times, December 25th (1869)

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 5 February 1870 (2)

THE police executed a gambling warrant in a regular gambling-house in Carpenter street, on Saturday evening, and arrested a considerable number of gamblers.  In the fright caused by the entrance of the police, one of the inmates sprang out of the second storey window into the street, fracturing his leg very seriously.  He was sent to the hospital.  On Monday evening, Mr. Evans, Commissioner of police, went to a private house in South Bridge road, to execute a gambling warrant, and succeeded in arresting seventeen Chinese, together with their "gambling implements."  On coming down the stairs, he was surprised to find no less that four Chinese lying helpless in the street, having jumped out of the upper windows.  They were sent off to the hospital, but one was so seriously injured that he died in about ten minutes after reaching there.  A coroner's inquest was held yesterday, and a verdict rendered in accordance with the facts.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 23 April 1870 (2)

NEWS OF THE WEEK.

MONDAY 18TH APRIL.

A sad affair occurred on board the North German barque Maria Helene, on Wednesday afternoon last.  The vessel had passengers on board for Penang, and the provisions were brought out to be inspected by the Master Attendant.  On opening a cask of meat, it proved to be in bad condition, owing to the brine having leaked out, and the Master, Capt. Warnkis, became very much enraged, seized a hammer, and threw it at the second officer; the hammer missed its aim, however, and struck a Chinese boy some 5 years of age, the son of one of the passengers, on the side of the head, fracturing the skull.  Information was sent at once to the police office, and Commissioner Evans and Inspector Barnum went at once on board the vessel.  The captain had gone ashore.  Mr. Evans sent the child to the hospital.  After making inquiries, the police officers started for the shore again, but on their way met the captain returning in the ship's boat, together with Dr. Kreiser.  Capt. Warnkis was arrested and taken before the Police Magistrate, who, after a preliminary examination, admitted the captain to bail in $3,000 on his own recognizances, and two sureties for $1,500 each.  Capt. Warnkis admitted the charge against him, and expressed his sorrow for what he had done; the hearing was adjourned untill to-day.  We learn that the child is progressing favourably, though its condition is extremely critical.

WEDNESDAY, 20TH APRIL.

THE case of Capt. Warnkis is just now exciting a great deal of attention, and is altogether a very sad affair.  The child who was so seriously injured by the hammer thrown by Capt. Warnkis at the second officer, died yesterday.  A coroner's inquest was held at the General Hospital, occupying nearly the whole day, and resulted in the jury bringing in a verdict of manslaughter against the captain.  Efforts are being made to get the case tried at the present criminal session.

THURSDAY 21ST APRIL.

THIS morning, Captain Warnkis, of the North German barque Maria Helene, was brought before the Police Magistrate, C. B. Plunket, Esq., upon the Coroner's commitment for manslaughter.  Several witnesses were examined, and the accused was committed upon the capital charge.  Application has been made to have a special jury empannelled, and to have the case tried at once, - which, as all the important witnesses belong to the vessel, will probably be granted.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 19 May 1870 (7)

YESTERDAY morning the body of a Chinese was discovered floating in the water at Tanjong Pagar.  H.M.'s Coroner held an inquest on it at 11 o'clock.  No one came forward who could identify the deceased.  The jury returned a verdict of "found drowned."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 21 May 1870 (2)

Repeat of the story in Overland Journal of 19th May.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 17 June 1870 (7)

INFORMATION was brought to Head Inspector Hayward, yesterday afternoon that a Chinese woman living in a house of ill-repute in New Bridge Road had poisoned herself by taking chandoo.  Mr. Hayward had her at once removed to the Station, whence she was despatched to the hospital, but died on the way.  An inquest was held this morning by H.M.'s Coroner, and the jury returned a verdict of felo de se.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 17 June 1870 (7)

Two inquests were held on Thursday, by H.M.'s Coroner; the first on the body of a Chinese child some seven years of age, who was drowned in a pond at Tanjong Pagar.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

   The second was on the body of a Chinese infant which was found floating in a bucket in Singapore River.  It appeared that the child was less than a month old, and had died from inflammation of the bowels.  The jury rendered a verdict of died from natural causes.

 

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 23 July 1870 (2)

ON Wednesday, a quarrel occurred between two Chinese named Tan Chew and Teo Swah, at a sago manufactory, in Havelock Road, about some money owed by the latter to the other, when Tan Chew seized the handle of a hoe, lying near, which was made of very hard wood, and struck Teo Swah over the head, breaking the skull.  The police were called in, and arrested Tan Chew at once.  The wounded man was sent to hospital, but died shortly after reaching there.  An inquest was held yesterday, at which the coroner's jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against the prisoner, who has been sent to jail on the coroner's commitment.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 29 July 1870 (6)

FRIDAY, 22ND JULY.

Repeat of story of 23 July in Straits Times.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 12 August 1870 (9)

TUESDAY, 9TH AUGUST.

ON Sunday, a Kling woman named Menah was found dead in a stable in Campong Rajah.  A coroner's inquest was held, at which the jury returned a verdict of "died from natural causes."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 13 August 1870 (2)

Repeated story from Overland Journal of 12 August.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 17 September 1870 (4)

A Coroner's inquest was held yesterday morning upon the body of an Arab vagrant who was found hanging by the neck in a mat shed in Beach Road.  The jury rendered a verdict of felo de se.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 23 September 1870 (3)

From the Straits Times, September 17th.

"CORRECTING" VERDICTS.

A MOST remarkable discovery has been made at Penang by a Committee of Inquiry.  Some of the clerks in our public offices are noted for their intelligence, but we doubt if the equal of what we are about to relate has ever come to light any where.  A coroner's inquest was held in Penang on the body of a Kling boatman named Hussainsah, and Mr. Donald Glass was arrested and brought before the Jury, charged with having struck the prisoner (sic) with a boathook and caused his death.  The jury consisted of five highly respectable Europeans, who, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict that "The jurors are of opinion that the deceased came by his death from effusion of blood on the brain, caused by a fall."  Had they been allowed to do so, the next day the jury would have altered their verdict, adding, instead of the last four words, "but from what cause there was not sufficient evidence before them to determine."

   Glass was released, and went to China in the steamer Glenartney, of which he was chief officer.  On his return to Singapore, he was arrested on a police warrant, and admitted to bail for his appearance at the next Criminal Session at Penang.  When his case came on for trial, copies of the depositions at the inquest were furnished to the Court, and the verdict therein contained was

"that the deceased had been struck on the head by D. Glass with a boathook, and there did fall, and after languishing did die, and the jurors are of opinion that the deceased came by death from said blow and from no other cause."

This verdict bore the signature of the Coroner and all the jurors.  The Chief Justice, when charging the Grand Jurors, commented upon the verdict, and marvelled that in the face of such a verdict as this the prisoner should have been allowed to go to China.  This led to the inquiry.

   It appeared that the Coroner had himself signed and afterwards obtained the signatures of the jurors, to a blank form, which was given to the clerk to be filled in with the copy of the verdict from the deposition book.  The deposition s and "copy" of the verdict, on being handed to the Coroner by his clerk, were sent up to the Supreme court without examination.  The Coroner's clerk was called, but said he had not made the copy, having obtained the assistance of a very clever clerk in the Import and Export Office.

   The latter was called, and readily admitted having made out the copy; in fact was rather proud of the ability he had shown in so doing.  On being told that he had altered the verdict, he said Yes, he had altered it, because, on reading over the evidence he thought the jurors had not given a proper verdict.  Having a book on Coroner's duties, belonging to the Coroner, he had taken the form from that and put in what he considered a proper verdict !!

   And this is not the worst, for, on being asked if he knew he was rendering himself liable to a criminal prosecution, he replied, that he didn't know about that, but he had been in the habit of doing this for then last ten years !!  "What !" said his astonished  interrogators, "do you mean to say you have been in the habit of altering Coroner's Jurors' verdicts for the last ten years ?"  "Yes," replied the imperturbable clerk, "I thought they were not proper according to the evidence !"

   Notwithstanding this man's wonderful ability, we hear that the Committee have recommended his dismissal from the public service.  It is, however, not very pleasant to reflect upon the mischief that may have resulted during the last ten years from his proficiency as a coroner's jury, to say nothing of other important documents that may have been metamorphosed in his hands. [See Straits Times, 12 November.]

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 7 October 1870 (7)

Comments on the new Prisons ordinance.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 25 October 1870 (11)

MONDAY, 24TH OCTOBER.

YESTERDAY afternoon a Chinese named Tang Ah Choo, meeting one of the opium farmers' Chintings in Lavender Street, turned short and started to run, but had proceeded only a short distance when he fell down dead.  A coroner's inquest was held this morning, and a post-mortem examination showed that death had resulted from disease of the heart.  Some contraband chandoo was found concealed on his person.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 12 November 1870 (2)

WEDNESDAY, 9TH NOVEMBER.

OFFICIAL.

The result of the Court of Inquiry upon the matter of a late inquest, has been that Mr. EARL has been suspended from the offices of Commissioner of Police and Coroner, Mr. M. THOMAS, of the Master Attendant's office reprimanded, as also Mr. PARKINS, Coroner's clerk.  ... Penang Gazette, 5th Nov.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 19 November 1870 (1)

THE DEATH OF CAPT. HARRIS.

WE have been favoured by the Sarawak Government with a copy of the depositions and the proceedings at the inquest on the body of the late Captain Harris, of the steamer Royalist, at Sarawak, which we give in full below :---

   INQUISITION held this ninth day of November, A. D. 1870, before me, James Augustus St. John, Esquire, Coroner pro tem for the Territory of Sarawak, on view of the body of William Harris, here lying dead.

JURY.

Alfred Houghton. - Foreman.

Rowland M. Mackenzie.

Oliver St. John.

Peter Middleton.

Henry Skelton.

The Jury having been duly sworn and the body viewed, -

   James Cropley, states :---Captain Harris, the deceased, came to my house about nine o'clock last night.  He left me about half-past twelve to go on board the Royalist, he went away by himself.  About two o'clock the steward of the Royalist came and told me that the Captain was dead.  I went to the Royalist and found the deceased on the wharf; he had been taken from off the fender between the Royalist and the wharf, where he had fallen.

   Giles Helyer; Captain of H.H. Gunboat Heartsease, states:- I saw the deceased last night about half-past twelve o'clock at Mr. Cropley's house, where I and the deceased had been passing the evening; he went on board the Royalist.  I never saw the deceased again until I saw his body this morning.  After he had left Mr. Cropley's, I heard no cry or any disturbance whatever.

   John Wareham, Mate of the Royalist, states:- I was on board the Royalist last night.  I was asleep when the Serang came to me and said that the deceased was lying on the fender.  This was twenty-five minutes to two o'clock this morning.  I assisted in getting the body up and placing it on the wharf.  Sura, a seaman, was on duty as watchman when I was called.  The deceased was quite dead when I found him lying on his face in the water - his feet were dry, but his face was slightly covered with water.  It was flood tide and the fender rose with the tide at one end, while the other was hitched under the vessel.  The watchman Sura should have been walking on the gangway next to the wharf, and had he been looking must have heard the deceased walking on the jetty, and afterwards falling between the vessel and the jetty.

   Bakir, a foreman, states:- I was on duty between 11 P.M. last night and 1 P.M. this morning.  When Captain Harris came by I was in the store room at this end of the jetty.  At 1 o'clock I was relieved.  A little while after I heard a disturbance on board the steamer.  When the deceased passed me, he went straight to the ship and did not return.  I heard no noise as of any one falling.  I was in the godown among the goods, of which I was in charge.  I saluted the deceased when he passed me.  This is all I know.

   Solong, fortman, states :- I relieved Bakir this morning, at 1 o'clock.  I did not see Captain Harris, but after I had been on duty about half an hour, I heard people calling out that Captain Harris was dead.

   Sura, a seaman, on board the steamer Royalist :- I was on duty this morning at 1 o'clock; I relieved a man called Hassan.  A little after 1 o'clock I had occasion to spit overboard, when I saw something between the Jetty and the vessel.  I went and reported it to Hassan.  We went together and found the body of the deceased lying on the fender.  We told the Serang, who assisted us in getting up the body.  When I relieved Hassan, he did not tell me he had heard any noise.

   Hassan, seaman, states :- I was on duty as watchman on board the Royalist from 11 P.M. last night until 1 A.M. this morning.  I kept watch and walked backwards and forwards the whole length of the vessel.  I had not been relieved by Sura for more than a few minutes when the last witness came to me and asked me what noise it was he just heard, when I said it was only the fender.  He came again after a few minutes and said there was some one lying dead on the fender.  I said - Oh, No! it can't be.  However, I went to see, and saw the deceased lying on the fender.  With the assistance of the Serang, whom I called, we lifted the body up on to the wharf.  The upper part of his body was covered with water, but his feet were quite dry.  I picked up the deceased's hat at the bottom of the ladder.  I heard no one crying out while I was on duty.  This is all I know.

   Edward Price Houghton, medical Officer for the Territory of Sarawak, states :- At two o'clock this morning I was called to see the body of Captain Harris, which was lying on the Government wharf.  I found concussion of the brain had taken place and probably fracture of the base of skull.  There were no wounds as from violence.  Death appeared to have been brought on by asphyxia or suffocation.  The wounds appeared to have been caused by a fall from a great height.  It is my opinion that had assistance been rendered at once, death would not have necessarily taken place.

VERDICT.

We find that Captain Harris met his death from accident, by falling between the ship's side and the wharf.

   We further consider the witness Hassan, had he kept proper watch, must have heard or seen the deceased coming on board or falling, and in our opinion he merits punishment.

[Signed by Jury and Coroner.]

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 22 November 1870 (3)

The Dedath of Captain Harris; reprinted from Starits Times, 19th November.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 26 November 1870 (4)

As Overland Journal of 6 December 1870.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 6 December 1870 (8)

On Sunday last, the coroner held no less than three inquests.  One was on the body of a Chinese found in the Singapore River, at which the jury returned a verdict of "found drowned."

   Another was on the body of a Chinese who fell dead while walking in Circular Road; verdict, "Died by the visitation of God."

   The other was on the body of a Chinese found hanging by the neck in a shed at Kallang Road; verdict, "felo de se."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 15 February 1871 (4)

TUESDAY, 7TH FEBRUARY.

AN inquest was held yesterday, by H.M. Coroner, on the body of a Chinaman who was found hanging to a tree at Bukit Timah, by means of his tail, which had been taken round his neck and then made fast to the limb.  The body was in an advanced state of decomposition, and the feet, being within reach, had been devoured by dogs or wild hogs.  The jury returned a verdict that deceased came to his death by hanging, but that there was no evidence to show how it occurred.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 1 March 1871 (5)

WEDNESDAY, 22ND FEBRUARY.

AN inquest was held yesterday by H.M. Acting Coroner, R. W. Maxwell, Esq., on the body of a Chinese who was found hanging by the neck in a compound near Outram road.  The jury gave a verdict of "felo de se."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 7 March 1871 (5)

WEDNESDAY, 7TH MARCH.

AT the coroner's inquest yesterday, on the body of the Chinese who was killed near Elgin Bridge on Sunday morning, it appeared that deceased was a thief, and had entered a boat, armed with a long knife, to steal.  The deceased, finding himself overpowered by the boatmen, sprang overboard, and was followed by the prisoner.  A struggle ensued in the water, in which the prisoner received two cuts, but succeeded in dragging the deceased alongside a boat, where the Chinese in the boat seized him by the tail and tried to pull him on board, but deceased, to avoid being taken, cut off his tail with the knife he had in his hand.  The post mortem examination proved death to have resulted from fracture of the skull.  It was impossible the prisoner could have dealt the blow.  The verdict of the jury was that deceased came to his death from fracture of the skull, but there was no evidence before them to show how or by whom inflicted.  It is probable, however, that some of the boatmen had dealt him a blow over the head during the struggle in the water.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 17 June 1871 (9)

THURSDAY, 15TH JUNE.

THE body of a European seaman named Thomas Walsh, belonging to the British barque Haidee, was found this morning floating in the water at Tanjong Pagar.  The man has been missing since the night of the 13th instant, when it is supposed he must have fallen overboard.  A Coroner's inquest will be held this afternoon.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 1 July 1871 (7)

WEDNESDAY, 21ST  JUNE.

AN inquest was held yesterday afternoon, by J. D. Vaughan, Esq., H.M. Deputy Coroner, upon the body of private Albert Hodson, acting master tailor to the wing of the 75th regiment, who died on Monday evening from the effects of poison taken through mistake.  Deceased, it appears, had been suffering from fever, and though discharged from hospital continued taking a mixture of quinine.  He had also a bottle of cyanide of potassium, which he used for brightening the gold lace of the officers' uniforms.  He kept both these bottles in his workshop, under the table, and had been in the habit of drinking the quinine out of the bottle instead of pouring it into a glass.  On Mon day evening, he, by mistake, took up the bottle of cyanide of potassium, and without looking at it drank a draught from it.  Finding his mistake, he hastened to the guard room and asked one of the men on duty there for some salt; the man had none, so Hodson left immediately, but had not proceeded far when his strength failed him and he fell.  A comrade went to him to inquire what ailed him, when Hodson replied, "I'm gone, Jack."  He was removed to the hospital, and medical assistance was called at once, but the doctor found the man dying when he arrived, and in two or three minutes afterwards he was no more.  A post mortem examination showed the presence of the poison in the man's stomach.  The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the circumstances detailed above.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 14 July 1871 (9)

ON Saturday morning, two Malays living at Changie observed a sampan floating about, and when it neared where they were they secured it, and found it to contain the dead body of a Chinaman.  The mats in the boat were covered with blood.  The matter was at once reported at the Changhie station, and yesterday an inquest was held by H.M. Coroner.  It was discovered that death had resulted from a bullet wound.  The jury returned a verdict that death had been caused by a shot fired by some person unknown.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 8 November 1871 (3)

From the Straits Times, October 4th.

THE RIOTS IN THE COUNTRY.

ON Sunday, J. D. Vaughan, Esq., H.M. Deputy Coroner, held an inquest on the body of a Hokien Chinese lying in the jungle, about 5 ½ miles out on Thomson's road.  After the inquest, Mr. Vaughan, together with Captain Dunlop, Acting Deputy Commissioner of Police, went on foot through the district, to observe the effects of the quarrel between the rival factions there. ...

[THE CORONERSHIP.  Interesting story about a previous Coroner.]

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 23 November 1872 (4)

Two adjourned inquests were held on Monday by C. B. Waller, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner, concerning the death of two Chinese, one of whom fell down in front of the Central police station, and the other was found drowned near the brick kilns in Lavender Street.  The verdict of the jury in one case was "Died by the visitation of God," and in the other "Found drowned."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 5 December 1872 (16)

MALACCA.

An inquest was held by H.M.'s Coroner last Tuesday, (and adjourned for a week), on the body of a European lady who died here last week, and strong suspicions are entertained that some deleterious  dugs had been administered to her for some time past, by a Chinese servant in her employ who has been arrested.  I understand that a portion of the lady's liver and heart, as also the gall, have been sent to your port to be examined by competent medical men, so as to ascertain if any traces of poison can be discovered.  Further particulars regarding this painful affair, I will send you after the Coroner's inquest has terminated.

NEWS OF THE FORTNIGHT.

THURSDAY, 21ST NOVEMBER.

AN inquest was held by C. B. Waller, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner, at the General Hospital yesterday, on the body of Kassim, a Boyanese boatman, who died yesterday morning after being struck by Captain Burrowes.  Captain Burrows was in custody, having gone voluntarily to the Central Police station and reported the matter.

   The jury was composed of Messrs. J. Baxter, J. Motion, E. McAlister, J. Lowell, and J. B. Carpenter.

   Mr. J. S. Atchison appeared as counsel for the prisoner.

   The evidence was taken of five Boyanese boatman, all of whom testified to having seen prisoner strike deceased and that he died in the boat on the way to the Police Station at Tulloh Blangah.  The most important witness was Dr. A. F. Anderson, who made the post-mortem examination, and who testified as follows :---

   Dr. A. F. Anderson, sworn, states :- I am Acting Principal Civil Medical Officer of the Straits Settlements.  I have seen the body of a Malay whose name was given to me as Kassim, at present lying at the Government dead-house.  I held a post-mortem examination on the body, and I am of opinion that deceased died from apoplexy.  I observe a superficial abrasion with slight ecchymosis over the right cheek bone and over the right angle of the breast.  The face and neck was much congested with frothy blood coming from the mouth.  The abdomen was much distended with gas.  Upon examination of the brain, I found that there was about four ounces of fluid blood underneath the membrane covering the upper and back portion of the head.  At the posterior part of the upper lobe of the brain there was a good deal of bloody congestion and serum under the pia mater.  On both sides of the brain there was a quantity of serum and very strong adhesions between the folds of the dura mater.  The heart showed signs of previous pericarditis.  The abrasion that I have described could have been caused by the blow of a man's fist or might have been caused by a fall.  The external injuries I saw were not sufficient to cause death.  I am of opinion that from the state I found deceased's brain, that if the deceased had received a blow it might have caused death.

   Q.  If a healthy man had received the blows described, what would have been the consequences ?

   A.  If these abrasions which I observed were the only ones, I say they could not be fatal.

   The corporal of Police at the Tulloh Blangah station, and Inspector Barnum, testified as to the body being brought to the station, and to the fact that Capt. Burrowes had himself come to the police and stated what had occurred.  The jury returned the following

VERDICT.

The Jurors are of opinion that deceased died from apoplexy, and that the prisoner is not guilty of manslaughter.  "Died by the visitation of God."

   Capt. Burrowes was detained in custody, to answer a charge of culpable homicide made against him by the police authorities, and was brought up for examination at the Police Court to-day before Capt. Walshe.

FRIDAY, 22ND NOVEMBER.

CAPTAIN Burrowes was yesterday brought up before the Police Magistrate, and the hearing of his case was adjourned till to-morrow, (Saturday), at 11 o'clock.

SATURDAY, 23RD NOVEMBER.

A clerical error caused the insertion of an extra sentence in the verdict of the Coroner's jury, at the inquest on the death of the boatman Kassim, as reported in our issue of Thursday.  The verdict given was, "Died b y the visitation of God."

MONDAY, 25TH NOVEMBER.

CAPTAIN Burrowes was brought up before Captain Walshe, Police Magistrate, on Saturday, and after the hearing had been partly gone into, it was adjourned till next Saturday.  Meantime the prisoner was admitted to bail in $5,000 on his own recognizance, with two sureties for $5,000 each.

TUESDAY, 26TH NOVEMBER.

Criticism that Waller acts as Coroner and also appears on behalf of the Police.

WEDNESDAY, 27TH NOVEMBER.

THE examination of Captain Burrowes before the Magistrate was concluded yesterday, and resulted on his committal for trial at the next criminal session.  Mr. Atchison asked for bail, but Captain Walshe declined to give bail, saying application could be made to the Chief Justice, who, being in Singapore, no serious inconvenience need result to the prisoner.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 14 December 1872 (3)

TUESDAY, 10TH DECEMBER.

ON Sunday morning, about ten o'clock, a convict living in the Buffaloe road was found lying dead in the plain, above the pauper hospital, on the Sirangoon road, with his throat cut.  The decreased kept cattle, which grazed on the plain while he watched them.  It is suspected he has been murdered, but no clue has yet been found to unravel the facts.  A coroner's jury was summoned, but the inquest has been adjourned to await further developments.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 20 December 1872 (10)

WEDNESDAY, 13TH DECEMBER.

AN inquest was held yesterday morning by Capt. Dunlop, H.M. Coroner, on the body of a Kling, found hanging by the neck in a house in Blanco Court, Victoria Street.  The jury returned a verdict of felo de se; the cause of the suicide is believed to have been jealousy.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 21 December 1872 (3)

MALACCA, 15TH DECEMBER, 1872.

The Coroner's Inquest on the body of the European lady who died here last month, was concluded last Tuesday, when the Jurors, after hearing the evidence adduced, returned a verdict of "Wilful Murder" against the Chinese servant who was previously arrested on suspicion of having administered poison to the deceased.  Fuller particulars regarding this somewhat mysterious case, I will send you when it comes on for trail before the Sitting Magistrate.

(4)

AN inquest was held yesterday by J. D. Vaughan, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner, on the body of James Hardy, horse-breaker, whose death was reported yesterday.  The evidence at the inquest proved that the fall did not cause death, as the deceased was able to sit up and hold the reins after being again put into his dog-cart. A post-mortem examination was made by Dr. Hampshire, Colonial Surgeon, who found that death was caused by apoplexy.  The jury therefore returned a verdict to that effect.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 13 February 1873 (6)

MONDAY, 10TH FEBRUARY.

ON Friday morning at about 11 o'clock two sailors belonging to the ship Lake Leman were employed painting the ship's side, when one of them, hearing a splash, found that his companion (a German named Schumacher) had fallen off the stage on which they were stationed; the unfortunate man could not swim, but was seen to strike out as he sank head first.  His friend immediately plunged in after, but could not succeed in reaching him.  At the time this occurred the vessel was heading to the north-east, the tide running out, and the deceased was not seen to rise again.  Captain Trannock communicated these facts to the proper authorities, but the body has not been recovered.

...

We learn that the coroner of Labuan held an inquest at the island of Daat on the 29th January, on the remains of a Malay man who was a cooly in the employ of Mr. Treacher in that island.  It appears that on the previous evening, about eight o'clock, the deceased, whose name was Timbole, was engaged with another cooly in putting up a keelang in a bay, which is dry at low water, but is flooded by the sea at high tides.  It was then high water, and Timbole's companion had just come out of the water when he heard the deceased give a cry, and turning round, saw a large alligator carrying the poor fellow off.  He courageously plunged in to rescue his comrade, but received a lash from the animal's tail in the arm, which was laid open from the shoulder to the elbow.  Efforts were made to recover the body that night, but in vain.  Next morning the remains were found in a mangrove swamp in the bay.  He was shockingly mangled.  One leg and hip and the entire stomach and intestines had been devoured by the alligator, and there were marks of its teeth on the head.  The deceased was about 25 years old, was married, but had no family.  The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.  The season in Labuan was an unusually wet one.

...

A MURDER is reported from Changhie.  It appears that a Malay man named Marshad wanted his wife, Pagie, to go to his parents'' house to live, but she preferred remaining with her own parents, and refused to go.  The husband, on Wednesday last, renewed his appeal to her to go, but she still refused; he appeared annoyed, but put on a smiling face, and she thought nothing more of it.  In the evening, she saw him near the house, but thought he had gone to bathe at the well, and took no notice of him; but shortly afterwards, while seated dealing out the rice to the family, the husband rushed at her with a short spear, with which he stabbed her in the abdomen, making a wound some eight or ten inches deep.  No attempt was made to look for the husband till next day, when he could not be found, and it is believed he has escaped to Johore.  The wife lingered for two days, and died on Saturday night.

...

AT about 10 o'clock last night, a Malay woman was taken by a police peon to the Central police station with her throat cut.  It appeared that she was the wife of a Kling school teacher, named Gopallo Naiken, who had cut her throat with a razor.  Inspector Kraal proceeded at once to the house, which is situated in a lane at the foot of the hill, below Lesudden House.  On arriving there, he found the door guarded by a single police peon, who was afraid to enter.   Mr. Kraal went in, and on going up stairs a horrible sight met his gaze.  Two children, a little girl of six or seven years, and a boy between three and four years of age, lay upon the floor quite dead, with their throats cut, the head of one of them being nearly severed from the body; the husband after killing his children and attempting to kill his wife, had drawn the razor across his own throat, cutting into but not severing the windpipe.  He was arrested and sent to the hospital, where he is expected to recover.  The wife's wound is a severe but not dangerous gash across the throat.  J. D. Vaughan, Esq., coroner, was apprized of the facts, and a jury were summoned, who viewed the bodies and the inquest was the adjourned.  The husband has, we learn, confessed the deed.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 27 February 1873 (11)

YESTERDAY morning, three convicts were found dead in the Convict Jail.  An inquiry into the circumstances showed that all three had eaten of some fish-roe purchased and brought to the jail by a fellow convict, who had eaten some if it himself, and was also taken ill, but had not eaten so much as the others.  It was believed the fish-roe had been poisoned, and the purchaser was taken into custody.  An inquest was held b y J. D. Vaughan, Esq., Coroner, yesterday evening, which has been adjourned.

   Mr. Vaughan also yesterday held an inquest on the body of a Chinese woman, who died in a brothel in Hongkong Street on Wednesday night, under circumstances leading to the suspicion that she had been poisoned herself.  After hearing some of the witnesses, the inquest was adjourned till to-morrow for medical evidence.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 13 March 1873 (9)

AN inquest was held at Changie on Saturday by Mr. Vaughan, Coroner, on the body of a Chinese Mahomedan named Mat Sallee, who died on Friday morning from spear wounds inflicted by a Bugis named Wah Dolah.  It appears the Bugis had first attacked and wounded an old man named Hadji Mahomet, who is now in hospital dangerously wounded, and deceased had gone to his assistance.  The cause of the attack is unknown.  The Bugis had formerly been living with Hadji Mahomet, but it was not known there had been any quarrel.  The attack was made as Hadji Mahomet was passing Wah Dolah's house.  The jury returned a verdict of willful murder against Wah Dolah, who is still at large.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 10 April 1873 (10)

THE Chinese carpenter of the steamer Sri Sarawak died at sea yesterday morning, and it being said that he had been beaten, while on shore at Sarawak, by four of the native firemen, Capt. Hewat informed the police authorities, on his arrival, of the men's death.  The four firemen were arrested and detained in custody, pending the result of a coroner's inquest.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 3 May 1873 (7)

AN inquest was held on Saturday morning, by Mr. J. D. Vaughan, Coroner, on the body of a Chinaman, the circumstances of whose death are extremely suspicious.  On the 14th inst., a Hokien Chinaman named Ong Hoon came to the Police authorities and stated that a thief had entered his house, with whom he had had a struggle, during which he had received a cut on the shoulder; but that the thief had escaped.  The complainant was sent to hospital, and nothing further was heard of the matter till a week later, on the 21st, when another Chinaman reported to the Police that a friend of his had been missing several days; he did not certainly know whether he was living or not, but suspected he had been killed or made away with by the man Ong Hoon.  On going to the hospital for Ong Hoon, it was found he had left there a couple of days after his admission, without permission.  Inquiries were made by the Police, and a Chinaman in the neighbourhood stated that he had been applied to by Ong Hoon to assist in burying a man whom he and a comrade had beaten to death, but that he had refused to help them.  The clue was followed up, and the police went to Ong Hoon's hut, on the Alexandra road at Passir Panjang, and after securing the inmates the place was examined.  In the jungle at the back, the body of a Chinaman was found buried only a few inches below the surface, and so decomposed as to be scarcely recognizable, much less to enable the cause of death to be ascertained from examination.  The friends of the missing man, however, declared it to be that of their friend, recognizing it by the teeth and by a tobacco pouch found on the deceased.  The two inmates of the hut were arrested, charged with murder, and brought before the Coroner.  The jury returned a verdict that "there was not sufficient evidence to show how the deceased came to his death."  The two prisoners will be prosecuted before a magistrate.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 13 July 1873 (12)

NEWS OF THE FORTNIGHT.

MONDAY 30TH JUNE.

ON Thursday afternoon, a fatal accident resulted from the incautious leaving of firearms within n the reach of children.  A young son of Mr. Reutens, living in Prinsep Street, got hold of a loaded rifle which was standing in a corner of the room, and it being too heavy for him, rested it on the window sill to endeavour to fire it off, but it was overbalanced and fell from his hands out of the window into the compound.  It appears, from the marks found, that it fell first on its muzzle and then capsized, and the hammer, being on the heavier side, struck the ground with such force as to discharge the rifle.  The Hylam cook was at the time stooping down, cleaning a fish, and the ball entered his back, broke two or three ribs, passed through the right lung, and came out near the shoulder; it then glanced along under a table, cutting a deep score in the plan k, and flew off on its course, and cannot since be found.  The cook was taken to hospital, where he died at eight o'clock, some four hours after the accident.  An inquest was held next morning by C. E. Velge, Esq., Coroner, at which the jury gave a verdict of accidental death.  A warrant for burial was issued, and the body delivered over to the friends of the deceased, who claimed it for that purpose, but who, on getting it, declared their intention of taking it to the Central Police Station, in order to make a demonstration there.  Inspector Warne, to whom the warrant had been delivered by the Coroner, ordered them to do nothing of the kind, but to bury the body immediately, which they promised to do, and they then went quietly away.  Later in the afternoon, however, a crowd of some forty or fifty Hylams proceeded with the corpse in a coffin to Mr. Reuten's residence, set it down beside the house, and coolly made themselves perfectly at home on the premises, walking in and out with the most unparalleled impudence; and finding none but the female members of the family in the house, they became still more insolent.  Word was sent to Mr. Reutens, who came home, but to him no more respect was shown than to the others.  When ordered to go away, they refused unless he would [?] then fifty dollars; and he, deeming himself morally liable for the funeral expenses, gave them fifteen dollars.  This made them only the more clamorous and insolent, so he sent information to Inspector Warne, who came down with a party of police, bringing, also, a number of handcuffs.  Mr. Warne ordered them out, and on their refusal to go, attempted to seize one of the bolder ones of the crowed, who, emboldened b y the presence of his friends, showed fight, an d was at once assisted b y others in the crowd.  Two or three well directed blows laid the two ringleaders prostrate, and they were handcuffed before they could rise.  Eight more of the noisier ones were also taken into custody and sent to the lockup, seeing which the rest readily gave in, and went off, with the Inspector, and buried the body without more delay. [continues.]

WEDNESDAY, 2ND JULY.

Appeared before magistrate and fined $5 each except small boy who was severely cautioned.

THURSDAY, 3RD JULY.

FOR about a fortnight past, an infant son of Captain Burrowes, licensed pilot, has been missing, and after every search had been made on the small island where Capt. Burrowes resides, it was believed certain that the child must have fallen overboard and been drowned and the body was dragged for in the neighbourhood of the landing place, but without avail.  This suspicion has, however, proved correct, for, this morning, the body of the little one rose to the surface, and was picked up. 

SATURDAY, 5TH JULY.

Return of inquests for the first quarter of 1873.  69; 32 in Singapore, 17 in Pinang, 14 in Province Wellesley, and 6 in Malacca.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 13 July 1873 (7)

SUPREME COURT---CRIMINAL SIDE.

BEFORE CHIEF JUSTICE SIDGREAVES.

From the Straits Times, July 19th.

Thursday, 10th July, 1873.

Hussain otherwise called Wah Dollah, was arraigned for having on 28th February last, inflicted certain bodily injuries upon one Mah Sallay without provocation and with intent to cause the death of a human being.  Prisoner pleaded not Guilty.

...

The Jury retired for about half an hour, and returned with a verdict of guilty of culpable homicide amounting to murder.  [Sentence; to be hanged.]

(9) The Ong Koon case; guilty of Homicide not amounting to murder; sentence, 15 years penal servitude each.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 9 August 1873 (9)

 

STRAITS OBSERVER (SINGAPORE), 14 December 1874 (3)

Two inquests were held on Sunday by the Coroner.  One on the body of a convict in the House of Correction, who died from natural causes; the other one that of an old man in Campong Krabow who died from choleraic symptoms on Sunday morning.  There were some dubious circumstances connected with this case, and the inquest was adjourned until Thursday next to allow time for the chemical examination of the stomach of the deceased.

 

OBSERVER (SINGAPORE), 22 February 1875 (2)

Another convict wounded in the affray died in the jail hospital on Saturday: This makes the nineteenth prisoner killed.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 21 August 1875 (4)

Return from Coroner of Inquests for quarter ending 30th June 1875(by month): 42, and 38 bodies viewed and buried without inquest.

 

STRAITS OBSERVER (SINGAPORE), 1 February 1876 (3)

INQUESTS.

An Inquest was held at the criminal Prison by A. W. V. Cousins, Esq., H.M. Coroner, on the 30th inst., on the body of a male Malay prisoner named Hajee Ismail.  The deceased was committed to the Criminal Prison on the Feb., 1875, under sentence from the Supreme Court of Pinang for two years rigorous imprisonment, for fabricating false evidence.  Was admitted into the criminal prison Hospital on the 26th, suffering from inflammation of the left lung.  On the morning of the 27th instant he complained of difficulty of breathing and of great oppression on the chest.  He gradually grew worse and died at ½ past 3 a.m. on the 30th, while in a fit of coughing.  He was also under treatment in hospital in September last year for Beri-beri and also treated at the commencement of the present month for chronic bronchitis. 

Verdict:---Died from natural causes.

   AN Inquest was held at the General Hospital, Sepoy Lines, by A. W. V. Cousins, Esq., on the 1st instant, on the body of a male Hokien Chinese named Yap Ghin.  From the evidence it appears that the deceased went to the bathing Tank at the foot of Fort Canning on the 30th ult at about 12 o'clock midday, to bathe and to wash clothes.  As he did not return at dinner time, the Towkay he was employed by sent men to look for him every where, and even to the police Stations, fearing lest he being a new comer, might possible have been arrested by the police.  All search proved fruitless and he was found floating this morning in the same tank that he went to bathe in two days previous.  As no evidence could be got as to how he got into the tank, the jurors returned the open verdict of "Found Drowned."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 1 July 1876 (2)

AN inquest was held at the Criminal Prison by A. W. V. Cousins, Esq., H.M. Coroner on the 27th June and which was adjourned till the 29th instant, on the body of a male Chinese named Yow Ah Kong.  The deceased was admitted into the Criminal Prison on the 10th Feby. 1874, under sentence for life from the Supreme Court of Penang for murder, was admitted into Criminal Prison Hospital on 9th Feby. 1876 suffering from consumption, from which he died at 4.30 on the 27th instant.

 

STRAITS OBSERVER (SINGAPORE), 23 September 1876 (2)

A MURDER was committed in Killeney Road on Thursday night last.  Two Kling men, one named Appahtoray Pillay, a clerk in a lawyer's employ, and the other named Eyloo, a syce, were brought before the Coroner's jury, who eventually returned a verdict of murder against both of them. It appeared from the evidence that a Malay woman named Rameenah, was returning home with two young children about ten that night, when she was assaulted and beaten, and being taken to the hospital she died there at five o'clock on Friday afternoon; her dying deposition having been taken by Mr. Maxwell.  Mr. Donaldson attended at the inquest on behalf of the prisoners.

   THE Coroner has held four inquests this week; three on prisoners in the Criminal jail named Choo Kow, Mat Saman, and Chong Ah Fook; the verdicts in each case was Death from natural causes. 

   The other was an adjourned inquest on a Chinese cooly named Ouh Ah Soo who died from opium poisoning; the verdict was, suicide while in an unsound state of mind.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 15 September 1877 (2)

THE SUSPECTED MURDER OF A CHINESE WOMAN.

INQUEST.

The adjourned Inquest upon the body of Ung Joh Hoon, a Chinese woman who lived with Low How Kim, a Chinaman of position here, as his mistress, was held yesterday at the Coroner's Office by Mr. A. W. V. COUSINS.

[Post Mortem][3 columns very heavily inked][Blue stone, Copper Sulphate.]

VERDICT.

"We are of opinion that the death of the deceased has been caused by poison, administered with intent to murder, by some person or persons unknown."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 23 March 1878 (5)

THREE adjourned inquests were held yesterday at the Coroner's office, by A. W. V. Cousins, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner, on the bodies of male Chinese, (1) named unknown, (2) Tek Inn, (3) Lim Ket Lee.   Verdicts severally---"Death from natural causes," "Accidental death from drowning," "That the deceased died from the effects of a wound in the throat, but how or by whom inflicted there was no evidence to shew."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 29 June 1878 (5)

MALACCA.

From the Daily Times, 26th June.

MALACCA, 24TH JUNE. 1878.

H.M.'s Coroner, E. Hayward, Esq., held two inquests during the present month, one at Klebang Kechee, on the body of a Chinese named Tan Boon Ann, who was drowned in the sea, and another on the body of a Chinese lad, six years of age, who fell into a well at Banda Ellier, on the 19th instant.  In both cases, the Coroner's Jury returned Verdicts of "Accidental Death."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 17 August 1878 (3)

Two adjourned inquests were held on the 13th instant, at the Coroner's office by A. W. V. Cousins, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner, on the bodies of two male Chinese, names unknown.  Verdict, the former "Accidental death" and the latter "Death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 5 December 1878 (9)

AN inquest was held yesterday the 2nd instant, on the body of a male Chinese named Bah Ah Jeng, at Sepoy Lines, by A. R. Ord, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdict.---"Death from natural causes."

   AN adjourned inquest was held today, on the body of a male European named N. Grant, at the Coroner's Office, by A. R. Ord, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdict.---"Accidental death by burning."

   AN inquest was held on Friday, the 29th Nov., on the body of a male Kling named Nainameah, at the Criminal Prison, by A. R. Ord, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes."

   THREE inquests were held on Saturday, the 30th Nov., one on the body of a male Kling named Nariansamy, the other two on the bodies of two male Chinese named Hoo Thiam and Tye Kim Fook, at the Criminal Prison, by A. R. Ord, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts,---"Death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 12 December 1878 (6)

AN inquest was held on Sunday, the 8th instant, on the body of a male Chinese named Lee Ah Wan, at the Criminal Prison, by F. G. Penny, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdict.---"Death from Natural Causes."

   TWO inquests were held yesterday, the 9th instant, [Straits Times, 14 December 1878 below.]

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 14 December 1878 (5)

Two inquests were held yesterday, the 9th instant, one on the body of a male European, named Wm. Byrne and one on the body of a male Kling named Miskin at the Criminal Prison, by F. G. Penny, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdict.---"Death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 4 January 1879 (5)

Two adjourned inquests were held on Friday the 27th ultimo, on the bodies of two male Chinese named Liew Long Hee and Leong Ah Leng, at the Sepoy Lines, by F. G. Penney, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts,---1st "Culpable Homicide not amounting to murder against Sia Ah Chiow."  2nd "Accidental death."

   Two inquests were held on Saturday, the 28th ultimo, one on the body of a male Kling named Darmalinguin, and the other on the body of a male Malay named Mamat, at the Criminal prison, by F. G. Penney, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts in both cases,---"Death from natural causes."

   FIVE adjourned inquests were held on the 30th ultimo, on the bodies of three male Chinese named (1st) unknown, (2nd) Yee Ah Ming, (3rd) Lim Jee Moey at the Coroner's Office, and on the body of a male Kling named Kader Macha at the Sepoy Lines, and on the body of a male Malay named Mat Ahmin at the Criminal Prison, by F. G. Penney, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts,---1st, "Death from natural causes."  2nd, "That death resulted from the rupture of an aneurism, but as to how the rupture was caused there is not sufficient evidence to shew."  3rd, "That deceased received the injuries to his head while in the cell with another Lunatic at the General Hospital, and that these injuries inflicted on the deceased, whose brain was in a state of congestion, caused his death."  4th and 5th, "Death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 17 January 1879 (8)

TUESDAY, 14TH JANUARY.

Two Inquests were held on the 12th instant, one on the body of a male Chinese named Sin Ah Swee, and the other on the body of a male Kling named Sultan, at the Sepoy Lines, by F. G. Penney, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts,---1st Suicide by hanging," 2nd "Death from drowning."

   Three Inquests were held yesterday, the 13th instant, one on the body of a Malay named Mat, the other on the body of two male Chinese named Yap Ah Quay, and Lin Ah Pang, at the Criminal Prison by F. G. Penney, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts,---"Death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 15 February 1879 (8)

FRIDAY, 15TH FEBRUARY.

THREE inquests were held on Wednesday, the 12th instant, on the bodies of two male Chinese named Toh Koh at Victoria Street, Ong Ah Peh at the Criminal Prison, and a male Malay named Hadji Droroof at Sepoy Lines, by F. G. Penney, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts,---1st, "Death by Suicide," 2nd and 3rd, "Deaths from Natural Causes."

   Two other inquests were held yesterday, the 13th instant, on the body of a male Chinese name unknown at the Coroner's Office, and on the body of a male Kling named Irlapen at Sepoy Lines, by F. G. Penney, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts,---1st, "Found dead," 2nd, "Death from Natural Causes."

TUESDAY, 11TH FEBRUARY. (7)

Two inquests were held on Sunday, the 9th instant, on the bodies of two male Malays, named Haji Mahomad Salleh and Chengah Jabbar, and two more on the 10th instant, one on the body of a male Chinese named Lee Sye, and the other, a male Siamese, named See Nong, at the Criminal prison, by F. G. Penney, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner.  Verdicts,---"Deaths from Natural Causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 15 January 1880 (19)

FRISDAY, 9th JANUARY.

AN adjourned inquest was held yesterday at the Coroner's office on the body of a male European, named Fass.  Verdict, "Death from excessive alcoholic drinking."

THE Inquest on the body of Dr. Trebling's Syce has been postponed to the 22nd instant when it is expected Major Studer will have sufficiently recovered to be able to give evidence.  Major Studer was out under chloroform on Wednesday and his arm submitted to a close examination  when it was discovered that a small bone near the shoulder blade was broken. Major Studer is progressing favourably.

SATURDAY 10th JANUARY.

We are informed that the accident to Major Studer's arm is more serious than we were led to believe.  The arm-bone, high up in the axilla, and not a small bone, is badly fractured.  Major Studer states that he is now quite prepared to give evidence before the Coroner's Jury empanelled to hold an inquest on the body of the syce, should he be required.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 28 January 1880 (6)

News of the Week.

TUESDAY 20th JANUARY.

AN inquest was held yesterday, on the body of a female child name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, - "Found Death."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 11 February 1880 (6)

SATURDAY 7th FEBRUARY.

AN Inquest was held yesterday, the b6th inst., at Sungie Brie, on the body of a male Chinese named Teo Low tee.  Verdict - "Culpable homicide amounting to murder against some person or persons unknown."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 3 March 1880 (10)

Tuesday, 2ND MARCH.

AN Inquest was held this morning on the body of a male Chinese, name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, Founbd Dead.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 13 APRIL 1880 (7)

TUESDAY, 13TH APRIL.

AN Inquest was held on Saturday the 10th instant, on the body of a male Chinese named Tan Hong, at the Sepoy Lines, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. H.M. Coroner.  Verdict, - "Death from natural cause."

   Two Inquests were held on Saturday, the 11th instant, one on the body of a male Malay named Mat Assan, and the other on the body of a male Chinese named Lim Seng, at the Sepoy Lines, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts - "Deaths from Natural Causes.

   AN Inquest was held on Sunday, the 11th instant, on the body of a male Malay named Mayan, at the Criminal Prison, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. H.M. Coroner.  Verdict - "Death from Natural Causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 14 April 1880 (7)

AN Inquest was held on Saturday the 10th instant, on the body of a male Chinese named Tan Hong, at the Sepoy Lines, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. H.M. Coroner.  Verdict.---"Death from Natural Cause."

   Two Inquests were held on Saturday, the 11th instant, one on the body of a male Malay named Mat Assan, and the other on the body of a male Chinese named Lim Seng, at the Sepoy Lines, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts---"Deaths from Natural Causes."

   An Inquest was held on Sunday, the 11th instant, on the body of a male Malay, named Mayan, at the Criminal Prison, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. H.M. Coroner.  Verdict---"Death from Natural Causes."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 17 April 1880 (6)

See Straits Times Overland Journal, 20 April 1880 [Friday, 16th April.], and Straits Times Overland Journal, 14 April 1880.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 20 April 1880

(12) Discussion of Tigers & In quests; letter from "GUN WAD."

(13)

THREE Inquests were held yesterday on the bodies of three male Chinese named Lay Koh, Gan Eng and Ung Ah Eng at the Sepoy Lines, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts---Death from Natural Causes.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 22 April 1880 (4)

THURSDAY, 22ND APRIL.

THE body of a man was found in the grounds at Tyersall, the residence of H.H. the Maharajah of Johore, yesterday.  It was much decomposed, and those who discovered it were unable to make any close inspection owing to the effluvium.  The Police were at once communicated with and a Coroner's Inquest will probably be held upon the body in the course of the day.  The medical examination would lead to the belief that the man died some days ago.  The face is almost entirely gone but the hair is decidedly that of an African.  At first it was rumoured that the deceased was a European but apprehensions on that score may, it is said, be now set at rest.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 24 April 1880 (4)

AN Inquest were held yesterday on the body of a male chinese Passenger from Hongkong, name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. H.M. Coroner Verdict---Death from natural causes.

   TWO Inquests were held yesterday the 22nd instant, one of the body of a male kling named Sababadiachey and the other on the body of a male Chinese named Lee Ah Seng, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdicts---Deaths from natural causes.  [Editorial re recent verdicts.]

 (12) Discussion of Tigers & In quests; letter from "GUn WAD."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 1 May 1880 (5)

From the Daily Times, 27th April.

PENANG.

(From an occasional correspondent.)

Penang, 24th April. - I have no very welcome news to communicate at present, but rather the reverse.  A murder of a most atrocious character has been detected in one of the lowest and worst localities of George Town.  On the evening of the 20th instant, between 7 and 8 p.m. a disturbance was heard in a house in Pitt Lane - a narrow alley leading off Chulia Street.  Amongst its occupants were two Chinamen, Kung Ah Yew and Yew Ah Waw and a boy of some 17 or 18 years of age whose name I have failed to discover, a quarrel appears to have arisen, words came to blows, blows came to weapons and a very free use was made of knives.  The police were very soon attracted to the spot and arrested two men who were endeavoring to leave the house, for I had almost forgotten to say, that the whole of the inmates, with the exception of the combatants beat a hasty retreat at the first signs of a disturbance.  On entering they found Yew Ah Waw horribly wounded, weltering in his blood and dying, in fact he breathed his last very shortly after the arrival of the Police.  All this time the alleged murderer Kung Ah Yew was making off as fast as his legs could carry him,.  The following morning Sub-Inspector Jennings - whose name for many months past has been a terror to delinquent syces - was sent in quest of the fugitive.

  It was evident from the first that Kung Ah Yew would make for the Province, with the intention of passing into Quedah territory where there would be as little chance of finding a needle in a bundle of hay.  After "paddling his own canoe" for many weary hours in chase of another boat ahead of him which he had reason to believe contained the murderer, Mr. Jennings landed at Penaga, and ultimately succeeded in bringing down his game.  He then returned to Penang and lodged him in "durance vile."  A Coroner's jury returned a Verdict of "Wilful Murder" against Kung Ah Yew whose examination is now pending before the Magistrate. [... continues re Jennings.]

MONDAY, 26th APRIL.

We now learn that the dead body found in the grounds at Tyersall is believed to be that of a German against whom a warrant had been issued on a charge of fraud.  It is supposed he took poison.  An Inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 1 May 1880 (11)

FRIDAY, 30TH APRIL.

HERE is a sweet revelation, but it must be kept a strict secret.  On Wednesday, 21st April, the dead body of a man, much decomposed, was found in the grounds of the residence of H.H. the Maharajah of Johore, at Tyersall.  The Police were communicated with, and a European Inspector of Police came to the spot, examined the body, and had it removed.  Major Dunlop, accepting, doubtless, the statement of the Inspector, officially reported that the body was that of an African, the hair being unquestionably not a European's; but the face, having wasted away left no clue.  The remains were buried.  A few days afterwards an active Inspector of Police in whose hands a warrant had previously been placed against a German named Kruger, who it was supposed lived in the Hotel de la Paix, under an assumed name, came to the conclusion that the gentleman about whom he had been so solicitously anxious.  He opened his mind to his chief on this point who authorised him to apply for an order to the Coroner for the exhumation of the body.  This was obtained, and, sure enough, the name of the missing German was found on the shirt which was on his body and was buried with him, and a card leaving no doubt as to his identity was found in his pocket.

   Now for the little incidemnt.  When the Inspector who first appeared upon the scene reported the circumstances officially, he handed to Major Dun lop all that was found on the body - a valueless brass chain with two watch keys attached - but as the active Inspector at whose instigation the body was exhumed entertained a shrewd suspicion that the deceased was in the habit of wearing a gold watch and chain and was under the belief that he wore thos ornaments on the day of his death, he demanded them from the first Inspector, who reluctantly handed them over to him, and we trust they are now in the possession of the unsuspecting Head of the Police.  A queer tale, it is said, was also told by the Inspector who mistook brass for gold about certain papers in the pockets of the deceased man's coat which a dog who appeared in the scene ate; of this the Major must be the best authority, but it is also said that when the deceased left his Hotel his pockets contained a considerable sum of money in notes.  This matter, perhaps, will be cleared up at the Inquest, which will be held next Tuesday.  Meanwhile the public must form their own conclusion as to the style in which some of the members of our intelligent police force perform their duties.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 8 May 1880 (5)

TUESDAY, 4TH MAY.

THE Inquest on the body of Kruger, the missing German, is being held to-day.  Dr. Bieber, German Consul, is watching the case.  The gold watch and chain and the brass chain about which there has been some difficulty, were both produced, and Sub-Inspector Bristow, among other witnesses, was examined.  We will publish the evidence when the verdict has been given by the Jury who, we may remark, are five Chinamen.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 8 May 1880 (3)

From the Daily Times, 5th May.

THE INQUEST ON THE BODY OF C. KRUGER.

AN adjourned inquest on the body of a male European named C. Kruger alias Van Kampen was held beforeVaughan Cousins, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner, at the Coroner's office, yesterday, 4th day of May, 1880.

   The following Jurors were called and answered to their names:- Tan Chye hee, Leong Voon Chong, M'Shang Bee, Vin g Ah Leong, Chang Mong Lin.

   The following witnesses were called sworn and examined:-

   Mohamned Syed, sworn states:- I am Mandore to the Maharajah,  About three weeks ago, I went into the grounds at Tyersall  close to the Garden side.  I noticed a bad smell and shortly after I saw a dead body lying below a rambutan tree.  I ran to Mr. Holley and reported the matter.  Mr. Abrams and Mr. Holley then went to see the body.  There was also another gentleman.

   Arthur Holley, sworn states:- I am Coachman to the Maharajah of Johore living at Tyersall.  On the 21st April at 9 a.m. the Maharajah told me he wished me to go and see a dead body, which was in the grounds of Tyersall.  Mr. Abrams and Mr. Clarke were with me.  The last witness accompanied us to the place.  I went within about ten yards of the body and saw it was lying on the bank of a ditch near a tree.  It was in a very decomposed state.  There was a chain round the neck coming down to the trowsers' pocket.  It struck me that it was a gold one.  The coat was open and in the breast pocket, I observed what appeared to be papers, but they were very black.  It might have been a handkerchief.  The jaw bones of the face were all bare.  The shoes were on the feet but I did not see any stockings.  I then reported to Sub-Inspector Bristow at the Orchard Road Station.  I returned to the body woth the Sub-Inspector and found the body in the same state.

   W. H. Bristow, sworn states:- I am Sub-Inspector of Police at Orchard Road Station.  On the 21st April about 10 a.m. the last witness came to the Station and reported to me that a man was lying dead in the Maharajah's grounds.  I went with him up to Garden Road and turned into the grounds  at the spot marked on the plan .  I saw a body lying there.  I went within about three yards of the body and noticed that the feet and hands were black.  There were no stockings on.  I noticed a chain round the neck.  When I arrived, the Mandore, Mahomed Syed and a Constable were there.  I put a Constable No. 11 on duty, in charge of the body, and came down to report to the Coron er.

  On the road I went with Mr. Holley into the Orchard Road Station.  The Coroner then ordered me to shift the body to the Sepoy Lines.  I went back to the body before the coolies had arrived, and in the presence of the Mandore an d two Constables, I took off a gold chain and watch (both produced) in pulling off the chain it broke.  The watch was in the fob pocket of the trowers on the right side.  I took from the breast coat pocket a handkerchief folded up just as if it came from the dhoby, it was of a dirty black colour like mud.  I also took a brass cigar case, containing three or four cigars, and a pair of eye glasses.  There was also the back of a carte-de-visite (produced); all these things were very dirty and stinking and covered with maggots.  I also found a glasss tumbler (produced) at the edge of the ditch, about two feet from his feet.  I also found a hat and shoes (produced.) - The hat was in a ditch - I found also a brass chain and two keys (produced) in the breast coat pocket. - I found I could not shift the dead body as the head fell off, and I again reported to the Coroner.  I afterwards superintended the burial of the body at the back of the Pauper Hospital.  I was present when the body was exhumed and I saw that it was the same body I had seen buried.

   By Inspector-General. - I found no money or papers on the body.

   Anthony Jacob  D'Souza, sworn states:- I am Senior Sworn Bailiff of the Supreme Couirt.  On 15th April, I executed a warrant of attachment of property at the Room No. 14, Hotel de la Paix, occupied by C. Kruger alias Van Kampen.  I seized one black trunk, one canvas trunk (produced), one box negatives, one box containing photographic apparatus, one box loose clothes, one silver bath and other things.  Mr. J. G. Davidson was present.  The key produced opens the portmanteau.  I produce two photographs which I found inside the portmanteau.  The name on the back is the same as the part of a photo shown me.  I also found inside the large box some shirts marked C. Eger - Dresden, and some of the shirts are marked with a K.  I found some handkerchiefs marked C. K.

   I produce a bottle of Cyan kalium which I found inside the room.

  J. D. Loff, sworn, states: - I am proprietor of the Hotel de la P:aix.  In the beginning of April, a person named Van Kampen came to my Hotel.  Five or six days afterwards he left the Hotel.  He was dressed in a dark coat not black - a pair of white trowsers and a sun hat.  I cannot say whether he wore shoes or boots.  Mr. Behr came to the Hotel and asked to see him and I then saw him going out of the side yard of the Hotel.  He was accustomed to wear a long gold chain like that produced, and also a watch in the trowsers' =pocket.

   The tumbler ;produced, is of the same kind as\ that used in my Hotel.

   The photographs shown to me are by the same photographer, that is they bear the same name.  I was present when the Sheriff's Officer took the Chemicals produced out of Van Kampen's room.

   Max Behr, sworn, states:- I am a partner in Katz Brothers.  On 12th April, I met a man named Kruger at Lambert's Photographic Studio.  His name was Carl.  I have known him about 2 years when I saw him on 12th he had shaved off his whiskers and dyed his hair a light brown, its natural colour was iron grey.  I spoke to him and addressed him as Mr. Kruger, when he said I am not Mr. Kruger, but Mr. Van Kampen, I said I recognized him as Mr. Kruger, but he would not admit it.  He was indebted to my firm in $1,900.  I secured an attachment against his property under the name of Kruger alias Van Kampen.

   G. Kugelmann, sworn states:- I know the man whose photograph is shewn to me.,  His name is Kruger.  I first knew him in Acheen.  On 7th April I saw him at the Hotel de la Paix - I played billiards with him and saw a good deal of him.  To the best of my belief, the watch and chain produced belonged to Kruger.  The shoes he wore were like those produced.  He was accustomed to wear white shirts.  I noticed that Kruger's hair was dyed formerly it was white and he wore whiskers.

   C. P. Richards, sworn , states:- I am Detective Inspector of Police.  On 23rd April I was present with the Coroner at the exhumation of a body at Sirangoon Road, near the Pauper Hospital.  I produce a portion of the shirt cut from that on the body.  It bears a stamped name Ernst Hubner - Dresden.

   A. F. Anderson, sworn states:- I am Colonial Surgeon.  On 23rdApril at 4 o'clock p.m. I was present at the exhumation of a body at the back of the Pauper Hospital.  The body was very much decomposed.  The head was nearly separated from the body and quite denuded of flesh.  The lower jaw and teeth were lying loose in the coffin.  The trunk was also very much decomposed.  From the advanced stage of decomposition I could not positively state the cause of death.  I think the body was that of a European.

   The bottle produced contains Cyanide of Potassium, which is a very strong poison.  It is very similar in its effects to Prussic Acid.

   Verdict. - ":Found dead."

(8) WEDNESDAY, 5TH MAY.  Editorial re Kruger investigation.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 29 May 1880 (5)

MONDAY, 24TH MAY.

AN adjoiurned inquest was held on the 22nd inst. on the body of a male Chinese named Goh Nung at the Coroner's Office.  Verdict - Culpable homicide not amounting to murder against the prisoner Mamoot.

(6) WEDNESDAY 26TH MAY.

     [Blacked out.] ... the body of a male Chinese named Ho Ah [?ee?] and 3rd on the body of  male Kling named Adey Gapen.  The verdicts were (1st) "Found dead," (2nd) "Death from Natural Causes," and (3rd) "Culpable homicide not amounting to murder against prisoner No. 1, Chew Ah Fun."  [See Straits Times Overland,31 May (10) below.]

   Another Inquest was held this morning on the body of a male Chinese named E. Cham, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, - "Found drowned."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 31 May 1880 (9)

MONDAY, 24TH MAY.

AN adjourned Inquest was held on the 22nd inst. on the body of a male Chinese named Gih Nung at the Coroner's Office.  Verdict - Culpable homicide not amounting to murder against the prisoner Mamoot.

(10) WEDNESDAY, 26TH MAY

       THREE Inquests were held yesterday rhe 25th instant, 1st, on the body of a female child name unknown, 2nd, oin the body of a male Chinese named Ho Ah Ngee, and 3rd on the body of a male Kling named Addy Gapen.  The verdicts returned were (1st) "Found dead," (2nd) "Death from Natural Causes," and (3rd) "Culpable homicide not amounting to murder against prisoner No. 1, Chew Ah Fun."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 14 June 1880 (9)

MONDAY, 7TH JUNE.

AN Inquest was held on Saturday the 5th inst. on the body of a male European named William Christie at the sepoy Lines by Vaughan Cousins, Esq., H.M. Coroner. - Verdict p- Accidental death.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 26 June 1880 (6)

THURSDAY, 24TH JUNE.

AN Inquest was held on the 22nd instant, on the body of a male Chinese named Chew Ah Sung at the Sepoy Lines by Vaughan Cousins, Esq., H.M. Coroner.  Verdict - Accidental death by drowning.

   WHILST driving on Mon day, Mr. Watson, the Planter, happened, unfortunately, through mere accident, to run over and knock down a Chinaman in Brass Bassa Road.  The unfortunate man has since died from the injuries he received.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 10 July 1880 (5)

YESTERDAY the body of a Russian Sailor was found at 5 A.M. floating in the sea close to Beach Road Station.  It was brought ashore and an Inquest was held at 3 P.M.  From the evidence of the Doctor there was no doubt that death resulted from drowning.  There were no marks of violence on the body.  A companion gave evidence that he was on shore with the deceased and that they had been drinking.  This man went on board drunk, and without his shirt.  The shirt was found on the beach.  It would seem that when they wanted to go on board they could not get a sampan, and that they started to swim off to some sampans lying some distance from the shore.  One got safely there and the other was drowned.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 12 July 1880 (1)

PENANG.

(From our own Correspondent.)

Penang, 8th July.

A murder was committed at Balik Pulo on Friday last, the 2nd inst., when a Malay woman fell a victim tol the insane jealousy of her husband.  It appears that she was sitting inside the house reading aloud to herself; her husband, who was returning from work, on approaching his home, heard the sound of his wife's voice and formed the hasty conclusion that she was receiving a visit from another man.  He rushed into the house, accused her of infidelity, snatched up a knife and inflicted a fatal wound.  His children screamed when the neighbours soon made their appearance on the scene to find the woman dead.  After some resistance on his part the murderer was sec cured and safely lodged  in "durance vile;" the inquest has been held and the case will be investigated by the sitting magistrate to-morrow.

 

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 19 July 1880 (5)

THURSDAY, 15TH JULY.

THE dead body of a chinaman was found in the Rochore River yesterday.  Although there are no marks of violence on the body there is good reason to believe the deceased was pushed wilfully into the river and drowned.  The inquest will be held at 3 p.m. this afternoon.  The person suspected of having caused his death has absconded.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 14 August 1880 (5)

The Penang Observer of the 3rd instant says:-

   We regret to hear of the untimely death of Captain Gibson of the S. S. Medina, who was drowned in Rangoon Harbour on the 12th ultimo whilst returning to the steamer at 10.30 p.m. in the ship's gig rowed by four lascars.  The Captain was steering when the gig suddenly struck against a large cargo boat with such force as to part asunder.  Three of the lascars managed to climb up the ship's side by a chain; the fourth was picked up safely by a man-of-war's boat whilst Capt. Gibson alone perished.  His body was picked up on the third day after and taken to the Government Hospital where an inquest was held and a verdict of "Death from drowning" returned by the coroner's jury.  [Masonic  funeral; widow and 1 child.]

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 19 January 1881 (5)

THURSDAY, 13TH JANUARY.

It is pour painful duty to record a fatal accident to Mr. William Cruickshank, the Chief Engineer of the New Harbour Dock Company, on Tuesday evening.  Mr. Cruickshank, at about half past 5 o'clock, was on board the S. S. Riga, which is undergoing repairs in the Dock, looking after the work, and was just making arrangements for working during the night, when, in going past the open hatch-way,. He stepped upon some buffalo horns, which gave way under his feet, and he was precipitated head first into the hold, striking his head upon the kelson.  He was picked up insensible, and medical aid immediately summoned.  Dr. Bentley hastened with all speed to the Dock, and on examination immediately pronounced the skull to be fractured.  Mr. Cruickshank died at about 8 o'clock in the evening.  An inquest was held yesterday afternoon, when a verdict of accidental death was returned. [Funeral, &c.]

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 9 February 1881 (7)

WEDNESDAY, 2ND FEBRUARY.

The case of Verapen, the police peon charged with the murder of his paramour, a woman named Letchmy, opposite the Kandang Karbau police station, was last week committed by the Magistrate for trial at the next Assizes.

   A REPORT having been made yesterday to the police that a Chinese child had been buried alive, Superintendent Riccard ordered the body to be exhumed and submitted to medical examination.  The medical officer, while believing everything to be right, was of opinion that a coroner's inquest would be more satisfactory.  An inquest was accordingly held, when the jury, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of "death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 14 March 1881 (12)

FRIDAY, 11TH MARCH.

AN Inquest was held on the 11th instant, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. at the Leper Hospital, on a male Chinese named Tay Ah Kean.  Verdict - "Death from Natural Causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 12 May 1881 (8).

TUESDAY, 10TH MAY.

THE following inquests were held at the Coroner's Office on the 7th instant, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq.:-

   On the body of male Bengalee, named unknown; verdict, death from natural causes.

   On the body of a male Chinese, name unknown; verdict, death from natural causes.

   On the body of a male Chinese, named Ng Teong; verdict, death from natural causes.

   An Inquest was held on the 8th inst. at the Criminal Prison, on a male Chinese named Chua Ah Kee; verdict, death from natural causes.

   An Inquest was held on the 9th inst. at the Criminal Prison, on a male Chinese named Keo Ah Lo; verdict, death from natural causes.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 26 May 1881 (2).

THE CORONERSHIP.

From the Daily Times, 20th May.

Editorial. - "The office of Coroner seems never to have received, either from the Government or the holders of the office, that consideration to which it is entitled, the custom having been to tack the duty on to some hard-worked official in addition to his regular work, as a means of ekeing out his salary, and necessitating the neglect of either one or the other of the duties entrusted to him. ...  [large part of the column, paper damaged.]

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 2 June 1181 (7)

MONDAY, 30TH MAY.

AN Inquest was held on the 28th instant at the Coroner's Office, on a male Chinese named Kwi Leng King, by Nicholas Bellfield Dennys, Esq.  Verdict, - "That the deceased died of heart disease not accelerated by violence."

...

At the Criminal Assizes to-day, the case of the Queen vs. Chong Ah Pow again came up for trial, the jury having failed to agree last week.  Mr. Vaughan, on behalf of the prisoner, withdrew the plea of "not guilty" on the capital charge, and pleaded guilty on the second charge of "culpable homicide not amounting to murder."  The Attorney general, on behalf of the Crown, then withdrew the charge of murder.  The Chief Justice said the prisoner had done wisely in following the advice of his counsel and pleading guilty, but as the assault had been a very murderous one, he felt bound to impose a severe punishment.  The prisoner was sentenced to ten years' rigorous imprisonment.

   This closed the Assizes, and the Special Jurors were accordingly discharged.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 30 June 1881 (7)

MONDAY, 27TH JUNE.

AN Inquest was held to-day on a male Chinese named Chua Lee Chau at the criminal prison, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. Verdict, death from natural causes.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 21 July 1881 (7)

TUESDAY, 19TH JULY.

AN Inquest was held to-day on a male Chinese, name unknown, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. - Verdict, culpable homicide amounting to murder against some person or persons unknown.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 28 July 1881 (5)

SATURDAY, 23RD JULY.

THE Supreme Court was occupied yesterday by the trial of a charge of murder against a Malay named Tamby.  The case arose out of a riot between two societies on the 29th April, the last day of the races, as the crowds were returning.  Mr. Vaughan prosecuted, and Mr. Buckley defended the prisoner, who was acquitted.  This is the only Special Jury case at the present Assizes. ...

   WE regret to hear of the sudden death last night of Captain Juan Manuel Larrinaga, of the Spanish mail steamer Salvadora. The deceased left Messrs. Syme & Co.'s office late yesterday afternoon, apparently in his usual good health, and went on board the Reina Mercedes to dine with Captain Munitez and the Spanish Consul.  He is reported to have taken a moderate dinner, and to have been in very good spirits.  Just as dinner was over he fell back in his seat and was dead in about two minutes.  The cause of death is said to have been the rupture of a blood vessel.  An inquest will be held in the course of the day,...

(6) MONDAY, 25TH JULY.

[Funeral.] The cause of death was ascertained by a medical board (composed of Dr. [Aker] and the surgeons of the Reina Mercedes and of the French transport Annamite) to have been the rupture of a vessel in the throat, and on their signing a certificate to that effect, no inquest was held.

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 4 August 1881 (6)

THURSDAY, 28TH JULY.

AN Inquest was held on the 27th inst., on a male Chinese named Sim Teo Chew, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq.  Verdict, - "Death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 11 August 1881 (6)

TUESDAY, 9TH AUGUST.

AN Inquest was held on the 8th inst., on a male European named Henry Sweeney, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq. - "Verdict, Death from heart disease accelerated by alcoholic poisoning."

 

STRAITS TIMES OVERLAND JOURNAL, 25 August 1881 (7)

WEDNESDAY 24TH  AUGUST.

THE adjourned inquest upon the two deaths caused by the fall of the unfinished Municipal bathing house at Clyde Terrace, will be held at the Coroner's office at 2 p.m. to-morrow, before A. W. V. Cousins, Esq., Coroner.  The Jury consists entirely of Chinese.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 8 January 1883 (4)

AN Inquest was held on the 5th inst., on a male Macao Chinese named Bo Ah Hiew, at Sepoy Lines, by V. Cousins, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner.---Verdict, "Death from tetanus, the result of fracture of both thighs, but how the latter was caused there is no evidence to show."

   THE following inquests were held by V. Cousins, Esq., H. M. Coroner.

  1. On 22nd ult. and adjourned till 4th instant, on a female Chinese named Lee Chow Fong.---Verdict, "Suicide by opium dross poisoning."
  2. On 30th ult. and adjourned till 4th instant, on a male Malay child named Mohamed.---Verdict, "Accidental death from drowning."

A SAD accident, that resulted fatally, occurred on Wednesday afternoon at the steam saw mills of Leung Fhong Cheong & Co. at Tanjong Rhoo.  One of the employees in the mills, named Leong Ah Whay, while working about one of the large circular saws, had his right hand caught in the saw, cutting it completely off just about the wrist, and lacerating the whole arm very severely.  The unfortunate man was taken to the Rochore police station between 4 and 5 o'clock, and then sent to the General Hospital, where he died at seven o'clock in the evening, probably from loss of blood.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 29 January 1883 (2)

THE body of a Chinaman was found on the 24th near Ah Chong's ship-building yard, under circumstances which lead to the belief that he had come to his death by foul means.  There has as yet been no evidence obtained to implicate any one.

AN inquest was held on the 18th inst., at Sirangoon Road, 7th mile stone, on a male Chinese named Lim Juat Siang, by V. Cousins, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner, and was adjourned till the 22nd inst.  Verdict,---"Death from excessive use of alcohol."

ON Sunday afternoon, at 4 p.m., a chinese woman named Lye Siu, somewhat under twenty years of age, residing in Princep Street, was admitted into hospital suffering apparently from an attempt she had made to commit suicide.  She admitted having taken powdered glass with a view to put an end to her life.  The girl's present condition leads the doctors to believe that she will be able to leave hospital in a few days, unless unfavourable symptoms set in sooner.  This modus operandi of her attempted "shuffling of this mortal coil," is quite a favourite one in China.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 30 January 1883 (2)

AN Inquest was held on the 18th inst., and was adjourned till the 29th inst., at the Coroner's Office, on a male European named Charles Gross, by V. Cousins, Esq.  Verdict,---"Culpable homicide not amounting to murder against Lim Geat."

   Three Inquests were held on the 30th inst., at the Coroner's Office, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq., Coroner.

1st.  On the 23rd inst., and adjourned till the 30th inst., on a male Chinese name unknown.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes."

2nd. On the 28th inst., and adjourned till the 30th inst., on a male Chinese name unknown.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes."

3rd.   On the 28th inst., and adjourned till the 30th inst., on a female Hindoo named Soronumy.  Verdict,---"Found dead."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 5 February 1883 (2)

ON the 18th instant, the dead body of a pauper chinaman was found in an unoccupied hut in the Changhie District.  The information was given to the police by a friend of the deceased, who had gone to the village for supplies, and was asked what had become of his friend, who had not been seen for ten days or more.  He thereupon went to the hut where his friend, Ng Ah Hok, had been known to put up, and found him dead and his body already far decomposed, he apparently having been dead seven or eight days.  An inquest was ordered, and permission given for the burial.

   AN Inquest was held on the 18th inst., and was adjourned till the 29th inst., at the Coroner's Office, on a male Eurasian named Charles Gross, by V. Cousins, Esq.  Verdict,---"Culpable homicide not amounting to murder against Lim Geat."

   Three Inquests were held on the 30th inst., at the Coroner's Office, by Vaughan Cousins, Esq., Coroner.

1st.  On the 23rd inst., and adjourned till the 30th inst., on a male Chinese name unknown.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes."

2nd.  On the 28th inst., and adjourned till the 30th inst., on a female Hindoo named Soronumy.  Verdict,---Accidental death."

3rd.  On the 28th inst., and adjourned till the 30th inst., on a female Child.  Verdict,---Found dead."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 10 February 1883 (2)

THE following inquests were held by A. P. Talbot, Esq., Coroner:---

1st.  On the 6th instant, at the Criminal Prison, on a male Chinese named Goh Ek Seah.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes."

2nd.  On the 6th inst., at the Criminal Prison, on a male Chinese named Seng Chah Tek.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes.

3rd.   On the 5th inst., at the Sepoy Lines, on a male Chinese, and was adjourned till the 7th inst.  Verdict,---"Death from an overdose of opium."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 12 February 1883 (2)

THE following inquests were held by A. P. Talbot, Esq., Coroner:---

1st.  On the 6th inst., at the criminal Prison, on a male chinese named Goh Ek Seah.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes."

2nd.  On the 6th inst., at the Criminal Prison, on a male Chinese named Seng Chah Tek.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes."

3rd.  On the 5th inst., at the Sepoy Lines, on a male Chinese, and was adjourned till the 7th inst.  Verdict,---Death from an overdose of opium."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 19 March 1883 (2)

THE following inquests have been held by H. O. Newland, Esq., coroner.

1st.  On the 10th inst., at the sepoy Lines, on a male Chinese, named Lim Kee Bee, and adjourned till the 15th.  Verdict, accidental death.

2nd.  On the 15th inst., at Teluk Ayer Beach, on a male Javanese named Russbun.  Verdict, accidental death.

   THE body of a Bugis named [L?]errie, who was murdered in his house---(an attap hut) at Tanjong Blakang Mati, close to Syed Massim's house, opposite Tebing Tinggi---was found by the police early on Monday morning.  Deceased was lying on his back, with his legs underneath the house, and his head on the hill, on the face of which the house is built, the head and upper part of the body resting in a pool of blood.  The case was reported to the nearest police station, and Corporal No. 7, Baboo, at once went and examined the place and reported the facts to Inspector W. Warne.  There are now under detention, in connection with the case, a malay named Jamat, and the wife of the deceased.  Their statements so far very much differ.  The Inspector found a spear about a hundred feet from the house, which the wife identified as being his property.  It is believed that the two persons in custody committed the deed.  Both seem to be in a great state of mind over the affair.  Prisoner Jamat says he resides at Campong Kapor with one Hadjee Dollah, and this is being enquired into.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 13 April 1883 (2)

THE following inquests have been held by H. O. Newland, Esq., coroner:---

   On the 7th inst., at North Canal Road, and adjourned until the 12th inst., on the body of a male Chinese named Koh Tek Kee.  Verdict, accidental death by drowning.

   On the 13th inst., at the Criminal Prison, on the body of a male Chinese named Gho Tuan.  Verdict, death by natural causes.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 16 April 1883 (2)

AN inquest was held on the 9th inst., by H. O. Newland, Esq., coroner, at the Criminal Prison, on a male Chinese named Yeo Ah Kia.  The jury returned a verdict of "death from natural causes."

AN inquest was held on the 8th inst., by H. O. Newland, Esq. coroner, at the Sepoy Line, on a male Chinese named Vong Ah Chin.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

THE following inquests have been held by H. O. Newland, Esq., coroner:---

   On the 7th inst., at North Canal road, and adjourned till the 12th inst., on the body of a male Chinese named Koh Tek Kee.  Verdict, accidental death by drowning.

   On the 13th inst., at the Criminal Prison, on the body of a male Chinese named Gho Tuan.  Verdict, death by natural causes.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 20 April 1883 (2)

THE following Inquests were held by H. O. Newland, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner.

1st.---On the 17th instant, on a male Chinese named Tay Guan, and adjourned till 19th instant.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes."

2nd---On the 18th instant, on a male Chinese named Tan Guan, and adjourned till 19th instant.  Verdict,---"Accidental death from drowning."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 23 April 1883 (2)

AN inquest was held on the 22nd March, at the Sepoy Lines, by H. O. Newland, Esq., Coroner, on a male Malay named Dollah, and adjourned till the 16th inst., when the jury returned a verdict of "culpable homicide amounting to murder against Saman."

   The Italian barque Annettin, loading timber for Mauritius, was the scene of a fatal accident last Sunday week.  A tong-kalg, going alongside with cargo, got her mast entangled with the rigging of the ship.  One of the men went aloft to clear the boat's mast from the rigging and fell down from the mast-head and was drowned.

   The funeral took place the other afternoon of an Irish sailor, named O'Lannehan, 43 years of age, employed on board H.M.S. Champion.  Deceased had been ailing some time; and died from natural causes. ...

   THE following Inquests were held by H. O. Newland, Esq., H.M.'s Coroner.

1st.---On the 17th instant, on a male Chinese named Tay Guan, and adjourned till 19th instant.  Verdict,---"Death from natural causes."

2nd.---On the 18th instant, on a male Chinese named Tan Guan, and adjourned till 19th instant.  Verdict,---"Accidental death from  drowning."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 12 May 1883 (6)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, coroner, on the 11th inst., at the Sepoy Lines:---

1st.  On a male Chinese named Lee Phoo.  Verdict, "accidental death from drowning."

2nd. On a male Chinese, name unknown.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 16 May 1883 (2)

WITH regard to the death by drowning of Mr. James Hardy, chief engineer of the steamer Pontianak, at Pontinanak, reported in our issue of 10th inst., .....

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 31 May 1883 (2)

THE following inquests were held on 23rd instant by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner.

      1 and 2.  At the Sepoy Lines, on two female children, name unknown.  Verdict, found dead.

  1.  At the Civil Prison, on a male Chinese named Goh Ah Chok, verdict "Death from Natural Causes."

1st.  On a male Chinese named Goh Siang Nee, at the Pauper Hospital.  Verdict, "suicide by hanging while in a state of unsound mind."

2nd.  On a male Chinese named Yew Tek, at the Criminal Prison.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

   THE Court and a Special Jury were engaged the whole of Monday and Tuesday in the trial of the Sirangoon Road murder, and the trial ended yesterday in a unanimous verdict of guilty, and His Honor the Chief Justice passed sentence of death upon the three prisoners, one of whom is a woman.  The Attorney General prosecuted, and Mr. J. D. Vaughan, at the request of the Court, defended the prisoners.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 5 June 1883 (2)

The undermentioned inquests were held on the 4th instant, at the Sepoy Lines, by Dr. Mugliston, coroner.

1st, on a male Chinese named Chung Ah Hak.  Verdict, accidental death.

2nd, on a male child, named unknown.  Verdict, found dead.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 7 June 1883 (2)

AN inquest was held on the 29th May, by Dr. Mugliston, coroner, at the sepoy Lines, on a male Chinese named Eng Ah Chew, and was adjourned till the 30th inst., when the jury returned a verdict of "culpable homicide not amounting to murder against Teo Ah Woo."

   The undermentioned inquests were held on the 4th instant, at the sepoy Lines, by Dr. Mugliston, coroner.

1st, on a male Chinese named Chung Ah Hak.  Verdict, accidental death.

2nd, on a male child, name unknown.  Verdict, found dead.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 8 June 1883 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, coroner:---

1st.  On the 6th instant, on a male Chinese, name unknown, at Thompson Road.  Verdict, "accidental death."

2nd.  On the 7th instant, on a male Chinese, name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 13 June 1883 (2)

THE undermentioned inquests were held on the 12th instant by Dr. Mugliston, coroner:---

1st.  On a male Chinese named Que Yong, at the Criminal Prison.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

2nd.  On a female child name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "found dead."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 14 June 1883 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, coroner:---

1st.  On the 6th instant, on a male Chinese, name unknown, at Thompson Road.  Verdict, "accidental death."

2nd.  On the 7th instant, on a male Chinese, name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

  An inquest was held on the 11th inst., by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, at the Sepoy Lines, on a male Chinese named Lim Toon, Verdict, "death from natural causes."

   A VERY sudden death occurred on Wednesday evening about 6 o'clock in the Adelphi Hotel, when Capt. Schulz, a well known shipmaster, breathed his last.  Deceased had been complaining slightly during the day, and had been attended by Dr. Trebing, but nothing was apprehended by any body as seriously ailing him.  He had, however, expired suddenly, and was found dead by the boy who went to attend to the room.  The funeral took place at 8.30 the following morning.

   THE murder trial at the Supreme Court where one Chinaman was found guilty of murder and another man and a woman were found guilty of abetment of murder, and all sentenced to death, will be fresh in the minds of the public.  The woman was a Christian Chinese named Mary, and the deceased was her husband.  The Executive Council, in considering the case to fix the time for carrying out the sentence, decided that Tan Ah Chin, the one found guilty of the actual murder, shall be hanged on Monday, the 18th instant.  H.E. the Governor has, however, commuted the sentence of Tan Ah Law and the woman Mary to penal servitude for life.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 20 June 1883 (2)

THE undermentioned inquests were held on the 12th instant by Dr. Mugliston, coroner:---

1st.  On a male Chinese named Que Yong, at the Criminal Prison.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

2nd.  On a female child name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "found dead."

   An inquest was held on the 15th inst., at the pauper Hospital, before Dr. Mugliston, and a Jury, on the body of a male Chinese named Ng Kiew Chye.  A verdict of "death by accidental drowning" was returned.

  The undermentioned Inquests were held on the 18th instant, by Dr. Mugliston, coroner:---

1st.  On a male Chinese named Tan Ah Chin, at the Civil Prison.  Verdict, "Death from the administration of justice by hanging."

2nd.  On a male Javanese named Sanawee, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "accidental death."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 5 July 1883

THE following inquests were held on the 26th June by Dr. Mugliston, coroner:---

1st.  On a male Chinese named Yeo Hee Foo, on the 23rd June, at the Sepoy Lines, and adjourned till the 26th June, Verdict, "culpable homicide not amounting to murder against Omar."

2nd. On a male Chinese named Chea Geok, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

3rd.  On a male Chinese named Lim Po, at the Criminal Prison.  Verdict, "death from natural causes.

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, coroner.

1st.  On the 28th June, on a male Hindoo named Veerapan, at North Bridge Road.  Verdict "Suicide by hanging while in a state of unsound mind."

2nd.  On the 29th June, on a female Chinese named Chan Ah Hoh, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, death from natural causes.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 12 July 1883 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, coroner, on the 4th inst., at the Sepoy lines:---

1st.  On a male Chinese name unknown.  Verdict, "found drowned."

2nd. On a male Chinese named Lee Ah Wan.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

AN Inquest was held on the 9th inst., by Dr. Mugliston, coroner, at the Criminal Prison, on a male Chinese, named Tan Ah leang.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 2 August 1883 (2)

THE undermentioned inquests were held on the 25th inst., by Dr. Mugliston, coroner:---

1st.  On a male Chinese named Tan Loo, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "accidental death."

2nd.  On a male Chinese, name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "accidental  death from  drowning."

AN inquest was held on the 1st instant, by Dr. Mugliston, coroner, at the Sepoy Lines, on the body of a female child.  Verdict,---"Found dead."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 31 August 1883 (2)

TWO Inquests were held on Wednesday the 29th instant by Dr. Mugliston, H.M. Coroner, and a Chinese Jury.  One was on the body of a Chinese coolie, who was engaged in weighting coffee in a rice shop in Malacca Street, when the floor gave way and he fell to the ground with a bag on top of him, which broke his leg.  He was sent to Hospital and was doing well, when gangrene set in and he died from exhaustion.  Verdict, "Accidental Death."

   The other was on a Chinese who was found by a policeman swimming in the water near Blakang Mati, seemingly in difficulties.  He was dragged out and charged with an attempt to commit suicide.  The man fell down in a fit in Court and was sent to Hospital, when he proved to be in a state of collapse from diarrhoea, and he died in two hours.  There was no symptom of poisoning, and medical evidence gave the cause of death as violent diarrhoea.  Verdict, "Death from natural causes."

 

6 Sep 1883

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 12 September 1883 (2)

TWO inquests were held yesterday, the 11th instant, by Dr. Mugliston, coroner.  The first on the body of a male Kling name unknown.  Verdict, "found dead."  The second on the body of a male blind Chinese named Tan Tay Boon.  Verdict, "suicide by hanging whilst in a state of non compos mentis."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 13 September 1883 (2)

AN inquest was held on Friday last, before Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, and a Chinese jury, on the body of one Ah Leow.  After hearing evidence the jury returned verdict of death from natural causes.

AN inquest was held at the General Hospital on Saturday afternoon on the body of a Kling, name unknown, before Dr. Mugliston Coroner, and a Kling Jury.  The Jury after hearing evidence gave a verdict of death from natural cause.

AN inquest was held on Saturday afternoon on the body of a European named Hottleman, before Dr. Mugliston, coroner, and a jury consisting of Messrs. George Buchanan, E. Landesberg, S. Goldenberg, P. Koorn, and M. McDonough.  From the evidence, it appeared that deceased was chief engineer of the german steamer Picciola, at present lying at the Borneo Co.'s wharf; that he had gone ashore on Friday evening, and on returning to the steamer about midnight he had missed his footing on the gangway, which had no handrail, and falling into the water was drowned.  It was a dark night and .... [missing]

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 27 October 1883 (2)

Two inquests were held at the Government Civil Hospital on the afternoon, of the 23rd inst. before Dr. Mugliston, one on the body of a male child found dead in a box in the Chinese burial ground in South Bridge Road.  The other was on the body of a male chinaman who was found on the road apparently in a dying state.  He was sent to hospital and gradually sunk, never recovering consciousness.  The medical opinion was that death resulted from heat apoplexy.  A verdict of "death from natural causes" was returned in each case.

   On Tuesday morning, about 3 o'clock, in a shop in Philip Street, a Chinaman named Koh Ah Tow was attacked with an axe or chopper by another Chinaman named Quay Lock Yan, and killed on the spot.  Deceased and his assailant resided together in the shop in question, along with several others, who were witnesses of the deed.  A European Jury, under Dr. Mugliston, coroner, viewed the body this afternoon, and the inquest was then adjourned to allow the assailant, who had made a desperate attempt at suicide after committing the deed, to recover in hospital.  The motive of the attack is said to have been a suspicion on the part of the assailant that the other man had tried to poison him.

   The hands of the Coroner, (Dr. Mugliston,) have been very full of late, and at the present moment several inquests are lying over, partly proceeded with and now awaiting the forthcoming of further evidence.

  

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 15 December 1883 (2)

THE following Inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, H.M.'s Coroner.

1st.  On the 8th inst., on a male chinese named Chan Kow, and was adjourned till the 10th inst.  Verdict, "accidental death."

2nd.  On the 9th inst., on a male Chinese named Quak Lack Hyang, the murderer of a man at Phillip Street No. 37.  Verdict, "Death from self-starvation while in an unsound state of mind."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 19 January 1884 (2)

AN Inquest was held on the 16th inst., at the Sepoy Lines, before Dr. Mugliston, H.M.'s Coroner, on the body of Fitz Bots, who was a seaman on board the Swedish barque Hermine.  On the 15th instant, at 4 p.m., the deceased and two others were in a boat preparing the sail to go ashore, when the boat capsized.  The deceased sprang to swim towards the ship and got hold of a line, but called out he could not hold on any longer and let go the rope and sank.  The body was found half an hour after the boat capsized.  Verdict, "accidental death by drowning."

   Two inquests have been held at the Sepoy Lines by Dr. Mugliston, coroner.  The first was begun on the 6th and closed on the 12th instant, on the body of a European named Simon Weinberg.  It appeared that on the 6th he left the house where he was staying and went to the Post office, and on his return blood was seen issuing from his mouth.  A carriage was called to take him to the hospital, but he died on the way. A post-mortem examination proved death to have been caused by a rupture of a blood vessel, and a verdict was rendered in accordance.

   The next was begun on the 8th, and also concluded on the 12th instant, on the body of a Chinaman named Chiang Chye Hin, who was proved to have poisoned himself with arsenic.  The jury returned a verdict of felo-de-se.

PENANG.

THE Penang Times of the 8th January records the two following cases of alleged suicide there:---

   On the 3rd instant a Batavia gentleman named J. J. Agerbeek, clerk to Messrs. Ban Joo & Co., the contractors to the Dutch naval forces in Acheen waters, committed suicide at his residence 95, Muntri Street.  He had arrived from Batavia about a week before Christmas with his wife and family, and had since been labouring under great excitement, owing to an uncontrollable fancy that some people were plotting to murder him.  On his wife perceiving that he was attempting to shoot himself with a revolver which he had procured a few days before, she tried to take it from him but did not succeed, and on her going to the window to call for help, he shot himself in the head.  An inquest held on Monday morning before Alfred De Wind Neubronner, Esq., Coroner, found that the deceased shot himself while in a state of temporary insanity.

   Another death supposed to be also a suicide took place in the hospital on the 4th instant.  An engineer, who had only been admitted there the day before, was found dead in his bed.  It is supposed that he took a dose of laudanum, which he must have had concealed on his person when he came to the hospital.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 16 February 1884 (2)

AN inquest was held by Dr. Mugliston, coroner, on the 12th instant, at the Sepoy Lines, on the body of a chinaman named Ung How.  It appeared that on the evening of the 11th instant, at about a quarter to eight, P.C. No. 350 found the deceased sitting in his jinricksha, in North bridge Road, near Elgin bridge, groaning and unable to speak.  He was taken to the Central police station, at the old prison, in order that he might be sent to hospital, but he died within half an hour after he was first discovered.  The body was sent to the Sepoy Lines for post mortem examination, which showed death to have resulted from shock occasioned by the fracture of the 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th ribs on the right side, and also fracture of the 5th rib in front on the left side.  There was no evidence to show how the injuries were occasioned, and the jury returned an open verdict of culpable homicide amounting to murder against some person or persons unknown.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 19 February 1884 (2)

TWO inquests were held at the Sepoy Lines by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner.

  1. On the 16th inst. on a male Malay named Rupseedin, and was adjourned till the 18th inst. verdict. "Death from natural causes.
  2. On the 18th inst. on a female Chinese named Wee Soon Neo.  Verdict, "Suicide by hanging whilst in a state of unsound mind."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 23 February 1884 (2)

AN inquest was held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, on the 14th inst., at the sepoy Lines, on a male Chinese named Ng Ah Choo, and was adjourned till the 21st inst., when the jury returned a verdict of "Culpable homicide amounting to murder against some person or persons unknown."

   TWO inquests were held at the Sepoy Lines by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner.

  1. On the 16th inst. on a male Malay named Rupseedin, and was adjourned till the 18th inst.  verdict, "Death from natural causes."
  2. On the 18th inst. on a female Chinese named Wee Soon Neo.  Verdict, "Suicide by hanging whilst in a state of unsound mind."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 1 March 1884 (2)

TWO inquests were held before Dr. T. C. Mugliston, Coroner.

  1.  On the 20th instant, at Cheang Hong Lim Street, on a male Chinese named Tan Kee, and was adjourned till the 28th instant, when the jury returned a verdict of "death from natural causes.
  2. On the 28th instant, at the Sepoy Lines, on the body of a Frenchman named Louis Angoste Chapdelaine, when the jury returned a verdict of "accidental drowning."

 

STRAITS TIMES, 27 March 1884 (2)

THE following inquests have been held by Dr. J. C. Mugliston, Coroner:---

  1. At the Sepoy Lines, on the 12th, and adjourned till the 26th inst., on the body of a male Chinese named Lee Ah Nan.  Verdict, culpable homicide amounting to murder against Lieow Eng Chew.
  2. At the same place on the 26th instant, on the body of a male Chinese name unknown.  Verdict, found drowned.

3.   At the same place, on the 26th inst., on the body of a male Chinese named Chong Ah Kiew.  Verdict, culpable homicide amounting to murder against Choo Geok, Lim Hoh Swee, Lim Quay Hong, Lim King Heng, Lim Weng Sing and Lim Chng.

4.  At the same place, on the 16th inst., on the body of a female child name unknown.  Verdict, found dead.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 29 March 1884 (2)

AN inquest was held on the 21st instant, by Dr. Mugliston, coroner, at the Pulo Obin sea beach, on a male Chinese named Moey Chew.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

TWO Inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston Coroner.

1st on the 23rd instant, on a female Chinese named Heng Ah Noh, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "accidental death."

2nd, on the 24th inst., on a male Chinese name unknown, at Pulo Brani.  Verdict, "found drowned."

   HIS HONOR the Acting Chief Justice and a Special Jury, composed of Messrs. James Miller (foreman,) H. F. Maack, W. Menke, J. C. F. George, C. Dunlop, M. Behr and J. Finlayson, were engaged the whole of last Tuesday in the trial of a Burmese named Oung Doon for the Waterloo Street murder.  The Attorney General prosecuted, and Mr. J. P. Joaquim was assigned for the defence.  The Jurors acquitted the accused of the charge of murder, but convicted him on the second count, of culpable homicide not amounting to murder.  The Acting Chief Justice sentenced him to penal servitude for life.

   HIS HONOR the Acting Chief Justice and a Special Jury, (Mr. G. T. Addis foreman), were last Wednesday in the trial of Slayman, a Javanese, for the murder of the Italian Consul's syce in October last.  The Attorney General prosecuted, and Mr. J. D. Vaughan was assigned for the defence.  The prisoner was acquitted and discharged.

   THE following inquests have been held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner:---

  1. At the Sepoy Lines, on the 12th, and adjourned to the 26th inst., on the body of a male Chinese named Lee Ah Nan.  Verdict, culpable homicide amounting to murder against Lieow Eng Chew.
  2. At the same place on the 26th instant, on the body of a male Chinese name unknown.  Verdict, found drowned.
  3. At the same place, on the 26th inst., on the body of a male chinese named Cong Ah Kiew.  Verdict, culpable homicide amounting to murder against Choo Geok, Lim Hoh Swee, Lim Quay Hong, Lim Kim Heng, Lim Weng Sing and Lim Chng.
  4. At the same place, on the 16th inst., on the body of a female child name unknown.  Verdict, found dead.

 

STRAITS TIMES, 7 April 1884 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner:---

1st. On the 5th instant, at the Sepoy Lines, on a male child, name unknown.  Verdict, "found dead."

2nd. On the 6th instant, at the Sepoy Lines, on a male German named Simon Christiansen.  Verdict, "accidental death."

 

STRAITS TIMES, 28 April 1844 (2)

THE following Inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner.

   On the 26th inst., on a male Chinese, name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

   On the 26th inst., on a male Kling named Gopaloo, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "death from alcoholic poisoning."

   On the 26th inst., on a male chinese named Lee Kit, at the sepoy Lines, and adjourned till 28th inst.  Verdict, "accidental drowning."

   On the 27th inst., on a male Chinese, name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 12 April 1884 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner:---

1st.   On the 5th instant, at the sepoy Lines, on a male child, name unknown.  Verdict, "found dead."

2nd.   On the 6th instant, at the Sepoy Lines, on a male German named Simon Christiansen.  Verdict, "accidental death."

   A FATAL accident occurred on board the German ship Decima, in the roads, on Saturday.  A seaman named Christiansen fell down the hatchway into the hold and was instantly killed.  The master of the vessel, probably ignorant of the law, was about to have him buried, but the police prevented the burial, and an inquest was held last Sunday by Dr. Mugliston, the jury returning a verdict of "accidental death."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 1 May 1884 (2)

THE following Inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner.

   On the 26th inst., on a male Chinese name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

   On the 26th inst., on a male Kling named Gopaloo, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "death from alcoholic poisoning."

   On the 26th inst., on a male Chinese named Lee Khit, at the Sepoy Lines, and adjourned till 28th inst.  Verdict, "accidental drowning."

   On the 27th inst., on a male Chinese name unknown, at the Sepoy Lines.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

   AN inquest was held on the 29th inst., at the Sepoy Lines, by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, on a male Chinese, name unknown. Verdict, "accidental death."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 5 May 1884 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, on the 2nd inst., at the Sepoy Lines:---

1st.  On a male Chinese name unknown.  Verdict, "found dead."

2nd. On a male Bengalee named Poeh-keale.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 7 May 1884 (2)

THE coronial enquiry into the circumstances attending the death of Mr. Johs Leesen, who was found dead in his room on the morning of 26th ultimo, resulted in a verdict of death from natural causes, the deceased having died from pulmonary apoplexy.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 28 May 1884 (2)

The following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, on the 26th instant, at the Sepoy Lines:---

1.---On a male Chinese name unknown.  Verdict.---"Found dead."

2.---On a female Chinese named Low Ah Jit.  Verdict.---"Accidental death."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 30 May 1884 (2)

THE following Inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, at the Sepoy Lines:---

1st.  On the 28th inst., on a male Chinese named Tan Tee.  Verdict, accidental death.

2nd. On the 29th inst., on a male Chinese named Wee Hood.  Verdict, accidental death.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 4 June 1884 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, on the 26th instant, at the sepoy Lines:---

  1. On a male chinese, name unknown.  Verdict.---"Found dead."
  2. On a female Chinese named Low Ah Jit.  Verdict.---"Accidental death."

THE following Inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, at the Sepoy Lines:---

1st.  On the 28th inst., on a male Chinese named Tan Tee.  Verdict, accidental death.

2nd. On the 29th inst., on a male Chinese named Wee Hood.  Verdict, accidental death.

THOSE who dwell in Buddoh District are in a state of excitement engendered by the supposed attack of a tiger on a Malay man.  It appears that on Thursday a Malay man was walking through the jungle, when a tiger fell upon him and killed him; but did not carry off the body.  The corpse was found by some passers-by, who examined it, and came to the conclusion that a tiger had struck and bitten the man and caused his death, which must have been instantaneous.  Our informant states that there was much excitement over the event; but the people were unwise to remove the body, for in all probability the tiger would have returned at night-fall and carried off his prey.

   A FATAL accident occurred on Saturday forenoon on board the s.s. Atholl, lying at New Harbour Docks Company's wharf.  Mr. G. J. D"Souza, an employee of the Dock Company, was on board the Atholl superintending the coolies employed in transhipping cargo from the Ascalon to the Atholl, when going near the hatch, he was knocked down the hold by a sling-full of cargo being swung on board by the winch-crane.  He was picked up in an unconscious state, and Dr. Tripp, who was in the Dock Company's premises, was called in but pronounced the case hopeless.  The unfortunate man was at once sent to the hospital, but died almost immediately after his arrival.  At half-past 7, an inquest was held by Dr. Mugliston, coroner, and after the body had been viewed by the jury, it was handed over to the relatives of the deceased for burial.  The inquest was resumed yesterday forenoon, when a verdict of accidental death was returned.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 6 June 1884 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, at the Sepoy Lines:---

1st.  On the 4th instant, on a male Kling name unknown.  Verdict, "found drowned."

2nd. On the 5th instant, on a male Chinese named Leong Ah Soo.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 11 June 1884 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, at the Sepoy Lines:---

1st.  On the 4th instant, on a male Kling name unknown.  Verdict, "found drowned."

2nd. On the 5th instant, on a male chinese named Leong Ah Soo.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 21 June 1884 (2)

THE following inquests were held on the 20th instant, by Dr. Mugliston, coroner:---

1.---At the Sepoy Lines, on a Chinese, name unknown.  Verdict, death from natural causes.

2.---At the Sepoy Lines, on a male Chinese named Lim Ah Fong.  Verdict, death from natural causes.

3.---At Trafalgar Estate, on a Javanese child named Pyano.  Verdict, found drowned.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 25 June 1884 (2)

See Straits Times, 21 June 1884, nos. 1, 2 and 3.

AN Inquest was held on 22nd inst., at Sepoy Lines by Dr. Mugliston, H.M.'s Coroner on a male Malay child named Camise.  Verdict: death from hydrophobia.

AN inquest was held by Dr. Mugliston H.M.'s Coroner, on the 23rd inst., at the Sepoy Lines, on a male Chinese, name unknown.  Verdict: death from natural causes.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 2 July 1884 (1)

Coroner's Bill.

(2)

NEWS OF THE WEEK.

Two inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, H.M.'s Coroner on the 25th instant, at the Sepoy Lines:---

  1. On a female Malay named Mar Nona.  Verdict, "found drowned."
  2. On a male Chinese named Ng Ah Wat.  Verdict, "death from natural causes."

AN inquest was held by Dr. Mugliston, H.M.'s Coroner, on a male Chinese named Chan Tek Lee, on the 1st instant, at the Pauper Hospital.  Verdict. "Suicide by drowning."

ANOTHER case of death from hydrophobia.  A native in the Havelock Road died at 5 p.m. yesterday in the General Hospital from the effects of a bite from a dog who bit him two months ago.  The cause of death is stated to be hydrophobia.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 16 July 1884 (2)

PENANG

THE Penang Times reports the suicide of a Mr. J. V. Melsom, a surveyor at Penang, who shot himself on the 2nd July.

  A European named Gunther, in the service of the Perak government committed suicide in a brothel in Campbell street on the 4th of July.

   THREE Inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, H.M. Coroner at the Sepoy Lines.

  1.  On 10th instant, on a male Chinese name unknown.  Verdict "Death from natural causes."
  2. On 10th instant, on a male Chinese named Ng Whay Tone.  Verdict "Accidental death."
  3. On 11th instant on a male Chinese named Lee Eng See.  Verdict "Death from opium poisoning."

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 27 August 1884 (6)

Government Gazette, - Inquests without Jury, etc.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 2 October 1884 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner.

1st.  On the 28th instant, at sepoy Lines, on a male chinese named Tan Soon Leong; verdict "accidental death."

2nd.  On the 28th instant, at Sepoy Lines, on a male Chinese named Yeo Thean Soo; verdict "death from natural causes."

3rd.  On the 29th instant, at the Lunatic Asylum, on a male Chinese named Tan Bing Loon; verdict "death from natural causes."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 4 October 1884 (17)

The Coroner's Bill.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 18 October 1884 (2)

THE following inquests were held by Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, on the 10th inst., at Sepoy Lines:--

1st.  On a male Bengallee named Cupamula.  Verdict, "accidental drowning."

2nd. On a male chinese named Fong Mun Cheong.  Verdict, "accidental drowning."

3rd.  On the 25th Sept. on a male Chinese named Chim Kinn Doo, and was adjourned till 11th inst.  verdict "accidental death."

4th.  On the 11th inst. on a male Chinese named Ong Leong Seng.  Verdict. "Accidental death from burning."

1st.  On the 12th inst., at Sepoy Lines, on a male Boyanese child named Awang, and was adjourned till the 15th inst.  Verdict, "culpable homicide not amounting to murder against Kristnapullay."

2nd.  On the 14th inst., at No. 15 Church Street, on a male Chinese named Aiy Whatt, and was adjourned till the 15th inst.  verdict, "suicide by hanging."

   A FATAL accident from careless driving of a bullock cart occurred on Monday morning at Teluk Ayer.  The child of a Boyanese syce was in the street, unknown to its mother, playing near the drain, when a bullock cart came along, the driver not attending to his business carefully, and knocked down and ran over the child, the wheel passing over its head and crushing in the skull, causing instant death.  A policeman arrested the carter, while the body of the dead child was taken to the dead-house, where an inquest was held by Dr. Mugliston.  The inquest was concluded yesterday, when the jury returned a verdict of culpable homicide not amounting to murder against the carter.  He will be brought before a police Magistrate for formal committal for trial.

   On Tuesday afternoon, a Chinaman brought to the police station a report of a death in a house in Church Street, stating that death had resulted from a sore hand.  Inspector Luke at once went to inquire into the actual cause of death, when he found that the man had hung himself, and though he had been cut down, the rope was still round his neck; moreover, the inmates of the house were just about to bury him.  The Inspector put a stop to the burial, and informed Dr. Mugliston, the coroner, who empanelled a jury to view the body, and an order for burial was then given.  The Inspector took into custody the man who had the report on a charge of giving false information concerning the cause of death.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 25 October 1884 (10)

Coroner's Ordinance amendments.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 1 November 1884 (1)

Coroner's Ordinance passed.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 8 November 1884 (9)

Passing of Coroner's Bill.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 26 January 1885 (2)

AN Inquest was held on the 25th inst., on a female child, name unknown, at Sepoy Lines, before Dr. Mugliston H.M.'s Coroner.  Verdict found dead.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 7 February 1885 (2)

An inquest was held on the 6th instant, on a male European named Walter Andrews, at Sepoy Lines, before Dr. Mugliston, coroner.  Verdict, "accidental death."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 19 February 1885 (6)

AN inquest was held on the 15th inst., at the Sepoy Lines, before Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, on a male Chinese, name unknown.  Verdict, death from natural causes.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 16 March 1886 (2)

An inquest was held at the Sepoy Lines on the 14th inst., before Dr. Mugliston, Coroner, on a male Javanese named Abdullah.  Verdict, "accidental death."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 7 June 1886 (2)

AN Inquest was held on the 6th inst. on a male Chinese named Gah Ah Gin, at the Criminal Prison, before Dr. Mugliston, H.M.'s Coroner.  Verdict, death from natural causes.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 7 July 1886 (2)

An inquest was held on 6th instant, on a male Chinese named Yee Ah Pah at Sepoy Lines, before Dr. Mugliston, H.M.'s Coroner.  Verdict---"Accidental death."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 11 October 1886 (2)

AN Inquest was held on the 1st instant on a male Chinese named Lim Sin at Sepoy Lines and was adjourned till the 8th instant, before Dr. Mugliston, H.M.'s Coroner.  Verdict "Death from self inflicted injuries when of unsound mind."

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 11 November 1886 (2)

AN Inquest was held on the 7th instant on a male Chinese named Tow Chiong Seng, at the Sepoy Lines, and was adjourned ill the 10th instant, before Dr. Mugliston, H.M.'s Coroner.  Verdict, Found drowned.

 

STRAITS TIMES WEEKLY ISSUE, 23 September 1889 (4)

Friday, 20th September.

At the inquest yesterday afternoon concerning the death of the Chinaman, Eng Seang, who died in the Hospital on Monday night last from the effects of injuries inflicted with a knife used by one Lo Ah Teo in a house No. 9, Fisher Street, on the morning of the 10th instant, a verdict of culpable homicide amounting to murder was given.  This morning the accused was brought up at the Police Court, and after hearing the evidence, the Magistrates committed Leo Ah Teo for trial upon the capital charge at the next sittings of the Assizes, which commence on the 12th November.  The prisoner, after being cautioned, declined to make any statement, but reserved his defence.

 

THE STRAITS TIMES, 1 November 1889 (2)

AT the inquest held over the body of Alex. Peterson, steward of the ship Lancing, who died from the effects of injuries received through falling into the dry dock at New Harbour, the Coroner returned a verdict of accidental death; and added a rider to the effect "that a rope should be placed round the dock."

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School