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Colonial Cases

1856INSW

Illawarra Mercury, 4 February 1856
INQUEST. -  An inquest was held by our district Coroner, Robert Falder, Esq., J.P., at Bulli, on the 1st instant, upon the body of William Collins, a sawyer, who had recently become a resident there.  The body was found at high water mark upon the beach, his woolen short lying at a little distance.  The face was mutilated and disfigured, probably by sea-birds.  Deceased had been in a very unsettled state of mind for some time, and had escaped from his home the day before he was found.  He was about 30 years of age.  The jury returned a verdict that deceased was found dead, supposed to have been accidentally drowned.

The Sydney Morning Herald, 4 February 1856
FATAL ACCIDENT. - At the beginning of the year Mr. M'Kensey, baker, of Newcastle, was up at Maitland, on his return to Newcastle.  After having passed Hexham a boy from a cottage adjoining the road threw out some loose ashes, in front of the horse, which caused it to bolt.  Mr. M'Kensey was thrown from his horse, and was carried into one of the cottages.  The next morning he was taken in the mail as far as Mr. Watson's, who afterwards drove him in his gig to his own house in Newcastle, where he died on Tuesday last.
A CHILD FOUND BURIED CLANDESTINELY IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND GRAVEYARD. - On Friday an inquest was held at Mr. Joseph Eckford's, Campbell's Hill;, by the coroner, on the body of an infant that had been found the previous afternoon in the Church of England burying ground., West Maitland. After hearing the evidence of Dr. Michael and others, the jury returned the following verdict:- We, the Jury, are of opinion that the deceased child was still-born, and that owing to the death of the child before delivery, which necessitated surgical interference, we think that no blame is attachable to the parents; and those implicated in the burial of the child are alone blameable through ignorance.
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Wednesday, an inquest was held by Mr. Parker, at the Bricklayers' Arms, West Maitland, on the body of Richard Munson, who, in November last, had either slipped ort been thrown from his mare.  She had dragged him a short distance, and struck his head with her hind foot.  Dr. Scott was called in, and found Munson suffering from chronic inflammation of the brain; he attended him, with other medical men, from that time, but Munson sunk gradually, and died on Tuesday last.  The jury returned a verdict of death from injuries received by a fall from his horse.

Empire (Sydney), 4 February 1856
INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Friday, before the Coroner, touching the death of Patrick Donnelly, then lying dead in the benevolent Asylum.  Constable Merrick deposed, that on the morning of the 25th January, he was on duty in York-street, and in his rounds discovered the deceased lying on the ground; he at first thought him asleep, but, upon examination, found that life was extinct; he had the body conveyed to the watch-house, and from thence to the dead-house at the Benevolent Asylum; he did not know the deceased.  Dr. Smith made a post mortem examination of the body; there were no marks of violence externally; the heart was enlarged, with the blood vessels ossified, and the right lung was adhering to the chest throughout; from these appearances, deceased must have been subject to attacks of difficulty in breathing, which was probably the cause of death.  Deceased was between 60 and 70 years of age.  Verdict, died by the visitation of God.

Sydney Morning Herald, 4 February 1856
Case in Brighton involving a German and his son.

Empire (Sydney), 4 February 1856
A CHILD FOUND BURIED CLANDESTINELY IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND GRAVEYARD. - Yesterday afternoon, an inquest was held at Mr. Joseph Eckford's, Campbell's Hill, by the coroner, on the body of an infant that had been found on Thursday afternoon, in the Church of England burying ground, West Maitland.  The witnesses examined were James Robertson, Dr. Michael M'Cartney, and Isaac Robinson.  James Robertson was the graved-digger, and saw that the ground was unbroken on Wednesday, but on Thursday was broken; the Rev. Mr. Chapman ordered the grave to be opened, and about two feet below the surface the grave-digger found a cedar box, and in it the body of a male child.  Dr. M'Cartney examined the body, which was in a state of decomposition.  The head was much bruised, and the bones broken.  The membranes of the brain were ruptured, and the substance of the brain broken up.  Afterwards he found a piece of parietal bone which had been broken off.  The chest and shoulders of the child were well formed, and it appeared a full-formed child and well developed.  The umbilical cord was nearly a foot long, and had not been tied.  He was satisfied from the appearance of the head that violence had been used, but whether before or after delivery he could not say.  Isaac Robinson had a child that was still-born, and buried it in the Church of England burying ground, at dusk, on Wednesday week.  He never had told the clergyman about it; he had three persons with him.  He told the original sexton about it, and asked him to do it. His wife was confined on last Wednesday, and Drs. Scott and Douglass attended her.  He did not see the body, he asked to see it, but the nurse did not allow him to see it.  The witness then went to the burying ground, by direction of the coroner, and identified the grave now opened as the one where he had buried the child. The jury returned the following verdict:- We, the Jury are of opinion that the deceased child was still bon, and that owing to the death of the child before delivery, which necessitated surgical interference, we think that no blame is attachable to the parents; and those implicated in the burial of the child are alone blameable through ignorance.

Empire (Sydney), 5 February 1856
INQUESTS. - An inquest was held on Saturday last, at Darlinghurst Gaol, before Captain M'Lerie, J.P., touching the death of Richard Jones, a convict.  From the evidence, it appears that deceased, when admitted, was suffering from delirium tremens, brought on by intemperance, and continued gradually to get worse until death terminated his sufferings.  Verdict - Died from the effects of intemperance.
  The same magistrate held another inquest, on Sunday last, touching the death of Mrs. Mary Jane Tims, who died on Friday night last.  From the evidence of the medical attendants, Drs. Brown and Daniell, who made a post mortem examination of the body, death was the result of apoplexy, produced by cerebral congestion.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

Sydney Morning Herald, 6 February 1856
INQUEST. - An inquest was held by our district coroner, Mr. Robert Falder, J.P., at Bulli, on the 1st instant, upon the body of William Collins, a sawyer, who had recently become a resident there.  The body was found at high water-mark upon the beach, his blue woollen shirt lying at a little distance.  The face was mutilated and disfigured, probably by sea-birds.  Deceased had been in a very unsettled state of mind for some time, and had escaped from his home the day before he was found.  He was about thirty years of age.  The jury returned a verdict that deceased was found dead, supposed to have been accidentally drowned.

Maitland Mercury, 6 February 1856
CHARGE OF CONCEALMENT OF BIRTH. - Catherine Lewis, alias Conynghame, was charged before the central police court on Wednesday, 30th January, with concealing the birth of a child.  Constable Costello, Dr. Charles Gray, Albert Petit, and Malvina Dearing, were examined as witnesses.  The body was found in the water, near Day's wharf, Pyrmont, on Friday, the 25th, tired up in a shawl, with a large stone in it.  On Sunday evening the prisoner was apprehended.  On Tuesday an inquest was held on the body, at the Benevolent Asylum, and the prisoner was acquitted of child-murder, as the child was proved to have been still-born.  She was then taken on the charge of concealing the birth, and she stated that she had never mentioned the subject to any one.  The two females who lived near her never suspected anything of the kind.  The police magistrate committed her to take her trial at the next Criminal Court, remarking that the prisoner's character stood good against any other charge that had been involved in the case. - Abridged from Empire, Jan. 31

Maitland Mercury, 6 February 1856
ACCIDENTAL DEATH. - On Monday an inquest was held before the coroner, at the Hunter River Hotel, East Maitland, on the body of Nathaniel Goldingham, aged eighty years.  The witnesses examined were John Eckford, Enoch Cobcroft, and Dr. Robert Bolton.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, who had long been a resident of East Maitland, was at the time in very affluent circumstances, but for the last four or five years he had not been in the receipt of any direct income.  On the 2nd January, he was returning from the Post Office to Mr. John Eckford's, where he had resided for some years, two digs which were fighting ran between his legs, and threw him down. Dr. Bolton visited him on the 5th January, and found that the thigh bones was fractured; the left knee was also sprained.  Being a very old man he had very little hopes of his recovery.  Goldingham died from exhaustion on Sunday evening, about eleven o'clock.  The jury returned a verdict that deceased had died from injuries received by a fall caused by dogs, and they would call the attention of the authorities to the nuisance of dogs roaming at large about the streets of Maitland.
  SERIOUS CASE. -On the 18th December last Mary Robertson was assaulted at Coolie Camp, and she lodged an information that she had been assaulted with intent, by one James Horrigan.  A warrant was at the time issued for the apprehension of Horrigan, but he having absconded, has not as yet been found.  The woman died on Monday afternoon, about two o'clock, but at present it is impossible to state what was the cause of death.  We have been informed that the medical man saw not the slightest scratch on the body, but it has been said that death has resulted from fright.  An inquest was commenced by the coroner yesterday afternoon.

Sydney Morning Herald, 6 February 1856
WINDSOR.
FEBRUARY 4, - INQUESTS. - On Sunday, the 27th ult., an inquest was held before the coroner for the district and a jury, at a hut on the Blacktown Road, on the body of a female named Phoebe Sheppard.  The following evidence s adduced:-
  John Smith deposed that the person with whom the deceased lived called on him on the Friday evening previous, and said she was unwell; he went to her hut and found her unable to speak; her son,, on witness' recommendation, went for a doctor, but whilst he was away the woman died.  The person with whom deceased lived depose that ever since a week before Christmas she had been drinking hard, and on Friday morning she complained of being ill; he came to Windsor to procure some necessaries for her, and on his return found her unable to speak.  Dr. Day made a post mortem examination of the body, but found no marks of violence sufficient to cause death; he was professionally acquainted with deceased, and from what he had seen and known of her, he believed that death had resulted from the effects of excessive intemperance.  Verdict accordingly.
  Another inquest was held on Monday last, the 28th ultimo, at Freeman's Reach, on the body of a child four weeks old, unnamed.  The mother, Mary Ann Thoms, deposed, that the child had been unwell a few days before, that she had given him some aperient medicine; he appeared to get better, and seemed well on the night previous to his death;' on the next morning when she awoke she found the child gasping for breath, and in about three minutes afterwards he was dead.  Dr. Day examined the body, and having found no external; marks of violence, was of opinion, after hearing the preceding evidence, that death had probably occurred from convulsions.  Verdict: Died from natural causes

Sydney Morning Herald, 8 February 1856
INQUEST. - A coroner's inquest was held on Tuesday last, at M'Grath's Hill, on the body of one Charles Kingswood.  From the evidence adduced it appeared that the night previous the deceased had eaten a hearty supper, and went to bed apparently quite well. Shortly afterwards he  sent to his master to say he was dying; was then  seized with fits, and became insensible; Dr. Dawe was  sent for, who coming, applied remedies, but without the desired effect; the deceased having died about six o'clock on the morning of the day of the inquest.  Dr. Day gave evidence that the deceased had, in his opinion, died from epilepsy.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

Empire (Sydney), 9 February 1956
CENTRAL POLICE COURT.
  Edward Crowden and Julia Crowden were brought up, charge with causing the death of their infant female child, aged about nine months.  Constable Quirk deposed that, last evening, the prisoners, both in a state of intoxication, were proceeding with a dray along the Liverpool-road, past Irishtown, when his attention  was attracted by the scream of the female; upon going up to see the cause, he found her sitting in the dray, and calling wildly for her child; the dray was searched by some bystanders, and the child was discovered suffocated, and quite dead; she had been sitting upon it the whole time; he understood they were on their way to the Murrumbidgee, to a station belonging to Messrs. Clark and M'Leay, in whose employ they are; he had taken charge of the dray and all other property found with the prisoners.  The prisoners, who have another child, about three years of age, were remanded to the coroner's court, to await the inquest to be holden on the body of the deceased infant.

Goulburn Herald, 9 February 1856
CORONER'S INQUEST. - On Monday last, Dr. Waugh, coroner of the town and district of Goulburn, held an inquest on the body of a child seventeen months of age, named Samuel Slater, at the residence of Charles Cowper, Esq., J.P., at Chatsbury.  It appeared from the evidence, that the child fell accidentally into a well, and although promptly rescued by his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Slater, and notwithstanding that every possible remedies were applied, he never rallied, but almost immediately expired.  A verdict of accidental death was returned.

Sydney Morning Herald, 9 February 1856
  On Saturday, the 2nd instant, a little boy, about eighteen months old, named Samuel Slater, whose parents are in the employ of Mr. Charles Cowper, junior, of Chatsbury, about twenty miles distant from Goulburn, fell into a small water hole near the garden, and was drowned.  One of the men on the establishment had been to the waterhole to lift a bucket of water.  Deceased went and returned with him, but afterwards retraced his steps there unperceived, fell in, and lost his life.  The painful task of taking the little fellow out devolved upon his distraught mother - the first woman who saw him, had not power to do so.  Dr. Waugh, the coroner of the district, held an inquest on the body, when a verdict of accidentally drowned was returned.

Empire (Sydney), 11 February 1856
BRUTAL OUTRAGE. - On Tuesday an inquest was held by Mr. Parker, at the school-house, Clifden, on the body of Mary Robinson, a young woman of twenty-three years old.  Although the result was the conviction that death was caused by disease of the lungs, as will be seen, the evidence disclosed was one of the most brutal cases of violence we have heard of.    .  .  .  
  The case must have been very soon brought before the police, as it was stated at the inquest that a warrant was out for Horrigan's apprehension, and on the 21st December, Mary Robinson, by direction of the Police Magistrate, was examined by Dr. Wilton, who found that she had been violated.  On the 22nd of January, Dr. Douglass was called in to attend her, and found her laboring under continued fever, approaching to typhoid; she gradually sunk under the fever, and died on Monday last.  A post mortem examination showed that the lungs were extensively diseased, apparently of long duration, and there were no external marks of injury; nor any internal appearances to show that injury was inflicted by the pressure on her chest. Fright could not have caused her death, nor induced the disease from which she died, Dr. Wilton said. The jury returned a verdict that she came by her death from natural causes, and they added the following rider:
  We record it as our unanimous opinion that the man Horrigan's conduct towards the girl, on the evening he committed the assault on her, was base and cruel.
[Editorial comment follows on the official handling of this case.]

Maitland Mercury, 11 February 1856
  A man named Connolly, was accidentally drowned in crossing the Shoalhaven River in a hollow log, which filled with water.  The deceased at the time was in the boat (if so it can be called) with a lad named Hogan - who fortunately clung to the boat and escaped, but the deceased having confidence in his swimming, made for the opposite bank, and sunk when a short distance of the shore, the distance being too great for him.  Constable Smith on being informed of the circumstance immediately procured assistance, and after several hours dragging, the body was got near sundown, the man having been found about 11 a.m. An inquest was held on the body at Mr. Hyam's Inn, on Tuesday following,   Verdict accidentally drowned in crossing the Shoalhaven River.  Constable Smith deserves much praise for his perseverance in recovering the body, and cannot be too highly lauded for his exertions in this sad catastrophe.  - AN OBSERVER.

Sydney Morning Herald, 12 February 1856
SUDDN DEATH.  - On Thursday afternoon a man named Henry Fowler Guise, formerly a stockman on the Lower Castlereagh, but who has recently resided in West Maitland, died quite suddenly.  Guise had just drawn up a bucket of water from the well, and complained of a feeling of sickness; he sat down by his wife, but in a few minutes suddenly fell backwards as if in a faint.  Dr. Scott was sent for, and was on the spot in a few minutes, but Guise died directly after his arrival.  He had for a few days previously complained of stiffness in his chest, and a feeling of sickness, but had not seen a medical man.  An inquest was held on the body yesterday by Mr. Parker, and a verdict returned of death from natural causes.

Sydney Morning Herald, 15 February 1856
DEATH OF MR. THOMAS BARTIE. - An inquest was held on Monday, by Mr. Parker, at Rock Bank, on the body of Thomas Bartie.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had been in the habit of frequenting "Goffin's House," which he generally left in a state of intoxication, and it appeared that on this occasion the unfortunate man was making his way home, when he walked into a waterhole, about ten inches in depth, where he fell down on his face, and being drunk was unable to extricate himself.  The jury returned a verdict that the deceased Thomas Bartie came by his death by suffocation, by drowning, when under the influence of drink.; adding a rider to the following effect: at the same time we are bound to call the attention of the authorities to the fact that a man named George Goffin keeps an improper housed, and is well known to sell spirits without a licence, on the property of the deceased.
THE CASE OF MNARY ROBINSON. - Further information.
The Goulburn Herald, 16 February 1856
DEATH FROM DISEASE OF THE HEART. - On Wednesday an inquest was held by Mr. Parker, at Narrowgut, on the body of Charles Willowby.  It appeared from the evidence of his wife, George Tickle, and Dr. Getty, that some time back Willowby injured himself by lifting a heavy log, and was for some years under the treatment of Dr. Getty from time to time, for disease of the heart.  On Tuesday he was taken ill while working in the field, and sent for his wife; and shortly after she reached him he expired.  The jury returned a verdict that he died from disease of the heart.

Empire (Sydney), 18 February 1856
DEATH FROM DELIRIUM TREMERNS. - On Tuesday an inquest was held by Mr. Parker, at the Hospital, on the body of Thomas Cridenton.  It appeared from the evidence that Cridenton, a settler at Bolwarra, had been living unhappily for some time, his wife having left him, and he had then given way to drinking to excess.  On Friday last, after he had been drinking for three weeks, he was taken in a cart to the hospital, suffering terribly from delirium tremens; every effort was used to save his life, but he died on Monday.  The jury returned a verdict of - Died from delirium tremens.

Empire (Sydney), 21 February 1856
HUNTER'S RIVER. - The Attorney-General will do well to peruse the evidence given on an Inquest held at Clifden, Hunter's River, on the body of Mary Robinson, aged 23, who died of diseased lungs, but whose death seems to have been precipitated) whether for a week, a month, a year, will of course for ever remain a secret) by the brutality of one Horrigan.  Blame is attached to Major Crummer for not using proper diligence in apprehending this ruffian before the poor girl died.
BRUTAL MURDER AT BOTANY. - On Tuesday night last, a brutal assault was committed at Botany on the person of Deborah O'Donnell, by her husband James O'Donnell, the result of which was that the former, in a short time afterwards, died, according to the medical evidence, from the injuries inflicted. The scene of the murder is within the Botany Waterworks Reserve, at about sixty yards to the rear of the Bridge turnpike-keeper's hut, on the New Botany road, within the reserve, and extending up by the side of the swamp, are two slab houses and a cottage, each situated about twenty of thirty yards apart.    .  .  .  
  A magisterial inquiry into the case was held yesterday afternoon, in the cottage of Mr. Warren, in the neighbourhood of which the murder was committed.  From the evidence adduced, and which is subjoined in full together with the medical reports of Dr. Mackellar and Dr. M'Kay, the jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against the prisoner, who was in consequence committed to take his trial at the next sitting of the Criminal Court.  .  .  .  
 Frederick Mackellar, M.D., and surgeon, residing in Sydney, being sworn, handed in a statement of the external appearances, and also of the post mortem appearances of the body of the deceased.  The statement he said was true and the cause of death had been as described therein.
  Charles M'Kay, M.D., and surgeon, Sydney, said he had assisted Dr. Mackellar in making a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased.  He entirely concurred with Dr. Mackellar as to the nature and extent of the injuries received and the cause of death, which was the result of the injuries referred to in the statement handed in by Dr. Mackellar.
  The following is a copy of the medical report of Dr. Mackellar and Dr. M'Kay.
  Post mortem examination on the body of a female lying in a slab hut at the Botany Reserve, this 20th day of February, 1856.
  We found the body of a female, about 36 or 38 years of age, lying on the floor of the hut, and opposite the door.  The upper part of the body naked, as if the clothes had been torn off.  A woollen polka jacket round the body torn, saturated with water, and thickly covered with sand.  The gown was in a similar condition.  The body of chemise off and one of the sleeves turned inside out, but not torn.  The chemise was also saturated with water, and had much sand adhering to it.  External appearances - hair disheveled and matted together, and wet, and full of sand and twigs and bushes, extremities rigid and fixed. Blood and sanguinous discharge from the mouth and nostrils.  Under the left eye, and on the left cheek, the jaw, and on the chin, the skin abraded, with evident marks of severe contusion.  On the right cheek and eye a very severe contusion, with external swelling and extravasated blood, which must have been the result of severe blows before death.  On the left shoulder and arms and hand, severe abrasions and contusions; and on the right shoulder and hand similar marks.  The chest below the right breast presented an ecchymosed spot, about two inches broad, caused by external violence.  In the back, between the shoulders, are several contusions, abrasions, and scratches, which seem to have been caused by dragging the body along a rough surface.  The cellular tissue over the chest anteriorly and posteriorly is emphysematous.  Abrasions on both knees, and skin on the left foot abraded as if it had been trodden on.
  On opening the integuments of the chest extensive extravasations of blood were found on both sides, many of the ribs being broken and lacerating the muscles covering the chest.  On opening the chest ware found effusions of blood; the left pleura penetrated by the ends of the broken ribs, and the lungs lacerated.  The broken ribs were eight in number, the second to the ninth.  On the right side, pleuritive adhesions from previous disease existed.  The lung lacerated by broken ribs.  The second rib is broken and the third to the eleventh are also broken and lacerating the internal lining membrane of the chest.  Many of the ribs on this side are broken in two pieces and the lung torn.  It is my opinion that sudden death was the result of these violent external and internal injuries.
(Signed) FREDERICK MACKELLAR, M.D.

  MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY. -An inquiry was held on Tuesday last, touching the death of James Grindley.  Catherine Grindley, daughter of the deceased, deposed that he had been complaining if illness for the last twelve months, during which time he had drunk very hard.  On Saturday last he had a few glasses of liquor to drink and on the same day he swore against drinking; he went to bed about five o'clock very ill, and complained of his head being very bad; he was afflicted with a severe cough, and spat up a good deal of blood; he lingered till Monday, when he died; he was about sixty years of age; she (witness) had no relations in the colony.  Dr. James Smith made a post mortem examination of the body; the chest and lungs were inflamed, and the intestines rather irritable; the liver presented the appearance usual inn persons addicted to drink; inflammation of the lungs was the cause of death, accelerated by habits of intemperance.  Finding - Death from natural causes.

Bathurst Press, 23 February 1856
MURDER OF AN ABORIGINAL. - A young black-fellow belonging to Mr. Peter M'Kellar of Cragilea was brutally murdered on Wednesday the 8th instant, as is strongly suspected by a Lachlan black, known by the name of Bobandyce.  It appears that the unfortunate deceased who was a native of the Murray, accompanied his master at the time in question to the Carcoar Mill when he met Bobandyce, who decoyed him about half a mile out of town to a spot between the Bathurst and Mount Macquarie Roads where his body was shortly afterwards found, much bruised about the head, apparently as if beaten to death with a nullah nullah.  An inquest was held over the remains, when a verdict of wilful murder was returned, and as suspicion very naturally fell upon Bobandyce, a warrant was issued for his apprehension.  Mr. M'Kellar offering a reward of 2 Pounds for his capture.

Sydney Morning Herald, 27 February 1856
To the Editor of the Sydney Morning Herald.
Sir, - In your paper of the 20th instant, "a magisterial inquiry" is reported to have been held by Major Wingate, touching the death of a man who had fallen into the hold of a ship.   
  Assuming the correctness of that report, I wish to be allowed an opportunity of making some remarks in the case.
  Mr. McKay, who appears to have been sent for, states, in his evidence, that he found the man suffering from concussion of the brain, and prescribed for him accordingly.
  For some reason, which does not appear, a person named Charles Ferdinand Eischler afterwards saw the patient.  He is reported as claiming to be a qualified surgeon, holding a certificate from the college at Merburg, Germany.  He is also reported to have testified to finding the man insensible, from concussion of the brain; but he adds that there was also difficulty of breathing from suffusion of blood into the chest, for which he bled the patient.  No reaction took place.  The jury found that death was caused "by injuries received by accidentally falling into the hold of the ship. No post mortem examination appears to have been made.  .  .  .  
ISAAC AARON.

Maitland Mercury, 27 February 1856
FATAL ACCIDENT AND INQUEST. - On Saturday last 23rd February, an inquest was held before the coroner, on the body of James Beattie, a carrier, about twenty years of age, lately residing at Illalong, on the Wollombi road.  The witnesses examined were Joseph Pinchen, Philip Martin, William Price, Thomas Kerrigan, Alexander NMorris, William Harris, and Ann Beattie.  On Saturday morning Mr. Pinchen was riding into Maitland, and found Beattie lying across the road, dead, with his head cut, and in a large pool of blood.  He was always considered to be a very sober man. -Philip Martin came up with the previous witness, and saw Beattie lying dead, with the pocket of the trousers inside out, and empty; a match box was near him.  There were foot tracks near the body, and there were also tracks of a horse cart coming from Black Creek.  He followed the track to Maitland, and observed it all the way to Campbell's Hill toll bar. - William Price was of opinion that the body had been turned over by some one after the accident had happened. - Thomas Kerrigan, on getting information, rode immediately out, and about six miles from Maitland found Beattie's body lying across the road, and the head completely smashed, as if some heavy substance had passed over it.  He was lying about a foot distance from a pool of blood, but deceased's head was on a line with a wheel track.  He found the left hand trousers pocket hanging out; in the waistcoat pocket there was a penny; in the right waistcoat pocket 1s. 4d., and in the right trousers pocket 19s.  He had no suspicion that Beattie had been robbed. - Alexander Norris had hired Beattie to bring a return load from Maitland to Illalong, and left him taking his loading on Friday evening, quite sober.  The load on the dray was his.  Ann Beattie, the widow of deceased, proved the dray to have been her husband's property. - The jury returned a verdict that the deceased, James Beattie, came by his death by falling off his loaded dray, the wheel of which passed over his head, crushing the same to atoms.  There was no evidence to show how the deceased fell off his dray, whether by accident or otherwise, nor did they suspect that he was robbed on the road.
SUDDEN DEATH. - On Sunday an inquest was held by Mr. Parker, at the Black Horse, East Maitland, on the body of William Bates.  It appeared that Bates, who had been employed as a cook, sometimes at one inn, and sometimes at another, and who was an intemperate man, had been in the hospital, suffering from a sore leg.  He was discharged from the hospital, and was allowed by William Howell, blacksmith, to remain at his place, until he got employment.  On Saturday, after dinner, he sat down behind Howell's, in the paddock, smoking his pipe, when he suddenly fell backward and expired.  Dr. Wilton having given evidence as to the appearance of the body, the jury returned a verdict of death from natural causes.

Empire (Sydney), 29 February 1856
SHOCKING ACCIDENT ON THE SYDNEY RAILWAY. - On Wednesday evening last, between the hours of ten and eleven p.m., the body of a man whose name is unknown, was discovered by one of the Company's engineers transfixed on the guard-iron of the locomotive used on that night for the propulsion of the ballast train, which had for some time past been regularly worked on the line between Sydney and the intermediate stations.  When discovered the unfortunate man was quite dead, and from the state in which the body was found (completely denuded of clothing, and terribly mutilated), there can be little doubt that he must have been dragged for a considerable distance after being struck.  Whether the deceased had staggered on the line in a state of intoxication, or fell asleep in the train's course, or whether the dreadful result was premeditated  as an act of suicide, has not yet transpired, but doubtless further particulars will be elicited at the inquest, which will probably be held in the course of to-day.  The occurrence was first discovered in the vicinity of Homebush; one of the engineers, it appears, had descended from the tender for the purpose of looking after a grease box which had been lost in the neighbourhood, and on approaching the engine, found the deceased in the manner described. The body was of course removed to Longbottom, with the intention of being subsequently conveyed to the Dead-house of the Benevolent Asylum.  The deceased appears to have been a man rather above the middle height, with dark brown hair, and apparently about thirty-eight or forty years of age.

Maitland Mercury, 1 March 1856
SUFFERINGS OF A SHIPWRECKED CREW. - The South American mail brings news of the manner in which the crew of the Enterprise escaped.  The Enterprise was bound from Callao for Queenstown, and left the former place, loaded with guano, on the 26th May.  On the 25th of July she encountered heavy weather, which carried away her rudder, and otherwise damaged her stern that she leaked to such a degree that it was found necessary to abandon her next day.  Accordingly, the whole of the crew and passengers took to the longboat, with the intention of reaching Monte Video, 800 miles distant.  During this perilous voyage, Mrs. Gardner was safely  delivered of a daughter under circumstances of extraordinary privation and hardship which continued without intermission for 14 days - the period these unfortunate people were exposed to tempestuous weather, cold, wet, and their food saturated with  salt water, and for the last day or two no fresh water to drink.
  This, added to the havoc that death was making among their small party - fifteen in all - must have been terrible.  The carpenter, Israel Powell, was the first victim, on the 5th; William Nerie, cook, next; and afterwards, William Thompson, boy.
  Their sufferings arose from drinking salt water, and eventually madness carried them off.  On the 9th of August, the Oriente, Captain Antonio, of and from Valparaiso, bound for Marseilles, fell in with the sufferers at lat. 39 30 S., long, 50 W., took them on board, and treated them with every kindness it was in his power to bestow  On the next day the boy James Ladon died.  On the 14th the Oriente spoke the Corneille, L. Bevan, from Baltimore, bound for Monte Video.  Captain Gardner and his party were transferred to her, and on the 24th of August arrived safely at Monte Video.  At the hospital at this port the boy Richard Oliver died from gangrene in his feet, caused by exposure.  Throughout all this terrible trial, Mrs. Gardner and the child survived, and both are improving in health.

Goulburn Herald, 1 March 1856
SUDDEN DEATH. - CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held at noon last Thursday, by Dr. Waugh, coroner for the town and district of Goulburn, at the Goulburn Hotel, on the body of a man, named unknown.  The jury having been assembled, the coroner addressed them at some length, briefly narrating the facts concomitant with the death of the deceased, in accordance with the information which had been brought to his office.  It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased - a man apparently between forty and fifty years of age - arrived in town on the previous evening by the Yass mail.  He was very ill, and stated that he was afflicted with aneurism of the heart.  Mr. Roberts, with a degree of kindness and benevolence which characterizes his usual course of conduct, gave the poor fellow a bed in the hotel, as he thought it improbable that he could reach Sydney in safety.  On the following morning (last Thursday), he was found dead in his bed.  Mr. Roberts, in ascertaining the fact of his death, searched his pockets, and found in them money to the amount of 5 Pounds 0s. 6d. The jury returned a verdict of death from natural causes, the coroner having clearly explained that aneurism was the cause of death.
A MAN FOUND DEAD IN THE BUSH. - On last Thursday morning, as the district constable of Marulan (Mr. Walker) was travelling in company with Mr. Plumb, of Shelly's Flats, he discovered the corpse of a man about 40 years of age, and shabbily attired.  The unfortunate creature had evidently been dead for a considerable space of time - at least for several weeks.  No fire-arm was found beside him to impress the persons who discovered him with the idea that his existence terminated by suicide; and on search being made, no money or other valuables were found upon the person of the deceased.  Dr. Waugh, coroner for the town and district of Goulburn, held an inquest on the body of the deceased, yesterday.  Dr. A. W. Hanford, being duly sworn, testified that he had made a post mortem examination of the body; he found the deceased lying in the bush about half a mile from the line; he was lying upon his back, with his legs crossed, in an easy position, such as a man would assume when lying down to sleep; the skin of the body was hardened, and the corpse generally in a state of decomposition.  There were no external marks of violence; on removing the scalp, the skull was perfect; witness examined the different cavities, but they were in too great a state of decomposition to enable him to speak as to there having been any pre-existent disease.  From the portion of hair remaining on the scalp, which was partially grey, he must have been a man of about forty of forty-five years of age; his hair had originally been of a light brown colour.  The body was that of a European.  From the general appearance of the body, and from the fact of the body being perfect, witness was not of opinion that the deceased had died by violence.  Robert Walker, district constable at Marulan, deposed that on the pervious forenoon he received information that a man travelling with cattle had discovered the dead body of a man, near the inn; witness went to the place, and there saw the body lying as it was seen and examined by Dr. Hanford; the corpse was lying about 150 yards from Mr. Plumb's inn; witness searched deceased's pockets, and they only contained some twigs, and a quantity of charcoal; witness had not heard of any person having recently been missing, nor had he been able to ascertain the name of the deceased.  Verdict - Found dead, but how the deceased came to his death there is no evidence to shew.

Sydney Morning Herald, 4 March 1856
THE ACCIDENT ON THE TRAMWAY. - In our last week's issue we reported the occurrence of a most serious accident on the Newcastle Coal and Copper Company's tramway.  We regret to announce that although in the first instance hopes were entertained by his medical attendants of his recovery, the unfortunate man expired on Monday morning.  An inquest has not been held.

FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Sunday last a little girl about three years old, daughter of Mr. Philip Cullen, of the Mountain Run, was so severely burned that she survived the accident only a few hours.  It appears that her parents had gone to visit a sick friend, leaving the younger children in charge of the elder ones, and during the absence of the latter the clothes of the unfortunate child caught fire.  Affrighted at the circumstance she ran outside, and the flames being fanned by the motion, she was almost literally roasted before the fire was quenched.  An inquest was held over the body on Monday, before Mr. Busby, and a verdict of accidental death returned.

Empire (Sydney), 4 March 1856
DEATH FROM SKINNING A DISEASED COW. - An old man named William Maloney died on Saturday last from skinning a diseased cow which had died of the disease now prevalent amongst cattle in the Kelso flats.  It appears the unfortunate man had a slight sore upon one of his hands, through which the virus of the disease was communicated, and a swelling of the arm instantaneously took place, accompanied by discoloration.  Mr. Busby was called in to administer, but medical aid was of no avail, mortification ensued, and a few days afterwards he breathed his last.

Goulburn Herald, 8 March 1856
FATAL ACCIDENT. - As Mr. A. Levy was driving into town on Sunday, the 2nd inst., about a mile from Queanbeyan, he observed a man stretched alongside the road, and apparently in a dying state, having been thrown from his horse.  The man was in so dangerous a state, that Mr. Levy made at once to the Chief Constable, who proceeded to the place with Dr. Hayley.  The poor fellow, when examined, was found to be literally smashed to pieces; his head was wounded, his ribs broken, his shoulder dislocated, and several severe contusions on the body.  A bottle was found smashed in his pocket, a portion of which had penetrated his right side.  He was removed into town; but died on Tuesday morning, the 4th inst.  An inquest was held by A. Morton, Esq., coroner for the district, and a jury of twelve, when a verdict was returned, that George Smith came by his death from a fall off his horse on Sunday, the 2nd instant, while proceeding from Queanbeyan to Duntroon.

Bell's Life in Sydney, 6 March 1856
DREADFUL ACCIDENT. - On Thursday evening as some men were blasting in a sewer, in the neighbourhood of Hunter-street, they entered the shaft just as the fuse had caught the powder, when terrible to relate, two of the party were forced by the power of the explosion up the cavity into the air, and on falling were nearly dashed into atoms.  The unfortunate sufferers were immediately taken to the Infirmary, where every care and attention is being bestowed upon them. They are very fine young men and in the prime of manhood.

Goulburn Herald, 8 March 1856
CHILD DROWNED. - On Thursday an inquest was held by Mr. Parker, at the Traveller's Inn, Wollombi, on the body of Thomas Little. It appeared that the child, who is about six years of age, had been sent by its parents to the creek for water, and staying longer than usual, his father went in search of him, when he found the deceased had fallen in, and was drowned.  Mr. M'Cartney examined the body, and saw no marks of violence upon it, and was of opinion that the child died from suffocation by drowning.  The jury returned a verdict of Found drowned, but how the child fell into the creek, we have no evidence to shew.

Goulburn Herald, 21 June 1856
SYDNEY.
MELANCHOLY CASE OF DROWNING. - The log-book of the whaling brig Packet, reports the death of Capt. Nixon in the following terms:-
  The captain was seen by the mate (Mr. Gold) to strike a whale about three-quarters of a mile distant; the boat of the second mate was close to the captain's boast, the chief mate, directly after the fish was struck, saw two whips, or signals to close, flying in the boat of the second mate.  On pulling up, the latter told him the captain was gone.  On asking how, he was told that the line fast to the harpoon had dragged him out of the boat.  The man in the waist-boat had hold of the line, as well as the crew of the captain's boat, - the line was hauled in as quickly as possible, to see if the captain might be entangled in it, but he had sunk at once. Captain Nixon had been walking forward after the whale was struck, and while the line was running out, which fouling, capsized the boat, and dragged him with it in the knot.

Goulburn Herald, 12 April 1856
CORONER'S INQUESTS.
SUDDEN DEATH. - On Saturday last, an inquest was held at Taylor's Creek, by Dr. Waugh, the coroner of the district, on the body of Helen Comfrey.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was acting as hut-keeper on a sheep station on which her husband was employed as shepherd.  On the morning of the 3rd instant, Mrs. Comfrey was found dead in the watch-box at the hurdles.  Verdict - Died from apoplexy.
FATASL ACCIDENT. - An Inquest was held on the 6th instant, at the Goulburn Hospital, on the body of Henry Stephenson, then and there lying dead.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was, and had for a long time been, in the employ of Mrs. Simons, Rhyanna; on Saturday he was in town, and drinking; he got on his dray to drive home, when, in consequence of being drunk, he fell off, and the wheel of the dray passed over his chest, breaking every rib in his body.  He was taken to the Goulburn Hospital, where he expired after lingering two hours in shocking agony, although everything possible was done to alleviate his sufferings.  Verdict - accidental [Long editorial comment: "This is another awful instance of the effects of intemperate habits.  .  .  .  ]
DAETH BY DROWNING. - An Inquest was held at the Commercial Hotel on last Tuesday evening, on the body of Conlin Sinclair, a little boy eight years of age, and who lost his life under the following circumstances:-
 John Smith deposed, that the deceased was his nephew, and had been living with him during the last five weeks.  He saw the lad alive last, about three o'clock that afternoon; her saw him dead two hours afterwards.  Every effort was made to restore animation but ineffectually; witness never gave the deceased permission to go bathing.  Frederick Munoz son of Mr. Munoz, tailor, said that he was driving a horse and cart with a water-cask in it, to get a cask of water at the pump for his father; the deceased and another boy named Cooper were with him; when they reached the bridge near the pump, Cooper and the deceased got down for the purpose of having a swim in the Mulwarree Ponds.  Mr. Peard's son was pumping at the time, and just as witness had half filled his cask, the boy Cooper ran up and told witness that young Sinclair was drowned.  Mr. Cammuck, carpenter, ran to the spot, undressed himself and jumped into the water; he succeeded in recovering the body which was taken to the Commercial Hotel.  Dr. Waugh was promptly in attendance, and exerted his medical skill to restore animation, but his efforts were fruitless, the vital spark having fled. The Jury returned a verdict of accidentally drowned.

Sydney Morning Herald, 18 April 1856
GOULOBURN.
[FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.]
  On Sunday an inquest was held before R. Waugh, Esq., at the Hospital, on the body of Henry Stevenson, better known as "Long Harry."  Deceased was in the employ of Mrs. Simon, of Rhyana, and met his death on Saturday afternoon by being run over by a dray which he had in charge.  It appeared that on that afternoon deceased and a man called [Henry] Cox had left Goulburn, the former was sitting in front, and Cox in the middle of the dray; they were both drunk, and as deceased was lighting his pipe he fell off, and the wheel passed over him.  The poor fellow was sensible when received into the hospital, but before the dressing of his wounds was completed he died.  The jury returned a verdict of - Accidental death. [See also Empire (Sydney); "generally known as "Black Harry."]

Freeman's Journal (Sydney), 12 April 1856
THE BOTANY MURDER CASE.
.  .  .    The result of the proceedings was the following written verdict of the jury - The jury find James O'Donnell guilty of the murder of Deborah O'Donnell, his wife; but the jury strongly recommend him to mercy on account of his previous good conduct, and add as a ride that Rowland Warren's and Joshua Yeoman's conduct was disgraceful and unmanly in the extreme in not interfering and thus preventing the disgraceful consequences that resulted.

Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong), 14 April 1856
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Saturday evening, a man named Piper, while on his way from Brown's Mill, Dapto, to his own residence, in the neighbourhood of Marshall Mount, fell out of his dray,  and so severely injured was he, that he died shortly afterwards.  A Coroner's inquest will, of course, be held on the body as soon as convenient, when the facts that led to this fatal result will be elicited and recorded by us in our next.

Bathurst Free Press, 16 April 1856
COWRA.
  A shepherd in the employ of Mr. Tooly, was found dead in the bush a few days ago.  It would appear that he took his sheep out in the morning, and did not return till brought home dead.  I have not as yet heard, whether an inquest was held on his remains, or what caused his death, but when in full possession of particulars relating to his death, I will forward them for publication.

Empire (Sydney), 17 April 1856
SUDDEN DEATH. - On Friday, a man of the name of Levene, died suddenly at Higgin's, Mount Keira Hotel.  He was a stranger in the district, having a few days before brought, with a team of bullocks and dray, some goods for a new comer, we believe, from Torrens Park.  If we are correctly informed he had sold the team, and was drinking at the house above named.  He had gone into the yard, and was found lying outside of the water-closet.  Medical assistance was sent for, but before the doctor arrived, he was dead.  On Saturday, a coroner's inquest was held on the body, when a verdict was given, Died in a fit of apoplexy, brought on by excessive drinking.

Empire (Sydney), 18 April 1856
SHOCKING SUICIDE IN ARGYLE-STREET.
  An act of self-destruction of a most determined character was committed yesterday afternoon, by a female named Cooper, who threw herself from the central bridge over Argyle-street to the road beneath, and was instantaneously killed.  It is stated that the unhappy woman had only recently arrived in Sydney, having left her husband, who is at Yass, in consequence of his ill-treatment.  She was lodging at Miller's Point, and had fallen into a state of despondency in consequence of having been unable to obtain employment.  For some time, she had been endeavouring to earn her livelihood by selling bonnets sand caps in the city.  At two o'clock yesterday afternoon she went out for the purpose of seeking employment; about three, she was seen standing upon the Cumberland-street bridge, which crosses the cutting in Argyle-street at an elevation of between 50 and 60fet.  She placed her umbrella against the paling that serves as a parapet to the bridge, and then deliberately clambered over the fence and precipitated herself headlong into the road below.  The body was picked up immediately, and conveyed to the surgery of Dr. M'Kellar, where it was seen by Dr. M'Kay, who at once pronounced life extinct.  It is remarkable that, although the concussion from such a fall must have been tremendous, the body was not greatly disfigured.  It is painful to add, that an infant aged twelve months, is deprived of a mother by the calamity.
  The unfortunate woman was respectably dressed, having on a black straw bonnet, linen print gown, and a plaid shawl; she was about thirty-five years of age, and of fair complexion, with brown hair.  There were found upon her person a portmanteau containing the sum of 11s. 1d.l, a pair of gloves, and a pocket handkerchief.  She wore a wedding ring and keeper.
  The body has been removed to the dead-house, near the Water Police Office, to await an inquest which will be held this morning.

Maitland Mercury, 24 April 1856
SUDDEN DEATH. - An inquest was held by Mr. Parker, on Tuesday, at Mr. Hickman's house, Belvedere, on the body of Lydia Price.  It appeared that Mrs. Price, who had been for many years a resident in Maitland and the neighbourhood, died from disease of the heart.  She and her husband, William Price, had visited Mr. Hickman's family for the day, on Sunday, and Mrs. Price complained of feeling very cold, and at length laid down on the bed, dressed.  She took a little spirits and water, once or twice during the day, and still complained.  She again laid down on the bed, in her clothes, about eight o'clock in the evening.  About nine o'clock her husband went into the room, undressed, and went to bed, and was then shocked to find his wife cold and dead.  No sounds of pain or struggling had been heard in the adjoining room, where the family were all sitting.  The jury returned a verdict of died by the visitation of God.
INQUEST. - On Monday an inquest was commenced by Mr. Parker on the body of Ann Latimer, supposed to be poisoned.  The inquest was adjourned till Wednesday afternoon, to allow time for the medical men to make the necessary examination.  The inquest was commenced at the house of James Elfick, Sawyer's Gully, Wollombi Road; the adjourned inquest was held at Mr. Keogh's Union Inn, Rutherford.  Elfick and his wife were apprehended, pending the termination of the inquest.

Sydney Morning Herald, 24 April 1856
DEATH FROM DISEASE OF THE LUNGS. - On Saturday, the 19th instant, an inquest was held before Mr. Parker, the coroner, at West Maitland, on the body of Denis Grady.  It appeared that deceased, who was a man of seventy years of age, but not infirm, was brought in a cart to Mr. Cleary's, the Harp of Erin, the evening of the 18th instant, by his son, who then went to seek medical assistance.  About a month previously, deceased had complained of pain, in the breast, shoulders, and neck, but had refused to obtain medical advice until the 18th instant, when his son brought him for that purpose into Maitland.  He was found by Dr. M'Cartnet6 suffering great pain, and difficulty of breathing, making constant efforts to expectorate.  The symptoms plainly showed severe inflammation of the lungs, which must have been very rapid.  His life might have been prolonged by early medical treatment.  He died on the morning of the 19th.  Deceased was addicted to intemperance.  The jury returned a verdict of Death from natural causes, accelerated by drunkenness.

Sydney Morning Herald, 25 April 1856
PARRAMATTA.
INQUEST. - An inquest was held at Newlands, before Mr. C. B. Lyons, on view of the body of Elizabeth Brown, wife of William Brown, a gardener in the employ of Mr. Oakes.  From the evidence of Dr. Bassett it appears that he was called to see deceased on the morning of the day that she died, and the doctor having observe sundry bruising, black eyes, &c., felt it his duty on hearing of her death to inform the coroner.  At the inquest, however, Dr. Bassett gave it as his opinion that death did not ensue from the bruises, but from delirium tremens, from constant habits of drunkenness.  A verdict was returned accordingly.
  Another inquest was held at Mr. Patrick Scully's, of the Harrow Inn, Church-street, on view of the body of Henry Read, a bullock driver, about fifty years old, in the employ of Mr. Purchase, of this town.  The deceased had been in Parramatta with a heavy load of timber.  On returning home to Castle Hill, and about three miles from town, he was sitting on the front part of the carriage, he being intoxicated, when he fell from his seat under the small wheel, which passed over the soft part of his body; the little boy, who was with deceased, did his best to stop the team, but could not do so in time;  and, secondly, the large wheel of the back part of the carriage also passed over him,  The unfortunate sufferer groaned for a few minutes and then died.  The jury returned a verdict that the deceased came to his death from falling from a carriage while in a state of intoxication.

Maitland Mercury, 26 April 1856
CORONER'S INQUEST.  - An inquest was held by the Coroner, Dr. Falder, at Marshall Mount, on Monday, 14th ultimo, on the body of John Piper, and old and respectable tenant of Mr. Osborne.  It appeared that the deceased was going home on Friday from West Dapto riding upon his dray, sitting upon a butter bag.  Near the Post office, Dapto, the dray suddenly fell into a deep rut, and deceased fell backwards, pitching upon his head and shoulders, by which his neck was partially dislocated.  He lingered in great suffering till the following evening. He was 47 years of age, and bore a very good character for sobriety and good conduct in his neighbourhood.   .  . .  Illawarra Mercury, 21st April.

Illawarra Mercury, 28 April 1856
DEATH OF A CHILD BY EATING A POISONOUS HERB. - O)n Monday evening last, two children, a little boy and girl, belonging to a small settler, named Wm. Hancock, residing at Winburndale Creek, were seized with a violent sickness, and, upon inquiry, it was discovered they had been eating the fruit of what is popularly known as the castor oil plant.  Dr. Machattie was immediately sent for, but, notwithstanding the prompt application of the most powerful remedies, the poor little fellow, who was about two years of age, died at one o'clock of the following morning.  The medicines, however, had the desired effect upon the sister, and she is now in a fair way of recovery.  An inquest was held over the body on the following day, before Dr. Bushby, when a verdict in accordance with the facts of the case was recorded, - Bathurst Free Press, April 19.

Sydney Morning Herald, 28 April 1856
SUDDEN DEATH FROM THE EFFECTS OF SOME DELETERIOUS SUBSTANCE. - An inquest was held at the Union Inn, before Mr. Parker, on the 22nd, and by adjournment on the 23rd instant, on the body of An Lattimer, aged 64 years.  It appeared from the evidence of the person wit6h whom she lodged, that about three months ago deceased came from Sydney to reside with her daughter, who was married to a sawyer, named James Elfick, living at Sawyer's Gully, on the Wollombi Road.  After about two months she left them to reside at the house of Elizabeth Barnett, at Bishop's Bridge, stating as a reason that her daughter's place was too small.  At the time of her removal she was not sickly.  She was a very sober woman.  She was separated from her husband, and frequently said that she had her troubles.  On the Thursday before her death, her son, Robert Latimer, brought a message from Mrs. Elfick concerning employment for him.  Deceased then went to her daughter's, her son remaining behind till an answer came from his mother. That afternoon Mrs. Elfiick came as far as the bridge, and her brother having met her, he stated on his return that his mother would come home again next morning by the butcher's cart. This she did not do, and on Sunday morning Mrs. Elfick brought word of her death, saying that her mother had been very poorly all night, asking for drink continually, and that she had given her coffee.  They were apparently on the best of terms.  Deceased was not purged or griped, nor d she vomit at any time during her residence at Bishop's Bridge.
  The medical evidence of Dr. Wigan was to the effect that on the 21st, at his examination of the body of the deceased, no cause of death was apparent, and finding that, in the absence of previous disease, she had been attacked the night before death with vomiting, thirst, and burning pains about the pit of the stomach, the chest, and the throat, he communicated his suspicions to the Coroner; and the inquest having been adjourned, a post mortem examination was performed, when he was first struck with the absence of all decomposition, and then found indications of inflammatory action, extending from the stomach to the smaller intestines.  Judging it necessary, he removed the portions of the stomach and intestines, and subjected them to chemical analysis, in which he was assisted by Mr. F. L. Riley.  The appearances indicated excessive disease, such as might have been expected from irritant poison; but he was unable to detect any deleterious substances.  He did not think the case could be looked upon as one of cholera.  Gastro-enteritis might produce the same appearances, but there would be concomitant fever.  From some indications the disease might have been progressive.  The head was not examined, the appearances in the stomach sufficiently accounting for death, which was caused by disease of the stomach and intestines - produced by what exciting cause could not be said.  Alcoholic drink taken in excess might produce many of the morbid appearances.  Vomiting and purging might carry off any deleterious substances.  The case did not appear one arising from the sudden discontinuance of ardent spirits. The jury returned the following verdict:-
  The deceased came by her death from the effects of a deleterious substance, but what that substance was, in what manner, by whom, or with what intention administered, we have not sufficient evidence before us to determine.  We further add, that, upon due consideration of all the evidence, nothing is adduced whereby to criminate James Elfick or his wife Elizabeth.

Empire (Sydney), 30 April 1856
WATER POLICE COURT.
  Jose Perara, the Chilian sailor, who stands committed for the late murder on board the ship Manuel Monti, was brought up, and again committed to take his trial for stabbing with intent to murder his two fellow-seamen, William Inglis and John Hale.  The examinations were conducted through Mr. F. Rayling, who was sworn as interpreter.  The evidence was similar in every respect, so far as the details of the outrage are concerned, to that given on the inquest in the case of the murdered man Easton alias Jackson, a full report of which appeared in yesterday's Empire.  The only defence offered by the prisoner was, that he was partially intoxicated, and that upon the three men attacking him, he made use of the knife in self-defence.

Maitland Mercury, 1 May 1856
SYDNEY NEWS.
  Today's papers contain detailed particulars of the inquest held on the body of Samuel Jackson, who met his death on board the ship Manuel Monti, by the hands of a Spaniard named Jose Perera.  This morning Jose was again arraigned before the Water Police Magistrate, on a charge of stabbing two other men, named Inglis and Malley, with intent to kill and murder them.

Sydney Morning Herald, 2 May 1856
QUEANBEYAN. SUDDEN DEATH OF CAPTAIN FAUNCE.
An inquest is to be held on the body on Monday, which I will forward you.

Bathurst Free Press, 3 May 1856
CORONER'S INQUEST.  - An inquest was held on Monday week, vat Mr. Durack's Sydney road, on the body of Thomas Green.  From the evidence, it appeared that on the previous morning the deceased, who was at that time unwell, was taken up by the mailman of the Bathurst coach a little above Hartley; he however became so much worse during the journey, that he was obliged to be left at Mr. Durack's, where he died about 12 that evening.  Upon a post mortem examination, he was found to have died from mortification of the bowels, caused by inflammation, from which he must have been suffering for three or four days.  A verdict was returned in accordance with the above facts.  The account which the deceased gave of himself, was, that he was a shoemaker on the Turon where he has a wife and three children.

Goulburn Herald, 3 May 1856
BURNT TO DEATH. - An inquest was held on Friday before Dr. Wilmot, City Coroner, on the body of Mary Simms, who died in the hospital on the previous morning from the effects of a severe burning.  The deceased woman, who was forty-five years of age, was living, at the time of the accident - Tuesday evening last - on South-street, Collingwood, with her husband, who is a mason.  The husband, it appeared, was absent from home for half an hour on the evening in question, and on his return he found the deceased lying with her right arm upon the fire.  She made no effort to get away, and he dragged her from it, and afterwards sent for Dr. Howitt, who advised that she should be sent to the hospital, which was done.  When the husband left the house the deceased had been drinking, but was "not much intoxicated." Dr. Garrard described the wounds to be a severe burn of the right arm and hip, which resulted in death.  The jury returned a verdict of died from a burn accidentally caused while in a state of intoxication.
FATAL ACCIDENT. - A man named Carmody was drowned yesterday morning by falling out of a boat near Shortland's Bluff.  He was partially intoxicated at the time, and his body had not been recovered up to last evening.
MELANCHOLY OCCURRENCE. - About six o'clock yesterday morning, the dead body of a woman and child were found in a gully near the Norfolk Hotel, Easy-street, Collingwood.  They are unknown to the police, but were seen on Sunday forenoon on Easy street.  The water in the gully was about six inches deep, and the child was lying under the mother.  The child was about four months old, and dressed in a white cotton frock.  The woman was about forty-two; hair dark, light brown cotton dress, polka jacket, no bonnet, and boots, but no stockings.  She was about five feet five inches in height.  The bodies were removed to the Norfolk Hotel, where they await a Coroner's inquest.  It is supposed that the unfortunate mother was intoxicated, and staggering into the gully destroyed herself and her offspring.
FATAL ACCIDENT. - A man named Edward Truggin, a married man, met with his death on Tuesday morning, while filling a dray with mullock for a puddling machine, a slip of earth took place and brought his head in contact with the wheel of the dray which caused instantaneous death.  An inquest will be held today.  The accident occurred in Long Gully. - Sandhurst Weekly Adv.

Goulburn Herald, 10 May 1856
SUICIDE. -  District constable Rowan reached Goulburn last Wednesday, from Bungonia, in order to engage the attendance of Dr. Waugh, the coroner, to hold an inquest upon a man name Burke, stated to have committed suicide.  It appears that the deceased was an aged man, and had been in very straitened circumstances recently, owing to an accident which he met with at the diggings.  D. C. Rowan received intelligence of Tuesday night, that the deceased had hanged himself at Mr. W. Nettleton's public house, at Windellima, distant about fourteen miles from Bungonia, and on going to the place, he found the unfortunate Burke a lifeless corpse.
INQUEST ON THE BODY OF CHARLES BURKE. - Dr. Waugh, coroner, having assembled a jury, held an inquest on the body of the deceased on Wednesday, at the Traveller's Rest Inn, Windellima.  William Nettleton, being sworn, deposed, that he saw the deceased for the first time on Saturday last, when he returned from Sydney; the deceased was at his inn, and laboring under the influence of liquor; he remained at the inn up to the day of his death, and during the time he was very keen to get liquor; witness saw him alive for the last time about half-past eight o'clock, last Tuesday morning; he was then sober, and did not appear laboring under the horrors; about half an hour afterwards witness was told that he had hanged himself; he ran round to a side of the stable, and saw the deceased hanging from a spoke in a ladder, which was placed against the outside of the entrance to the hay loft; witness ran to fetch his wife to look at him, and had him immediately cut down, but he was quite dead; he appeared about fifty years of age, and very inform, as from the petition for charity which he was carrying about, it appeared that the deceased had been injured by the falling in of a tunnel at the Turon. Joseph Nettleton, son of the last witness, and a person named Timothy Doran corroborated the above evidence.  The jury returned a verdict that the deceased did feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, kill and murder himself.  It came out in the evidence of Mr. Wm. Nettleton that the deceased had been buried prior to the arrival of the coroner. He had no money found upon his person.

Goulburn Herald, 17 May 1856
FATAL EFFECTS PF INTEMPERANCE- A young woman named Mary Leslie died at Balmain, in the early part of the week, and in the course of the examination at the inquest, Dr. Evans stated that on three different occasions he had attended the deceased for delirium tremens; and that he was of opinion that the deceased died from nervous depression, consequent on the reaction following from the successive use of spirituous liquors.  The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

Empire (Sydney), 19 May 1856
DEATH FROM OVER-FEEDING. - An inquest was held before Mr. Parker, on the 16th instant, on the body of Sophia Unicomb, a little girl, aged two years.  It appeared that the child, after eating heartily at dinner of beef, turnips, and potatoes, and a kind of pumpkin called graino, was playing about for some time by the side of her mother, who was husking corn in a barn.  She commenced crying while there, and her elder sister took her home; her mother followed her in about ten minutes, and found her almost choked.  She could not speak, but pout her hands to her mouth, and screamed loudly.  She had great difficulty in breathing.  Her mother gave her some drink, and put her in a water bath, but after she had been there about five minutes she expired very suddenly, her lips and eyes turning very black.  She had been a health child previously.   Her father, on first observing that she was will, galloped off for Dr. Douglas but she was dead before his return.  Dr. Douglas, having made a post mortem examination, stated that he found the stomach loaded with a quantity of undigested food, chiefly pumpkin and maize, much swollen, the whole of the intestines being much inflated, the death having apparently resulted from the great and sudden accumulation of flatus causing suffocation.  The child had been seen with a cob of corn in her hands whilst in the barn.  The verdict was that the death was caused from the child over-feeding itself with green corn and other vegetables. -Maitland Mercury of Saturday.

Sydney Morning Herald, 20 May 1856
   An inquest was held on Thursday before the coroner, Dr. Waugh, and a respectable jury, on the body of a man who for some time past has been a shepherd in the employ of Mr. Francis Cooper, of Willeroo, near this town.  It appears that the deceased came into town for the purpose of buying a shepherd's dog, that he had drank at various public houses, and did not return the same evening, but slept at the house of one Edward Ordidge, a sausage dealer.  On going to bed he was partially intoxicated.  In the morning he was discovered to be dead, and on his being searched, nothing was found upon him save a three penny piece.  The jury returned a verdict of Died by the visitation of God.

Sydney Morning Herald, 20 May 1856
WINDSOR.
INQUESTS. - On Wednesday, the 14th instant, an inquest was held at the Butchers' Arms, Richmond-road, before the coroner and a jury, on the body of one John Thomas [Streets]. A groom in the employ of Messrs. Burt, Hassan, and Co., then and there lying dead.  It appeared that at the termination of the last day's racing at Windsor, the deceased, being a little excited with drink, was riding furiously on the road, when suddenly he ran against another horseman, and was violently thrown to the ground.  He was taken up, insensible, in which state he remained until his death a few days afterwards.  Dr. Day ascribed the cause of death being apoplexy, from the rupture of a blood-vessel in the brain.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death, caused by being thrown from a horse.
  Another inquest was held on the 13th instant, at Lower Hawkesbury, on the body of a man named John Long, otherwise Campbell, formerly in the employ of Mr. James Singleton, of the Lower Mill.  The deceased was found drowned in the Hawkesbury on the 8th instant.  A verdict was returned of Accidental drowning.

Maitland Mercury, 20 May 1856
SUDDEN DEATH OF AN INFANT. - An inquest was held before Mr. Parker, at the Sportsman's Arms, yesterday, on the body of a female child, three weeks old, unbaptized.  The mother is an immigrant, and had been about nine months in the colony.  The child has appeared unhealthy, and been constantly crying since its birth; its death resulting from natural causes, being apparently of premature birth.  Verdict - died by the visitation of God.
DEATH BY DROWNING. - An inquest was held on Saturday, at the Crown Inn, Anvil Creek, before Mr. Parker, on the body of a man named James Beattie.  The witnesses examined were William Tyson, Samuel Chapman, George Edwards, and Joseph Davis.  It appeared from the evidence that deceased was a carrier, and was taking property to Merriwa from the stores of Messrs. Davis Cohen and Co., Webb and Gorrick, and Solomon, Vladin and Co.  He had two drays with him, and had hired a man named Edwards to drive one of them.  They proceeded as far as Anvil Creek, and stopped there; whilst there they lost their bullocks, and deceased was four days looking for them; during this time he drank a good deal, and spliced a cask of brandy which was on the dray, drew off a quart, and drank the half of it.  Edwards stated that the deceased had not been a day sober since he put his loading on in Maitland.  Deceased had only half a nobbler from Mr. Chapman on the day on which he is supposed to have drowned himself.  Chapman remarking "Your eyes look too wild for me."  Tyson found a smock and cap[ laying close to the water hole,  which was near the public house and recognized it to be Beattie's; upon searching the hole afterwards, Constable Davis found the body of the deceased.  During the examination, the coroner and jury retired to view the water hole, to see whether it would be possible for the deceased to have fallen in whilst taking a drink, but from the steepness of the side, and other holes being easier of access close by, they did not think it was likely.  Dr. Wigan had examined the deceased, and saw no marks of violence on his person; he was of opinion he came to his death by suffocation through drowning.  The jury returned a verdict that the deceased came to his death by suffocation by drowning, and we find that the deceased James Beattie was labouring under the influence of drink at the time, which he procured from a cask of brandy that was on the dray.

Sydney Morning Herald, 22 May 1856
NEWCASTLE.
May 21. - A very horrible discovery was made here yesterday forenoon, the painful interest excited by which is much increased by the mystery which yet attaches to it.  Between the hours of ten and twelve o'clock the body of a male infant, deprived of arms and legs, was found in a street leading to, and adjoining the Queen's Wharf, along which, as is usual at this time, a number of persons were then passing to meet the down river steamers touching at the wharf, on their way to Sydney.  The remains were immediately removed to the dead house at the hospital, and an inquest was held on them in the evening, when the following was shown in evidence:-
  Mr. Evan M'Pherson said that on going down to the wharf, between ten and eleven o'clock, he saw a dog scraping a hole in the ground by the pilot boat crew's hut; having passed on for a short distance, he turned round to observe more particularly what the dog was doing, when he saw him take something out of the hole, which he then supposed was as piece of meat he had buried there; he was returning towards the dog when he heard a voice  say "there was a dog with the body of a child," and on looking again, he found it to be the same substance as the dog had taken from the hole, and which he had not recognized as a body at first, in consequence of its being without limbs; about five minutes had elapsed from the time he had seen the dog until he had returned to the spot, during which the dog had not had time to have eaten the limbs; the hole was on the surface of the road, about fifteen or twenty feet above high water mark.
  Mr. W. T.  Boyce said that at the time already named, on passing near the Government boat shed, he had observed a large dog with the body of a child in his mouth; he immediately told one of those present to protect the remains, and went himself for the police; there was a hole in the soil about forty feet from the body; the hole appeared to have been scratched by the dog; the dog did not appear to have been eating the body, but, apparently, playing with it.  
  Doctor Bowker said he had made an examination of the body, which was that of a full grown male infant; putridity had very considerably advanced; the legs and arms had been removed - the legs about a couple of inches below the hip joint; the stumps did not appear as if cut, but as if broken; there was no appearance of extravasated blood, so that it seemed as if the thighs had been removed after death; the arms were removed close to the body; the separation at the thighs was not so smooth as if they had been removed by a knife, and, apparently, not so rough as if they had been gnawed away; on dividing the scalp, there appeared a considerable effusion of blood over the fore part of the head, between the boned and the scalp; this, from the blood being so loosely coagulated, seemed to have been the effect of violence during life; it might have been caused by blows from a blunt instrument, or from a fall on some hard substance, or during birth.  The doctor then described the other appearances exhibited on his examination, and said that the child seemed to have been newly born; but that although the lungs had floated in water, it was not conclusive that the child had breathed, as putridity would produce the same effect - the latter had advanced so far as to render it doubtful, and might have been in progress for a week or ten days, or even for a fortnight, according to the influence of the weather.
  The jury returned a verdict of found dead, but how death had been produced there was no evidence to show.  The police are endeavouring to trace the circumstances connected with this revolting affair.

Sydney Morning Herald, 27 May 1856
INQUEST. - On Wednesday last, the 19th instant, an inquest was held at Cornwallis on the body of a child six and a-half years old, the son of Henry Power, of that lace, labourer.  It appeared there was a deep water-hole a short distance behind the residence of the parents, and it is supposed the child had on standing on a log over-hanging, fallen in, and was drowned.  His hat was seen floating on the surface of the water by his mother, which led to his discovery.  A verdict was rendered of accidental death by drowning.

Empire (Sydney), 28 May 1856
DEATH FROM EXCESSIVE DRINKING. - A man named Williams was found lying dead at Stony Creek, near Jamberoo, on the morning of the 16th instant.  There were no marks of violence visible on the body, nor was there any indication of disease discovered by the post mortem examination mad by Dr. Falder.  From what was stated in evidence at the inquest, it appeared that deceased had been at the auction of Mr. Clark's dairy stock on the 15th of May, and that he had there partaken freely of overproof rum.  He had not gone far from Clark's place when he fell to the ground, and there lay, it is thought on his face, exposed to the cold during the night of the 15th instant.  Deceased had no relatives in the colony, but it is rumoured that his wife and family have just come to Sydney.  There were 50 Pounds found on the body of the deceased.

Bathurst Free Press, 29 May 1856
CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held by Dr. Busby, on Monday last at the Macquarie Plains, on the body of John Weekes, of Connell, who was killed on Saturday evening buy the over-turning of a dray, in which he was returning home.  It appeared from the evidence, that as the deceased was returning home from Bathurst, after dark in company with his daughter, in such a state of intoxication as not to heed what he was about, and that while, in spite of the remonstrances of his daughter, he was driving in a careless manner, and with more than proper speed. They came to that part of the road, between Bathurst and Maquarie Plains, where there are small creeks running into the Saltwater Creek, he got off the proper track, and from the horse trying to jump a small water course, running into the creek, the dray was completely overturned into the creek, which was dry at that time, throwing the whole weight of the front board of the dray upon the chest of the deceased in such a manner as to prevent his being able to extricate himself, and that upon the daughter's creeping out, at her father's request, she ran for Dr.  West's, the nearest house, where she could obtain assistance, when Mr. John West, accompanied by a man who happened to be there at the time, went down to his assistance but upon reaching him he was quite dead. Dr. Machattie who had examined the body, gave as his opinion that the deceased had died from suffocation, arising from the pressure of the dray on the chest.  A verdict was returned in accordance with the above facts.

Goulburn Herald, 31 May 1856
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Thursday week, in the neighbourhod of Numba, Shoalhaven, a boy of the name of Duncan, was thrown from a dray, and so severely injured that he died on the following Sunday morning.


Sydney Morning Herald
, 2 June 1856
ACCIDENTAL DEATH. - Between nine and ten o'clock on Friday night a man named [William] Fox, in the service of Mr. Walsh, of Cox's River, was proceeding to his master's with a load of timber, when owing to the darkness, the off wheel of the dray came in contact with a stump on the side of the road, and was overturned, falling upon the driver, who was killed upon the spot.  The body of the unfortunate man was conveyed by Constable Brown to West's public-house, in order to await an inquest.
FOUND DRWONED. - About nine o'clock on Sunday morning Francis Phillips, residing near Whittell's Wharf, found three dead bodies in the water at the foot of Bathurst-street - a man, a woman, and a child.  The bodies were taken up- and conveyed to the Asylum to await an inquest. Two bodies were identified - that the woman, named Keenan, and the child, were recently inmates of the institution; but the third body was not recognized.

Empire (Sydney), 2 June 1856
MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY- The inquiry into the cause of death of Elizabeth Frazer was resumed on Saturday, when the following evidence was taken:-
  Ann Carr deposed: I am a  wardswoman at the Sydney Infirmary; the deceased was admitted into the Infirmary on the 25th April last, and has been since under my care, up to the time of her death; she was bruised all over the body; the bruises on her hips ulcerated; deceased was aware that she was dying; she told me that her husband had beaten her and had afterwards thrown water over her; she also said that her husband had deprived her of nourishment, and that her neighbours used to assist her; she died at half-past seven o'clock on Wednesday morning last.
  Alfred Roberts, Surgeon, and Haines Gibbes Alleyne, deposed that they had made a post mortem examination of the body of deceased; found externally a scar of a cut on the back of the left hand; extensive bruises on both thighs, a sloughing abscess extending from the right hip over the upper and back part of the thigh, and nates commencing with an extensive slough over the sacrum exposing the bone; the brain exhibited symptoms of intemperance, but generally the internal appearances was healthy.
  A finding of died from injuries received at the hands of her husband, John Frazer, was recorded, against whom a warrant was ordered to issue as having been guilty of manslaughter.

Illawarra Mercury, 2 June 1856
DIED BY THE VISITATION OF GOD.
Letter to the Editor re death of Williams at Jamberoo, critical of the verdict. "A jury of 12 men summoned and the coroner's charge to them, we understand, pointed very distinctly to the real cause of the man's death, viz. Drinking to excess overproof rum.  Yet, notwithstanding this, the verdict brought in was, Died by the visitation of God. .  .  .   NORRVALIS.]

Maitland Mercury, 3 June 1856
HUNTER RIVER DISTRICT NEWS.
MERTON. FATAL ACCIDENT. - An inquest was held here on Wednesday, the 28th instant, by the coroner, J. B. West., Esq., on the body of Alexander M'Donald, late of Crabbee Creek.  On Monday last he was asked by an acquaintance to try a young horse, which he had bought, as he was a fearless rider, and the horse was very head-strong.  M'Donald got on him, and rode about a mile from Merton, very quietly, in company with two other young men, and on returning ridiculed the idea of the horse being a bolter. On starting into a gallop, the horse bolted to one side, running against a tree, breaking one of his legs, and tearing the side of his head; the rider was dashed against a tree, receiving a severe blow on the temple, breaking his arm, and various other injuries, from the effects of which he died on Wednesday morning. The deceased was a very sober, steady young man, and much respected in this district.  The jury, on the above facts being duly sworn to, returned a verdict of accidental death.  Merton, May 31, 1856.

Empire (Sydney), 3 June 1856
THE AFFAIR AT NEWINGTON.
  As there were various rumours afloat throughout the town for the last two or three days in relation to this affair - one of which wad that the body of the burglar had been found near the residence of Mr. Blaxland and that an inquest was to be held on it - a reporter from this establishment was directed to make enquiries on the spot - the results of which are given below, and the accuracy of the facts may be relied on. .  .  .  
MAN, WOMAN, AND CHILD, FOUND DROWNED. - The dead bodies of a man, woman, and boy having been discovered floating in the water at the foot of Bathurst-street, on Saturday morning last, John M'Lerie, Esq., J.P., opened a court of inquiry into the causes of death, yesterday morning, at The Wellington Inn, George-street.  The bodies had been conveyed to the Benevolent Asylum.  
  The name of the deceased woman was Bridget, otherwise Eileen, Keenan; that of the child, her son (a boy about two years of age,) Joseph Keenan.  The body of the man had not been recognized.   Margaret [Roshford] deposed: I have known the deceased for the last six years; I was acquainted with her in Clare county, Ireland; she was a married woman, and the mother of four children, the child  that was drowned was the youngest; I think she was addicted to drinking; I saw her on Friday last, about six o'clock in the evening; she had the child in her arms; she came to ask if I had any money; I gave her a shilling, she told me she was going over to see Father Therry, at Balmain, but did not know if she would return that night; I had charge of her three other children; there was something in her manner indicative of mental derangement; deceased said she had been looking for her husband all day, and had not seen him.  
  Francis Phillips said, his attention was drawn to the body of the deceased by seeing two stockings in the water off the foot of Bathurst-street; he told two men, who were near, and they accompanied him to the spot; when they discovered the body of a female; he immediately reported the circumstances to the police.
  Constable Whale said, in consequence of the information he received, he proceeded to the place in question, and there saw the legs of the deceased floating in the water close to the wharf; he took the body out and had it conveyed to the Benevolent Asylum; there was a shilling found in one of her hands; there was no gas-light near the wharf; the body of the child was discovered near the opposite side of the wharf.
  James Smith. Surgeon, deposed: I have known the deceased for the last six months; she was an inmate of the Benevolent Asylum, and escaped from that Institution, on Wednesday last; I have not seen her alive since; I have examined the body; there are no marks of violence on it; from its appearance, I am of opinion, death was the result of suffocation from drowning.
  The dead body of the child was discovered by a man named Denis Driscoll, about a quarter to nine o'clock, on Saturday morning, floating in the water of Whittel's Wharf. Mr. Surgeon Smith had examined the body; there were no marks of violence upon it; death appeared to have been caused by drowning.
  With regard to the unfortunate man, who appeared to be about 45 years of age, but whose body remained unclaimed, and unknown, the following evidence was taken:-  Richard Deering, residing at Bathurst-street Wharf, deposed: about a quarter to seven o'clock on Saturday morning I was standing in the gateway at [Ore's] or Oven's Wharf, talking to a man about the body of a female having been found in the water; passing along, I saw the body of a man floating near the Wharf; I called out to the man I had been speaking to, and took a dingy; the body was soon after taken out of the water, but life was extinct; the body was on the opposite wide to that in which the woman  was found; the deceased had on a rough coat and pair of corduroy trousers,  William Whale, police constable, deposed: I went to the Wharf, and found the body of the deceased lying in the water; got it out and had it conveyed on a dray to the Benevolent Asylum; there were a few scratches on the face; I have made inquiries, but have been unable to learn anything further about the deceased. James Smith, surgeon: I have examined the body of the deceased; there are no marks of violence upon the body, except a few scratches on the face, which might have been occasioned by the deceased falling on the sand; I am of opinion death was the result of drowning.  In each case an open verdict was returned, found drowned.
A DRAYMAN KILLED. - A magisterial inquiry was held yesterday morning by John M'Lerie, Esq., J.P., at the Wellington Inn, George-street South, touching the death of William Fox,, whose body was then and there lying at the Benevolent Asylum.  Thomas Quigg, residing at Cook's River, said he knew the deceased; saw him between one and two o'clock on Friday last, at which time the deceased was taking a horse and cart towards Sydney; the deceased was perfectly sober; about half-past nine o'clock p.m., he (witness) was aroused from bed by a female who told him the dray had been upset, and begged him to go and assist in raising it; he went to the place indicated; the dray was capsized, and the body of the deceased lying beside it; he helped to get the horse up, and then went for a constable; there was a mark on a stump of a tree close by,  which appeared to have been made by one of the wheels of the dray; it was a bush road, and a very bad one; the horses heads were towards Cook's River; it was very dark; the dray was laden with boards; the horses appeared to be very quiet.
  John Walsh, of Cook's River, deposed: The deceased was in my employ; he was about sixteen or seventeen years old; on Friday last, he left my place with a load of wood, drawn by two horses, for Sydney; I afterwards saw him in Sydney, and accompanied him a part of the way home; I left him quite sober, on the Sydney side of Canterbury, about eight o'clock in the evening; the dray was upset about two miles from where we separated; there was a hole on one side of the road, and my impression is, that the dray was upset through one of the wheels passing over the sump.  
  James Smith, surgeon, deposed: I have examined the body of the deceased; there is a wound on the upper part of the chest, and lower part of the neck, which might have been produced by a cart falling upon him,; these injuries were quite sufficient to have occasioned death. Finding: Died from injuries accidentally received.

Empire (Sydney), 4 June 1856
LAW INTELLIGENCE.
CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT. - TUESDAY.
MURDER.
  John Perara was indicted for the wilful murder of Samuel Jackson, otherwise Richard Watson Easton, on the 27th of April last, on board the Chilian ship Manuel Monti then lying at Port Jackson.  .  .  .  
  William Houston, house surgeon of the Sydney Infirmary, being sworn, deposed: He recollected the morning of the 27th of April, when the deceased was brought to the Infirmary, suffering from two severe wounds in the lower part of the abdomen; the said deceased expired the same afternoon.  He saw Mr. North, the Water Police Magistrate take his dying deposition; his opinion was that deceased's mind was wandering, and his ideas were very vague and indistinct.  He thought that the deceased had been drinking, both on account of the odour of spirits about him, and the continuous vomiting with which he was afflicted, though the latter might have been the effect of the wounds. He examined deceased's injuries; he assisted also at the post mortem examination.  The wounds were about two inches apart on the middle of the body; they both penetrated the walls of the body and the bladder, and either was sufficient to cause death.  He was of opinion that death was the effect of those wounds.
  By Mr. Isaacs: There was a difference in the size and direction of the wounds internally, but they both seemed to have been inflicted by the same hand and with the same instrument; Mr.  North gave instructions that as soon as the deceased became sensible, he should be sent for, which was accordingly done.
  Dr. Evans, one of the surgeons of the Sydney Infirmary, was also examined: He deposed to having made a post mortem examination of the body of deceased; his evidence was to the same effect as Dr. Houston's, with the trifling difference that the wounds were only an inch and a half apart; he saw the deceased almost immediately upon his admission to the Infirmary.  .  .  .  
  The jury retired for about a quarter of an hour and then returned into Court with a verdict of guilty with a strong recommendation to mercy.  In answer to his Honor, the foreman stated that the jury had arrived at their verdict on the evidence before them, excluding altogether the testimony of the deceased.  The grounds for the recommendation to mercy were - the peculiar circumstances in which the prisoner was placed, he being a foreigner, and the provocation he may have received to induce him to the dreadful act. .  .  .  

Bathurst Free Press, 7 June 1856
CORONER'S INQUEST. - A coroner's inquest was held by Dr. Busby, J.P., on Thursday afternoon, at Mount Pleasant, on the body of Mr. Peter Rein Campbell, who died suddenly the previous evening.  It appeared from the evidence of Mr. Terence O'Connell, that about eleven o'clock on Wednesday evening, he was awakened by some one knocking at the door of the adjoining portion of the building in which he was sleeping, and some shrieks in which he recognised the voice of deceased.  He immediately got up and went out to his assistance, when he found him lying on his back, with blood pouring out of his nose and mouth.  Mr. Connell with the assistance of some other person whom the deceased had aroused, then took him into his room where he died a few minutes afterwards.  From the medical evidence it appeared that the deceased met his death from suffocation arising from haemorrhage from the lungs. A verdict was returned in accordance with the above facts.

Maitland Mercury, 10 June 1856
CHILD RUN OVER AND KILLED. - On the 8th instant an inquest was held at the Cross Keys, West Maitland, before Dr. M'Cartney, on the body of Richard Nathan Hammond, a child three years old.  It appeared that on Saturday, at about a quarter past four o'clock, a bullovcjk0dray and team were standing outside the Cross Keys Inn, the driver having entered to get some refreshment.  A number of children were playing around, helping one another over the wheel on the near side.  George Murray, the driver, told them to come down, and having finished what he was drinking prepared to go on.  While he was standing at the head of his team on the off side, the dray was seen to move on, and in doing so, passed over the head of the deceased, crushing both the jaw-bone, and inflicting injuries that caused instantaneous death.  Murray was quite sober.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death, and that no blame was to be attached to George Murray or any one else.

Sydney Morning Herald, 10 June 1856
THE BURGLARY AT MR. BLAXLAND'S.
THE INQUEST.
YESTERDAY, an inquest was held at Newington, before C. B. Lyons, Esq., coroner for the district of Parramatta, on the body of a man named William Davis, alias Swabby, who was wounded, on the night of the 29th ultimo, in attempting to force an entry through one of the windows of Newington House.  The body of the man was discovered on Sunday morning last, about a quarter of a mile from the residence of Mr. Blaxland, and presented a revolting spectacle, having apparently been dead some days. .  .  .  
  Dr. Frederick Basset, stated: I have made a post mortem examination of the body; I found two wounds in the abdomen apparently caused by the same bullet having passed through; from this wound there was considerable internal haemorrhage; I found three other small wounds  in the chest, caused by small shot, which had penetrated the left lung, producing also much haemorrhage; he could not have survived thirty-six hours after receiving such wounds, although it is probable he died much earlier; I also found an incised wound on the forehead, which had penetrated to the scalp; a sharp edge might be found on a pistol which would produce such a wound; the wound in the abdomen was sufficient to cause death, but not immediately. .  .  .  
  The jury returned the following verdict: That the death of William Davis was caused by wounds inflicted by the firing of one or more shots by Mr. Edward J. Blaxland, in defence of his own life and the lives of several other persons then and there being in the house, and also for the preventing the loss of his goods and chattels.

Empire (Sydney), 11 June 1856
DEATH BY DROWNING. - On the 23rd ultimo a man named James Kinchela, in the employment of Mr. Henry Moon, innkeeper, of Tumut, went to the river with a dray drawn by a team of bullocks and containing casks for the purpose of procuring a load of water for the use of the inn.  He drove the team into the stream, when the bullocks became restive and made for the opposite side.  The river being much swollen by previous rain, and the current running strong, the unfortunate man was swept off the dray and drowned.  The aborigines were employed to search for the body, but up to 1st instant it had not been recovered. - Correspondent.

Maitland Mercury, 12 June 1856
DEATH BY DROWNING. - An inquest was held yesterday before Dr. M'Cartney, the coroner, at the Hinton Hotel, on the body of William Kirby, who was drowned last Sunday week by falling  from the stage of the Hinton punt.  The evidence does not furnish information in addition to the given in our columns at the time; but the opinion was expressed by a witness that although the deceased was intoxicated, the unprotected state of the stage might endanger the lives of any man, however sober.  Verdict, that the deceased met his death by accidentally falling from the stage of the Hinton punt, while in a state of intoxication; and the Jury begged to record their opinion that the present disgraceful state of the punt ought to be represented to the authorities by the coroner.

Empire (Sydney), 12 June 1856
CORONER'S INQUESTS. - J. S. Parker, Esq., Coroner fort Sydney, held an inquest at the Sydney Infirmary, yesterday, on the body of Thomas Lacey, aged fifty-four, who was scalded to death.  The deceased had been in the employ of Mr. Slater, residing on the Parramatta road, near Longbottom, in the parish of Ashfield, upwards of twenty years.  It appeared that, about the middle of April last, he was asked by a fellow-servant Elizabeth Porter, to assist her in talking a pot of boiling water from off an American stove.  He made an attempt to do so, , but the female, observing that he was intoxicated, and fearing an accident, told him to desist, and left him.  Almost immediately afterwards, she heard a noise, as of something falling, ran to the spot, and discovered the deceased lying over the boiler, which he had capsized.  He was scalded very severely, from his face downwards.  Dr. Pearson was called, and immediately attended upon the sufferer.  Amongst other remedies, he caused the man's body to be oiled; but finding at the expiration of a week that his patient showed no signs of recovery, he advised his removal to the Infirmary.  Dr. Houston deposed that the deceased was admitted to the Infirmary on or about the 25th of April, suffering from the effects of a severe scald all over the body more particularly on the left side; slightly on the right side, and much over the face; the deceased had told him, it was an accident; he was of opinion that death resulted from the scald.  The wardsman of the Infirmary under whose care the deceased had been placed, said the deceased had told him, he was trying to lift off the pot, when his foot slipped, and the vessel capsixxxed; the deceased expired at half-past two o'clock on Tuesday morning.  The Jury returned a verdict of accidental death.
  Another inquest was held yesterday by J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Canterbury Arms, Canterbury, on the body of William Henry Berrant, a child between six and seven years of age, who was drowned in  a well or water-hole.  It appeared from the evidence that the little fellow, on his return from school, went to the well with a quart pot and a can to fetch some water.  After he had been gone about a quarter of an hour, his mother called to him, but receiving no answer, sent his brother in quest of him.  The boy went to the water hole and called out directly that the can was there, but he could see nothing of his brother.  The wretched woman immediately ran to the spot, and found the child's statement true; it was growing dark; she obtained a light, and searched about the water hole; presently she saw her son's cap floating on the water, and exclaimed - "Oh ! my child is drowned !"
  James Warrington, a butcher, residing at Canterbury, deposed:- He heard the mother of the deceased cry out that her child was drowned, and ran to the place, which was a kind of water-hole near the road-side; Mrs. Heath (the deceased's mother by former husband) said "There's my son's hat floating on the water;" the body of the child was nowhere to be seen; he (witness) procured a sapling stick, with which he discovered the body, and after a few efforts brought it to the surface of the water, and landed it on the shore; the hole was fenced round, and had a small gate to admit of approach to the water; the gate had no fastening; the hole was about six feet deep; he could not tell how the child fell into the water; life was extinct and the body cold when he drew it out.  The coroner considered it unnecessary to take medical testimony, as the cause of death was evident.  The following verdict was recorded, Found drowned; but how the child got into the water-hole, there is no evidence to show.

Bathurst Free Press, 14 June 1856
MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT ON THE RAILWAY LINE.
  An inquest was held yesterday at the Parramatta Railway Station, on the body of a man apparently about 70 years of age, whose body was found lying across the rails that morning.  George Kingston deposed that he was a constable attendant upon the railway; at half=-past six this morning, he and constable Paine observed something on the line, with a dog by it'; he went about half a mile down, and found the deceased lying between the rails, his neck on the rail, quite dead and cold; a dog was by his side, also two bundles containing coats, trousers, and other clothing, and 13s. 9d. in his pocket; and there were no papers from which he could ascertain the name of the deceased.  Frederick Paine deposed that the last train, up or down, the previous evening, was the 5.30 p.m.; that there was a small pool of blood about two yards from the body; the engine driver saw a dog pass down the embankment.  Mr. F. Oakes saw the deceased in Parramatta on Sunday evening.  Dr. Bassett having examined the body found his right thigh fractured, and three severe cuts on the head penetrating to the skull; the shock from the injuries received and the loss of blood were the cause of death.  Verdict accordingly. - S. M. Herald.

Goulburn Herald, 14 June 1856
QNEANBEYAN.
FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Friday, the 6th inst., John Evans, son of Robert Evans, gingerbeer brewer, of Queanbeyan, was killed by a fall from a horse.  In company with three other young men, he went out in horseback in search of stock, and when about a mile and a half from Queanbeyan, in the bush, a young man, named James Hutcheson, and deceased ran foul of each other, when at a gallop.  Both horses and riders fell; but Hutcheson, being only a little bruised in the leg, got up, and went to the assistance of Evans, who was lying on his face on the ground.  He turned him over, and he was then quite black in the face, but the colour returned.  He never spoke a word.  Information was immediately sent to town, when Dr. Morton, the Chief Constable, and others hastened to the spot.  He was then removed on a door to Mrs. McDonald's, a house near the spot, where he lay from that time (about eleven a.m.) until next morning (Saturday) at four o'clock.  An inquest was held on the body, and a verdict found. That John Evans came to his death, by a fall from his horse, on Friday, the 6th of June instant.  The deceased was a good young man.  It is to be hoped this sudden occurrence will operate as a warning to those who are apt to indulge in the too common practice of reckless and unguarded riding

Goulburn Herald, 14 June 1856
QUEANBEYAN, JUNE 11, 1856 . - SUICIDE. - On Monday, the 9th instant, an inquest was held before A. Morton, Esq., Coroner for the district, in a hut at the residence of A. Cunningham, Esq., Lanyon, near Queanbeyan, touching the death of Margaret Saunders, wife of William Saunders, both of whom had been in Nr. Cunningham's employment for some time.  It appeared from the evidence that the poor woman had been suffering from depression of spirits, and the jury could come to no other conclusion than that she committed suicide on Friday evening, the 6th inst., (the night on which she was missed from her hut) by drowning herself in the Murrumbidgee river, which runs close by the hut in which she lived.
FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE FISH RIVER. - Our correspondent informs us that a few days since a fatal accident occurred at one of the drafting yards of this place.  According to the usual custom, a number of stockmen had assembled on the spot, and whilst engaged in going through the cattle for the purpose of separating some of them from others, a bullock turned on one of them, and before the unfortunate man could gain the upper rails of the stock-yard fence, the animal had its horns inserted in the poor fellow's neck, and tore away the whole of the side of the cheek.  The spectacle he presented was a frightful one, and soon put an end to his sufferings.

Empire (Sydney), 14 June 1856
FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE BURWOOD MINES - TWO MEN CRUSHED TO DEATH.
 Yesterday (Thursday) afternoon, about three o'clock, Peter Baily, and Thomas Straw, two miners, in the employ of the Newcastle Coal and Copper Company, who had undertaken contract to cut a new tunnel adjacent to the other works of the Company, at Burwood, and while employed in driving in a heading for that purpose, a mass of earth from above, estimated at twenty tons, fell in upon them, burying both underneath it.  Assistance was immediately procured, and a gang of men put in to dig out the unfortunate sufferers, and after a lapse of about twenty minutes, the body of Straw was discovered in a frightfully mutilated condition, apparently a mass of remains, with the bones in places protruding through the clothes.  Soon after, the body of Baily was found in a similar state, life in both instances being quite extinct.  Their bodies were removed to an adjacent hut, where medical attendance was in readiness, Dr. Stacey being in the vicinity at the time of the accident, but the nature of the case put it beyond all human skill. .  .  .   An inquest will be held on the bodies this day, Friday.  Newcastle, June 13th, 1856.

Empire (Sydney), 16 June 1856
NEWCASTLE.
The Accidents at the Mines. - Coroner's Inquest.
  At an inquest held today, (Friday), on the bodies of the two unfortunate miners, whose death resulted from the falling in of the earth which they were engaged in opening up  a new tunnel at the Newcastle Coil and Copper Company's Works, at Burwood, on Thursday, the [xxth] instant.  .  .  .  The jury, which consisted chiefly of miners, ultimately returned a verdict of accidental death.  Today all hands have refrained from work in consequence of this distressing affair and in token of their regard for the sufferers . .  .  
ACCIDENT.  - A man named Northcote, formerly stockman in the service of Mr. Wellman, J.P., near Burrowa, was thrown from his horse on Saturday last while attempting to run a timor pony into the stockyard of a person at Illalong, and received such injuries that his life was despaired of.
THE TUENA GOLD FIELDS. - A boy named Andrew Wakefield fell down a shaft last Thursday. It appears that while passing the mouth of it he stepped on a part that had been under-mined which gave way, precipitating the lad to a depth of nearly thirty feet.  Assistance was immediately rendered to him, and when brought to the surface it was discovered that, with the exception of a few contused wounds, he had received no further injuries.

Empire (Sydney), 17 June 1856
MUDGEE.
  On Monday, the 9th instant, an inquest was held at the Harp of Erin public-house, before  D. R. Macdonald, Esq., coroner, on the body of a man named Absolom West, who was found dead in  a field near the township.  It appeared from the evidence of a person named Michael Brophy, that as he was going into a paddock near his house at Bambira, early on Sunday morning, his attention was arrested by a dog rushing at him, and on looking over the fence which separates his paddock from the adjoining field, he observed the body of a man lying on the ground, which circumstance he immediately reported to the chief constable.  Other witnesses, who were examined, stated that the deceased had been drinking feely on the Saturday previous, and is supposed to have laid down in the paddock that night.  The verdict of the jury was that the deceased, Absolom West, died from exposure to cold while in a state of intoxication.
MURDER OF A BLACK FELLOW AT BURRUNDULLA. - On the same day, the Coroner held another inquest at the house known as the Royal Oak Inn, on the body of an aboriginal native, well-known in our township by the name of Brandy.  He was found in a mutilated state, his face gnawed away on the right side by some animal; on the right side of the throat, a little above the larynx, was a wound about two inches long extending backwards to the vertebra. The doctor, R. Harris, Esq., who examined the body, was of opinion that the wound must have been inflicted by a sharp-cutting instrument - probably a knife - and that one of the large blood-vessels of the neck, one of the carotids, probably the internal one, was severed, and that the immediate cause of death was haemorrhage from the wound described.  An intelligent blackfellow, named James Magpie, informed the jury that he was chief of the Mudgee tribe of blacks; Brandy, the deceased, was his brother-in-law, and belonged to Mudgee.  He had not seen him for two Saturdays - two weeks - and that having examined the body of the deceased, thought he had been murderer by two blackfellows, called Billy Tuokenga and Jacky, who are missing from the tribe; they quarrelled with the deceased, Brandy, when they received the blankets from the Government) on the Queen's birthday).  The culprits are brothers, and are supposed to have gone to Dabee, to which place constables are gone in search of them.  The medical gentleman did not think it possible that the deceased could have inflicted the wounds himself. His waddy was picked up covered with blood, leaning against the tree close to which the body was found.  The verdict of the jury was, that the deceased, Brandy, was murdered by some person or persons to them unknown, and that strong suspicions rested on the two blackfellows who are missing.

Maitland Mercury, 17 June 1856
DEATH BBY DROWNING. - On the morning of Saturday, 31st ultimo, a woman named Jones, who it appeared had for some days been laboring under symptoms of monomania, was imprudently left alone in her cottage on the Glebe.  In a fit of insanity she left the hut, and was last seen running towards the sea beach; since that time no traces of her have been discovered save the remnants of her clothes, which have probably been torn from her body by the force of the breakers.  We believe search been made for the body, but with no success. - Newcastle Telegraph, June 14.

Sydney Morning Herald, 19 June 1856
WINDSOR.
JUNE 17TH.  - An inquest was held in the 6th instant at Wilberforce, before the coroner for the district and a jury, on the body of one Margaret Stanfield, the wife of Henry Stanfield, a labourer, then and there lying dead.  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had indulged freely in the use of intoxicating drinks, and that on the 4th instant she was found dead in her bed, with her husband.  The jury found a verdict that the deceased had died from the effects of the excessive use of spirituous liquors. This is another painfui illustration of the dreadful consequences of intemperance

Empire (Sydney), 20 June 1856
ACCIDENT BY FIRE. -  On Sunday morning last, while a married woman, named Denny, who, with her husband, occupies one of the cottage houses known as the "Five Islands,"   .  .  .   A short time since a little child belonging to her was drowned on Mr. D. H. Thorn's farm, Brisbane Grove.
INQUEST. - Yesterday an inquest was held before Robert Waugh, Esq., coroner for the district, at the house of Mr. Rodgers, farmer, Lake George, on view of the body of John Gray.  The deceased was a labouring man of the advanced age of 74.  He had been for a number of years in the habit of jobbing about the neighbourhood of Lake George and Spring Valley.  On Friday last he went to Mr. Rodgers' house, where he slept that night.  On the following morning Mrs. Byrnes called at the farm and engaged the deceased to go with a horse and cart to Mr. John Byrnes's, at Spring Valley, for a pig.  The deceased started away, and was last seen alive by Mr. William Payne,. Whose house he passed on his return from Mr. Byrnes's.  This was about sun down.  On Sunday, about 11 o'clock, he was found lying quite dead and cold in the Sawpit Gully, which is on the road leading from Goulburn to Lake George.  The cart was capsized over him, the rail resting across his neck, and part of the wheel touching his head; the mare was still in the shafts, and had evidently wearied herself in endeavouring to get free of them.  A verdict of accidentally killed, was returned.

Goulburn Herald, 21 June 1856
ACCIDENT BY SCALDING - An accident which we fear will prove fatal, has occurred to a little girl, five years of age, named Isabella Davidson, daughter to Mr. Duncan Davidson, a settler at Veterans' Flats.  It seems that the child fell by accident into as pot of boiling water, which had just been taken from the fire, and in which some meat had been boiled.  The poor child was shockingly scalded from the calves of her leg, as far up as her waist.  Her distraught father at once conveyed her into town in his gig, to the residence of his friend Mr. M'Farlane, boot and shoemaker, Sloane-street.  Dr. Waugh was promptly in attendance, but despite his skill, there is no hoper of the little girl's recovery, she being most severely scalded

Sydney Morning Herald, 23 June 1856
HUNTER RIVER DISTRICT.
DEATH BY A FALL FROM A HORSE. -  Mr. Richard Lloyd, a young man about twenty-one years of age, died on Wednesday night, as we hear, from the effects of a fall from his horse, while riding near Jump-up Creek.  It appears that the accident happened at a turn in the road where there was an ironbark tree; but whether the deceased struck against the tree, or was thrown at the turning, and fell on his head, we did not learn.  There were no cuts or marks on his person.  The deceased had lingered under medical attendance at Black Creek, where he was taken on the occurrence of the disaster.
DEATH FROM APOPLEXY. - An inquest was held at the Sportsmans' Arms, on the 19th instant, before Dr. M'Cartney, the coroner, on the body of Charles Henry, well known as an inhabitant of Maitland.  His death was very sudden.  Mrs. Henry left him in the morning about half-past seven o'clock, having been sent for by her daughter, who was in her confinement; on returning, at about half-past twelve, she found her husband lying on his face on the gro9unhd, in a room behind the shop, and his son being called to lift him up, and put him to bed, he was found to be dead.  There were two cups of strong rum on the table.  Dr. Wigan believed that Henry fell with his face on the floor in a fit of apoplexy, and that from the livid state of his countenance and nails, suffocation was the immediate cause of his death.  Deceased had evidently been drinking rum; and his habits for some time past had been intemperate.  He was 58 years of age.

Sydney Morning Herald, 27 June 1856
QUEANBEYAN. - On Friday morning, the 20th instant, a child aged five years, named Fanny Smith, daughter of Edward Smith of this township, met with her death under the following circumstances.  Her aunt's house adjoins that occupied by her father; at the time the accident occurred there were none but children there, with whom the deceased came to play, accompanied by her sister; the child unfortunately stood so close to the fire that her clothes ignited; in her fright she ran out into the yard, the wind blowing rather strongly at the time; her child-friends at once gave the alarm, but before effective assistance could be obtained, she was burnt very seriously, and died the same evening.  An inquest was held on Saturday before Mr. A. Morton, coroner for the district, when a verdict of accidental death was returned.

Sydney Morning Herald, 30 June 1856
Inquest. - On the 22nd instant an inquest was held by the coroner and a jury, on the body of a young woman named Susan Baldwin, aged twenty-nine, the daughter of Mr. Wellon Baldwin, of Wilberforce.  It appeared that about three weeks ago the deceased accidentally fell asleep with a candle burning near her bed.  The light of the candle came in contact with her clothes, and she awoke enveloped in flames.  She was so severely burnt that recovery was impossible, and she lingered for three week and died on the morning of the inquest.  The jury returned a verdict of died from accidental burning.

 

Empire (Sydney), 2 July 1856

SHOCKING ACCIDENT. - About six o'clock last evening, a little girl named Sarah Ball, about five years of age, was killed in Kent-street, by falling under the wheel of a timber dray, which passed over and crushed her head.  The vehicle was in the charge of a man named William Heath, who is now in custody.  It appears that the deceased and another child were amusing themselves by  swinging from the logs between the two sides of the carriage as they moved along, when suddenly the load was jolted and the children were thrown off.  It is supposed the deceased fell under one of the wheels of the after part of the carriage, which passed over her head.  She was instantly taken up and carried to the house of a surgeon in the neighbourhood, where she immediately expired.  The body wad then removed by a laundress named Mrs. Ball, a widow, residing in Ann's-place, Kent-street, as that of her daughter.  It was then removed to the residence of the unhappy mother, whose lamentations were most piteous.  Her mother, it appeared, had sent her to one of the Steam Company's Wharves to inquire for a letter from a daughter in the country, and was momentarily expecting her return at the time of the accident.  No blame, it is said, is attributable to the driver of the vehicle, as the occurrence was purely of an accidental nature.  An inquest will be held on the body.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 2 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUESTS.

An inquest was held on Monday afternoon, at the Napoleon Inn, Windmill-street, touching the death of Robert Hort, seaman, recently discharged from the ship New Forrest, who died suddenly at a seaman's licensed lodging-house.  The following was the evidence taken on the occasion:-

   Peter Johnson, being duly sworn, deposed: I am a lodging-house keeper, and reside in Windmill-street, No. 31; on last Sunday afternoon, between three and four o'clock, the chief officer of the ship New Forrest, that was lying alongside Captain Towns' wharf, came and asked if I could take a lodger into my house; I said yes, and the chief officer said the man was not very well, and fell down from some part aloft, but did not say what part, and that he thought he was more  frightened than hurt, and that he had got a little money, and that he could pay for his board;  I saw by his discharge that his name was Robert Hart, late a seaman on board the New Forrest; the man looked bad, and could not  walk uprightly; I asked the deceased on Monday, how he got hurt; she  said he fell down from aloft on board the New Forrest, and that after he fell down, he was badly ill-used by the captain of the ship, and that he was the biggest brute afloat; the chief officer, when he brought the man to my place said, give him something to eat, for I don't think he has had any thing these two days; I said to the deceased, what will you have? he said, anything!  I gave him something to eat, which he seemed to enjoy, and ate very heartily of, for he was very hungry; this was about four o'clock in the afternoon; he had tea and meat at seven o'clock, and eat well, and seemed to enjoy it, and about 10 o'clock went to bed, and did not disturb any body in the house during the night, and appeared to have slept well; he got up next morning and dressed himself, and looked refreshed, ate his breakfast, and walked to the shipping office, in Lower George-street, for his discharge; he got it and came back, and remained in doors all day, over the fire; I never saw him drink a drop of any kind of liquor during the time he was in my place; on Wednesday morning he complained of his bowels not being open; I then sent him to Dr. Vaughan to get some medicine; he gave him some, which he took; he got worse; he kept vomiting, and ate nothing, and kept his bed; Thursday morning her appeared worse, and talked a great deal of nonsense; I went to work from the house; dinner time came; went up stairs and saw deceased; I said, Robert, how are youxx he  said I feel very bad, and can hardly breathe; I then went for Dr. M'Kay, who came to see deceased, about 2 o'clock, when the doctor ordered some bottles of hot water to be placed against the feet of deceased, and to give him some hot brandy and water, which was done'; the  doctor said he would not live, and to let him know when he died; about 5 o'clock the same day (Thursday), he expired; all the money he had was about 5 Pounds, which he left in my hands; also, he had some clothing.

   Examined  by the Coroner: The deceased did not tell me of any particular ill-treatment he had received at the hands of the captain; nor did he say he had been badly fed; nor did he complain of not being allowed to have a doctor, nor did he say he was kept at work after he received the injury; all he said was that the captain was the "biggest brute afloat;" when I went on board the New Forrest for deceased's things, one of the seamen on board then, but who has since left her, said to me, in the presence of Mr. Nathan, that the captain of the ship drove the poor man (meaning decease) out of his senses; saying at the same time, I was not a child to be drove by him;  I think the same seaman is now in Sydney; the chief officer said to me, when on board the vessel, do not let the deceased lie in bed, you must rouse him, and keep stirring him about; all he (deceased) complained of was the captain and said nothing about  the chief officer; deceased did not appear to be neglected in his person; saw no marks or bruises on any part of his body; the deceased is indebted to me, including doctor's fee, 4 Pounds 3s.

  Samuel Nathan, being duly sworn, deposed: I accompanied Peter Johnson on board the ship New Forrest, lying at Towns' Wharf, when I heard one of the seamen way what Johnson stated about the treatment he received from the captain; but what that treatment was, I did not learn; I heard deceased say he had met with an injury by falling down from aloft, and have heard Johnson's evidence read over, and I can add nothing more to ity.

   Charles M'Kay, M.D., being duly sworn, states on oath: I have examined the body of the deceased, Robert  Horth, lying in the house of Peter Johnson, Windmill-street; there were no external marks of violence on the body; on opening the chest extensive inflammation of the lungs was found, particularly on the posterior surfaces; inflammation had gone on to hepatonation, which of itself was sufficient to cause death; there was chronic inflammation of the liver, and softening of the posterior surface; there was also extensive peritonetic inflammation, and also inflammation of the duodenum, caecum, and colon; I consider the cause of death to have been caused by inflammation of the lungs and abdominal viscera, which may have been produced by cold and neglect; the injuries adduced in evidence may have caused the disease now described - and the want of proper medical treatment, no doubt hastened his death.

   William White, being duly sworn, states as follows: I was a seaman on board the New Forrest, and Robert Hort,  the deceased, belonged to the same vessel; we arrived here from Melbourne about the 16th instant; the vessel belonged to Captain Towns, and the captain's name was  Milne; about a fortnight before we arrived at Melbourne, deceased fell about twelve feet from aloft, and he told me, when he came below from his watch, from twelve to four, during that day, that he hurt himself across the back from that fall, and he appeared to suffer very much pain; the captain gave deceased something to rub his back, and he was confined to his bed for three or four days; he at this time was so helpless that we were obliged to assist him by feeding him, and rubbing his back; the third day the captain came down into the fore-cabin, and asked deceased how he got on'; the deceased said, "I am very bad, and unable to go on deck;": the officers of the ship came once, and sometimes twice a day, to see deceased, but did nothing for him; it appeared he had lost his appetite, and did not relish the food on board; the salt pork was very bad, but everything else was middling good; the fore-cabin, where the deceased resided, was very wet, the ship leaked so much; deceased often lay with his wet clothes on his berth when he came down from on deck;  the sailors often spoke to him about such coin duct, but he paid no attention to them; the ship was about 250 tons; there were only four sailors, cook, two officers and captain, eight in all;; the pumps were kept going in bad weather every hour; about the sixth day, I think, the captain went down into the fore cabin, and spoke rather harshly to the deceased, saying, "We are short-handed, and you ought to come on deck;'" the deceased did come on deck, when I considered he was in a very unfit state to do so, for he hardly knew what he was about; he remained, doing what he could, till paid off, when the deceased was stupid; I once saw the captain fling a piece of rope at deceased; this was after he was injured; deceased never was struck by any of the officers to my knowledge; I have heard deceased express a desire to see a medical man; I have been twenty-eight years at sea, and never was with such a hard-driving man; he gave us very little rest, and often when no occasion required it, used to call the watch up    on deck; from the constant nagging of the captain towards the deceased I am sure it turned his brain, and was the cause of him not knowing what he was about at times; he attributed his falling down to the captain's conduct towards him.

  By the Coroner: Was the captain speaking to the deceased in angry language when he fell? I only heard the captain said :"what a fool you are to fall down"; the deceased, when he fell, said he could not get up sand the chief officer came to his assistance; it was a dead calm, the vessel knocking about, and raining at the time; deceased was wet through, and remained three or four hours in the storm before we could assist him, as we had not a chance to do so, being at work; when we arrived in Sydney our voyage was ended, and the seamen; I saw the deceased paid 13 Pounds 6s., deceased was about 35 years of age, a native of the West if England, and was one of the seamen on board the ship Schonberg, lost at Melbourne; during the voyage he never received a draught of spirits or coffee.

By the Coroner: I am not aware that there was any medicine chest on board; the two officers were very kind to all of us.

   The verdict was that Robert Hort, late a seaman on board the New Forrest, came by his death from injuries received by a fall, and that his death was accelerated by exposure to cold

An inquest on the body of Elizabeth Mozley, aged 45, who died on Saturday morning last, was held at the house of William Mozley,  New Brighton, Botany, by J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner for the city of Sydney, on Sunday, 29th instant.  Thomas Grayson, police constable, deposed he had known deceased eighteen months, and had frequently seen her drunk; she had often complained to him of ill-treatment by her husband; he had often seen her with marks of violence on her face, and occasionally went to their house to pacify them; two months ago he apprehended the deceased under a warrant issued by the bench at Penrith, on her own information against a man whom she accused of violently and indecently assaulting her; at that time she told him (witness) she was suffering from the effects of the assault, and wished to see a doctor; had seen her worse for dink lately; could not tell whether she was quarrelsome in disposition.

   Elizabeth Gotts being sworn, said she had resided in the same house with the deceased during the last six months; she was much addicted to drinking, and would not rest while there was a bottle of spirits in the house till she had consumed it; had heard her complain of ill-treatment from her husband, but never saw him ill-use her; he was kind to her as long as she was sober.  On Tuesday last she complained of feeling ill, and of phlegm and a choking sensation in the throat; she went to bed, but had no medical man to attend upon her; she said she was going to die; witness did not know what to do; deceased expired on Saturday morning at two o'clock. 

   James Charles Russell, of Chippendale, surgeon, deposed: he had made a post mortem examination of the body of deceased; he found no external marks of violence except the cicatrix of a wound lately healed; there was disease of the right lung, with effusion in the cavity of that organ; the heart was fatty, unusually so; the stomach was in a natural state, and indicated that there had been food for digestion; the liver was enlarged; and there was also chronic inflammation of the bowels; he was of opinion death resulted from disease aggravated by intemperance; he found no appearances of ill-treatment on the body, nor had he any reason to judge that death had been hastened by ill-usage; if a medical man had been called to the relief of deceased when she was taken ill, her life might have been considerably prolonged.

   The Jury found that Death was caused by disease brought on by frequent acts of intemperance, and not otherwise.

 

Bathurst Free Press, 2 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at the Nugget Inn, before Mr. Busby, on the body of an infant, the daughter of Mary Oliver, who was found dead the previous morning at the residence of Captain Battye.  From the evidence of the mother, who was in Mrs. Battye's service, it appeared that on her going to bed the previous evening, the child appeared to be in its usual state of health - which was rather delicate - and on her waking in the morning, she found it lying with its face on her arm quite dead. It appearing from medical evidence that death had been caused by [over-laying], a verdict was returned accordingly.

 

Empire (Sydney), 4 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - The city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., held an inquest at the Ship Inn, Kent-street, on Wednesday last, on the body of Sarah Ball, aged five years, who came by her death through injuries received from a timber-dray.  William Heath, the driver of the dray, was brought up in custody, on suspicion of having caused the child's death.  Benjamin Jones deposed that he was walking along Kent-street, about 6 o'clock, on Tuesday evening, when he observed a three-horse team and dray, with logs of timber slung to the axle-tree, going quietly along; the driver was at the head of the off of the horses; at the same time, several young children were playing about the logs behind the fore part of the dray; hearing a child call out "Mammy, mammy," he turned, and saw a little girl running away from the dray; after the dray had passed on a little, he observed the deceased lying on the ground on her side, with blood flowing profusely from her mouth; she was much injured about the head, but was not quite dead; he ran off for the doctor; before the accident occurred, he had heard the driver warning the children to keep from the dray; it was darkening at the time, and it was very probable the driver did not see the children when the accident occurred.

   Dr. M'Done said, the deceased was brought to him, and dier in five minutes afterwards; one side of the face was smashed; he was of opinion death was caused by compound fracture, combined with congestion.  The following verdict was returned, namely - That the deceased died from injuries accidentally received;:  to which a rider was added exempting the driver from blame.

 

Goulburn Herald, 5 July 1856

SUICIDE. - An inquest was held yesterday by J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner for Sydney, touching the death of a labouring man named William Smith, who committed a determined act of self-destruction at O'Connell Town, at about noon on Thursday last.  It appeared that the deceased was seen kneeling by the side of a well as if in prayer, after which he raised the lid and threw himself in.  Three or four men instantly ran to the spot, and tried to rescue him; but he resisted their efforts, and called out that he did not wish his life to be saved.  Mr. Sedgewick, surgeon, of O'Connell Town, was called, and quickly attended, but he could render no assistance, as life was extinct before he arrived.  The deceased was about twenty-four years of age.  He came to the colony two years ago, and nearly ever since resided with Mr. John Gough, on whose premises he committed the fatal act.  Verdict, temporary insanity. - Empire.

 

Goulburen Herald, 5 July 1856

DEATH BY A TIGER. - An inquest was held on the 30th of March on the body of a Chinese wood-cutter who was killed the night before by a tiger as Pulo Ubin.  It appeared that the party to which deceased belonged lived in a bangsal, which was not quite finished; it was thatched, and the sticks to form the walls were tied together, but not covered with attaps, and there was not a door.  The chief apartment was a loft raised about ten feet from the ground; sixteen men were sleeping in the loft when a tiger entered either by the step-ladder, or by a bound from an adjoining bank.  He seized the third man from the door and was leaving the bangsal with him in his fangs when frightened by the other wood-cutters he dropped his prey, but the poor man was lifeless.  The animal returned again in a couple of hours, but was scared away by a discharge of fireworks. Probably deceased was stirring up in his bed at the time as the head was separated from the spine as if by a smart blow on the back of the head.  There were several lacerated wounds on the neck which had evidently been inflicted by as large animal.  Verdict - Killed by a tiger. - Straits Times.

 

Freeman's Journal, 5 July 1856

REPRIEVE. - John Perrara, who was convicted at the last sitting of the Supreme Court of having murdered a fellow-seaman on board the Manuel Monti, has been reprieved.   .  .  . 

 

Empire (Sydney), 7 July 1856

AN OLD MAN FOUND DEAD. - An inquest was held on Saturday last at the Camperdown Hotel, Petersham, by J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner for Sydney, touching the death of a man named William Boyce, aged 60, who was found dead on Friday morning in a creek on the Kingston estate.  Agnes Boyce, widow of the deceased, deposed that she resided on the Kingston property near Camperdown; about three years ago the deceased received an accidental blow on the head from a billet of wood; and his memory had been impaired ever since; he was also paralyzed; about seven o'clock in Friday morning, he left home for Newtown, to seek for something to eat, as they had not a morsel of food in the house; she went to work that day at the Glebe, and again on Saturday, when her son came and informed her that her husband had been found drowned; she was very uneasy about him on Friday night, and went out to look for him, but could not find him; his intellect was so much impaired, that at times he would strip himself naked and walk about in that state; she was not able to watch him closely, because she had four children to support. Henry Briggs, residing at Kingston Farm, in the parish of Petersham, said a little girl informed him on Friday morning, that a man was lying in a blind creek in the neighbourhood; he went to the place and found the body of a man, lying on his left side; he examined the body and recognized it as that of William Boyce; he had evidently begun to undress himself, for his shoes, frock, and comforter were lying on the ground where his body was found; the deceased was a brickmaker formerly and of dissipated habits; on Thursday night he was near witness's  residence, and said he could not find his way home; witness then directed him; from the rambling propensity of the deceased, he always anticipated something serious would happen to him.  A verdict was returned to the effect that the deceased died from exposure to cold.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 7 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUESTS. - An inquest was held on Saturday, at the house of Mr. Parkinson, Wellington Inn, George-street South, before Mr. J. S. Parker, city coroner, touching the death of Angus M'Lachlan, aged 44 years.  Jane M'Lachlan, the wife of the deceased, deposed that he was a shipwright by trade, and was employed in repairing the French ship Sydney, that lay at the Circular Quay; he came home on last Saturday evening to his tea, and gave witness 4 Pounds, keeping 4s., being the remainder of his week's wages, to himself; after tea he cleaned himself and left home in Clyde-street, saying he was going up town.  This street runs down to the water side, Darling Harbour.  He left home about eight o'clock at night, from which time witness never saw or heard anything more of him, except that he was seen by a neighbor named Fenwick, walking up George-street by himself.  She identified the body now produced by its features and clothes as that of her husband.  She had seven children, two only being able to earn a livelihood, and with the exception of their receipts, she had not a sixpence to support herself, as her husband had not been in the habit of having constant employment.  Her own opinion was that the deceased had been drinking, and, having lost his way, accidentally walked into the water and was drowned.  When he did not return the next morning she immediately gave information to the police.  Robert Hobbs, a sailmaker, deposed that on the same day he was working at his trade in a loft at the bottom of King-street; that he eventually saw the deceased's body floating at the wharf, from where the Pyrmont steamer plies, and that he lent assistance to take it out of the water.  This took place at eight o'clock in the morning.  Similar testimony as given by Constable Hegarty, who stated that he found in one pocket of the deceased 6d., and in another a three-penny bit.  The court returned a verdict - Found drowned. 

 

Maitland Mercury, 10 July 1856

THREE MEN KILLED. - On Tuesday afternoon, a most distressing accident occurred at West Maitland, by which three lives were lost.  The accident happened at a brickyard, near St. Mary's Church, rented by William Stonebridge, one of the deceased.  It was the custom, it appears, to undermine the bank of the excavation for a certain distance, leaving pillars to sustain the superincumbent mass; and this narrow cuttings, called chimneys, having been dug out at each end, a trench connecting them was marked, and the whole required body of earth  was thrown down into the floor of the yard.  In this case the earth fell sooner than was expected, and the men working underneath were crushed to death beneath its weight. A great number of persons immediately set to work vigorously to discover the buried men, and after great exertions they were all recovered, the last being found at about nine o'clock in the evening.  Two of the corpses were frightfully crushed, one having evidently been in a sitting posture when the bank fell upon him.   An inquest was held at the Coach and Horses, yesterday, before Dr. M'Cartney, when the evidence of Richard Head, the only person on the spot at the time, besides the three deceased, was taken.  He was in the employ of Stonebridge, and at the time was picking in one of the chimneys before referred to.  Stonebridge, Samuel Gunter, and John Lamb were undermining the bank.  Suddenly he heard one of them cry "Look out!" and before he could move from where he was at work the bank fell, burying them beneath an immense mass of earth. This was at about three o'clock in the afternoon.  It was customary on such occasions to place a look-out man on the top of the bank, to see if the earth cracked.  On this occasion, however, there was no one appointed for this purpose, the undermining not being sufficiently advanced to require the adoption of this precaution, it was thought.  The ordinary pillars had been left to sustain the bank and no danger was apprehended, the fall being quite unexpected.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death, resulting from the falling of a bank of earth. .  .  .;   [charitable collection.]

   INQUEST. -An inquest was held on Monday last, at the Butcher's Arms in the township of "Largs," by Dr. M'Cartney, coroner, on the body of Mary Meagher, a child twelve months old.  The witnesses examined were Maria Harpur, Catherine Bennett, James Bennett, and Robert Thorley Bolton.  From the evidence it appeared that the child was always very sickly, and small for its age; no blame seemed to be attached to the mother, Ellen Casey, who, although occasionally in liquor, was generaally affectionate towards it.  The evidence of Dr. Bolton went to show that the child's lungs and glands were in such a diseased state, that with the greatest care it could not have lived.  The jury returned a verdict accordingly.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 10 July 1856

INQUEST. - A coroner's inquest was held yesterday, at the Three Tuns public-house, King and Elizabeth-streets, on view of the body of a man named Timothy Daley, who was found dead the previous night in George-street by a constable on duty.  It appeared from the evidence of William M'Nish, a constable in the Sydney police, that, between seven and twelve on Tuesday night, the deceased was found lying on the footway near the corner of Bridge-street; witness sand a fellow constable and a watchman went to him, but finding that he was insensible, without any appearance of drink, procured the assistance of a doctor, who, on examination, pronounced him dead; deceased was at once removed to Dr. Elliott's, where restoratives were applied without effect, and he was then conveyed to the Infirmary dead-house.  A small medicine bottle was found upon his person; the body exhibited no signs of violence or intoxicating drinks.  Margaret Cagle, a lodging-house keeper, residing in Cumberland -street, deposed that the deceased lived in her house for the last twelve months; he was about 50 years of age, and lived by cutting firewood; he had been in the colony for about 20 years, and during the time that witness had known him she never saw him drink any kind of spirits; he was a sickly man, and generally suffered from a pain in the chest.  On the night of his decease he went to bed about 9 o'clock, but in an hour afterwards he got up and went out; as he did so, he said "I'm off!" He did not return, and in the morning she heard of his death; deceased wore a gold ring and a silver one when he left the house.  There was only one ring spoken of as being found on deceased by the policeman - a silver ring.

   Dr. Houston examined the body of deceased when brought to the Infirmary; there were no marks of violence or injuries upon it; it was thinly and insufficiently clad; believed that deceased suffered from as disease of the throat, and that the bottle found upon him contained medicine for such disease; was of opinion that deceased died from natural causes, hastened by exposure to the weather.  A finding was returned in accordance with the above, That the deceased, Timothy Daley, died suddenly on Tuesday night last by the visitation of God.

 

Maitland Mercury, 10 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday, before J. S. Parker, at the house of Mrs. Eliza Creagh, Brisbane Arms, touching the death of a male child, about five months old, not batptixxxed.  It appeared from the evidence of Dr. M'Done and the father, James Atkins, a labourer, that the deceased was a healthy child, that it slept in the same bed with the parents, and whilst in bed with them it had died suddenly, about six o'clock on the previous morning.  The jury returned a verdict - Died from natural causes; and in doing so they exempted the parents from all blame. - Herald, July 5.

A CASE OF ALLEGED SUSPICION. - Constable M'Mullen reports that a woman named  Lonoz, residing in Kent-street, had an illegitimate child some short time ago, which died on the previous day and was buried yesterday.  About a week since the mother was seen drunk in Kent-street, when she allowed the child to fall with its head on the footpath and she on top of it.  The child was afterwards attended by Dr. Muller. - Herald, July 5.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 11 July 1856

WINDSOR.

An inquest was held before the Coroner for the district, and a jury, on the 30th ultimo, at Portland Head, on the body of one Thomas Smith, a boy eleven years of age, who had been previously found drowned in the Hawkesbury.  After hearing the evidence, the jury returned a verdict of accidental drowning.

 

Maitland Mercury, 12 July 1856

THE LATE FATAL COLLISION. - We learn that the collision, on Saturday night, between the steamer Hunter and a fishing scow off the Sow and Pigs, and which caused the death of one of the men in the boat, has led to the arrest of Captain Petley on the coroner's warrant, to appear when the inquest on the body takes place.  Captain Petley has been admitted to bail. - Empire, July 9.

WATER POLICE COURT. -Wednesday. -Before Mr. G. T. Thornton, J.P. - William Petley, master of the steamer Hunter, charged with causing the death of Peter Carsten, by running down a boat in which he (Peter Carsten) was, was remanded till this day week.  Bail allowed. .  .  .  Herald, July 10.

 

Goulburn Herald, 12 July 1856

I hear that a shocking accident has occurred on the Newcastle railway. It appears that on last Saturday morning, the body of a woman named Catherine Dowe was found literally cut in two lying across the line of rail at Hexham. It appeared from the4 evidence at the inquest, that she had been drinking at a tavern in Hexham, which she left about six o'clock p.m., she was then in a state of intoxication, but nothing more was heard of her until the next morning, when her body was found as above described with a bottle of rum by her side.  The engine driver who had driven over the ground where the body was  found, was examined, but could give no account of the transaction, being quite unconscious of having met with any impediment or obstruction on the passing of the train.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

 

Maitland Mercury, 12 July 1856

   I regret to have to report, what is happily of rare occurrence in our township, namely, a fatal accident.  The daughter of Mr. John Smith, a girl 3 years of age, set fire to her clothes, in her mother's absence, and has since died of the injuries she received.  The child has been buries without any enquiry whatever being held as to the cause of death, and it really becomes the duty of Government to have some one appointed as coroner, as accidents from negligence, or, perhaps, something worse, may hereafter occur. - Correspondent of the Empire, July 9.

 

Goulburn Herald, 12 July 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT. - On Friday, the 27th ult., an inquest was held upon a stout able-bodies man, named David Finley, in the employ of Mr. M'Quade, of Gunderoo.  It appeared from the evidence that on the day in question the deceased was driving home his team, and riding on the shafts of his dray which was laden with flour and other property, and having proceeded a short distance from town his horses took fright and ran away, when deceased jumped off, and while endeavouring to stop them was knocked down, and the wheel passed over his abdomen.  He was immediately conveyed to the hospital, where he lingered in great agony until the following Thursday, when death put an end to his sufferings.  Verdict - Accidental Death.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 14 July 1856

SUDDEN DEATH - A man of the name of Henry Darcy was yesterday found dead in a water-closet, at the rear of a house in Lyndon's-lane, Parramatta-street.  He had been ailing for a long time, and was seen about a quarter of an hour before he was found dead.  The body awaits an inquest.

SUDDEN DEATH. - We regret to have to announce the sudden demise of the wife of one of our oldest and most respected fellow-citizens - Mr. B. Kemp.  The sad event took place yesterday afternoon about four o'clock.  Deceased had been in the enjoyment of tolerable health up to that time, but was suddenly attacked with illness, and expired ere medical aid could be procured.  Apoplexy is supposed to have been the cause of death. - Newcastle Telegraph of Saturday

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 14 July 1856

INQUEST. - A Coroner's inquest was held on Saturday, at the Ship Inn, Gloucester-street, on view of the body of Mary Mason, wife of William Mason, a watchman at the Circular Quay, who expired suddenly about one o'clock in the morning of the same day.  Eliza Anderson deposed that she was a widow residing in Gloucester-street; the son of the deceased celled me between 12 and 1 o'clock, saying his mother was almost dead; I immediately went and found deceased out of bed, sitting on a chair; her son was holding her by the shoulder to support her; she was gasping for breath;  there was another female in the house at the time, and the deceased fell into her arms off the seat; we stretched deceased out on the floor, she was quite dead; deceased's husband came into the house while I was there, and seemed much affected; he is a night  watchman at the Circular Quay, and was sent for; I live next door to the deceased, and never heard her complain of any sort of illness; deceased was within three weeks of her confinement; she was a hard-working woman, and assisted to support a large family of seven children.   The evidence of William Mason, son of the deceased, was much to the same effect as the previous witness.  Dr. Fredrick Mackellar being sworn, stated that he had viewed the body of Mary Ann Mason, lying in Essex-street, that from the evidence of the witness it was his opinion that the deceased had died from natural causes, but in the absence of a post mortem examination it was impossible to state the immediate cause of death.  Verdict - Died from natural causes.

 

Maitland Mercury, 15 July 1856

DEATH FOM INTEMPERANCE. - An inquest was held at the "Rock of Cashel," Morpeth, on Saturday last, by Dr. M'Cartney, on the body of Michael Cavanah, who had been found dead the previous day in the tap-room.  The witnesses examined were Roger Kennedy, John Farrell, Mary Murnane, and Dr. Getty. It appeared that the deceased, who was a horse driver in the employ of Mr. Farrell, had been addicted to hard drinking for some time past.  On Friday morning last he went into the Rock of Cashel public-house, and had one glass of rum; he did not appear drunk at the time'; his employer came in subsequently and treated him to another glass; he then, after wishing the landlady "good bye," went and sat down on a form, and about a quarter of an hour afterwards he fell off the stool, and upon examination was found to be dead.  Dr. Getty was immediately sent for; he examined the deceased, and was of opinion, that from the enlargement of the liver, the flamed appearance of the stomach, and general appearance of the intestines, that the deceased came by his death from long continued habits of drinking.  A verdict to that effect was accordingly returned.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald, 16 July 1856

MANSLAUGHTER.

AN inquest took place on Monday last, at the house of Mr. Driver, Three Tins Tavern, corner of King and Elixxxabeth streets, before Mr. J. S. Parker, Coroner, touching the death of John Robinson, who met with his death under the following circumstances:-

   Inspector Brown, of the Sydney Police, deposed that about half-past one o'clock in Saturday afternoon, he apprehended the prisoner, Robert Matchett (who with Thomas Silly were in custody before the Court on suspicion of having cause the deceased's death). The charge on which he apprehended him was that of having violently assaulted the deceased at Flander's public-house, in Sussex-street, on the 4th instant.  After being duly cautioned, the prisoner stated the row originated through some one going behind the bar whom the people sought to detain until he paid for nobblers, but their efforts were unavailing; the man Silly, then in custody, was standing talking to the deceased.  The latter said to Silly, "If you don't hold your tongue, I'll break your mouth."  Prisoner, however, still kept talking to the deceased until the latter at last struck him.  Silly returned the blows, and a fight ensued; prisoner Matchett then went to strike Silly, but was thrown down, and when he got up he saw Robinson bleeding.

   George Read, an Inspector of the Sydney Police, deposed to the apprehension of the prisoner Silly, about three o'clock oin the same afternoon, on the charge of violently assaulting the deceased; he found him in the Builders' Arms, public-house; prisoner admitted having seen the disturbance, but denied that he was guilty of the assault; witness produced a gimlet, which had been given to him by a man name Beer, with whom the prisoner lodged.

   Charles Nathan, surgeon, being duly sworn on oath, said, the deceased was admitted into the Sydney Infirmary on Monday, July the 7th, labouring under inflammation of the brain and medulla oblongata, and also a punctured wound on the left temple.   He was not able to give me any account of himself, but was informed that he had received a wound on his temple in a public-house.  He continued to get worse, and died on the 12th instant.  I have made a post mortem examination of the body, and found that the puncture wound on the temple penetrated into the middle lobe of the brain, which was the seat of a large abscess.  The brain also exhibited generally marks of inflammation, and also the medulla oblongata, which was covered with pus.  The wound was caused by a gimlet, large awl, or nail, or similar instrument, and was the cause of the mischief which ensued in death. The abscess was the result of the wound. The diameter of the opening was about a quarter of an inch.  A man might go to work after receiving such a wound, and his memory might not be impaired until inflammation set in.  Habits of drinking might have occasioned the danger.  A fall on a nail might have occasioned the wounds, but it is not probable, as the wound had a tendency downwards.  The organs of the deceased were generally healthy.

  James Flanders being sworn, deposed as follows:- I remember the 4th of this month; I was in my own house; about half-past 9 p.m. I saw Robinson, the deceased, Matchett, now in custody, and Silly, and a foreigner; they were larking; I called the deceased into the parlour; he sat down beside me on a chair; he and I were talking when Matchett came into the parlour and struck Robinson, the deceased, one blow with his clenched fist on the left temple; I immediately saw blood upon Robinson's left temple; deceased said, Matchett, why have you struck me? he replied, you have left my company, or words to that effect; they both left the parlour and had some drink together at the bar; the prisoner Silly was in front of the bar, and interfered between them,  and Robinson said, if you don't mind your own business, I will give you something for interfering with ours; he still kept on talking to Robinson and Matchett, and Robinson struck at Silly and knocked off his cap; Silly took no notice for a minute or two, when he struck Robinson; the three were scuffling together; I took hold of Matchett and threw him into the parlour; when I returned from the parlour, Silly was on the floor, and the deceased, Robinson, was kneeling over him; I took Robinson up off him; they (that is Robinson and Silly) had another scuffle inside, and continued to scuffle until they got into the street; there was no other party took part in the scuffle, except the two prisoners and the deceased, Robinson; Robinson was a little fresh; Silly might have been in my house about an hour previous to the row, and the deceased and Matchett were in the house about 15 minutes It is my belief that the deceased, Robinson, was the aggressor by striking Silly; Silly is a house carpenter; there were carpenter's tools lying on a form in the bar; the tools were brought there by Silly; I cannot say whether there was a gimlet there or no; deceased, Robinson, was sitting on a chair in the parlour, when Matchett came into the parlour and struck him over the left temple; I did not see anything in Matchett's hand; Matchett appeared excited; I was not aware that Matchett intended striking Robinson; I think Robinson and Matchett had been drinking before they came to my house; there were two rows, on in the parlour, between Matchett and the deceased Robinson, and the other between Robinson, Matchet, and Silly in front of the bar; there were two candles in the parlour; the bar is lighted by gas; Robinson made no remark about being injured after he received the blow from Matchett; I saw a mark over the left eye of the deceased, like a scratch, after deceased was struck by Matchettl; after the row was all over I observed blood trickling down his whisker, and I then examined his head, and I discovered a scratch or hole on the left temple; I think nif he had received the wound on the temple when in the parlour I would have observed it; the only motive I had in taking deceased into the parlour was to take him from the foreigner; the wound or scratch which I saw blood flowing from in the parlour was a different wound from the one which I saw the blood flowing from when the row was all over; Robinson, the deceased, and the prisoner Matchett were both upon Silly when scuffling in front of the bar; I did not see a gimlet in the hands of any of the parties; the foreigner is not now nin Sydney, nor do I believe that he saw anything of the row; the two prisoners are hard-working men, and the deceased was also a hard-working man.

   Eliza Flanders, wife of the receding witness, deposed as follows: - I was in the bar on the 4th instant, between 9 and 10o'clock at night; there were the two prisoners, Silly and Matchett, and the deceased John Robinson in front of the bar; there was a foreigner who went behind the bar, and three or four tried to hold him and make him stand treat; Robinson went into the parlour, where my husband was; I saw Robinson and Matchett soon after coming out of the parlour accompanied by my husband; Robinson had hold of Matchett as they came from the parlour; they then were trying to arrange their difficulties; I observed  a scratch over Robinson's left eye, and I saw blood on the temple; Matchett and deceased then drank together at the bar, and had arranged their misunderstanding;  during the time Matchett and deceased were arranging their differences, the prisoner Silly interfered, and Robinson told him not to interfere with their business, but he still persisted, and Robinson struck Silly on the head and knocked his cap off; Silly took up his cap, and in about a minute and a half Silly struck the deceased on the left temple; Robinson returned the blow, and Matchett  went to Robinson's assistance; my husband pulled Matchett away and  said that one was enough on Silly; Robinson got Silly on the floor, and my husband took him off him; they both got up and had a scuffle outside the door; when that was over Silly attempted to get in, but I resisted him and refused to admit him into the house; there were carpenters' tools lying on a seat in the bar, which were brought in by Silly; I cannot say whether there was a gimlet amongst them; Matchett and deceased returned to the house after Silly had left, and I then discovered blood trickling from the left temple.  

   Jane Robinson, the wife of the deceased, residing in the lane in Sussex-street, stated as follows: The deceased was my husband, he was about thirty-two years of age, by trade a shoemaker.  On Friday night the 4th July, my husband came home between ten and eleven o'clock; he was slightly in liquor; I was in bed; I got up and lit a candle; I observed blood on his left whisker, and on looking at his temple I saw a punctured wound, and a watery fluid flowing from it; I also observed a lump on his forehead, and his lips were swollen; he went to bed, and I put pillows under his head; he slept  well all night; between five and six o'clock next morning he got up, dressed, and left the house; he returned about eight o'clock; he could not eat his breakfast; he again left the house and returned about one o'clock in the afternoon; he complained of being sick, and went to bed; Dr. Duigan was sent for and attended twice, and recommended his removal to the Infirmary, which was done on the Monday morning following; I do not know of my own knowledge how he receive the injury; my husband was at times warm tempered.

   The jury returned a verdict of guilty of manslaughter against both prisoners, Silly as being principal, and Matchett as accessory before the fact.  They were accordingly committed to take their trial at the next sittings of the Central Criminal Court.

 

Empire (Sydney), 16 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held at the Albert Inn, Parramatta-street, on Monday last, by J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner for Sydney, on the body of Henry Darcy, aged 60, who was found dead the previous afternoon, in a water closet belonging to the housed of one Charles Hale, London-lane, off Parramatta-street.  From the evidence adduced, it appeared that the deceased came from Bathurst about three months ago, in a sickly state.  He took up his abode with Mr. Charles Hale and was attended by a medical adviser. Between one and two o'clock on Sunday afternoon, he suddenly left the house,, and was found, soon after, lying dead in his back on the floor of the water closet. W. C. M'Dene, M.D., deposed that he knew the deceased, who was about 45 years of age, and had been ailing about three years.; he was suffering from cancer of the tongue, which was so [ond] that it prevented him from taking any solid food; a few days prior to his death, he labored under acute bronchitis; on Sunday morning last, witness was called, and found him dying; he could safely certify that death was the result of natural causes; he strongly suspected that the disease in the deceased's tongue arose from his smoking tobacco pipes used by persons suffering from syphilitic complaints.  The verdict was to the effect that death was the result of disease brought on by natural causes.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 17 July 1856

GOULBURN.

ON Saturday evening, an inquest was held before the coroner, Dr. Waugh, on the body of George Begg.  Deceased had been for a few years a partner in the form of Fawcett and Co., and had had during that period the entire management of the business as well as of the post office in this town.  A month or two since the business was taken by Mr. Bull, who engaged the services of the deceased.  It appears that on the Tuesday previous to the inquest, deceased left Mr. Bull's employ and took up his quarters at the Commercial Hotel, where he was last seen on Wednesday evening.  As he was not there on Thursday, it was supposed he had gone to some of his friends in the town, but not returning on Friday enquiries were made, and the fact of his being missing was communicated to the constable, who pursued the enquiries without effect.  On Saturday afternoon information was given that a little girl named Garner had found a coat in the pocket of which was a pocket-book, which was identified as belonging to the deceased.  The being found near a large water hole in the vicinity of the Scotch Kirk, suspicions were aroused as to the fate of the owner.  The boat was forthwith procured, and Mr. Fitzpatrick with two others searched, when the former with his grappling hook found the body.  The jury were not able to agree on a verdict, several of them considering that the deceased drowned himself whilst suffering from the effects of intoxication, the others thinking from the evidence adduced that a verdict of found drowned was the only one to be arrived at.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 18 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - Yesterday an inquest was held before the coroner, Mr. J. S. Parker, at Darlinghurst Gaol, on the body of Alice Harper.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased and her husband were committed to gaol on the 13th of May, for keeping a disorderly house.  She was in a bad state of health when admitted, and continued so until yesterday afternoon, when she died.  Mr. Galbraith, dispenser of the gaol, stated that she was suffering from dysentery, which terminated in dropsy.  When she came into the gaol she was much emaciated.  Verdict - Died from natural causes.

 

Empire (Sydney), 18 July 1856

DEATH OF A CHILD THROUGH NEGLECT AND EXPOSURE TO COLD. - A coroner's inquest was held on Tuesday last, before J. S. Parker, Esq., and a jury of twelve, at the Storm King, public-house, Botany-street, Chippendale, on the body of a child named Thomas Taylor, aged ten months, whose death was occasioned by convulsions, consequent upon teething and neglect on the part of the mother.  Police Constable Edward Slattery deposed that he knew the parents of the deceased., George and Jane Taylor, between three and four years; he had several times take the mother into custody for drunkenness; once, about three months ago, he confined her for neglecting the deceased child; having been informed that the deceased died suddenly that morning, he went to the house to make inquiry about it; the deceased was lying on a sofa dead; the father was in the house, quite drunk, and unable no give the least account of the child's death; he examined it, and observed some black spots on the neck; the finger nails were also black; he considered it his duty to report the case; the parents were both intoxicated at the time of the inquiry; they had three or four more children; the father was a shoemaker.

  William Henry Smith, landlord of the Storm King, deposed that on Tuesday afternoon, between three and four o'clock, Taylor, with his wife and two children came into his house; he observed that they had been drinking; after purchasing a box of float lights from them for 3d, witness gave them something to neat; the deceased child was then in the mother's arms, and appeared to be in good health; after eating the husband and wife had two glasses of colonial ale; after this a strange female came in, and treated Taylor to a glass of rum; they then left together; about nine o'clock that morning (Wednesday) Taylor came and said that the child was dead, and asked witness if her would give him a pint of rum to give to the people what washed and laid out the body of the deceased; witness replied, "I do not know, I will go into your house, and see if the child is dead;" he went and saw the deceased; while he was there a female said that the child had died from convulsions, and showed him the finger nails of the left hand of the deceased; he observed that the nails were a little black; after this, Taylor and his wife were at witnesses house talking about the deceased; Taylor said to his wife, "It's your fault;" he had never seen them ill-treat the child; they appeared to be sober then, and the female appeared to be capable of suckling her child. Jane Henkin [or Higgins], a   widow, deposed that she went on Tuesday evening last to George Taylor's house; Jane Taylor was there, and appeared as if she had been drinking, but knew what she was about; the deceased was then asleep in bed; about half an hour afterwards, Jane Taylor left the deceased in witness's lap, and went out; witness then observed that the child had a kind of hiccough; it moaned slightly, and appeared to be very uneasy; the mother returned about an hour after, and had evidently been drinking more spirits; witness then saw her suckle the child, undress it, and go to bed; Taylor come home with his wife, and had also been drinking, but knew what he was about; the place was very cold; about 4 o'clock the following morning, Jane Taylor aroused her husband to light a candle, saying the child was dead; when the light was procured, witness saw the deceased lying on its back in the middle of the bed quite dead; the child had only a little flannel petticoat to keep it warm; witness did not hear the child cry, or make the slightest noise during the night; she heard Taylor say to his wife, "It is your fault the child died;" to which she replied, "It is not my fault."  William Williams, a publican, residing at Chippendale, deposed that he employed the father of the deceased lately out of charity; Jane Taylor used to come with the child to see her husband; the child appeared to be in a very delicate health; he spoke to her several times about keeping it out so late at night during the cold weather, and about varying the child carelessly under her arm, as if it were a parcel.

   William J. Jenkins, surgeon, deposed that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased child, and found the lungs much congested, the stomach contracted, and the bowels full of flatus; the child had been under the influence of teething and neglect on the part of the parents would accelerate the child's death; the house the parents resided in was a miserable place, and their bedding was extremely scanty. 

   The jury found that Jane Taylor, the mother of the deceased child, was guilty of manslaughter, in having through drunkenness neglected and exposed here child to the inclemency of the weather, and they acquitted George Taylor, the father, but requested that he might be reprimanded. [See also Sydney Morning Herald, 21 July; letter from W. J. Jenkins re his evidence.]

 

Empire (Sydney), 19 July 1856

ALLEGED NEGLECT OF A PATIENT BY A MEDICAL MAN        .

            The following correspondence, relative to the death of a lady , name Mrs. Lane, of Pott's Point, Woolloomooloo, has been handed to us for publication by the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., who declined holding an inquest upon the body.  [Owen William Williams, M.D.]

 

Goulburn Herald, 19 July 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT AT RYALSTONE.

   On the 3rd instant a shocking and fatal accident occurred at this place.  A man named Thomas Burns, a little settler, horse-breaker, &c., residing about three miles from this township, had been at Cunningham Creek races, in charge of two horses belonging to Mr. Cox, of Dabee, to run at the races.  After the races were over, Burns, in company with Mr. Cox's overseer and two others, were  quietly returning home, when deceased's jockey cap blew off, and he alighted from his horse to pick it up, his companions slowly walking their horses onward; presently the deceased came galloping after; at the instant of his coming up abreast of them, and in the act of reining up his horse, his body swerved from an erect position, at the same time his head striking against a tree, immediately fracturing his skull in a most dreadful manner; her ferll from his horse dead, without uttering a moan or making a struggle.  Being only a short distance from Mr. Redford's house, near which the races had been held, the overseer galloped back, procured a cart, and removed the lifeless body to Mr. R's house. A magisterial inquiry was held, resulting in a verdict of accidental death.  Burns was a married man, but without any family, and had fort many years resided in this neighbourhood, frequently riding at races. - Empire.

 

Empire (Sydney), 21 July 1856

THE CASE OF RUNNING DOWN OFF THE LIGHT-SHIP.

   William Petley. Master of the steamer Hunter, was again brought up on Saturday morning, at the Water Police Court, in order to receive judgment at the hands of the presiding magistrate (George Thornton, Esq.)  .  .  . 

   The accident, doubtless you regret as much as one can; it was one of those unfortunate events against which no amount of human foresight or caution could provide.  I, therefore, in conclusion, declare you wholly innocent of the charge brought against you.  Your conduct in the matter is entirely blameless.

  Captain Petley, who seemed deeply affected, expressed his regret at the unhappy occurrence, and after thanking the bench, withdrew.

   CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Saturday, on the body of a woman who was reported to have been found in the water at the foot of Margaret-street, on Friday; as the body had not been identified, and there being no evidence to how she came by her death, the jury returned an open verdict of Found drowned. Shortly after the jury had separated, the body was identified by one of her own daughters, as that of Jane Hennessey, wife of a carpenter and builder, in Goulburn-street.  She was [64] years of age, and had been the mother of 17 children, 8 of whom are living.  She was unfortunately addicted to drinking, and had not been seen by any of her family since Wednesday last.  It is supposed that she must have fallen into the water while intoxicated.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 22 July 1856

QUESANBEYAN.

   A dreadful occurrence (says a correspondent) took place last Wednesday, in this town.  A man named Wehday, while in the charge of a bullock dray, got tipsy, and was thrown off his loading; he was almost instantly killed, the team passing over his body.

   There was also another sad occurrence.  A man named Jackson, in the service of Mr. Tomlinson, was stacking a load of hay, when he fell down suddenly, and was so severely injured by the pitchfork, that his bowels protruded, and he was fatally injured.  He died almost immediately.

   There was another inquest held on the person of Matthew Firbisher, who died last week in the service of Mr. Tomlinson; the jury returned a verdict of Died by the visitation of God.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 22 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Saturday last, at the house of Charles Smith. Botany, relative to the derath of William C. Maudsley, aged 45 years, who was found dead in the bush in the vicinity.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was a bush carpenter residing at Botany, that he was very much addicted to drink, and that he was found lying dead in the bush, with his face downwards.  Mr. Smith gave evidence to the effect that about 3 o'clock on Thursday the deceased, who was working for him, complained of a pain in his chest and retired top his bed, and that, though sent for regularly, he did not attend at meal-time afterwards.  From the evidence of Dr. Jenkins the jury were informed that the deceased died of apoplexy accelerated by habits of intemperance, and a verdict accordingly was returned

 

Empire (Sydney), 23 July 1856

FOUND DROWNED. - An inquest was held yesterday at the King's Head Inn, Lower George-street, by J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner, touching the death of a man, unknown, who was found drowned on Monday morning in the Sydney Cove, facing the Water Police station.  George Henry Lord, a waterman, stated that he discovered the body of the deceased, about seven o'clock on Monday morning, in the middle of Sydney Cove; he was proceeding to the Circular Quay when he perceived the body; he secured it, and took it to the Water Police Office; the deceased appeared to be about thirty-five years of age, had light hair and little whiskers; he had no hat, but wore an alpaca coat like a shooting coat; and waistcoat of the same material; trousers, of striped tweed, and an old pair of short boots; witness observed that one side of the deceased's neck was much swollen; the body did not appear to have been long in the water; from the dress, he thought the deceased was a landsman, and a stranger; the body was about 200 yards from the wharf; it was that of a small sixxxed man about five feet four inches high; nothing but an old penknife was found upon the body; the clothes were not soiled; witness also noticed a black mark or bruise over both eyes.

 N b Charles M'Kay, M.D., deposed that he had examined the body of the deceased; the only marks he could discover were a slight abrasion of the skin over the bridge of the nose; the body was decomposing fast, and he could not say whether the wound was occasioned before or after death; it might have been occasioned by a fall; from the rigid state of the muscles, he was of opinion that death had been caused by suffocation from drowning; the body appeared to have been in the water two or three days.  The jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased, not known, was found drowned on Monday morning, and that he was about thirty-five years of age.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 24 July 1856

To the Editor of the Sydney Morning Herald.

SIR, - In April last I observed in your journal a paragraph headed "Fatal affray at Cockatoo Island," stating that a prisoner named Flannery or Flannagan, had met his death by violence, and, that an inquest had been held and adjourned; and, as I have never heard anything of the matter since, I suppose it has been hushed up, as is the custom at Cockatoo.  I should like to be informed whether the inquest has ever been resumed, and if so, what was the result of it, and in what issue of your journal I shall find a report thereof. .  .  .    RELATIVE OF THE DECEASED, July 22, 1856.

 

Empire (Sydney), 25 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - J. S. Parker, Esq., held an inquest yesterday at the Constitution Hotel, York-street, touching the death of a man named Phillip Brenan, aged fifty-eight years, who died suddenly in the above house, between midnight and one o'clock yesterday morning.  On Tuesday night last, it appeared the deceased, a stranger, slept at the Constitution Hotel, and went out apparently in good health at an early hour in the following morning; he returned on Wednesday evening, and retired to bed about seven o'clock.  About an hour after, he called for assistance, and said he was dying.  A medical man was in the house and prescribed an emetic and an application of mustard to the deceased's stomach. About midnight Dr. Robertson was sent for, but the patient expired before his arrival.  Two papers were found in the pockets of the deceased, one a certificate of his discharge with a good character from his late employer as a cook; the other a recommendation of him to the Sydney Dispensary by the Rev. Robert Allwood.  The jury deemed it unnecessary to call for medical testimony, and found that the deceased died from the visitation of God.

 

Goulburn Herald, 26 July 1856

FOUND DROWNED. - About seven o'clock on Friday morning, the body of a female, whose name is at present unknown, was found floating in the water, off the bottom of Margaret-street, by a waterman named Andrew Melville. The deceased appeared to be about forty years of age, and was attired in a brown merino dress, black cloth boots, white stockings, and white petticoats.  She wore a gold ring and a keeper on the fourth finger of the left hand.  The body was conveyed to thr Benevolent Asylum, where it now awaits an inquest.  [Jane Hennessey.]

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 26 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUESTS.

AN inquest, commenced on the 21st instant and concluded on the 24th, was held at the Wheelwrights' Arms, Petersham, before Mr. J. S. Parker, city coroner, touching the death of an aged man named John Cahill.  Susan Jones, a married woman, and a daughter of the deceased, was taken into custody on suspicion of having caused her father's death, by striking him over the eye with a billet of wood.

   Denis Linane, constable at Petersham, deposed: That about the 16th of June last, at 7 o'clock in the evening, he was going on duty, and while standing at Jones' corner he saw Dr. Redhead and Mrs. John Jones, publican's wife, proceeding down the street and eventually entering the deceased's house. Some boys were close at hand, and on asking them what was up at John Cahill's, one of them answered that "his eye was out of bed."  Witness then went over to the place, and on entering the room saw the deceased on the sofa with the doctor examining his eye, over which there was distinctly visible a wound of a bruised kind; the deceased appeared to be under the influence of  drink, a vice to which he was much addicted; the following morning witness returned and found the deceased in much the same state; he then made inquiries about the case, not thinking that there was anything serious about it, when deceased's daughter (the before the Court), Susan Jones, said while her father was under the influence of drink and pulling her about, as well as pulling a large quantity of hair from her head at the time she was lighting the fire, and had a small piece of wood in her hand which she either flung or struck him with; was not positive which she said; at this time there was no apprehension of danger to the man's life, and consequently no suspicion of anything being very wrong; the deceased got better, and was out after receiving the injury, and lived for about five weeks; he never mentioned to witness how it was that he received the injury; had reported the case to the inspector some short time after the occurrence took place; during the time that deceased went out after being injured, witness saw him the worse for liquor.

  John Redhead, being duly sworn, deposed, I am a legally qualified medical practitioner, and reside in Sydney, and about a month ago I was called by Mrs. John Jones, wife of Mr. Jones, who keeps the Wheelwrights' Arms public house, Petersham, to see a man named John Cahill, lying ill at his own house, close by; I found the deceased lying on a sofa in a front room in a partial state of insensibility; I examined him, and found that he was drunk, and also discovered a contusion over the left eye, penetrating the ball of the eye; he would not allow me to examine him much, as he seemed to suffer much pain; the humours of the eye were escaping, and, as I considered the case dangerous, to have him removed at once into the Infirmary; they did not remove him, and the following morning I was sent for, and again recommended removing him to the Infirmary as the only chance of saving his life; they promised to do so; I saw no more of him until a fortnight ago, when sent for to see him again. I found him then suffering from inflammation of the brain; I prescribed for him, but considered his  case very dangerous; I attended him for several days, and recommended a second medical gentleman to be called in; Dr. Walker was called in, and both attended deceased; for about three days; deceased appeared to rally a little, but never was sensible, and kept sinking, when he expired last Sunday morning; by order of the Coroner I made a post mortem examination; on examining the covering of the head found there contusion over the left eye; I removed the bone and found the brain much diseased; the left anterior lobe of the cerebrum I found an abscess containing about four table-spoons of matter; the right ventricles were also full of blood; the left eye was completely destroyed; upon opening the chest and abdomen, I found the heart very flabby, the liver very much diseased, as also the omentum, mesentery, and intestines; the cause of death was from the injury the eye received from the blunt instrument crushing the eye and dissecting the nerve, producing inflammation, and ultimately suppuration, accelerated, no doubt, from the deceased's intemperate habits; I asked how it occurred when one of the party (I do not know now who it was) said "Mind your own business;" great violence, no doubt, was used, and a fall on anything like the point of a stick would cause it, as the wound was irregular, and tended inwards and upwards.  I told the parties to discontinue allowing deceased anything in the shape of spirits; I saw the daughter of deceased there, and she seemed very anxious about her father (the deceased); deceased was never in a state to be able to tell how it occurred; deceased was about 60 years of age, and much reduced, and might have lived for years, if his eye had not been injured.

   Dr. Walker concurred generally in the evidence of Dr. Redhead, and expressed an opinion that if the friends of the deceased had been in a position to command the necessary amount of medicine and nourishment, he would have recovered.

   Mr. Thomas Dean, chemist, gave evidence as to making up a prescription for Cahill, which in the first instance was called by a young man, who was so drunk as scarcely to be able to mount his horse, but which, although ordered by Mr. Redhead, to be repeated, was not called for again.

   Dr. Redhead, recalled, deposed that the daughter, Susan Jones, not administering the medicine as prescribed, lost the only chance there was, if any really existed, of saving the man's life.

   The jury found a verdict in the following terms:- we find that the above individual came by his death from inflammation of the brain produced from an injury received over the left eye, as well as crushing the ball of the eye completely; and we find his death was accelerated by drunkenness; and we regret there is no evidence before us to show, beyond suspicion, how the said injury received  was inflicted.  At the same time, we are led to believe that the deceased, from his drunken habits, was likely to inflict the injury by falling himself on some blunt instrument.

   Another inquest was held, yesterday, at the house of Mr. Richard Driver, touching the death of a man named Thomas Bally, aged 60 years.  It appeared from the evidence of John M'Gregor, constable, that the deceased; as stated in our issue of yesterday, suddenly staggered, fell, and died in Clarence-street, on Wednesday night, before he could be conveyed to the Infirmary.  The deceased, who appeared to be aged and inform, had a small basket on his arm a few minutes before his death.  Edmund Lexton deposed that he knew the deceased, who used to work for Hughes and Hoskings as a kind of blacksmith, for 20 years; that he was seldom sober, and drank very hard; that he was a man of about 50 years of age, and lost the use of one arm, and had been about thirty years in the colony.  The court returned a verdict of Died from natural causes, accelerated by frequent acts of intemperance.  [See also Empire, 26 July.]

 

Goulburn Herald, 26 July 1856

BUNGONIA.

On Wednesday evening , a man, whose name had not yet been ascertained, apparently about 60 or 70 years of age, called at Mr. Armstrong's inn, and was apparently in good health; after partaking moderately of refreshments, he was shown to his bed, and he was found dead therein on the following morning.

   I have been hitherto unable to ascertain any particulars relative to the deceased's history, but as an inquest is to be held upon the body today, something tending to throw a light upon the subject will doubtless transpire., .  .  . 24th July.

 

Goulburn Herald, 26 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held at the Carriers' Arms, on the body of a man named John Garratt, about 45 years of age, who was drowned in a water-hole of the Mulwarree Creek.  It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased had been for about 3 months in the service of Mr. Davis, tanner, and about six weeks since last Saturday, Mr. Davis saw him outside the house of a butcher, named Carron; he had a bottle of rum with him; that was the last time witness saw him alive; he did not return to work on the following Monday, but having been a man greatly addicted to intoxication, and also notorious for absconding from his employment, no particular notice was taken of the matter, excepting that he (Mr. Davis) looked at the crossing-place over the creek, to see if he could trace the deceased's footsteps.  He expected to hear that deceased was in some other employment, when he meant to get out a warrant for him.  Deceased was heard no more of until last Wednesday; when his body was discovered floating in the water by a little boy.  Verdict - Death by drowning.

    Inquest. - Dr. Waugh held an inquest yesterday at Mr. Armstrong's Inn, Bungonia, on the body of a man whose name was not known.  It appeared from the evidence that the man had arrived in Bungonia in a very feeble state of health, had taken up lodgings at Mr. Armstrong's inn.  The coroner, Dr. Waugh, believed the deceased to be a person named Morris, who was liberated from Goulburn gaol about a fortnight ago.  Verdict - Died by the visitation of God.

 

Empire (Sydney), 28 July 1856

SUDDEN DEATH. - On Saturday night, a man named Alexander Gould, a carpenter, residing in Middle-street, Chippenham, being awakened by violent pains, rose out of his bed, and was walking on the floor when he reeled and fell down the step ladder which led to the apartment where he slept.  He never spoke after the fall, an expired in about half an hour.  An inquest will be held on the body this day.

INFANTICIDE. - The body of a newly-born male infant was discovered yesterday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock, by a boy who was playing in the enclosure at the Colonial Secretary's Office, Hyde Park.  It was wrapped in a piece of old Orleans shirt, and from the marks on the throat and face, there is no doubt that the child had been violently put to death.  The body has been removed to the Benevolent Asylum, where it awaits an inquest.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 29 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUESTS.

AN inquest was held yesterday, at the house of Mr. Parkinson, Wellington Inn, before Mr. J. S. Parker, City Coroner, touching the death of a man named James M'Guiness, aged 40 years.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was in the employ of a man named Thomas Frakes, a dealer, and was in the habit of travelling about the country.  On Saturday night deceased accompanied witness to a place in George-street South, for the purpose of bleeding a horse which was afflicted with some complaint.  Deceased was drunk at the time, and after the operation had been performed, he was entrusted with the halter to lead the animal about.  Shortly afterwards witness ordered him to go home and go to bed, and in compliance with the order, deceased left, but he was not heard of until the next morning, when he was found dead on the Ultimo Estate,  surrounded by the blood which had been taken from the horse.  Dr. Smith gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from exposure to cold, accelerated by intemperance, in accordance with which a verdict was returned.

   A second inquest .  .  .   [Alexander Gould] .  .  ;.  A verdict of accidental death was accordingly returned, with a recommendation that a railing should be affixed for the purpose of protecting the entrance to the ladder.

   A third inquest was held at the house of William Norris, Royal Oak Inn, touching the death of an infant child, seven weeks old.  Dr. Mackellar deposed that he had viewed the body of the deceased child at the house of Andrew Fenwick, its father, and from the appearance of the body and history of the case, it was his opinion that the child had overlaid on the pillow, and that death was caused by suffocation thus produced; had known the parents for some years, and had always found them sober and well conducted persons.  The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death.

   Another inquest was held on the same day, concerning the death of a newly-born infant, which was found on Sunday morning in the enclosed ground, adjacent to the Colonial Architect's department; but we are not at liberty as yet to publish the particulars.  We may observe, however, that the medical testimony went to prove that the child had been born alive, and that although there was no air in the lungs, yet, if it had been properly attended to, it would have lived.  There were no marks of violence, except a scratch on the neck. The jury returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against some person or persons unknown.

 

Maitland Mercury, 29 July 1856

DEATH FROM A FALL FROM A CART. - An inquest was held on Saturday, the 26th, at Four Mile Creek, before the coroner, Dr. M'Cartney, on the body of James Armitage, a miner, who on the previous day had been in East Maitland, and on his return, while near Mr. Parthing's stables, was observed to get up and stand in a cart for a few minutes.  He then fell over the cart-wheel, soon after became insensible; was visited by Dr. Bolton, who saw at once the nature of the injury.  The jury returned a verdict of - Died from injury to the spine, accidentally received while under the influence of drink.

DEATH FROM THE FALL OF A TREE. - An inquest was held yesterday at Oakville, before the coroner, Dr. M'Cartney, on the body of Ann Nora Walker.  From the evidence it appeared that on Thursday the deceased had been cutting down a sapling for the purpose of getting an opossum for her dogs.  In endeavouring to escape the falling tree, she ran in the wrong  direction; it fell on her, and though she was drawn from under it by her daughter, she never rallied from the injuries she had received.  She did not send for medical assistance, but on Saturday her daughter fetched Dr. Bolton, who administered the usual remedies.  She died on Saturday night, her death being caused by concussion producing a collapse.  About three weeks previously the deceased had fallen from her horse, but was recovering from the injury she then received.

   SUDDEN DEATH. - A man between 50 and 60 years of age, who had not yesterday been identified, was found on Wednesday night in Clarence-street, where he had fallen down suddenly, apparently in a fit.  He was immediately conveyed to the Infirmary, but he expired before reaching the institution.  He was a man about five feet eight inches high, with dark brown hair, and whiskers partly grey.  He was dressed in pepper and salt, or "parsons' grey" trousers, and brown doeskin shooting coat; he had also on four waistcoats, three of which were light coloured, and the outer one was tweed.  An inquest will be held today, at Mr. Driver's, Three Tuns Tavern. - Herald, July 25.

MERTON. - A correspondent writes on the 18th - This day eight days we had a copious fall of rain, and on Saturday the river rose so that it was impossible for men or horses to cross.  A constable, who was escorting a prisoner from Merriwa to Merton, in attempting to cross on horseback, was swept off the horse and both men were drowned.  The bodies have not yet been recovered, although diligent search has been made for them.   .  .  .  Empire, 24th July.

FATAL ACCIDENT. - A man in the employment of Mr. Petrie, named Patrick Maher, was killed yesterday by the falling of a tree - death was instantaneous.  The fatal accident occurred in the vicinity of the Quarry, where the deceased had been at work, beyond the Breakfast Creek.  The deceased, we understand, has left a family of four children.  An inquest was held yesterday afternoon by Dr. Cannan, the Coroner, and a verdict in accordance with the fact returned. -  Moreton Bay Courier, July 5.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 30 July 1856

CORONER'S INQUESTS.

AN inquest was held yesterday, at the home of Mr. Richard Driver, Three Tuns Tavern, touching the death of Margaret Rose, a child about six and a-half years of age.  Constable Lane deposed that, on Thursday evening last, about half-past 8 o'clock, in consequence of information received, he went to the residence of a Mrs. Leonards, and then saw, in the arms of her daughter, the deceased child, wrapped up in a blanket.  On examining her, he found that she was very seriously burned, and had her immediately conveyed to the Infirmary.  Upon asking her how the accident occurred, the child said that her clothes caught fire whilst taking a piece of barm from the fire-place.  Mrs. Leonards, who appeared to the constable to be under the influence of drink, in the meantime had been lying on the sofa dozing or sleeping, after a hard day's work.  She was awakened by the screams of the child, but not before the clothes of the latter had been literally burnt off.  She died on Sunday morning, and the jury returned a verdict of accidental death.  Mrs. Leonards stated, in her evidence, that she had only drank two glasses of ale during the day.

   Another inquest was held on the same day at the Hand and Heart, Liverpool-street, relative to the death of a young woman named Bridget Mahir.  Susan Mahir, the mother of the deceased, deposed that the latter had been in the service of a shopkeeper named M'Grath; that on Saturday she came home supported by two women, from the Glebe buss, complaining of pains all over her body; she had not met with any accident, nor had she eaten anything out of her usual course; she was attended by Dr. Grey, and received the usual treatment in such cases, but she died in about seven hours and a half after coming home.  Verdict - Died from natural causes.

 

Empire (Sydney), 30 July 1856

SUDDEN DEATH.  Bridget Mahir case.  Duncan M'Phee, surgeon, deposed that he had examined the body of the deceased, and found considerable swelling of the abdomen, and of the lower extremities; and, from the appearances of the body, was of opinion that death was caused by ascites or dropsy.  Verdict - Died suddenly from natural causes.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 1 August 1856

   On Tuesday an inquest was held before the coroner, Dr. Waugh, and a respectable jury, on the body of a man named Samuel Heathcote [also Heathwood], who died the previous evening.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased had during the last two years been in the employment of Mr. Roberts, the proprietor of the Goulburn Hotel; that during the last few weeks deceased had been driving the Braidwood mail; that on Monday last he was driving the mail into Goulburn as usual, when suddenly he was observed by one of the passengers to stoop down, as if trying to pick up his whip, and he then fell from the vehicle to the ground.  The coach was stopped immediately, and on the passengers coming up to him, the deceased uttered three groans and expired.  The unfortunate man had for the last few years been suffering from a disease of the heart, having at times during that period been under medical treatment.  The jury returned a verdict that the deceased died from disease of the heart.  [See also Empire (Sydney), 1 August.]

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 5 August 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST.  An inquest was held yesterday, at the house of Mr. Francis Cohen, son of the deceased, 42 Dowling-street, Sydney, touching the death of a female, named Sarah Cohen. It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was in the receipt of a regular income, that she lived with her son Francis, that she was much addicted to intemperance, was often found lying against the doors of people's houses in a beastly state of intoxication; that on Friday night last she came home and was found lying in the front room, upon the ground, evidently intoxicated.  She was then lying upon her stomach, and was allowed to remain in this position until morning, to which, it seems, she was frequently accustomed.  In the morning, between 8 and 9 o'clock, she was again visited, when life was found to be exti8nct.  She had several bruises on her person, but not sufficient to cause death.  According to the medical evidence she died from suffocation brought on by frequent acts of intemperance, in pursuance of which the jury returned a verdict. [Se also Empire (Sydney), 5 August:  John Moon, surgeon, re-sworn, having made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, described the state in which he found it, and said he was of opinion that death was caused by a rupture of the pulmonary blood vessels, which, from her position on the floor, produced suffocation. The jury found that the deceased Sarah Cohen, residing in Duke-street, Woolloomooloo, died from suffocation, brought on from frequent acts of intemperance, and not otherwise.]

 

Empire (Sydney), 5 August 1856

LAW INJHTELLIGFEBCE.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

MONDAY, AUHUST 4.

MURDER.

   Patrick Quin was charged with having, at Rooty Hill, on the 2nd of June last, feloniously killed and murdered Katherine Quin his wife.  Plea; not guilty. .  .  . 

   DR. T. O. Clarke, Coroner for the Penrith District, deposed to having known the prisoner for many years; the latter ostensible gained his livelihood by keeping a fruit-stall; when informed of the death of the woman known as Mrs. Quin, witness proceeded to the hut occupied by the prisoner, which stands about twenty yards from the high road; witness there saw the bed on which deceased died, which was much stained with blood; also a woman's cap, and other articles, all of which were much stained with blood; on examining the body witness found a severe wound on the left hand, another above the right ear, two inches long, with a fracture on the skull about half an inch long at the same place; and several marks of blows were on the legs; the deceased was a woman of very intemperate habits, and witness was of opinion that the deceased died from loss of blood which, in a person of intemperate habits, was more likely to produce collapse than in a person of temperate habits; the prisoner stated to witness that the deceased had fallen out of bed, and that the wound on the head was caused by her striking the drawers.

   Cross-examined by Mr. Holroyd: He (witness) was the coroner; there was no other medical practitioner present at the inquest; could not say whether it is satisfactory for an inquest to be held under such circumstances without the presence of another medical man; by adjourning the inquest witness might have procured the attendance of one of the other medical men in Penrith; one of the posterior branches of the temporal artery was divided by the wound on the head; the body smelt of rum; witness did not examine the stomach of the deceased, because he considered it would be fruitless, could not say whether the deceased had drunk much rum immediately previous to her death; her doing so might have aggravated the effects of the wounds. .  .  .

   The learned judge then lucidly summed up thre case, and the jury retired.  After a short absence the jury returned with a verdict of guilty of manslaughter.  Sentence - Five years hard labour on the roads.

MANSLAUGHTER.

   John Frazer was charged with having, at Sydney, in the month of April last, caused the death of his wife, Elizabeth Frazer, by beating her.  .  .  . 

   John Yates Rutter, surgeon, deposed to seeing the deceased on the 16th April, who very reluctantly allowed witness to examine her; she appeared to be bruised all over her body, particularly about the breasts and hips, and appeared to be in a very weak state of health; recommended her removal to the Infirmary.

   Cross-examined by prisoner: Asked the deceased how she received the wounds, but that she did not appear willing to state; deceased said she had hurt herself by a fall, and that it was all her own fault; witness was of opinion the wounds were dangerous if not properly attended to; the house in which witness saw the deceased was in a wretched state - there was not a bed in it  .  .  . 

   Dr. Alleyne deposed to assisting at the post mortem examination of the deceased; saw her also the day after she was admitted to the Infirmary; she appeared very much bruised all over her back, hips, and thighs, - considered her in a dangerous state; witness was of opinion that the cause of death was the excessive discharge from the abscesses caused by the injuries she had received; the bruises could not have been caused by a fall on the floor or the corner of a box.  .  .  . 

   The jury retired to consider their verdict, and, after an absence of some hours, returned into Court with a verdict of guilty, accompanied with a recommendation to mercy.

   The prisoner was then sentenced to ten years; hard labour on the roads.

 

Empire (Sydney), 5 August 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held this morning, at the Court-house, before the coroner J. S.  Stacey, Esq., on the body of James Conway, a mariner, lately arrived here from New Zealand, and who had been under medical treatment.  From the evidence before the jury it appeared he had gone to the closet at the house where he lodged on Sunday morning last where he was found by one of the inmates soon after quite dead.  The finding of the jury was died by the visitation of God. - Newcastle, August 4. [See also Sydney Morning Herald, 6 August: A post mortem examination shewed extensive disease of the lungs.]

 

Empire (Sydney), 6 August 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday before J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Captain Cook Inn, Clyde-street, touching the death of a child named David Evans, aged four months.  From the evidence it appeared that the parents of the deceased lived in an underground, damp apartment in Clyde-street, Miller's Point, and that the child had been sickly from its birth.  Dr. Mackellar, having viewed the body, said he was of opinion, from the appearance and the history given by the witnesses, that the deceased had been afflicted with disease of the lungs, and died from that complaint.  He also considered that the apartment being damp and underground was injurious to the deceased, and that medical aid would have been of little service.  Verdict - Died from natural causes.

 

Bathurst Free Press, 9 August 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held by Dr. Busby, on Thursday afternoon on the body of John Duddridge, shoemaker, who died suddenly on the morning of that day from the effects of intemperance.  Mr. Smith deposed - I am a boot and shoemaker, residing in Howick-street; the deceased has been in my employ upwards of three years and a half as shoemaker.  He was a man of extremely intemperate habits; for the last ten days he has been drinking hard during which time he has done no work.  Since Sunday he has been in a state of delirium tremens.  About half-past twelve this morning I was awakened by my apprentice Edward Kirkman, who informed me that the deceased had fallen down stairs.  I then went to him and assisted him up stairs and got him into bed; at that time he had nothing on but his shirt; his mouth was bleeding slightly but beyond that he seemed to have sustained no injury by the fall.  I saw nothing more of him until about half-past nine this morning, when in consequence of having been told that he was dead, I examined his body; he was not quite cold, but was getting stiff; he was lying in the bed in which the jury have just seen him.

   Edward Kirkman deposed: I am apprentice to Mr. Smith; about half-past twelve this morning I was awakened by the deceased, who was sleeping in the same room with myself falling down stairs; I immediately got up and lighted a candle; on my going out6 I saw the deceased walk up stairs and fall down a second time; I then awoke Mr. Smith, who assisted him up, and got him into bed; being afraid to sleep in the same room with him, Mrs. Smith made up a bed in another room.  About seven I went into the room and saw the deceased who was alive, and appeared to me to be breathing.  I next saw him about half-past nine, when he was quite dead.  Mrs. Smith deposed: About half-past nine this morning I went to the deceased's bedroom to ask him if he would have a cup of tea.  In consequence if his making no answer to my inquiries I felt his hands, which were quite warm, but on shaking him I found him quite dead.  I then sent for my husband, who found him in the state he described.

   Dr. Machattie handed in a certificate to the effect that from an examination of the body and inquiries which he had made, he was of opinion that the deceased died of apoplexy caused by drinking.  A verdict was returned in accordance with the above facts.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 9 August 1856

DEATH BY BURNING. - On Thursday evening, a boy named Graham, residing with his parents in Albion-street, Surry Hills, who had for a short time been left alone, set fire to his clothes and was so severely burned that death ensued.  An inquest will be held on the body.

ACCIDENTAL DEATH. - Between six and seven o'clock on Thursday evening, an old man named [?] Wheeler. While on his way from Sydney to his residence at Cook's River, in his cart, accompanied by a female and two children, had proceeded about three miles beyond the dam, when the horse took fright and started off, upsetting the cart.  The women and children were unhurt, but the old man was so severely injured that he almost immediately expired.  The body was conveyed to his late residence, where it awaits a coroner's inquest.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 11 August 1856

DROWNED. - A boy named James Gibson, about seven years of age, was playing with some others on Brodie and Craig's Wharf, bottom of Bathurst-street, when he fell into the water.  Some of the other boys succeeded in getting him out of the water after some difficulty.  His father was immediately sent for, who conveyed him to Dr. M'Done's, Kent-street, but on his arrival there, life was extinct.  The body was afterwards removed to the house of his parents, No. 2, Syers-lane, Sussex-street.  An inquest will be probably held this day.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 11 August 1856

SUDDEN DEATH. - On Thursday an inquest was held by Dr. M'Cartney, at Four-Mile Creek, on the body of John Evans, a miner.  It appeared that Evans, who was about 38 years old, had for two years suffered from disease of the heart, and had been attended by medical men, who cautioned him as to his danger from great exertion at any time.  One night this week he was going to his work as usual, in a coal mine, and had reached the bottom of the ladder when he complained of sudden illness, and in a few minutes died, in the arms of another miner.  The jury returned a verdict of - Died from natural causes. - Maitland Mercury.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 12 August 1856

SERIOUS ACCIDENT.  - A few days ago, as a little boy of Mr. Bedford's was playing with another boy near his father's residence, the latter threw an empty sardine tin which hit him in the forehead, near the temple, and inflicted a very serious wound which penetrated the skull and injured the bone.  The parents, naturally, very much alarmed in consequence of having recently lost a little boy, three years old, who fell whilst holding a blacklead pencil in his hand, which penetrated the brain through the temple, sent for Dr. Machattie, who examined the wound and adopted such remedies as have effected  a complete restoration to health.  The wounds in the two cases were very nearly inflicted on the same spot, and within about three weeks of each other, but fortunately for the mourning parents, have been accompanied with very dissimilar results.

 

Empire (Sydney), 13 August 1856

CORONER'S INQUESTS. -A court of inquiry was held on the 10th instant, by J. S. Parker, Esq.,, coroner, at the Marrickville Hotel, Petersham, touching the death of a female named Ellen Hogan, aged eighty-four years, who died suddenly on Saturday last, in a tent which she inhabited at Wardell's Brush.  The evidence went to show that the decease died from cold accelerated by recent acts of intemperance; and an open verdict to that effect was returned by the jury.

   An inquest was also held by the same coroner, on Monday last, at the Butcher's Arms, Sussex-street, concerning the death of a little mulatto-boy, named James Gibson, about seven years of age, who was found drowned at Brodie and Craig's Wharf, Sussex-street, on the previous day.  Margaret Golden, aged eleven years, stated that she saw the deceased, a little before dinner hour on Sunday last, standing on the wharf; he was anxious to purchase a coconut from a vessel lying there; he had a penny piece in his hand, which, shortly after, witness heard a girl say he had dropped it into the water; she saw the deceased leave the wharf by the sheds, and about a quarter of an hour after heard some little boys call out that a child was drowned; she went to the spot and saw that it was the boy who had had the penny piece; she did not think any person saw the deceased fall into the water.  Henry Scott, aged sixteen, deposed that he was playing at "hide and seek," and whilst going to secrete himself on board a vessel, saw the deceased floating face downward in the water; he called another boy, and with his aid, got the body out; froth was then issuing from deceased's mouth.  James Gibson, father of the deceased, deposed, that having heard his son was drowned, he went down to the wharf immediately, and saw a man holding his child up by the feet, head downwards, in order to get the water out of the stomach; witness said it was his  boy; the child was dead and cold; he took the body to a doctor, but nothing could be done for it; witness was aware that his wife gave the deceased a penny, and the child said he would buy as coconut with it at a shop, for witness would not have allowed him to go near the vessel, and it was the first time the child ever went there.  A verdict of Found drowned was returned.

 

Maitland Mercury, 14 August 1856

DEATH BY DROWNING. - An inquest was held on Monday, before the coroner, at the Commercial Hotel, Morpeth, on the body of George Wilson.  On Saturday last Messrs. Cox, Sinclair, and Robertson, with Mr. Robertson's son, were crossing the river in the Morpeth punt, worked by David Wilson and his son.  When about half way across a splash was heard and the elder Wilson was seen holding on to the chain which kept up the flap of the punt.  He was got out of the water, and then directed attention to his son, the deceased, some twenty yards off.  Messrs. Robertson and Sinclair went out in the boat immediately, but the deceased sunk before they could reach him.  This occurred about eleven o'clock, a.m., and the body was found at about five in the evening.  The cause of the accident was the breaking of the rope, which, was stated to be unsound, rotten, and unfit for the purpose; the condition of the punt being described in similar terms.  Wilson was beginning to improve in the discharge of his duties, in which he was unpracticed.  The Jury found the following verdict, That the deceased was accidentally drowned by falling from the working stage of the Morpeth punt, owing to the breaking of as rotten rope.

   To this was attached a rider to the effect that the Jury request the coroner to make known to the Maitland Road Trust, who are responsible to the public for the soundness of the punt itself, and the strength and quality of the tacking, as well as for the employment of experienced persons to manage it, that the evidence clearly shows that owing to a  failure in all these points, one life had already been sacrificed, and many more must be daily endangered, if their immediate attention be not directed to the matter.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 14 August 1856

WINDSOR.

A CORTONER'S INQUEST took place on the 26th ultimo, at Kurrajong, on the body of one John Stanford, aged 26, a farmer, there lying dead.  From the evidence adduced, it appeared that the deceased met his death in consequence of a gunshot wound accidentally received, and a verdict was rendered accordingly.

 

Bathurst Free Press, 16 August 1856

SOFALA.

INQUEST. - On Saturday last an inquest was held at Damack's, the Crown Inn, Meadow Flat, on view of the body of a man found dead in the bush on the previous day.  The body, which was that of a stranger, from the appearance must have been lying exposed several days.  The deceased was in stature about five feet eight inches, of slender make, with rather long chin, full forehead, black whiskers, and moustache, and black, straight, and rather thin hair.  He had on a bluish speckled guernsey shirt, a pair of corduroy trousers, light Cossack boots, and cotton socks.  One shilling and sixpence in one of the pockets.  The body was found among the rushes ion the alluvial bank of the Meadow Flat Creek. , about a mile distant from Damack's, and had the appearance of having been deposited by the subsiding waters of the creek, the banks of which bore evident marks of having been recently flooded.  About 8 yards higher up the steam a straw hat, with blue ribbon, was picked up in the stream;, where it had caught against a stone , by which its further progress downwards was stopped.  So much of the man's face had been eaten away that identification was impossible, but it is supposed to that of a man who had been at Damack's and in the neighbourhood for two or three days about, a fortnight previously, and whom the police had instructions to apprehend as a lunatic, but who had not been seen since that period; the clothes, whiskers and moustache, of the deceased, correspond with those of that individual. Verdict - Found Dead!

 

Empire (Sydney), 16 August 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was conducted on Thursday last, by J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Angel Inn, Liverpool-road, touching the death of a female named Bridget Geary, aged 49, who died under the following circumstances: Eliza Dank, a married woman, residing on the Liverpool-road, near the dwelling of the deceased, deposed that, about a fortnight ago the deceased complained of illness, and gradually became worse until she expired on Wednesday last; she was not seen by a doctor; witness had sent for one; but the deceased expired before his arrival; she supported herself by laundry work, and drank hard; when the deceased was drunk, she was in the habit of sleeping out in the open air; and both husband and wife were a drunken couple; the deceased would not allow a  doctor to be sent for; the husband lately attended to his wife; the place they lived in was very cold, but they had plenty of blankets, and sufficient to eat. Daniel Geary, formerly chief constable and gaoler at Goulburn, deposed that he was a government pensioner in the receipt of one shilling per day; the deceased sometimes earned 2s. 6d., per day; she was addicted to colonial ale, and he sometimes chastised her for it, hoping she would reform; he drank himself, and punished her when he was sober; he called on a doctor, but his wife was dead before he arrived.  John Readhead, surgeon, having made a post mortem examination of the body, said he was of opinion that the immediate cause of death was disease of the heart, no doubt hastened by acts of intemperance; he saw no marks of violence, and nothing that indicated neglect; he had not the slightest doubt but deceased was a very hard drinker.  The jury found an open verdict, to the effect that deceased died from natural causes, accelerated by habits of intemperance.

 

Bathurst Free Press, 16 August 1856

STONEY CREEK DIGGINGS.

HORRID MURDER AND ATTEMPTED SUICIDE.

   On Tuesday morning, the 29th instant, about 5 o'clock, one of the most frightful murders ever brought under our notice was committed upon Stoney Creek.  It appears from the information we have been enabled to gather, that the murderer was a man of the name of George Brinsley, a native of Kent, England, and that the unfortunate woman he murdered was his wife, Phoebe Brinsley, a native of the colony.  At the time the prisoner committed the dreadful deed he was perfectly sober.  The wound was inflicted by a razor, which it is reported his father left in his (the prisoner's) tent on Sunday last.  The deceased presented a fearful appearance, the wound on her throat beings four inches in length and one-and-a-half inches in depth.  The age of the murderer is23, and the unfortunate deceased about 22 years of age.  They have been married only three months, and it is generally believed that the exciting cause was a fit of jealousy on the part of the prisoner.  It also appears that on the night previous to the murder, the deceased called the prisoner a lazy vagabond and threatened to write to her father to get him to come and take her away. After the prisoner had cut the throat of his unfortunate wife, he attempted to cut his own, but did not inflict the wound deep enough to produce the desired effect.

   The spot on which the murder was committed, is between 200 and 300 yards from the foot of the Golden Gully.  For several days the prisoner had appeared very dejected, so much so, that the men working in a claim adjoining the one in which he was working, frequently spoke of the matter. He has been attended by S. Curtis, Esq., M.D., of Wellington, and we have every reason to believe the wound in his throat will not prove fatal.

   On Wednesday, the 30th inst., an inquest was held outside the hut in which the murder was committed, before Dr. Curtis, Coroner for the district of Wellington, when the following facts were elicited.

   John Tippen was the first witness called, and said: I am a gold digger residing at Stoney Creek; I know the prisoner, his name is George Brinsley.  Yesterday morning about 5 o'clock I heard two screams, when I immediately got up, and found the deceased, Phoebe Brinsley, standing against a tent which belonged to a man named Spencer.  Directly I got up to her, I found blood flowing from a wound in her neck; I and Mr. Scaltock assisted her to lay down outside Spencer's tent; she said nothing in my presence; she laid for half an hour on the ground; the deceased appeared to me to die whilst we were in the act of laying her down.  After death I assisted to remove her to my tent.  I caused messengers to be sent for medical aid, and give notice to the police.  The last time I saw the deceased alive was about 5 o'clock, yesterday morning; I have since identified the body; she was living with her husband on the diggings, and was the wife of the prisoner, George Brinsley; she was, I should think, about 22 years of age.  After seeing the deceased in the state before-mentioned, I went to Brinsley's tent, where I saw Brinsley recovering from a fainting fit; I observed that his throat was cut.  His mind appeared to be wandering; James Scaltock and a man of the name of Morris were in the tent with Brinsley.  I endeavoured to stop the blood with a piece of rag.  It was about twelve yards from the prisoner's tent that I saw the deceased first.  In the middle of the night preceding the morning of the murder, I heard the prisoner and the deceased quarrelling.  I heard her say, he (the prisoner) had pinched her.  He said he had not, and if he had she had given him just cause to do so.  The deceased said she was very glad she was living between two tents, and that he had no knives about him.  She afterwards called him a lazy vagabond, and asked him whether he had brought her to the diggings to starve her.  She said she would get washing to maintain herself but not him, and would write to her father to get her away, and would get some one to give him a licking, or a thrashing. 

   I produce a razor which I found on the ground of the prisoner's tent.  The handle of the razor was in one part of the tent, and the blade in another.  Both the handle and the blade were covered with blood.  I have seen the wound on the neck of the deceased; it is a deep gash in the throat, a little inclining to the left side; the wind-pipe is nearly severed; the wound, I think, caused the death of the deceased.  When I came to the prisoner's tent he was lying on his back in bed, on the left side of the tent, with his clothes on.  I found blood on his right side; he had no shoes on; the razor was found near the prisoner's right hand; there were two razors in the tent; the one I produce is the one the prisoner generally used; there was no blood on the other razor.  During the day on which the deceased died, I had a conversation with the prisoner, when he asked for his mother; I said she was coming.    He said, "I have had just cause for all of it." I am a married man; my wife is not on the diggings; the prisoner was formerly one of my mates, and during that time, he was a very sober and steady man.  I swear I do not owe the prisoner any malice or ill-will whatever.  He appeared to treat the deceased very kindly indeed; no man could do more for a woman that the prisoner.

   The wound on the deceased's throat was about four inches long, and one and a-half deep, from the left to the right side.  I should think the deceased lived between four and five minutes after her throat was cut.

   The prisoner declined asking this witness any questions.

   Charles Cannan, was then sworn and said: I am an Englishman; I know the prisoner' his name is George Brinsley; I am a gold digger in Stoney Creek.  I was awoke yesterday morning by the deceased coming to me and pulling me by the chest, and making a very strange noise.  I asked her what was the matter; she could not answer me.  When I got up from my bed a quantity of blood burst from the deceased's throat into my mouth and eyes; she then went out of my tent; I followed her; she pointed to her own tent, and appeared to give me to understand her husband had murdered her.  I then gave the alarm, and Mr. Scaltock came to my assistance.  I then went to my tent to put on my trousers; when I returned I found the deceased lying on the ground perfectly dead.  The last time I saw her alive was about 5 o'clock yesterday morning.  I have since identified the body.  My tent is about 20 yards from the prisoner's. It is my opinion the deceased came by her death through the wound in her throat, and from no other cause.  I have known the deceased for the last 6 years, and her husband for about 13 years. I was on very friendly terms with the prisoner, but have once quarreled with him since I have been on the diggings; the quarrel was caused by the prisoner ill-treating his wife, when the deceased appealed to me for protection; I have since made up the quarrel with the prisoner.  I positively swear I do not bear towards the prisoner any malice or ill-will. Previous to the prisoner's marriage with the deceased, I paid my addresses to her.

   By the prisoner: The quarrel was made up on Monday night last.

   The prisoner being asked by the Coroner, whether he had anything to say to the charge brought against him, replied that he had not.

   The Jury after retiring for about 15 minutes, returned a verdict of Wilful Murder against the prisoner, George Brinsley.

   The prisoner, previous to his removal for Bathurst, requested that he might be allowed to seer the body of his unfortunate wife, which was granted him.  On seeing it, he sobbed violently.  He was then taken away in a cart, under the charge of three mounted police.

 

Empire (Sydney), 16 August 1856

   AN INQUEST was held last Saturday in the gaol, on the body of a man named Joseph Ostler [or Hostler].  The deceased who had been sent to gaol for a breach of the Vagrant Act for three months, on the expiration of his sentence was found to be too ill to render his removal safe as he was then suffering from paralysis, and soon afterwards died.  Verdict, died from natural causes.

 

Maitland Mercury, 16 August 1856

A CHILD BURNT TO DEATH. -A coroner's inquest was held at the Apple Tree Hotel, Albion-street, Surry Hills, before J. S. Parker, Esq., on Saturday last, touching the death of a child named David Graham, aged nineteen months, who was accidentally            burnt to death by his clothes taking fire during the temporary absence of his parents.  There was no evidence to show how the accident occurred, and no blame was attributed to any one.  Mary Ann Graham, the mother of the deceased, residing in Albion-street, stated that, On Thursday evening last, about seven o'clock, her husband being away at work, she quitted the house for a few minutes on business, leaving three young children behind her; some wood was burning on the fire; on returning she saw her baby in a man's arms; the man was running with it to a doctor; she took the child from him to carry it herself; and then saw that the clothes were burnt from off the body, and that his little chest, arms, and legs were much injured; two doctors attended the child, but it expired about half-past eight o'clock on Friday morning; the child could walk and was very strong; there was no fender or grate to the fire-place.  John Shying deposed that whilst he was at work on Thursday night, at his own house, near the residence of the last witness, he heard children screaming in an unusual manner; he looked across the yard, and observed a great blaze; he then ran across, and saw the deceased child about four yards from the door with its clothes on fire; he tore off the burning clothes, and wrapped the deceased up in a towel, and was hurrying with it to a doctor, when Mrs., Graham met him, and took the child from him; the deceased was very much injured, and must have been ion fire about three minutes; the father and mother of the child were very steady, sober people.

   The jury found that the deceased died from injuries received by his clothes taking fire; but they had no evidence to show how the child's clothes caught fire. - Empire, Aug 11.

 

Empire (Sydney), 18 August 1856

SERIOUS ACCIDENTS ON THE LIVERPOOL RAILWAY.

ONE MAN KILLED AND SEVERAL INJURED. - VERDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER. 

   An accident of a very painful nature occurred on Friday afternoon, on the line of railway, near Liverpool, resulting in the death of a labourer named Daniel Murphy, and in personal injury, more or less serious, to several other men.  The accident was caused by a ballast train being thrown off the rails, owing to a plank having been carelessly thrown on them by one Joseph Happer, a man employed on the railway line, who was at that time engaged in the erection of a gate near the place where the accident occurred.  A verdict of manslaughter has been returned against Happer, by the coroner's jury. The subjoined evidence, taken at the inquest held at Liverpool, on Saturday last, before the Coroner, C. B. Lyons, Esq., and a respectable jury, will place our readers in full possession of the particulars of this painful occurrence,  .  .  . 

   John Benton Watson, surgeon, stated, the bones of the left arm (humerus) was broken; a compound fracture, bones protruded three inches through the shirt sleeve; muscular parts very much lacerated, the main vessels ruptured; severe injury to the lungs; recent injury; three (3) several wounds on the head, penetrating to the skull; recent wound; right eye black, and swollen from recent injury; Murphy never, after the accident, spoke intelligibly; death must have been caused by a shock to the system, most probably internal injuries; amputated the arm; had no doubt Murphy's death was caused by the injuries received yesterday; will examine the body internally and report the result to the coroner.

 

Empire (Sydney), 19 August 1856

FATAL OCCURRENCE. - A DRAYMAN KILLED. - An inquest was held on the 28th instant, by the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Whalers' Arms, Argyle-street, Miller's Point, touching the death of John Fitzpatrick, a drayman, aged twenty-six years, who met with his death under the following circumstances:

   Thomas Place deposed, that on Saturday evening last, about six o'clock, he met the deceased at the Gas Hotel, Kent-street; he was then on his dray; witness got on behind and rode with deceased; when they reached Cochrane's small house, opposite the quarries, the horse appeared to be very anxious to get home and began to quicken his pace; the deceased tried to hold the horse in, but could not; he then struck the horse across the head with his whip, and checked the animal; the horse again became restive and appeared anxious to get on, when deceased struck him a second tine over the head with his whip; the horse then bolted, and deceased jumped off his dray to try to stop him; but he got entangled with the reins, fell, and was dragged along the ground a distance of about 200 yards; the dray was checked by coming in contact with a large stone, when the horse broke loose and ran away; before witness jumped off the dray, he felt a jolt of one of the wheels passing over the body of the deceased; it was getting dark when the affair happened; her could not say whether deceased s sober or not, ads he did not speak to him; the dray was not loaded; the deceased struck the horse with the lash of the whip.  The jury found that the deceased died from severe injuries received by being dragged along the ground some considerable distance by the horse's reins, as well as the wheel of the dray passing over his body, occasioned by his horse (a restive one) bolting. [See also Sydney Morning Herald, 19 August; evidence of his brother, Michael Fitzpatrick.]

 

Maitland Mercury, 19 August 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held by the Coroner, J. E. Stacy, Esq., On Saturday last, at Fullerton Cove, on the body of a little girl, eight years of age, the child of Thomas Lees, a settler.  It appeared that the deceased had been left alone in the hut, and probably approaching the fire incautiously, her clothing became ignited, and she sustained injuries of so serious a character that she survived only a few hours.  This should provide another caution to parents. - Newcastle Telegraph, August 16.

  

Sydney Morning Herald, 19 August 1856

   Another inquest was held on Sunday last at the tent of John Frederick Wickham, stationmaster at Ashfield, touching the death of a child about three years and a half old, named Mary Harriet Wickham, who was accidentally drowned in an open well at Ashfield.  J. F. Wickham, the father of the deceased, stated that on the previous day he was informed by one of his children that "Molly," meaning the deceased, was in the well; on going there he saw another of his children, named Elizabeth, trying to pull her out, but was unable; witness of course immediately relieved her, but on dragging the child out he saw that she was dead.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death occasioned by drowning, and added by way of a rider a recommendation that the well be fenced in.

 

Maitland Mercury, 21 August 1856

CHILD BURNT TO DEATH. - We regret to state that on Wednesday last, Patrick Connor, a little child of two years of age, residing with his parents near Mr. Panton's new store, was playing with other children in a neighbour's house, when by some mishap his clothes caught fire, and he was observed with his playmates rushing out of the house covered with flames. Assistance was promptly rendered as soon as the alarm was given, but it was too late to be of any service to the little sufferer, who succumbed to the injuries he had received a short time afterwards.

   Information of the circumstance having reached the police magistrate, an inquest was ordered to take place, but it transpired that the parents had already caused the remains to be buried.  On Friday they were desired to attend at the police office, when the police magistrate lectured then on the impropriety of their conduct in not sending information of the occurrence to the authorities immediately after the child's death.

   A similar accident occurred on the same day to a young girl named Elizabeth Gadsby, who was assisting Mr. Daveney's servant in her household duties.  It appears that the attention of Mr. E. O. Douglas, who happened to be in the house at the time, was attracted by hearing screams proceeding from the kitchen, and on hastening to the spot he saw the girl running out enveloped in a sheet of flame, her dress having caught the fire accidentally.  Mr. Douglas lost no time in procuring a blanket, and immediately threw it over her person, and succeeded in extinguishing the flame.  Medical assistance was immediately procured, and the proper remedies applied;  but the unfortunate girl was so frightfully burned in the upper part of the body, that she lies in a very dangerous state and but little hopes are entertained of her recovery. - North Australian, August 12.

ALLEGED SHOCKING ACCIDENT NEAR BRAIDWOOD. - FOUR CHILDREN BURNT TO DEATH.

   The Goulburn Herald of Saturday, says - Intelligence reached Goulburn on Wednesday evening, that a frightful accident, by which four children lost their lives, had occurred at Mongarlowe (the Little River), near Braidwood.  The particulars concerning this melancholy disaster are not so minute as we could wish, but from them we gather the following:-

   On Sunday or Monday last, a man named McCormack left his wife and five children at home in his tent, and proceeded to Anson's public-house, to partake of a "shout" for seven pounds worth of champagne, in celebration of the discovery of the monster nugget.  Being absent too long, his wife went in search of him, and during her absence, the four younger children, by some means or other which has not transpired, were so dreadfully burnt that two died almost immediately, and the other two, we learn, survived but a few days.  The eldest child, a girl of between 10 and 11 years of age, was much burnt in endeavouring to save the others, but the injuries she received are not likely to prove fatal.  The Chronicle of the same day, .  .  .  we are inclined to believe the rumour wholly baseless, or at the worst very much exaggerated.

 

Maitland Mercury, 21 August 1856

To the Editor of the Maitland Mercury.

Re Inquest at Morpeth on George Wilson; drowned.

 

Empire (Sydney), 22 August 1856

INQUEST. - An inquest was held on the 19th instant, at the Friendship Inn, Liverpool-road, before J. Parker, Esq., coroner, on the body of a female infant about two months old.  It appeared from the evidence adduced, that on the Saturday previous William Pearce, the father of the deceased child, had been engaged in a drunken quarrel, at Mr. Davis's public-house, and was under the influence of liquor -the child was quite well on that evening, and was found dead on Sunday morning.  Dr. Redhead made a post mortem examination of the body, and gave it as his opinion that the deceased had been overlaid.  The jury found that the deceased died from suffocation, but whether the parents were to blame or not three was no evidence before them to show, as it did not appear either of them neglected the child.

 

Empire (Sydney), 22 August 1856

A MAN FOUND DROWNED. - Between seven and eight o'clock on Wednesday evening last, the body of a man, unknown, was discovered by Constable Jones floating in the water off the A. S. N. Co.'s Wharf.  The body was immediately removed to the Hunter River Inn, where Dr. Wright, of Hunter-street, promptly attended and made every exertion fort half an hour to restore animation, but without success.  The body was then removed to the dead-house of the Old Water Police Office, and still remains there for identification.  The deceased was about 55 years of age, about 5 feet 6-inches high,  has gray hair and whiskers, nose crooked, as if broken some time since; he had on a black cloth shooting coast, black vest and trousers, and blucher boots.  An inquest on the body, commenced yesterday, stands adjourned till eleven o'clock today.  [See also Empire (Sydney), 23 August.]

 

Empire (Sydney), 23 August 1856

DEATH OF A WOMAN FROM DRUNKENNESS. - An inquest was held yesterday, by J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner, at the Billy Blue, public-house, North Shore, touching the death of a woman named Sarah Binney, aged forty-five years.  From the evidence adduced, it appeared that the deceased was a notorious drunkard and frequently subjected to severe attacks of illness.  The jury found that the deceased died suddenly from disease brought on by intemperance, and exposure to cold.

 

Maitland Mercury, 26 August 1856

GUNDAGAI. - I am sorry to report a fatal accident, which occurred about seven miles from this, on Wednesday last.  A man named Diggins, accompanied by his wife and two children, was proceeding towards Albury with his dray. He had not gone far from Lovat's public-house when his leaders went wrong.  He jumped down from the shaft where he had been sitting, and in doing so, slipped under the wheel, which went across the back part of his thigh.  The wound made was a fearful one, opening all the arteries of the leg.  The poor man was crawling about on his hands and knees in the greatest agony, when his wife left to obtain some assistance; but on her return he was breathing his last.  He actually bled to death.

   A very sudden death, the full particulars of which I have been unable to obtain, occurred on Tuesday last, at Mrs. Hankey's public house.  It seems that a man, whose name I have not heard, and who, it is supposed, had been drinking for several days, stopped there.  On Monday evening he was in the parlour - where a candle had been placed to light him to bed - when the inmates retired to rest.  In the morning he was found lying, with his face on the floor, quite dead. - Correspondent Goulburn Chronicle.

 

Empire (Sydney), 26 August 1856

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE. - A coroner's inquest was held by J. S. Parker, Esq., on Saturday last, at Mr. John Wearin's Chippendale Hotel, Chippendale, touching the death of a female named Anne Whitelaw. Aged about forty years, who died suddenly that morning.  From the evidence adduced, it appeared that the deceased was a woman of doubtful character, and a confirmed drunkard.  She complained of being unwell on Friday evening, and again at 3 o'clock on Saturday morning.  About half-past 7 o'clock on Saturday morning, as female acquaintance who slept with her the previous night, went fort some brandy to mix with a dose of castor oil for the deceased; but before the brandy was brought, the deceased expired without a struggle.  Mr. W. J. Jenkins, surgeon, deposed that he had examined the body of the deceased, but found not a mark of violence; he had known her about six years, and some time ago attended her for delirium tremens,; she was an habitual drunkard, and he had frequently seen her drunk of late; her death was sudden, and the result of a disease brought on by frequent acts of intemperance.  A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

 

Maitland Mercury, 28 August 1856

DATH FROM DROWNING. - An inquest was held on Tuesday, at the Windsor Castle Tavern, East Maitland, before the coroner, on the body of Ann Kelly.  From the evidence it appeared that on Monday, Charles Wakeley, a carpenter at Morpeth, was out shooting ducks on Mr. Close's Swamps.  At about one o'clock, his attention was attracted by a dark body lying in the water; and proceeding to examine it, he found it to be the body of a female.  Information was immediately given to the police, and the deceased was recognixxed, and removed to nr. Cox's tavern.  Mrs. Kelly had barren seen the previous evening at a house at Four-mile Creek, about two miles distant from the spot where she was drowned.  She then appeared sober; but her mind seemed wandering, and made some remarks expressive of her fear of the blackfellows.  She started at nine or ten o'clock to go to Miller's Forest.  The water in which she was found was about two feet deep; a track appeared in the surface, through the weeds having been disturbed, in a direction leading to the place where she lay.  She had been addicted to habits of intemperance, and lived apart from her husband.  The jury returned a verdict, that Ann Kelly was accidentally drowned, while laboring under delirium tremens.

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday on the body of a man who, as we stated in our previous issue, was found on Wednesday evening in the water at the Stream Navigation Company's Wharf.  The inquisition was held at the house of Mr. George Ewan, King's Head Hotel, before Mr. J. S. Parker, coroner for the city.  Constable Jones deposed that about half-past seven o'clock on Wednesday evening last, whilst on duty at the Steam Navigation Company's Wharf, he heard a noise in the water as if something was plunging; he ran out immediately, and saw a man struggling in the water between the Illalong steamer and the wharf; he gave the alarm to the persons on board, who immediately lowered a boat, whist another man to whom he spoke threw down a cork fender; two or three life boys were thrown into the water, but the deceased appeared to be in such a helpless state that he did not attempt to make any use of them; he was ultimately caught by one of the men in the boat, and instantly conveyed to the Hunter River Hotel; witness sent for Dr. Brown, but as that gentleman could not attend, he was induced to send for Mr. Wright, surgeon, who promptly attended; but in the meantime about half an hour elapsed form the time when deceased was taken out of the water. - Mr. Wright applied the usual remedies, but the deceased died in less than two hours after his attendance; witness had not been able to discover who the deceased was, and his identity therefore remains unknown. Mr. Wright gave it as his opinion that the deceased died from suffocation, occasio9ne by drowning, adding however, that if medical assistance had been immediately procured, it was quite possible that life might have been saved. A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned. - Herald, Aug, 23.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 29 August 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST, - An inquest was held yesterday before Mr. J. S. Parker, at the house of the Rose and Crown, Gibbs-street, touching the death of a man named George Morrow.  Sergeant Hannah deposed that on the 26th instant, about half-past 9 o'clock, whilst he was seated in his own place, he heard a heavy fall outsider, and on going to see about it, he saw the deceased George Morrow lying near his door, insensible from the effects, as it appeared to him, of a fall from an elevation of four feet from the middle of the road; the part of which the deceased fell was flagged and the descent precipitous; the top of the height in not fenced in, nor in anyway secured; the property, it was said, belongs to Mr. Holdsworth, of George-street; when taken up it was difficult to discover whether he was dead or alive, but in a few minutes after he began to breathe perceptibly, and witness had him immediately conveyed to his own residence, a few doors off; there was no smell of liquor on him, and witness had never known him drunk; when discovered, he was lying on his side, with his hand under his chin and twisted, evidently showing that he had fallen upon his head; he never spoke to witness. 

   It appeared from the evidence of the son-in-law, John Farrelly, that the deceased was about sixty-seven years of age; was generally known to be a sober man; that on the Tuesday evening in question he left his residence to see a person on the South Head Road, relative to some business matter; that he walked uprightly, and could read without glasses; there was no lamp at the place where the accident occurred, and that it is frequently crowded with cabs and busses.  The Court found a verdict that he died from falling down a precipice, and added a recommendation that the place be fenced in and otherwise protected.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 29 August 1856

SUICIDE OF MR. CHARLES FOX. - On Monday, the 25th, an enquiry was held at the court-house, Muswellbrook, before the coroner, Mr. J. B. West, and a jury of twelve, touching the death of Mr. Charles Fox, chief constable, who, on the same morning, had committed suicide, by shooting himself with a pistol.  It appeared on evidence that the deceased was latterly under medical treatment for general debility and depression of the mental faculties, and has been for some time past labouring under hypochondria.  It seemed on a view of the body, which presented a shocking spectacle, that he had placed the muzzle of the weapon in his mouth, which dreadfully shattered - the teeth driven in, and a large hole on the side of the nose, apparent from the discharge of the pistol. A finding of Destroyed himself while labouring under temporary insanity was accordingly made.  The deceased was much respected as a steady inoffensive man, and has left a widow and one son.

 

Empire (Sydney), 30 August 1856

DEATH FROM INJURIES RECEIVED BY A FALL OF A CHANDELIER. - An inquest was held yesterday, by the coroner of Sydney, at the Three Tuns, public-house, King and Castereagh-streets, on view of the body of a young man named Robert Booth, aged twenty-five years, then lying at the Sydney Infirmary.  It appeared that deceased was employed as a labourer about the Victoria Theatre, and occasionally assisted in lighting the house.  On Wednesday evening, he had gone of his own accord, although it was no part of his duty - into the Governor's box to light the chandelier which projects over it, and which was fixed in an iron bracket.  The witnesses examined was of opinion that the deceased must have turned the chandelier the wrong way and thus loosened the joint.  Deceased was a strong, healthy sober man, and very willing to work, but rather awkward, and being quite ignorant of the proper way to go about lighting, had overbalanced himself and clung to the chandelier, which extra weight brought it and himself to the floor of the stage a height if about fifteen feet.  The inmates of the theatre were startled by the crash and on proceeding to the spot he was found lying on his face in an insensible state.  A doctor was immediately sent for who advised his removal to the Infirmary which was done, but he never recovered consciousness, and died the next morning at 10 o'clock.  The jury returned the following verdict, That the deceased came ti his death by falling with the chandelier from the Governor's box at the Victoria Theatre in attempting to light the same previous to the performance, and at the same time being wholly ignorant and utterly incompetent to do so from his want of knowledge as to the mode the same is constructed.  And we further find that gross negligence had been exhibited by Mr. Taylor, the lessee, in not employing proper tradesmen to attend to the same nightly (in order foolishly to retrench the expenses of his establishment.)

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 1 September 1856

   An inquest was held at the North Rocks, on the 20th instant, before Mr. J. Dowe, coroner, and a jury, on the body of Thomas Curl, then and there lying dead.  It appeared that the deceased was a very aged man (74), and that death resulted from natural causes.  A verdict was returned accordingly.

 

Empire (Sydney), 1 September 1856

Letter to the Editor, from Thomas Taylor, lessee of the Royal Victoria Theatre, re the inquest on Robert Booth.

 

Empire (Sydney), 2 September 1856

SUSPICIOUS CASE.

   An inquest was held yesterday at the Wellington Inn, George-street, by the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., on the body of a man named James Foster, who was found drowned in a water-closet in Murphy's-alley, Clarence-street, under very suspicious circumstances.  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased, who resided in Clarence-street, arose and went out about six o'clock yesterday morning, without his hat or coat, and carrying his boots in his hands, saying, as he passed, that he would return in a minute.  Finding that he did not return, his landlady sent a woman to call him.  The messenger returned, and said she had found the deceased's boots at the door of the water-closet, and saw a woman there, but could see nothing of the deceased; and she also observed that the flooring boards were taken up.  At nine o'clock on Sunday night, the boards were down, but not nailed, the deceased having himself previously taken them up for the purpose of cleaning the upper part of the place, after which he replaced them. The deceased was a very quiet man, it appeared, and seemed to be dissatisfied about his wife having been taken to the Magdalen Hospital, and often said he would rather be dead than alive since she went there.

   Henry Hogg, police constable, deposed that at about half-past nine yesterday morning, he received information that a man was supposed to be in a closet in Murphy's-alley, Clarence-street; her immediately proceeded to the spot, and found one-half of the flooring boards taken up and piled one upon another at the back; at first he could see nothing unusual, but on probing with a stick, he felt something floating under the water, and presently raised the left arm of the deceased; he immediately procured assistance, and got the body out; a doctor was sent for, who at once pronounced life to be extinct; the boards had evidently been taken up purposely by some one, but by whom or for what reason he could not tell; the place had recently been cleaned.  He had the body removed to the Benevolent Asylum; he had known Murphy's-alley for the last twelve months; the houses were used as common brothels; he never saw Mrs. Taylor, the landlady of the deceased, till the last few days; but had seen prostitutes and other disorderly characters in her house; there appeared to be something very suspicious in the case, but he could not throw any further light upon it.  If a man had gone into the place in a hurry without looking as he opened the door, he might have fallen through.  No quarrel or fighting in the alley could have continued long, without being noticed by the police; the woman Jesse (who first discovered the boots of the deceased at the door) was in such a state pf drunkenness, that no reliance could be placed on whatever evidence she might give; the woman pointed out by her as having been in the place when the deceased was there, denied having been in the alley at all; but she also was a woman of bad character.

   James Smith, M.D., resident surgeon at the Benevolent Asylum, deposed that he had examined the body of the deceased, but found no marks of violence Except a slight abrasion on the bridge of the nose; there were large ulcers, of old standing and neglected, on both legs; death, to all appearances, was caused by suffocation from drowning; the trousers of the deceased were up on about his person, with a belt around them, he was a muscular, healthy man, and about forty years of age.

   The jury returned the following verdict:- We find that the deceased was found drowned in a water-closet in Murphy'-alley, Clarence-street, Sydney, under very suspicious circumstances.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 5 September 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday at the Palmer-street Hotel, Woolloomooloo, before Mr. J. S. Parker, touching the death of a woman named Margaret Finucane, about fifty years of age.  It appeared from the evidence of Bridget Callaghan, with whom she resided, that deceased went to bed about 10 o'clock on Tuesday night, desiring that she might be called early, as she wanted to go soon to the market in the morning, for the purpose of buying oranges; witness accordingly called he at the time appointed, but received no answer; she then went into Sydney twice, and after returning the last time, she examined the door of deceased's room, and found that instead of being locked outside as usual, it was firmly secured within; an alarm was at length given, and the door having been forced open the deceased was discovered in her bed, with her head resting on her chest and her neck much swollen; she was a hard-working woman, and earned her living by selling oranges near the Hyde Park gate; she complained of illness on Monday, and was advised to take a little castor oil in brandy, but whether she did so or not witness was unable to say; she had been separated from her husband during the last three years on an allowance, which he never paid.  Constable M'Kenxxxie stated that on searching the deceased he found in the skirt of her dress a deposit receipt, marked Margaret Rowley, for the sum of 99 Pounds 120s. 1d, which, with other moneys found in her possession, amounted to 111 Pounds 10s. 7 ½d.  Verdict  Died by the visitation of God.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 8 September 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Saturday at the sign of the "Bald Faced Stag," Petersham, before Mr. J. S. Parker, city coroner, touching the death of Alfred Window, aged 35 years of age. It appears that the deceased was a pork butcher, employed at an establishment on Brickfield-hill; that on Thursday last he left a friend's at Petersham with a horse and cart containing a pig.  He was a little the worse for liquor, but apparently quite able to conduct himself.  Shortly after he had proceeded on his journey Mr. James Farrelly was informed by a boy that a man was lying on the road side, and that a little farther on there was a cart and a horse proceeding without a driver. On going to the spot he found the deceased as described, all but dead.  Witness had him immediately conveyed to his residence, but he never spoke, and died a short time after.  It was proved also that the cart was a spring one, and that he was [in] the habit of driving in a standing position, from which it would appear that he had been thrown out, and in the fall dislocated his neck.  Verdict, died by injuries accidentally received.

IPSWICH. - SHOCKING DEATH. - We regret to learn that a frightful accident occurred on Wednesday, the 20th ultimo, in this town, which was attended with a fatal result to a lad named Edwin Shelton.  It appears that he was proceeding down Brisbane-street, driving a horse-dray loaded with timber, between two piles of which he was seated, when the animal suddenly took fright at another dray, and becoming unmanageable, started off at a furious rate in the direction of Thorn-street, to a spot where they had frequently before drawn their load.  Before reaching their destination, however, the dray came in contact with some obstruction in the street, and immediately capsized, when the entire load fell upon the unfortunate youth, and crushed him to death.  The parties who witnessed the accident rendered prompt assistance, and sent for medical aid; but it was of no avail, for before it arrived life was already extinct.  A magisterial inquiry was held upon the remains, when the foregoing facts were given in evidence.  North Australian, September 2.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 9 September 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Saturday at the home of Mr. Cadman, Nelson Bay Road, touching the death of an aged gentleman named William Bush Mortimer.  It appeared from the evidence of Charlotte Phoebe Serjeant, that the deceased was her uncle, and was about 73 years of age. On Friday evening last, after accompanying witness from the tea-gardens, as was his usual custom, deceased went to bed about 8 o'clock, the cottage in which he resided being adjacent; he was then by himself, and nothing further was heard of him until next morning, when a messenger as sent to invite him to breakfast, who found the door fastened, and after knocking some time failed to get admission.  Witness then went, and, having opened the door, found the deceased lying dead beside the sofa on which he slept.  The alarm was immediately given, but of course all assistance proved unavailing.  Deceased had not complained of any illness previously, and was always noted for his enjoyment of remarkably good health, witness never having known him to take a dose of medicine, nor to suffer a day's illness in his life.  From further enquiry, it would seem that the deceased, who possessed no property, was a man of eccentric habits - that he would allow no one to sleep with him, that he had fallen into as fit, and there being no assistance at hand had evidently expired from its effects.  Verdict - Died from the visitation of God.

 

Empire (Sydney), 9 September 1856

SUDDEN DEATH. - On Tuesday an inquest was held by Dr. M'Cartney, at the Railway Hotel, East Maitland, on the body of Mary Ann Kelly.  It appeared that Mrs. Kelly, formerly Mrs. Riley, had for some time past complained of pain about the heart.  She had not, however, been under medical treatment, noir was danger apprehended by her friends.  On Monday morning she was found dead in her bed.  A verdict was returned that she died from disease of the heart, accelerated by intemperance.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 9 September 1856

FLOOD AT MUDGEE, AND SERIOUS LOSS OF LIFE.

On the late flood at Mudgee, and calamitous loss of life occasioned thereby, three different gentlemen have addressed us by letter, from that quarter.  .  .  . 

MUDGEE, 1st SEPTEMBER. -  .  .  .   A most melancholy and fatal accident occurred this evening, which has cast a gloom over the whole township.  Mr. Thomas L'Estrange, an old and respected inhabitant was, about dusk, endeavouring to cross the river on horseback, the water was very deep, and the current strong, and sad to say, Mr. L'Estrange was washed from his horse, and struggled with the stream. Mr. James Gorman, a gentleman also highly respected, nobly endeavoured to save his friend; he flung himself into the river, reached Mr. L'Estrange, but I am sorry to relate they both perished.  It is supposed that Mr. L'Estrange, who could not swim, clung to Mr. Gorman, and that in the struggle they both sank to rise no more. Up to eleven o'clock this night, although every search has been made, the bodies have not been found.

...

Wednesday. -This morning, at day-break, the search recommenced, and about 11 o'clock the body of Mr. L'Estrange was recovered about 150 yards from the spot where he was last seen; the body of poor Mr. Gorman has not as yet been discovered. .  .  . 

   A report has reached town this morning that a man and his wife, living on the Cudgegong, below Mr. Rouse;s, at Guntanang, in endeavouring to cross the river, have been washed away.

   Another individual, named Harvey, has been missing since Friday last, and it is supposed that he, also, has been drowned.

MUDGEE, - 2nd September. .  .  .  In addition, it is rumoured that several more lives have been lost, a Mrs. Harvey and child, and her uncle, and that one of the bodies have been found.  Also, a person, Dick Hunt, who left on Sunday morning for the Meroo.   .  .  . 

  Today, about 112, the body of Mr. L'Estrange was found by dragging a few hundred yards below the usual crossing place.  An inquest was held for form's sake; nothing material was elicited.  The only witnesses examined were a girl and Mr. Cockburn. .  .  . 

   The rumours in regard to Mrs. Harvey and D. Hunt have been incorrect; still it is reported that several others have perished.

 

Maitland Mercury, 9 September 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE FISH RIVER. - A fatal accident happened, one day last week, on the Fish River.  As two persons were riding across the runs, they came to a spot where lay the lifeless body of a man, whom they presently recognized as that of Darby Campbell, shoemaker, a resident of Gullen Flat, From the fact of the man being of intemperate habits, the conclusion was instantly arrived at, that having fallen from his horse he was stunned by the blow, and from the position in which he lay had died from suffocation.  On examining the tree whereunder the body lay, the lower limb was barked.  The probability therefore is, that riding unguardedly his head came in contact with the projecting limb, and thereby received the injury which led to so fatal a termination.  The neighbouring settlers on hearing of the catastrophe hastened to the spot, and contributed their good offices towards having the body removed to a house, and to order for the interment.  The deceased was a single man, and about forty years of age. - Goulburn Chronicle. Sept. 3.

INQUEST. -At the Flagstaff Hotel, near Bedlam Ferry, on Wednesday last, before C. B. Lyons, coroner for the Parramatta district, on view of the body of an old man named James Harris, a labourer, who came to his death by swallowing a large piece of meat which stuck in his throat, and thereby caused suffocation.  On examination of his clothes there was found in his pocket a Savings Bank receipt for x00 Pounds.  The jury returned a verdict that deceased died from suffocation. - Herald, Sept. 6.

 

Empire (Sydney), 10 September 1856

SUDDEN DEATH. - A ferryman named Francis Silvey, residing at No. 1, King-street, burst a blood vessel yesterday morning between ten and eleven o'clock, while standing in front of his own house.  Dr. Warren, of Castlereagh-street, was immediately sent for; but before he could arrive, the sufferer expired.  The body now awaits an inquest, which will be held at ten o'clock this morning.

 

Maitland Mercury, 11 September 1856

SUDDEN DEATH.  - On Thursday morning, Ann Marie, the wife of Charles Senior, residing at Lane Cove, was suddenly seized with convulsions, in which she continued for about three hours, and then expired. - Herald, Sept. 6.

 

Empire (Sydney), 11 September 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - A Court of Inquiry was held yesterday, by J. S. Parker, Esq., touching the death of a waterman named Francis Silvey, who expired suddenly on the previous day, from the bursting of a blood vessel.  It appeared that he had complained for the last fortnight of a bad cough and soreness in the chest.  During Monday night he plied as usual for hire, between King-street and Pyrmont; but on Tuesday morning was very unwell, and retched frequently.  About eleven o'clock in the forenoon of that day, having just returned with a passenger from Pyrmont, he went home with his wife, when he commenced to vomit blood, and died two or three minutes after.  Mr. C. H. Warren, surgeon, depose, that he was sent for, but in arrival found the deceased dead, with blood flowing from his mouth; he observed also a large quantity of blood on the floor, the passage, and stairs, showing evidently that the deceased had died from the rupture of some large artery, which might have been caused by over-exertion.  A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony.

 

Empire (Sydney), 12 September 1856

SAD CASE OF DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE.

   A coroner's inquest was held yesterday at the Red Lion, public-house, Camperdown, before J. S. Parker, Esq., and a jury of twelve, on view of the body of a woman named Christina Miller, who died suddenly on Wednesday night last, from the effusion of serum upon the brain.  The husband of the deceased was in custody on suspicion of being accessory to her death.  It appeared that on the night of the 230th August last, the deceased complained to Sergeant Quirk, of the police force, that her husband had threatened to take the life of herself and their child, and wanted him to be taken into custody.  The deceased as then under the influence of liquor, but knew what she was about.  At that time she had a black eye.  The officer accompanied her home, where he found the prisoner standing in an inner room, apparently quite stupid, as if suffering from delirium tremens.  As he appeared quiet and harmless, it was thought unnecessary to take him into custody.  On the Tuyesday following, a neighbour requested Quirk to visit the house of the prisoner and decease.  He went, and found them lying on the floor, apparently both drunk with the child between them, covered with some bed-clothes.  Quirk then lodged an information against them for being habitual drunkards, and neglecting to take proper care of their child.  A warrant was accordingly issued, and prisoner and the deceased were apprehended on last Thursday week, when they were severally sentenced to seven days' imprisonment, in default of finding bail for their good behaviour.  The deceased was discharged the same day; the prisoner was released from gaol on Tuesday last,

  Mary Braddick stated that the prisoner knocked at her door about 9 o'clock on Wednesday night, and requested her to comer to the aid of his wife, who was very ill; she sent in, and saw the prisoner with the deceased resting on his arm on the bed; witness remarked that deceased was dying, and  went out for assistance; returned a few minutes afterwards, and found her dead; witness saw no vomiting; and deceased did not appear to suffer pain; witness heard no noise in the prisoner's house; the prisoner was quite sober when witness went into the house, and appeared to have been attentive to the deceased all day; witness saw the deceased in the garden on Wednesday morning, and spoke to her; the deceased said she was unwell and had a sore throat; the prisoner and deceased had lived in witness's house nine weeks, and during that time witness never saw him ill-use her.

    John Foulis, a duly qualified medical practitioner, deposed that, by order of the coroner, he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased; in the chest he found extensive signs of old and recent disease, the lungs adhering to the  walls of the chest almost throughout the cavity; there was a considerable quantity of serum in the pericardium, and marks of recent inflammation; the liver was enormously enlarged, and bore signs of recent inflammation on its surface; the intestines were nearly empty throughout; there were numerous patches of inflammation all over the surface of the stomach; the deceased was about three months advanced in pregnancy; on opening the skull, witness found the posterior part of the brain very much congested; there was also a large quantity if serum in the ventricles; there was also a large quantity of serum escaped from the spinal chord; there were marks of inflammation on the membrane of the brain, such as is usually found in persons addicted to intemperance; the vomiting might have been caused by the state of the brain and stomach; the glass of rum said to have been given to her by the prisoner would not have improved her state; any excitement would have been likely to produce such effusion as witness described; his conviction was that the immediate cause of death was serous apoplexy; he saw the body of the deceased very shortly after death, when the appearance corresponded with his subsequent post mortem examination; the body was then warm and without rigidity of the limbs; the deceased must have been in the habit of constant tippling to have produced the state of disease found in the stomach and internal viscera; the effusion of the brain would of itself account for the suddenness of her death.

   The jury found that the deceased came to her death by effusion of serum on the brain, induced by habits of intemperance. [See also Sydney Morning Herald, 12 September.]

 

Goulburn Herald, 13 September 1856

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE. - A coroner's inquest was held yesterday, by J. S. Parker, Esq., at Dent's, Woodman Inn, Lane Cove, touching the death of a woman named Anna Maria Senior, about thirty-seven years of age, who died under the following circumstances.  From the evidence, it appeared that the deceased was addicted to drinking spirits to excess, and often quarreled with her husband, a woodcutter, by whom she was in consequence violently treated.  At the time of her death she had two black eyes, the result of a recent quarrel.  She had for the last four years suffered from great debility.  On Wednesday morning last, she called at the Woodman Inn, husband), and remained in the parlour through-out the day, in order to avoid seeing her husband who was displeased with her, because she had (which was formerly kept by her husband), and remained in the parlour throughout the day, in order to avoid seeing her husband who was displeased with her, because she had refused to return home with him. She was then, to all appearances, quite sober.  At night she still refused to go home, and Mrs. Dent allowed her to sleep on the sofa in the parlour which she had lain upon all day.  Between four and five o'clock, next morning, the husband of the deceased called upon Mrs. Dent, and requested her to go and look at his wife, as he said he had heard her groaning from his own house - a distance of 60 or 70 yards.  Mrs., Dent accordingly arose and went to the decease, whom she found in bed, convulsed and breathing heavily.  She gave her a little brandy, and bathed her head in vinegar for a short time, but the deceased expired about twenty minutes afterwards.  Mr. Robert D. Ward deposed that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and after describing its appearance, said he considered the cause of death to have been effusion on the brain, a sequel of chronic inflammation of the membrane.  The jury returned a verdict to the effect that death was caused by disease brought on by frequent acts of intemperance. - Saturday's Empire.

 

Maitland Mercury, 13 September 1856

SUDDEN DEATH OF MR. PARNELL, OF OSTERLEY. - Yesterday an inquest was held by Dr., M'Cartney, at Osterley, on the body of Mr. Parnell.  It appeared from the evidence that Mr. Parnell had been under occasional medical treatment for some time past, and Dr. Getty informed Mrs. Parnell some months since that the nature of the attack threatened sudden death on some occasion.  Mr. Parnell had complained much of his chest for the last fortnight; but not sent for medical advice; on Thursday evening he took a hearty tea, but about an hour later became ill, suffering from great chilliness; he then took a glass of brandy, but it did not revive him, and violent sickness coming on, he continued in the same state until he died., about eight o'clock.  Dr. Getty had been sent for immediately, but couild not reach the place until some hours after Mr. Parnell's death; and Mr. Edwin Hickey, who lived near, and was sent for, could only arrive in time to perceive a faint remnant of life, just prior to death.  Dr. Getty was of opinion death was caused by an effusion of blood on the brain, occasioned and accelerated by pulmonary disease.  The deceased gentleman was widely known and greatly respected in this neighbourhood, and his many friends here and at a distance will lament his sudden death.

 

Illawarra Mercury, 15 September 1856

SUDDEN DEATH. - During the night of Sunday last an old man, well known in Wollongong, named Edward Pantrey, died suddenly.  He was found by a person named Mrs. Walker, who resides on the adjoining premises, on yesterday (Sunday) morning quite dead in bed.  He complained of a slight pain in his left side the day before, but otherwise seemed to be in his usual health.  The deceased was about 65 years of age.  An inquest will be held on the body today.

 

Empire (Sydney), 15 September 1856

MAN DROWNED. - On Saturday afternoon a man named James [George] Johnson, in the employ of Mr. Robinson of the Bathing-house in the Domain, went down as usual to lock up the place, and being gone a longer time than usual uneasiness was occasioned by his absence.  On a search being made for him, his clothes were found on shire at the bathing-house, and his body was seen lying at the bottom, face downwards.  Life was quite extinct.  The body was conveyed to the dead-house, to await an inquest.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 16 September 1856

INQUEST. -The City Crooner held an inquest yesterday on view of the body of George Johnson, the young man who was unfortunately drowned while bathing on Saturday evening last.  There was nothing particular elicited beyond what has been already reported.  The deceased was 29 years of age, and was only six months in the colony; he was perfectly sober a few minutes before he went to the baths.  It was proved that deceased could not swim, which confirms the opinion that the poor fellow was seixxed with cramps.  The jury found that deceased came to his death by suffocation by drowning in the baths at Woolloomooloo Bay.

 

Maitland Mercury, 16 September 1856

DEATH OF AN ABORIGINAL. - A coroner's inquest was held at the Maitland Hospital on Sunday, before Dr. M'Cartney, on view of the body of "Tommy," an aboriginal.  It appeared that the deceased was brought to the hospital on the previous evening, in a cart, upon a recommendation signed by Mr. Swift, of Morpeth.  The man driving the cart told Mr. Riley that the deceased was in a fit, but upon his (Mr. Riley's) going out to the cart he found him dead.  Dr. Wigan made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, and found the broken end of a spear penetrating the cavity of the pleura, having remained there probably for years; considerable inflammation excited, quite sufficient in his opinion to account for the cause of death.  The jury returned a verdict that the deceased, Tommy, met his death from injuries received by a spear wound in the lung.

 

Empire (Sydney), 16 September 1856

WELLINGTON. - A day or two ago an enquiry took place before the Coroner. Dr. Curtis, as to the death of Mr. James Wilson, an old and respected inhabitant.  The deceased had been in Sydney with cattle where he was attacked with a kind of influenza.  He felt much worse on his road home, and died suddenly at Mr. Hayward's Inn.  Death seemed to have been the result of natural causes,

BURRENDONG. - An inquest was held here before the coroner for Wellington, (Dr. Curtis), on view of the body iof James Steptoe.  It appeared that the deceased, who was an innkeeper, was about to proceed into a cellar, the communication with which was by a kind of trapdoor, when a part of the wood gave way and he was precipitated a distance of about four feet.  He never spoke afterwards, and it was thought that his neck was broken.  The deceased was sober at the time; the jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

 

Empire (Sydney), 17 September 1856

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE.  An inquest was held by J. S. Parker, Esq., city coroner, yesterday, at the Omnibus Inn, George-street south, touching the death of a man named William Walsh, aged 61 years, who died suddenly on Monday night last, at his residence in Sydney-street,  Dr. Redhead deposed that he was called in to see the deceased about twenty minutes before he died; he found the deceased lying on a sofa in the parlour, undressed, speechless, and in a dying state; he was suffering  from congestion of the lungs and brain; his extremities were quite cold, and pulse still; witness applied the usual remedies in such cases, but the deceased did not rally; the deceased was under the influence of drink when witness saw him,  and from the state he was in, witness would say he had been drinking for some time before; deceased's wife was also drunk; witness had known the man for some time; he was a quiet man, and his only fault was intemperance; the cause of death was pulmonary apoplexy.  It further appeared in evidence that during the last fortnight the deceased and his wife were almost constantly drunk, the liquor they consumed being colonial ale,  William Walsh, son of the deceased, deposed as follows:- My father has resided in Sydney for the last twenty-four years; he formerly kept the Napoleon Inn, Kensington-street; latterly the deceased was much addicted to acts of intemperance, and has received medical treatment from Dr. West; he complained of a pain in the side and swimming of the head, and feared he would fall; he was possessed of property and managed his own affairs; I saw him on Thursday last; he was then under the influence of drink; I begged and prayed of him to leave it off; he said the little drop he took he could not do without, but that he would leave it off by degrees; four or five days back I dined with deceased, and saw him drink a little drop; but nothing could induce him to take any food; deceased's wife, when she kept sober, would not neglect him; and it was only when she was drunk that she did so; there were times when my father never touched drink; but when he broke out,  he kept it up; I never saw him take more than a wine-glassful of this colonial ale at a time; but it appeared that he had a continuous thirst on him; he had an objection to being attended by a medical adviser, saying he knew his complaint better than any doctor.  The jury returned the following verdict; - We find that the deceased, William Walsh, aged 61 years, died from disease brought on by intemperance, and not otherwise.

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquiry was held yesterday by J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Three Tuns Inn, Elizabeth-street, touching the death of a woman named Elizabeth Mansfield, aged 44, who died suddenly in bed yesterday morning.  It appeared that the deceased had been an out-patient of the Sydney Dispensary for some months past, under the care of Dr. Aaron, and was suffering from an ulcerated sore leg and general debility.  Dr. Aaron said he had not made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased, but he believed, from her husband's statement and his own observation, that the deceased died from disease of the heart; and had no doubt that her previous habits of intemperance would accelerate the disease.  Verdict - Died from natural causes.

 

Empire (Sydney), 2 September 1856

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE. - An inquest was held in Darlinghurst gaol, ion Saturday last, by the City Coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., on view of the body of Sarah Montgomery aged 46 years, who died in the hospital of the gaol on the previous evening.  It appeared that she was received into the gaol in an ailing state, on the 19th July, under a sentence of three months imprisonment with hard labour for repeated drunkenness.  She received medical treatment from the 11th August, and was placed in the hospital on the 6th instant.  Her constitution was broken down, and she had a cough which merged into rheumatic fever, under which she sank and expired on Friday evening.  The jury found that the deceased, Sarah Montgomery, came by her death form disease induced by previous habits of intemperance.,

 

Maitland Mercury, 23 September 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday at the house of Mr. Thomas Quigley, St. Patrick's Inn, touching the death of a child about four or five years of age, named Mary Ann Bulger.  It appeared from the evidence of a female residing in the same house that on Tuesday last the mother as engaged in the yard washing whilst the deceased with her infant brother were playing in the kitchen.  When first noticed by witness they were standing near the fire, and the deceased had a tin pot in her hand, which she attempted to put on the fire, but was checked by witness.  In a few minutes after witness had retired to her room when she heard the children screaming, and on running into the kitchen she found the decease with her clothes in a blaze.  She immediately wrapped her up in a large coat, and thus succeeded in putting out the fire before it had inflicted much injury.  The deceased, however, became convulsed with the fright, and although medical attendance was procured she never rallied from the shock, but died yesterday morning about 8 o'clock.  The jury returned a verdict accordingly. - Herald, 19th Sept.

 

Bathurst Free Press, 24 September 1856

COWRA.

   Two melancholy accidents occurred here to two men, employed by Mr. Campbell, of Cowra.  The first was struck by lightning on the 5th instant, but the body was not discovered till the 13th, when it presented a frightful appearance.  The unfortunate man's name was Coleman, and he was employed shepherding when the electric fluid out an end to his existence.

   The second individual who met with a sad end, was a person of the name of James Fitkin, who was employed as bullock driver, and while attempting to cross the Lachlan yesterday, 16th instant, was drowned, but the body was not found till about 11 o'clock this morning. .  .  . 

  When the inquest has been held, I will make you acquainted with the particulars.  Sept. 27th, 1856.

Empire (Sydney), 25 September 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT IN MARGARET-STREET. - A coroner's inquest was held, yesterday, at the Three Tuns, public-house, Elizabeth and King-streets, before J. S. Parker, Esq., touching the death of Mr. William Henry Hayes, publican, of Parramatta, which happened under the following circumstances:-

   Mr. Patrick Hayes, father of the decease, deposed that he met his son on Tuesday morning, about ten o'clock, riding on a grey horse; his son was then perfectly sober - in fact, he never drank to excess - and the animal appeared to be quiet; about eleven o'clock he was informed that the deceased had been thrown by coming in contact with a carriage in Hunter-street, and had gone to the Infirmary; his son was an excellent horseman, and had been in the habit of riding horses for a number of years; he had been informed that the horse was a vicious animal and shied in the street.

   Frederick Butcher, a licensed drayman, deposed that between ten and eleven o'clock on Friday morning, he was walking in George-street in front of Mr. Maher's shop, when, on turning round, he saw a man on horseback in contact with a gentleman's carriage at the corner of Margaret and George-streets; the horse and man appeared to be jammed up between the carriage and the lamp-post in front of the Exchange Hotel. The horse plunged, got clear of the carriage and bolted; he ran up and saw the deceased lying quite insensible with his head in the gutter, his chin resting on the edge of the kerb stone, and his legs on the pavement; he was of opinion that the coachman turned the carriage round the corner from George-street too suddenly.

   Alfred Roberts, M.R.C.S.,  deloused that, on Tuesday morning last, he instructed his coachman to drive him from the French Café to Pettly's Hotel; they went gently along to the corner of Margaret-street, where, going in the same direction with themselves, they saw the deceased on horseback; the coachman passed him, and  went passed the corner; turning into Margaret-street, her thought the head of the deceased's horse would come rather close to the carriage, and looked out of the window as the carriage came at right angles with the deceased's horse in rounding the corner; the front corner of the nearer-side of the body of the carriage struck the nose of deceased's horse, which turned sharply up Margaret-street, between the carriage and the left hand kerbing; the deceased lost control of the horse, and the animal began to get into a shaking gallop; the deceased after shaking in his saddle, fell off opposite the store of Gilchrist, Watt and Co,; witness stopped the carriage, and finding thee deceased insensible had him placed in it and conveyed to the Infirmary; he followed himself immediately, and visited the deceased afterwards in the day and in the evening; the deceased died from the effects of the fall; he was of opinion that when the deceased found the carriage turning in front of his horse, he was unable to prevent the animal's taking  two or three steps more, which brought its nose in contact with the carriage, then moving at right angles with it; the deceased died about eight o'clock on Tuesday evening, either from the rupture of a blood vessel ort fracture of the bone at the base of the brain; the deceased was a very weighty man.

   Peter Licker, coachman to the last witness, stated that after the horse came in contract with the carriage, the deceased's horse immediately went off in a gallop, and he observed the deceased's left leg out of the stirrup om and the whole of his body leaning on the right side with all his weight on the off stirrup, which forced the saddle round and caused the deceased to fall off on his back; he then saw the deceased holding by the reins which brought the horse's head round, and the fore feet over the deceased's body; the horse then kicked the deceased with his hind feet.

   Michael Dillon, a drayman, stated that, after the accident occurred and deceased had been placed in the carriage, he began to move and vomited a great deal; the deceased afterwards became so violent that witness could scarcely hold him; at other times deceased was quite quiet; he did not speak intelligibly after the accident. 

   It further appeared that the affrighted horse ran away, with the saddle under its belly, and was afterwards secured in King-street, where he shied at a lamp-post and fell.  The deceased had hired the horse from Mr. Pearson, of the Australian Horse Bazaar, having left his own there, to be broken in.  The horse was grazed on the off side from his hip to his shoulder, where he had a deep cut, evidently done by some sharp instrument; one stirrup leather and iron were gone, and the other stirrup iron was bent and the saddle much grazed.  The graxxxe on the off shoulder of the horse was semi-circular, hence it was concluded that it had been caused by the wheel of a vehicle.

   The jury unanimously recorded the following verdict - That deceased, William Henry Hayes came to his death by injuries accidentally received by a fall ort a kick on the head from his horse, and we consider that no blame attaches to any party.

 

Sydney Morning Herald, 27 September 1856

   An inquest was held before Dr. Dowe, the coroner for the district, and a jury, at Wilberforce, on the body of a child named Ophir Graham, 4 ½  years old, son of Mr. Thomas Graham, farmer, of Wilberforce.  It appeared that the deceased had accidentally scalded himself so severely and to such an extent whilst by himself, that death ensued after some lingering; and a verdict was returned accordingly.

 

Goulburn Herald, 27 September 1856

THE LOCK-UP. - A short time since, a man named William Forster was admitted into the Queanbeyan Hospital, but within the last month became very unsettled in his mind, at the same time suffering otherwise.  On last Thursday he broke out of the Hospital, and it was found necessary to confine him in the lock-up.  He became from that time very feeble and to all appearances dying fast.  Yesterday morning he expired.  A coroner's inquest was held on the body this morning, when a verdict of death from natural causes was returned.

 

Empire (Sydney), 2 October 1856

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE. - An inquest was held by the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., yesterday, at the Wellington Inn, George-street South, touching the death of a seaman name Henrick Simeon Hansen, a native of Germany, aged thirty-three years.  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased, who was addicted to drinking, was suddenly seized with vomiting, while on a visit at Redfern, and expired before medical assistance could be obtained.  Mr. W. J. Jenkins, surgeon, deposed that he had examined the body of the deceased, and the previous history of the deceased - that of a drunkard - that death was the result of effusion on the brain caused by the excessive use of intoxicating drinks.  Verdict: That the deceased died of apoplexy, brought on from habits of intemperance.

An inquest was also held by J. S. Parker, Esq., on Tuesday last, at the Wheelwright's Arms, Petersham, touching the death of a woman named Margaret Tobin, aged twenty-six years, who was found dead on the floor in a room in her own dwelling-house, at seven o'clock the same morning.  It appeared that she was addicted to drinking, and that her death was the result of an apoplectic fit.  A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 2 October 1856

MURDER OF AN INFANT, AND DEATH OF THE MOTHER.

AN inquest was held on Tuesday last, at the Rainbow Tavern, Pitt and King streets, before J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner for the city, on the body of Sarah Pawley, aged 25 years, who died on the preceding evening.  Many rumours had got afloat in reference to the deceased having had medicine administered to her to procure abortion, and the consequence was that much interest was taken in the enquiry.  The following evidence was taken on the above day:-

  Asher Jude deposed: The deceased Sarah Pawley was my servant, and had been in my service about eleven weeks; last Sunday, having been out part of the day, I returned home shortly after five o'clock, and then learnt that deceased was very ill, and enquired whether she had taken anything; I was told that she had had some rum and water; I again went out at seven and returned at ten o'clock.  I then learned that deceased had been out and returned about nine o'clock, and that she had gone straight to bed; about 12 o'clock I was aroused from bed by my other female servant, who slept in the same bed with the deceased; I got up, went up stairs, and found deceased in a violent fit, working very hard with hands, features, and body; she recovered from the fit after I had been in the room about eight minutes, but did not speak, though she kept her eyes fixed upon me; in about fifteen minutes afterwards she had a second fit, and again came round; I went to Dr. Muller, who prescribed for her; I got the medicine made up, and gave it to her on my return; she took the medicine, and  said, "nasty stuff;" this might have been about half-past 2 o'clock; I then left the room, as the other girl was about to apply poultices, as directed by the doctor; I returned to the room after a few minutes had expired, and found her again in a fit; I waited several minutes, and when she got better from the fit she fell into another, and then began to get them faster than ever, the fits, however not lasting so long; about four o'clock seeing the fits come on so rapidly, I again went for Dr. Muller; he accompanied me back, and directly he saw her, he said to me, as I understood him, "This woman must have been delivered of a child, or she has been taking something;" he then again prescribed for her, and leeches were applied by me to her abdomen, but she did not improve; the doctor left after prescribing for her, but when I found that she was getting worse, I again went for him, and he returned between 7 and 8 o'clock; he made the same remarks as before, and ordered certain treatment for her, saying she was dangerously ill; he also asked Mrs. Jude if she had any suspicion of deceased being in the family way; my wife said, "No" and that she had never heard deceased complain; I myself never observed anything that led me to suspect she was so, for when she came to my place she was rather stout, and I received a good character with her; I also spoke to my other servant, asking whether she ever heard  deceased make any remarks that would lead to the idea of her being in the family way' she said, "no, I never did, but I miss the counterpane off from our bed, and I cannot find it;"  Mrs. Jude then told her to go and look for it until she found it; this conversation did not take above two minutes, and I then went back into deceased's room with the other girl, to look for the counterpane; opened the deceased's box and put my hand into it; feeling about I touched something hard, which proved to be the missing counterpane; I felt something like a child in it, so I went and fetched my shopman, opened the quilt in his presence, and found a dead child wrapped up in it; I then went to Dr. Muller's, but as he was out, I gave information to the police, and Dr. Rutter was  sent back with me; deceased died about half-past 10 o'clock last night.

Dr. Charles Muller deposed to the treatment he had ordered.  I went to the house on being informed by Mr. Jude that the girl was getting worse, and found deceased lying on a bed on the floor; I asked several questions of the other servants, and made an examination of deceased; from that I found that deceased was  either in the beginning of pregnancy or that something extraordinary had happened to her; she was perfectly senseless at the time, constantly vomited, with her extremities cold; I told the other girl to look for any medicine that deceased had been in the habit of tasking, and she told me that deceased had taken some pills that she got from a chemist; I called in again about 11 o'clock, bringing Dr. Nathan with me, and then learned that a dead infant had been und in deceased's trunk; Dr. Rutter was there, and we then examined the woman and found she had been recently delivered, the child was a full time infant; deceased died that night, and from the symptoms of the whole case, I believe something improper had been administered to her.

The inquest was then adjourned to the following day, in order to have a post mortem examination of the body.

On the following day (yesterday), the jury again assembled at the same place.

Dr. Charles Nathan deposed: I first saw deceased on Monday morning about 11 o'clock, in company with Dr. Muller; she was then dying;  I have since assisted at a post mortem examination of the body; it presented marks of recent delivery; there was enlargement of the right hemisphere of the brain, with extravasation of blood on the brain; this, with the history of the case, would be sufficient in my mind to account for death; this would account for the succession of fits, though we may frequently get fits of the kind without any lesion of any part of the body; doubtless the extreme mental anxiety she must have suffered would be sufficient to account for the appearances, and, with the fits, were sufficient to account for death; if he had had simply that state of the brain which we found, death would no doubt have resulted, but it would have been more slow; owing to her state and to the tendency at such times to puerperal convulsions death followed more rapidly; there was nothing in the intestines to show that she had been drugged, or that she had taken anything improper; the child had come to its full time; we made no analysis of the contents of the stomach, as there was nothing to lead us to think that it was necessary; she might have delivered herself without anaesthetic; the umbilical cord was not tied, but broken; attending on herself, with the great and unusual fatigue that I learn she must have suffered, would be sufficient to bring on convulsions and hasten death; she did not appear to have suffered much from haemorrhage, and I could not say whether this was her first child; she, however, appeared to be a strong, healthy woman; fright, distress, or any strong mental emotion would cause those appearances of the brain; even the continuance of the convulsions, supposing all other causes to be wanting, would have produced them; the proper remedies seem to have been used; there was nothing to show that she had tightened herself in so as to lessen her sixxxe; the infant was certainly born alive.

Dr. Muller deposed: The something

extraordinary that I alluded to yesterday has

been explained to me by the post mortem

examination; the moral impression made on her

mind by what she had done has caused the appearance of the brain; the cause of death was

cerebral congestion, brought on by violent

mental impressions.  (He then detailed the

appearance of the body, &c.)

Isabella M'Gillivray deposed: I have been three

weeks in the service of Mr. Jude, and deceased

and I slept in the same bed; she was not sickly, but during the last week she complained much about her feet being swollen; I never saw her take anything for it, nor did I know that anything further was the matter; I certainly never suspected that she was in the family way, nor did I ever see anything in her appearance to make me think she was so; she never hinted that she was going to leave the place but she told me she was going to get married to a sailor laddie, though she was not very sure of when it was to be; she went out walking with me and the children on Sunday last, taking one of them by the hand; she walked well enough, and we went to the racecourse; but after a time she left me and the children, and came back home, telling me that she was sick and could not stay longer; she left me about half-past four, and came back at six o'clock; when I came home, I

went up stairs to put away my bonnet; it might have been half-an-hour after my return; when I went into the room, she was dressing herself, putting on clean under linen, and I noticed that the floor had just been washed, as it was very wet just beside where her box stood; I did not make any remark to her, nor did she say anything to me; I did not observe that she was smaller, nor did I see any marks or traces about the place; when I went up the door was shut, but not fastened, and as I came up she asked, "Who's there?" I said, "it's me," and she replied, "Oh; all right!" I could not see if she was confused; for I just went to out my bonnet down, and then went out, as I was in a hurry to out the children to bed; she came down stairs about twenty minutes after I went down, and came into the children's bedroom, sitting down in a chair, but saying nothing; she looked very sickly; I did not see her take anything; a little after seven o'clock she went out, as she  said, to see her lad, and put on her bonnet and shawl to do so; she was out about two hours; I know she had a young man but I did not know him; she did not say anything when she came in, but asked for a drink of water; she said, "I am very weak; will you bring ma a glass of water;": I fetched her a tumbler-full and she drank it; she seemed to me to be very ill; she then went up-stairs to her bedroom; I had not been there since her absence; she walked up herself and sat down on her box; I went up-stairs at Mrs. Jude's desire to ask her to have some tea; she would not have any;  she told me she had seen her young man, and told him how ill she was, and that he had said that she ought not to have come out when she was so poorly; she went to bed about an hour afterwards; she did not complain of her head, but merely said that she was ill; she seemed all right and quite sensible of what she was saying; when I came up to bed she was in bed all right, under the clothes; she never made any statement to me as to what the young man had said to her; when I was giving the children their supper down stairs, we heard a noise up stairs, and Mrs. Jude called up-stairs to know what was the matter; it was as though a person was stamping up and down the room.

The Jury then almost immediately returned a verdict of Death from natural causes.

An inquest was then held upon the body of the male infant of the unfortunate woman, when the following evidence was given:-

  Mr. Asher Jude deposed: When I went up on Monday morning in Sarah Pawley's room to look for the counterpane, I had some suspicion from the remarks made by Dr. Muller, that I should find something like what I did; I found the counterpane in the box and the child in it; nobody told me it  was there; when I saw what was there, I called up my shopman, and we opened the counterpane and found the child; the box was closed but not locked, and there was nothing but the child in the counterpane; it looked quite clean, was naked and dead; I saw some bruises on its arms and face, but the sight was not a tempting one, and therefore I did not look into it very closely; I informed the police of the circumstance; I do not think that there was anybody assisting the woman in her delivery; my place is so small that persons musty go through the shop or sitting room to go upstairs, and therefore could not pass up or down without exciting notice.

  Dr. Muller detailed the appearance of the infant's body.  The body of a male child was shown to me first on Monday morning, which Drs. Rutter and Nathan and myself examined.  We then found by positive signs that the child had been born alive, and at its full term.  A post mortem examination of the body was made, when the following marks of violence were discovered.  The superior portion of the right side of the head showed a violent contusion, with ecchymosis, extending from the lower part of the right cheek to the superior part of the occipital region; the eyebrows and the lips showed signs of contusions. On removing the scalp, we found a comminuted fracture of the skull corresponding with the external marks; the sutures were disjointed, and the  sinuses of the brain were torn, the contents being reduced to a pulpy matter mixed with blood, which escaped through the fractured bone of the cranium; the cause of death is the injury found on the head, and may have been caused by violence from a blow or from throwing the child against a wall or some such place; it could not have been done by the pressure of the hand; great violence must have been use; the injury might have been caused by dashing the child against the wall or floor; it need not necessarily have made any mark on the wall, as the scalp was not broken, or if against the floor any mark would have been washed up; I know from certain signs that the child was born alive; I do not, however, think that it could have lived more than a quarter of an hour at the outside, though respiration and every function had been performed.  It is quite possible that a woman should deliver herself and go out, &c., the same as Sarah Pawley had done.  No mere fall could have caused the injuries I have described, very great violence must have been used.  One very powerful blow against the w all or floor might possibly cause such injury.

  Dr. Nathan agreed with the above testimony; and drew the coroner's attention to the state of the dead-house at the Circular Quay.  Light was admitted to it only from two sources, the door and a window at the back.  The door of course had to be closed, and in the middle of their task, much to their surprise, they found an audience of some fifty men and boys looking at them through the window, which was commanded by a high bank in the rear.  In addition to this there was neither water or towel to cleanse their hands, seat to sit upon, nor convenience of any kind.  Under such circumstances he thought perhaps a recommendation from the jury might have some effect.

  The Coroner thought the better course would be for the two medical gentlemen employed to address a letter to him on the subject, and he would take care to forward it to the Government.

  The Jury then found that the deceased infant had met with its death from violence received at the hands of the deceased mother, Sarah Pawley.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 2 October 1856

  An inquest was held on the 30th ultimo, at the Wheelwright Arms, Petersham, before Mr. J. S. Parker, touching the death of a female about 16 years of age, named Margaret Tobin.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was a woman of loose character, very much addicted to intemperance.  Dr. Redhead who viewed the body after death, detected some bruises and other marks of violence, but none sufficient to account for death.  James Martin, a boy about eleven years of age, residing next door, who was in the habit of bringing her drink, deposed, that on the morning of the 30th he went into the deceased's house and found her lying on the floor dead, with her face downwards; her  sister-in-law was in bed in another room close by, and although the door of the deceased's room was open, she, the sister-in-law, appeared to know nothing of the occurrence; when informed of the deceased's death she commenced crying, but said nothing; the only liquor witness brought for the deceased during the previous day was two gills of rum; this was besides half-a-pint he brought for his father-in-law, of which the deceased, who was not then sober, partook; indeed, the evidence went to show that the whole three were intoxicated and consequently that they were not in a position to give correct testimony.  The Jury found that the deceased died from the effects of an apoplectic fit, accelerated by habits of intemperance.


 

Maitland Mercury, 2 October 1856

SOFALA. - Shortly after the above news reached town, a man from Monday Point announced the death of his mate, by drowning.  It appears that the man was at a public-house at Erskine Flat, where he was in the habit of spending a great deal of his time, and all the money he possibly could finger. In all probability, therefore, he had taken some liquor, when he started to cross the river to Monday Point, which he never reached.  He took a candle with him to light his path, but as he had a temporary bridge to cross, it is supposed that in crossing he fell, and was powerless to help himself.  J. Walford, Esq., held an inquiry on the body, when a verdict was found in accordance with the evidence. I do not know the name of the deceased, but he answered to the delegation of Old Harry.  Sofala, Sept. 23, 1856. - Correspondent of the Bathurst Free Press.


 

Empire (Sydney), 3 October 1856

DEATH OF A PERSON UNKNOWN. - The following is a description of a man, whose name is unknown, now lying dead at the Sydney Infirmary:- About 35 years of age, five feet seven inches high, and of slight make; fair complexion, light hair and whiskers, acquiline nose.  Had on a brown tweed coat, white moleskin trousers, a dark vest, chequered shirt, cabbage-tree hat with black ribbon round it, and short light boots.  An inquest will be held on the body at ten o'clock this morning, at Mr. Driver's Three Tuns Tavern, Elizabeth street.


 

Empire (Sydney), 3 October 1856

Letter to the Editor from Dr. Muller concerning reporting of the Sarah Pawley case.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 3 October 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST.   An inquest was held yesterday, at Longford's Hotel, Kent-street, on view of the body of Jane Brennan, a female about fifty-eight years of age.  It appeared from the evidence that she had been declining for some time past; that she resided with her daughter, Elizabeth Chandler; that in the afternoon of the previous day she complained of a giddiness in the head; that soon after she went to Crowley, the pawnbroker's, to get a note of hand; that on her return she said she felt much better, and ate a very hearty tea, consisting chiefly of some beef and pickles.  Shortly after tea the daughter, whilst sitting by the fire, noticed her mother gradually falling on one side, until at length her head dropped on the table.  She then caught hold of her and carried her to bed; but the deceased never spoke after.  She died at half-past four o'clock the next morning.  Verdict - Died suddenly from natural causes.


 

Goulburn Herald, 4 October 1856

SUDDEN DEATH. - A man named Giles Johnson dropped dead on Wednesday week, while sitting at his supper in his tent, at Tuena Creek.  An inquest was held on the body, when a verdict of Died by the visitation of God, was returned.

SUICIDE. - A shocking case of suicide occurred at Tuena on Sunday last.  A person named Thomas Rhodes, who was formerly superintendent for Messrs. Benjamin and Moses at Bigga, had been drinking for some time, and on the day named quitted Mr. Bright's house where he had been carousing and after proceeding a short distance cut his throat by drawing a penknife cross it.  Mr. Miles attended the unfortunate man and rendered all the assistance possible.


 

Empire (Sydney), 4 October 1856

MYSTERIOUS DEATH BY VIOLENCE.

  An inquest, which lasted from ten o'clock yesterday morning till half-past five in the  afternoon, was held at the Three Tuns Tavern, Elixabeth street, by the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., on view of the body of a man unknown, then lying dead in the Sydney Infirmary.  A woman named Hogan was in custody, on suspicion of having administered a deleterious drug ti the deceased.  From the evidence, it appeared that the deceased went, on Saturday morning last, between twelve and one o'clock, in company with a woman named Hogan, to the house of Ann Simpson, No. 23, Clarence-street, and paid 5s. for a bed; about ten minutes after they had entered the house and gone up stairs, the woman went away alone, giving as her reason for so ding, that the deceased was drunk and that she would not stay with him; about two o'clock in the afternoon, a young woman who was sleeping with a man in the room adjoining that into which the deceased had been taken, informed Mrs. Simpson that the deceased had fallen down stairs in attempting to follow the woman Hogan; he had fallen down three steps and was found lying on a landing-place, in a state of insensibility, with his head downwards and feet up; Mrs. Simpson stated that she requested the male lodger to help her to remove the deceased, but he declined doing so; she then got his legs down and placed a pillow under him; she allowed him to remain in the house till Saturday night, believing that he was only in  a drunken sleep; she gave him a basin of coffee, but it made him sick; he mouthed some words, but she could not understand what he said.

  Ann Williams deposed that she was at Ann Simpson's house on Friday night; between twelve and one o'clock, she was sitting in the kitchen when the prisoner and the deceased entered; they did not remain long; but the prisoner lighted a candle and held out her arm to assist the deceased; as he was going to take her arm, he, being drunk, fell against the back door, striking, she believed, the front part of his head; he walked up stairs with the assistance of the prisoner; and soon afterwards witness went up stairs to her own room; and heard some one go down ; about a minute or two after this, she heard a noise, went out, and sawe the deceased lying as above described.

  William John Brown, an inspector of the Sydney police force, deposed that he went to Simpson's house between 1 and 12 o'clock on Saturday night, and found the deceased lying on the floor of a room up stairs, with his clothes on; he was restless and kicking about with his feet; he made inquiries about the deceased, but Ann Simpson did not mention that the deceased had fallen down stairs; witness called in Mr. Aguilar, surgeon of King-street, who came and examined the deceased in his presence, and recommended that the deceased's head should be bathed with vinegar; witness then asked the deceased his name, and he answered something like "Hinehy": or Hinehen;" witness also asked where he lived, and he said the end of, or near, Bathurst-street; the doctor ordered a pillow to be placed under the head of the deceased, who was then almost in a state of coma; witness then ordered constable to search the deceased's pockets; two sixpence and a threepenny piece were found in them, and Ann Simpson handed over to him a watch and chain; the watch was marked ":Arnold and Co., Liverpool, No. 6613;" On Sunday evening last, having had a conversation with Dr. Houston, at the Infirmary, respecting the deceased, witness arrested the prisoner on the charge of having administered to the deceased a deleterious drug and thereby endangered his life; he cautioned her that anything she should say might be used against her, when she said, :if he had anything of the kind, it must have been before she saw him, as they only had two nobblers of gin at Alphon;s public-house in King -street;" she was then taken before Mr. Dowling on Monday morning on that charge, and remanded for a week, bail being taken for her appearance; the house kept by Ann Simpson was a common brothel, and the houses round about the neighbourhood were nearly all brothels; he was led to believe from Ann Simpson that the deceased was only suffering from drunkenness; the deceased as lying near a stretcher bed when he went into the room, and Ann Simpson said the deceased had fallen off from the stretcher during the morning.

  Haynes Gibbes Alleyene, a duly qualified medical practitioner, deposed that on Sunday last, about noon, the deceased was brought to the Infirmary in a state of unconsciousness; he then thought him to be suffering from cerebral affection, and treated him accordingly; he died on Tuesday night about nine o'clock; the body was free from marks of violence, except a few scratches on the hand and foot, evidently done before death; he had made a post mortem examination; on opening the head and taking off the dura mater,  he found the whole surface of the brain covered with a layer of effused blood, the anterior lobes of the brain  at the extreme point were completely disorganized; at the base of the brain there was a large clot of blood, and the right lobe of the cerebellum was broken down to a sanguinous mass; he dissected the muscles from the back of the neck; they were contused, and there was a fracture extending through the occipital bone to the foramen magnum; a part of that bone was quite detached and loose; he examined the viscera of the chest and abdomen which we all quite healthy; the injuries on the head, he thought to be the result of a fall; if a blow had been given, it would have taken great violence to have caused such a fracture, and  would have left external appearances; the injuries described were the cause of death; he thought,  from such a severe injury, the deceased must have been unconscious from the time of its infliction.

  Several other witnesses were examined, but they threw no further light on the matter.

  The following verdict was returned, That the deceased, a man unknown, came to his death by injuries on the head received in a brothel kept by one Ann Simpson, in Clarence-street; but how, and by what means, those injuries were inflicted, there is no reliable evidence to show; as the channel, or information is from such depraved characters, that no reliance can be placed upon their evidence.


 

Empire (Sydney), 6 October 1856

A CHILD FOUND DEAD AT STRAWBERRY HILLS, - A VERDICT OF WILFUL MURDER AGAINST THE MOTHER.

  An inquest was held on Saturday last, by J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Wellington Inn, George-street South, on view of the body of a female infant, unknown, which was found on the previous day buried in the sand, in a box, on the Strawberry Hills, near the burial ground.

  Thomas Pennington, police sergeant, deposed that a little before twelve o'clock on Friday last, he received information that the body of an infant had been discovered in a box at Strawberry Hills close to the burial ground.  He went to the spot, where he found a box by the side of a ledge of sand, and partially covered with sods.  He took it out, and found that it resembled a candle box.  The lid was in two pieces, and was not nailed, but fastened round with cord.  On raising one of the boards, he saw the body of a child, wrapped up in a new flannel.  Some of the sand had fallen into the box and covered the face and head of the infant.  The box had evidently not been long placed there.  The locality was frequented, and there was a path running close to the spot where the box was found.  The box was first seen by two children whilst playing about the place.  They had not meddled with it; nor could they say how it came there.  He had made every enquiry, but could gain no further information up to that time.  He caused the removal of the box and its contents to the Benevolent Asylum.

  James Smith, a duly qualified medical practitioner, deposed: that he had made a post mortem examination of the body.  There were no external marks of violence upon it; but the head appeared to be compressed from the forehead backwards; the nose also was flattened a little.  On opening the chest, he found both lungs partially congested - the heart tinged with blood, but empty and the stomach empty but healthy; the other viscera were also healthy.  On opening the head, her found effused blood between the scalp and the left half of the frontal bone; as also, effused blood at the back of the head, which might have been caused at birth; the frontal bone was forced in and was overlapped by the parietal bone - that might be caused in delivery; the occipital bone was also overlapped, which was caused by violence; the vessels of the brain were greatly congested.  He was of opinion that the death of the child was caused by violence, by compression.  On examining the umbilical cord, he found it longer than usual, and not tied as a medical man would have tied it.  The child was a female.

  It was discovered in new clothing, as follows:- white frock, flannel bed-chemise, and a bandage round it, with a good cap trimmed with lace.  The child might have lived about one day; it was full grown and healthy.  He did not think it had been suckled.  Decomposition having set in, he could not say whether there were any external marks about the head.  He placed the lungs in water, and found that they both floated - satisfactorily showing that respiration had been fully established.  It was not uncommon for the stomach to be empty in new born babies.  The part of the box where the head lay was padded with calico; and it appeared as if the deceased infant had been in the box some time before it was buried.  He thought it had been dead about four days.  The body had been well washed and dressed by some person that understood such matters.  The eyes were perfectly red, being blood shot, showing that violence must have been used.

  The verdict of the jury was as follows:- We find that the deceased female infant now lying dead at the Benevolent Asylum, came by its death by violence; and we pronounce the mother, at present unknown, guilty of the crime of wilful and  deliberate murder.


 

Maitland Mercury, 7 October 1856

BOAT ACCIDENTS. - During the first of the westerly squall yesterday forenoon, several boars, under canvas, were capsized; one, a waterman's skiff, off Johnson's Bay, containing two persons, but who were fortunately picked up by parties who saw the accident; another, off Kirrribilli Point, met a similar fate; but we regret to mention that it was rumoured two other boats were capsized, and two persons drowned - one off Johnson's Bay, and another off Pyrmont.


 

Empire (Sydney), 7 October 1856

QUEANBEYAN. -On last Sunday morning a child of Patrick M'Namara's, of Woden Swamp, near Queanbeyan, came by her death under the following melancholy circumstances:- It appears that the father and mother went out to the back-yard about ten o'clock in the morning to milk a cow, leaving the children sitting at the table eating their breakfast; shortly afterwards the second eldest child was observed running out all in flames; both father and mother of course ran to the child and extinguished the burning garments, but not before the child and parents were injured.  Oil and other remedies were applied to relieve the litte sufferer.  Dr. Morton was sent for, and was quickly in attendance, but to no effect, the sufferings were too severe to last ling, the poor child expired on the following night about 12 o'clock,  An inquest was held on the body yesterday (Monday), before Andrew Morton, Esq., Coroner for the district, and a jury of twelve,  when the following verdict was returned:- Maria M'Namara of the age of three years and five months, daughter of Patrick M'Namara, came by her death through accidental burning.

  It is to be hoped that this solemn warning will prove to be a lesson to parents in future, seeing that it is such a short time since it was our painful duty to report a similar case.

NEWCASTLE.

INQUEST. - On Saturday morning last, at the Five Huts, five or six miles from town, a man named Robert Clint was so seriously injured by kicks from a horse, that he died the next day.  An inquest was held on Monday before the Coroner for the district, R. R. S. Bowker, Esq., and a verdict of Accidental death was returned.

FEARFUL ACCIDENT. - On Wednesday last a man named John Rutherford was brought into the Newcastle Hospital from Hexham, where he had fallen into the fire, and in a few minutes more would have been literally roasted to death but for the timely assistance rendered him by a female.  It is presumed he must have been drunk at the time, as he was unable to extricate himself, but this is stoutly denied.  He now lies in a very precarious state, not being yet considered out of danger. [See Empire (Sydney), 14 October, below, for inquest.]

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. - On Sunday morning last William Bell, a settler, left Mosquito Island about 9 o'clock in a small boat for the purpose of coming into Newcastle.  About half-past 9 the boat was discovered, keel upwards, a short distance from the Island, and there is not the slightest doubt but the unfortunate man was drowned.  We understand that, during the week, the Water Police and other parties have been dragging in the vicinity of the accident; but, up to last evening, the body had not been found.


 

Maitland Mercury, 7 October 1856

ACCIDENT. - On Friday last, a female child of Mr. Smith, of Chatsbury, met with a fearful accident.  A person in the house had been boiling a pair of moleskin trousers, and whist his back was turned, the little girl, only about three years of age, tumbled into the pot of boiling water. The lower parts of the body were fearfully injured.  The little sufferer was brought into town the next day, and has been since attended by Dr. Hanford.  We regret to say that she is still lying in a very precarious state. - Goulburn Chronicle, Oct. 1.


 

Empire (Sydney), 8 October 1856

LAW INTELLIGENCE.

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT.

TUESDAY, 7TH OCTOBER 1856   

MANSLAUGHTER.

  Joseph Patten surrendered to his bail, and was charged with having, on the 11th day of August last, in the colony of New South Wales, caused the death of Daniel Murphy.  .  .  .   the jury, without leaving the Court, returned a verdict, acquitting the prisoner, who was immediately discharged.


 

Empire (Sydney), 8 October 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday morning by J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Neptune Inn, Princes-street, on view of the body of Mary Louisa Ward, the child who was killed on Monday last by the wheel of a cart passing over her neck.  A man named George Knapp was in custody on the charge of having occasioned the death of the deceased by careless driving.

  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had only left her mother's house a minute or two before the fatal occurrence.  The defendant, a dealer in potatoes, was sitting in his cart driving steadily along the street, when by some means unknown the child came in contact with the cart, and fell downwards with her neck under one of the wheels.  Dr. A. M. Brown deposed that he was called to see the child immediately after the accident, and upon examination found her to be dead; he found extensive laceration on the back part of the head exposing the bone of the skull, a few abrasions on the forehead with flattening of the lower part of the face; the neck evidently showing that a wheel had passed over it crushing the face in the ground; the wheel no doubt slipped down on to the neck and caused the strangulation of the child.  The jury returned the following verdict:- We find that the deceased child died from injuries inflicted by a cart-wheel passing over its neck, causing instant death; and we acquit the man George Knapp of any blame, being satisfied it was an accident; and we further regret to find from the innumerable occurrences of this kind, that parents are not more cautious in allowing their young children to play about the streets.


 

Maitland Mercury, 9 October 1856

DANGER OF AN OLD PIPE. - A little boy died in Bangor lately from the effects of using an old tobacco pipe to blow soap bubbles with.  His little sister, who used it with him, is lying dangerously ill.  It is supposed they were poisoned with the essential oil of tobacco, imbibed from the pipe which they were using. - Empire, 7th October.

A MAN KILLED. - On Sabbath last, the weather being somewhat stormy, a person named Gardner, on his way to the Church at Jeringong, in company with a Mr. Francis, was suddenly killed by the branch of a tree falling on him and fracturing his skull.  His companion, Francis, escaped narrowly from a like fate.  We have not yet been put in possession of the particulars of the accident. - Illwarra Mercury, October 6.


 

Maitland Mercury, 9 October 1856

DEATH BY A FALL FROM A HORSE. - On Monday an inquest was held before Dr. M'Cartney, the coroner, at the house of Michael Casey, Narrowgut, near Morpeth, on the body of John Peters.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, who was a German by birth, and a farm servant, started from the house of Mr. Casey, his master, on horseback, about two o'clock on Sunday afternoon.  The horse was quiet, and not given to any shying or bolting, and Peters was not riding fast when he left the house.  In a few minutes, however, the horse returned without his rider, and on search being made, the latter was found lying on the ground, near a fence, bleeding from the nose.  Dr. Getty was sent for, and arrived very soon, but Peters, who had not spoken since the accident, was then dead.  Blood was found to have issued in quantities from the nose and right ear; and the cause of death was supposed to be extensive injury to the bone of the skull, and the rupture of a blood vessel near the base.  Peters was quite a sober man when he set out.  It is said that he was unaccustomed to riding.

CASE OF DROWNING. - As the Hunter steamer was on her way from Sydney on Saturday last, she stopped as usual at Raymond Terrace.  A man there came on board, apparently much the worse for liquor.  On the steamer's arrival at Morpeth, in the evening he was loitering about the deck, and was told either to go ashore or to go below and lie down.  He returned some answer, and no further notice appears to have been taken of him.  At about two o'clock on Sunday morning, a noise was heard as of some one shouting ion the wharf, and then a splash in the water.  Every endeavor was made to discover what had caused the splash, but without success, the only clue obtained being a blue cap found floating on the river.  The supposition is that the man referred to had gone ashore, and returning to the vessel at night had in the darkness fallen over the bank, and been drowned.  We hear that inquiries have been made at Raymond Terrace, and that it had not been ascertained that any such person had been missed from that place. [Maitland Mercury, 11 October; Inquest by Dr. M'Cartney; Found drowned.]


 

Empire (Sydney), 9 October 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT ON BOARD THE NEW STEAMER PREMIER.

 Considerable alarm was caused yesterday by a report that the boiler of the new ferry steamer Premier had burst, killing one man, and doing considerable damage otherwise.  On going to the scene of the occurrence the report was fully confirmed.  We give the following facts in relation to the melancholy affair.

  The steamer, which has been built expressly to ply between Balmain and Sydney, was got under steam yesterday, for the first time, and plied about Johnson's Bay and Darling Harbour on her trial trip.  Coals running short, she was brought alongside the Balmain Steam Ferry's Wharf, at Balmain, to take on board a fresh supply, preparatory to going down to the Heads.  This was about half-past twelve o'clock.  The engineer (whose name we did not ascertain) was below, in the engine-room,  packing the cylinder-trunnion, and had occasion to call to his assistance another engineer, named James  Leal - now deceased - he immediately went.  He had not been below a minute, when the workmen on shore (no other persons being on board) observed a considerable escape of steam all over the vessel.  And presently the engineer first alluded to came on deck in a state of exhaustion.  He said Leal was below.   Strenuous efforts were immediately made to recover Leal, but the steam was too overpowering for any one to go below; and it was not till after the fire was taken out of the furnace and the partition between the cabin and engine-room broken down, that the unfortunate man was extricated.  He was, however, quite dead. Dr. Evans was promptly in attendance, but his services were of no avail.

  It appears that the explosion was caused by a stay-bolt detaching itself from the centre of the head of the boiler, and thus the steam erupted.   Leal's back was turned towards the boiler at the time.  The other engineer, perceiving what had happened, called out to him to rush out, and at the same moment made his way out as best he could, but, unfortunately, poor Leal, in his terror, turned to the left instead of to the right -where he was found, and becoming overpowered was unable to extricate himself, and thus met his melancholy fate.

  He leaves a widow and one child and a large circle of friends to lament their loss.

 We understand an inquest will be held on the body this morning.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 13 October 1856

HUNTER RIVER DISTRICT.

SHOCKING SUICIDE. - On Thursday afternoon, about half-past three o'clock, Mr. Stephen Ryan committed suicide in West Maitland, by shooting himself through the head with a pistol, causing instantaneous death.  Mr. Ryan, who was a man of good education, and had resided man years in Maitland and the neighbourhood, was formerly a respected man, and his family are well connected here.  An unhappy propensity for drink, however, destroyed his character and position, and ultimately led him, after quarrelling with his family, to threaten the life of his wife, who had been compelled, by his violence, to take refuge with her married daughter.  Since that tome Mr. Ryan's intellect has never seemed quite right, although at times he was better than others.  During the whole of Thursday forenoon he had been seen wandering about the spot, muttering incoherently, and asking whether some person, of whom he appeared in search, had been seen.  Little more than a quarter of an hour before the act, he was seen walking along the street, with a large pistol in his hand, and a coat over his arm.  It appears that he turned down the opening near Mr. Mitchell's new buildings, and when close to the well, applied the pistol below his right ear, and fired.  The discharge scattered the brains and portions of the skull around.  He must have died instantly.  He had another pistol in his pocket unloaded, and also a powder-flask.  An inquest was held yesterday before the coroner, at the Maitland Hotel, when but few additional particulars were elicited. .  .  .   The jury returned a verdict that deceased came by his death from a pistol wound, inflicted by himself whilst labouring under temporary insanity, produced by long-continued habits of intemperance.


 

Empire (Sydney), 14 October 1856

INQUEST. - On Thursday evening last an inquest was held at the Daniel O'Connell Inn, Auburn-street, before Robert Waugh, Esq., Coroner for the district, on view of the body of Charles Waygood, aged one year and eight months, who had been accidentally killed that morning.  The only evidence was that of the father of the deceased.  On being sworn he stated that his name is John Waygood, and that he lives at the New Country Flat.  This morning about 11 o'clock, he left Goulburn on his return home; he was d riving a team of bullocks and dray, on the latter was his wife, the deceased, and a schoolmaster. The bullocks were young, and rather unmanageable.  On arriving at the top of the 'Big Hill' on the Sydney road witness endeavoured to stop the team, for the purpose of attaching a chain to the wheel of the dray before descending further: The bullocks, however, continued going in despite all witness could do, and the ultimately broke into a trot; witness ran before them but could not succeed in stopping them,.  On looking back he saw his wife and deceased lying on the ground about 15 yards behind the dray; he found deceased on his hands and knees; he (deceased) was unable to speak, and he did not cry; he was then alive, but died within six or seven minutes.  Witness's wife was severely injured about the body, and her left arm was broken.  Witness turned the bullocks round, and brought his wife and deceased into town.  Witness's wife had told him that the bullocks were in a trot, and one of the wheels passed over a log, and jerked her and the deceased off.  The jury, without hesitation, returned a verdict of accidentally killed.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 14 October 1856

DEATH BY STEAMBOAT ACIDENT.

A Coroner's inquest was commenced on the 9th instant, and concluded yesterday morning, before Mr. J. S. Parker, City Coroner, at the house of Mr. John Alton, known as the Unity Hall Hotel, Balmain, touching the death of James Leal, who came by his death under the circumstances disclosed in the following evidence.  .  .  .  

  After one or two remarks from the Coroner, the jury found the following open verdict: - That the deceased James Leal came to his death by suffocation, subsequent upon the breaking of a defective stay-bolt in the boiler of the steamer, and also some disarrangement of the machinery.


 

Empire (Sydney), 14 October 1856

THE LATE FATAL ACCIDENT AT BALMAIN.

  Owen Spencer Evans, a duly qualified medical practitioner, stated as follows: - Yesterday, at one o'clock, I was sent for to go on board the steamer Premier; when I went below into the cabin I saw the body of the deceased lying dead; and am of opinion that the deceased James Leal died from suffocation by steam; I saw no injuries on the body, and think he must have died immediately he inhaled the steam,; I have known him about three years; the action of the steam - the deceased having been under its influence so long - would have caused the present appearance of the body.


 

Empire (Sydney), 14 October 1856

NEWCASTLE.

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held before R. S. Bowker, Esq., Coroner, in our court-house, on Saturday last, on the remains of a man named Rutherford, who had died in the hospital from injuries received by falling on the fire, at the Hexham Hotel, on the 3rd instant, where he was employed in the capacity of cook.  It appeared from the evidence that at the time of the occurrence, the deceased was in a helpless state of intoxication, and had, it is supposed, gone to the fire to light his pipe, and while in the act of doing so fell upon the fire and was severely burned before assistance could be procured to rescue him from his perilous position, from which, in his state of intoxication he was incapable of extricating himself.  The undertaker had caused the deceased to be interred on Saturday morning, but by order of the coroner the body was exhumed for the purpose of the inquest, which, after hearing the evidence, returned a verdict of accidental death.  Newcastle, October 13. [See also Empire (Sydney), 21 October.]


 

Maitland Mercury, 16 October 1856

THE FLOOD. - FATAL ACCIDENTS. - We regret to learn that a young man named Matthew Woolley, attached to the surveyor's broad party, and employed in the construction of the new bridge at Little Ipswich, was drowned near that place on Sunday morning, in attempting to swim across the creek with the intention of joining his mates on the opposite side.  It appeared that, contrary to the advice of several persons who endeavoured to dissuade him from his purpose, he rashly jumped into the creek, and succeeded in reaching the middle of the steam, which was running at the rate of six or seven miles an hour, when he suddenly disappeared, shortly after rose to the surface, and then sank immediately afterwards to rise no more.  It is conjectured that the unfortunate young man was attacked with cramps, or that he got entangled with the branches of a sunken tree, from which he was unable to extricate himself.  The body has not yet been recovered.

  On the same day an aboriginal native woman attempted to swim across the same creek with a picaninny round her neck, when the force of the current compelled the child to let go its hold, and it was swept down the stream. The mother reached the bank in safety, and loudly bewailed with her country-people the loss of her infant. - -North Australian, Oct. 7.


 

Empire (Sydney), 17 October 1856

DEATH BY THE FALL OF A BRANCH FROM A TREE.

  A Coroner's inquest was held yesterday, before J S. Parker, Esq.,, coroner, at the Bath Arms, Burwood, on view of the body of Thomas Murphy) who was a woodman residing at Longbottom), when the following evidence was given:-

  William Prior, being sworn, deposed - I am related to the deceased, Thomas Murphy; I reside at Longbottom and cart wood to Sydney; yesterday, deceased and I went into the bush to cut firewood; when we were in the act of cross-cutting a log a great gale came on and brought down a large limb from of a tree close by; the limn fell on deceased's head as he was stooping and using the cross-cut saw; he fell forward, and I came to him and found he was dead, with the limb lying across his back; I saw a cut on the top of his heads; there was no other person present but deceased and myself; on Monday he felled a tree which fell into the body of another tree, breaking of a branch which held on to another branch; deceased, remarking that it was dangerous to leave it in that state, drove the wedges into the tree and knocked it down, leaving the hanging branch; we commenced cross-cutting the tree we felled on Monday yesterday, which, on a sudden, the wind blew heavily, so that the branch fell, as I stated, on deceased's neck; it was three o'clock when we went into the bush and got assistance.

  By the Coroner: The tree the limb fell from was a very high one; deceased never moved after he was struck, and but little blood came from the cut that was on the crown of his head.

  Recalled:  Deceased had been only five minutes at work when the limb fell.

  A verdict in accordance with the foregoing statement was returned by the jury.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 17 October 1856

THE LATE CASE OF DROWNING. - Some clue has been obtained which will assist in the identification of the man recently drowned in Morpeth.  It is said that a person who, on the Saturday in question, left the service of Mrs. Gordon, of Tomago, embarked at Raymond Terrace, and has not since been heard of.


 

Goulburn Herald, 18 October 1856

INQUEST. - DEATH BY DROWNING. - On Wednesday last, an inquest was held at Bunnaby before Robert Waugh, Esq., coroner for the district, on view of the body of Julia Taylor, aged 64 years, there lying dead.  From the evidence of the deceased's son, Thomas Taylor, who is a shoemaker, it appeared that deceased came to his house about sundown on Monday last; she had apparently been drinking; after remaining there for a short time, she left with a bucket in her hand for the purpose of getting some water from the creek; he saw her pass the hole from which they were in the habit of procuring water for domestic use, and go in the direction of a hut where there was a sick man.  About twenty minutes afterwards, witness's father (the deceased's husband) called out to witness to know if deceased was in his hut, and on being told that she was not, told him to go in search of her; he went to the water-hole from which they usually get water, and observing something floating on the surface, procured a stick and pulled the object to the bank; it proved to be deceased.  Having secured assistance, he got the body on to land; deceased was then quite dead. The jury returned a verdict of accidentally drowned.


 

Empire (Sydney), 18 October 1856

THE OVENS.

THE LATE MR. MILLER AND MR. M'LEOD.  - The bodies of Mr. Miller and Mr. M'Leod have been at length found, and the Coroner will hold an inquest this day near the spot.  They were discovered in the Happy Valley Creek, about 25 yards below the spot at which the unfortunate men were seen to go down. -October 9.

FUNERAL.  .  .  . The particulars of the death of Mr. Miller and Mr. M'Leod are already well known to our readers, and do not require repetition.  The coroner had held an inquest.   .  .  .   October 11.


 

Illawarra Mercury, 20 October 1856

A CORONER WANTED FOR WOLLONGONG.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 20 October 1856

NEWCASTLE.

FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE HUNTER RIVER RAILWAY. - October 17. - A lamentable accident, resulting in the death of one person, and in severe injury to several others, occurred last evening on the railway between here and Maitland; the particulars, as related by the sufferers, who are now in Newcastle Hospital, appear to be as follows:-

  About half-past five o'clock the locomotive, accompanied by fourteen wagons, in which only were a number of workmen, was passing along the line from Fourmile Creek to a place called the Sandhills, where several of the men employed on the railway reside;  the men on the trucks, fourteen in number, at starting, were returning from labour, and as is usual at that hour, the train, as it went along was picking up other men residing at the same place, and were employed at various places along the rail; the number on the wagons had in this way advanced to about twenty persons altogether, when, on the arrival of the train at a place called the Swamp, about two miles beyond Hexham,  from here, a large sow was observed to cross the road, which is there on a natural level, and coming immediately in front of the forward waggon, was struck down by the wheels;  the wagon being driven off the line by the shock, was upset, and being followed by the other trucks to which it was coupled, a number of them were instantly doubled up in a broken and confused mass on the side of the rail. Several of the men in the rear had sufficient warning of the catastrophe to enable them to jump off the trucks and escape, the engine, fortunately, not being driven with much speed at the time; but those on the forward wagons were less fortunate.

  A person named George Worrall, a workman on the line, was killed instantaneously; a man named William Brien had his right arm broken, and another, Peter M'Geary, has receive several severe cuts and contusions on the head and hands; the two last are in the hospital here, and three others, said to be more or less hurt, are being attended to at their own hones, at the Sandhills; one or two more are stated to have been taken for surgical aid to Maitland.  The number of the injured is not exactly known here, but those named are, as far as I can learn, the severest sufferers.

  An inquest was held yesterday at the Miners'; Arms Inn, Lake Macquarie Road, on the body of William Moxey, whose death was caused in the following manner:-Deceased and Robert Turton were returning together from the Rocky River Diggings on the 10th instant, when, on the toad between here and Maitland, Turton being at the time on horseback, and Moxey following him on foot, leading his own horse, the latter, in order to quicken Turton's mare, struck her with a whip handle on the flank on which she kicked and struck him in the abdomen with one of her hind feet.  Moxey lingered until yesterday, when he died.  Verdict, accidental death.


 

Empire (Sydney), 21 October 1856

A MAN ACCIDENTALLY SHOT. - A very plainfil accident occurred at Burwood, on Sunday afternoon last, by which the life of a man was sacrificed.  It appears that a person named John Sturmey, and his friend Henry Benham, the deceased (a man about thirty-five years of age), were shooting in Flood's Bush, at the rear of the Dove Inn, when the deceased, having wounded a bird, called upon his friend to give it a final shot.  Sturmey hastened to the spot, but in so doing, unfortunately caught his foot in some of the underwood and accidentally discharged his gun, the contents of which lodged in the back of Benham's head and killed him.  Sturmey has been taken into custody, and was yesterday remanded from the central Police Office to the Coroner's Court; but no doubt is entertained that the discharging of the gun was purely accidental.

SUDDEN DEATH. - An inquest was held yesterday, by J. S. Parker, Esq., Coroner for Sydney, at the Steam Engine Inn, George-street South, on view of the body of a female child, named Maria Enmore, residing with her parents on the Ultimo Estate, who died suddenly yesterday morning.  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had been ailing for some time (teething) and on Sunday night last was seized with convulsions.  By the advice of a neighbour the child was put into a warm bath, which seemed to afford her considerable relief, but about an hour afterwards wax found dead on her mother's arm, her mother having fallen asleep. Dr. Redhead stated that if a medical man had been called in in time, the life of the deceased might have been saved; and he considered   that the use of the hot bath was injudicious.  The jury returned a verdict of Death from natural causes.


 

Maitland Mercury, 21 October 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT. - A melancholy accident occurred on the night of the 19th instant, on the estate of Mr. George Mackay, of Brownlow Hill, near Camden.  The facts are these:  Mr. George Salting, the eldest son of Mr. Salting, merchant, of this city, was on a visit at Mr. Mackay's. On the evening above mentioned he rode out to the farm of a person named Cox, a tenant residing in the estate, for the purpose of wallaby shooting. Cox had often before accompanied gentlemen on similar excursions, and on this occasion he readily joined, and took his two boys, the elder of whom had been in the habit of going with his father.  Mr. George Salting, Cox, and the elder boy were armed, the youngest son had no gun.  In accordance with Cox's practice, he placed them in certain positions, so that if the game rose up one of the parties was pretty sure to hit; and he intimated that there was no danger, and that they could not shoot each other.  About 12 o'clock, after having waited for an hour and a half, Mr. Salting thought he saw something start up, and levelled his piece, but did not fire.  Becoming more assured from appearances that a wallaby was staring, he fired, but, unhappily, he shot the elder boy, Frederick Cox, who died upon the spot.  It appears the two boys, who had been in a sitting position, had risen up to look over the rock, to see if any game was at hand.  Mr. Salting mistook the grey hairs for game.  As may be imagined, Mr. Salting, who is a young gentleman of great promise, of deep and tender sympathies, was, with poor Cox, greatly affected by the sad occurrence; they were equally inconsolable.  An inquest was held afterwards before Mr. Antill, when the foregoing facts were elicited.  Since then, the father, John Cox, had made an affidavit in which he admits that having examined the spot at which Mr. Salting and his sons were stationed, he was very much surprised to find that he was mistaken in his calculations; he discovered that the distance from each other was not more than twenty yards, and nothing to obstruct the view.  Cox exonerated Mr. Salting from all blame in the matter.  A verdict to the same effect was returned by the Jury. - Herald, Oct. 20.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 21 October 1856

NEWCASTLE.

OCTOBER 20. - An inquest was held yesterday (Sunday) at Mosquito Island, on the Hunter, on the body of a child named Ellen MacKnight, which had been found drowned in a well there.  The father of the child, William MacKnight, deposed that on returning home from work on the previous day, he had missed her, and on enquiring of his wife had learnt that, a short time before, the little girl had left the house for the purpose of going to where he was at work, about one hundred yards from the place; on going to search for her he found her body in the well, at a short distance from the house; she was then quite dead.  Verdict, accidental death.

DEATH BY POISONING. - Yesterday information was received by the Coroner, that a Mrs. Seaman, residing at Bollum, about 18 miles from Tyrl Tyrl, had met with her death from poison.


 

Maitland Mercury, 21 OLctober 1856

THE LATE RAILWAY ACCIDENT. - On Saturday an inquest was held by Dr. M'Cartney, at the Wheat Sheaf Inn, Hexham, on the body of George Whirl.  .  .  .   A pig was found on the rails nearly cut in two. Verdict, that death was caused by injuries received by the overturning of a waggon on the railway, accidental, and not otherwise.

DEATH FROM THE RESULTS OF INTEMPERANCE. - An inquest was held yesterday, at the Hospital, by Dr. M'Cartney, on the body of Malcolm McLean.  It appeared that the deceased was an old man, almost seventy-six years of age, and of intemperate habits. On Thursday he applied to Dr. Getty, at Morpeth, and was treated for his disease.  He was recommended to get an order of admission to the Hospital, and on Thursday he was admitted, being then in a deathlike state, scarcely able to articulate.  Dr. Wigan was sent for, and he received every attention, but did not rally, and died at about five o'clock on Sunday morning.  The verdict found was to the effect that he came to his death from natural causes, accelerated by habits of intemperance.  He had been known a few years ago, in the neighbourhood, as a vendor of snuff.


 

Bathurst Free Press, 22 October 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Monday last, at Davey's Creek, before Dr. Busby, on the body of Thomas Ryan, who had been found dead in a water-course running into Davey's Creek, the previous morning.  It appeared from the evidence that on Sunday evening, just after dark, the deceased, who was a shepherd in Mr. Robert M'Phillamy's employ, left Mr.  Spedden's Inn, for his house, on horseback, and after going for a mile and a half along the road, instead of turning to the right as he should have done on nearing the crossing-place at Davey's Creek, he must have ridden on until he came to a newly-formed water-course, which runs into the creek when, from the horse's suddenly stopping, he was thrown down the bank to a depth of 16 feet,  and from the blow received in  falling, was so stunned as to be unable to extricate himself from about 2 feet of water into which his head and shoulders were thrown face   downwards. In consequence of the horse having returned home with saddle and bridle the next morning, a search was made for the deceased, when he was found in the position described.  The deceased leaves a widow and two children, one seven years and the other seven months old.  A verdict was returned in accordance with the above facts.


 

Empire (Sydney), 22 October 1856

THE LATE FATAL SHOOTING CASE. - A coroner's inquest was held on Monday last, by J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Dove inn, Enfield, Liverpool-road, on view of the body of a man named Henry Benham, who was accidentally killed in the bush by the discharge of a gun on the previous day.  .  .  .  

  Dr. Redhead stated that he had examined the body of the deceased, and found a gun-shot wound at the back of the head; the shot from the gun penetrated the head through the lower and back part of the occipital boner in a sloping upwards direction, causing instant death; the wound evidently showed that the shot had taken a slanting direction, upwards, showing that the party who discharged the gun must have been in a lower position that the deceased at the time. The jury found that the deceased Henry Benham was accidentally shot by John Sturmey's gun going off when he unfortunately fell into a stump hole at the time that the deceased happened to be standing before him,; and we find that there is no blame to be attached to any person whatsoever.


 

Maitland Mercury, 23 October 1856

MAGISTERIAL ENQUIRY. - A magisterial enquiry was held on the 19th instant, before R. Park, Esq., J.P., Paterson, on the body of Adelaide Chippendale.  The deceased, a child nine months old, had been sick for two or three days, but not alarmingly so.  A medical man was sent for on the 18th, but he was not then at home.  The child grew worse, and died about half-past six in the evening.

DEATH BY DROWNING. - A magisterial inquiry was held on the 19th, before Robert Park, Esq., J.P., Paterson, on the body of Harriet Humble.  The deceased, a child of about fifteen months old, had on the afternoon of the Friday previously been playing with another child, of about the same age, when her mother, who was then hanging out some clothes, suddenly missed both of them.  Search was made, and the boy was observed coming from then river bank.  The body of the deceased was found soon after, floating on the surface of the water, apparently quite dead.  This was rather more than a quarter of an hour from the time when the child was missed; and the river was one hundred yards from the spot where she was missed.

SUDDEN DEATH. - We have, this week, to notice an unusually sudden death, which occurred in East Maitland, on Tuesday morning.  The deceased, Mrs. James Dodds, had not been under medical treatment for some time, nor complained of ill health, and during the previous evening, which was spent in company with her husband and her parents, she manifested her usual cheerfulness.  She retired shortly before ten o'clock, and nothing happened till about half-past two in the morning, when Mr. Dodds being awakened by the crying of their only child, spoke to her, and was only answered by a deep sigh.  He was alarmed, and procured the immediate assistance of Dr. Bolton, who arrived when life was just extinct.  Dr. Bolton, at the inquest, held by Dr. M'Cartney, on Tuesday, expressed his opinion that the death ensued from the consequences of disease of the heart, probably of long standing.  A verdict in accordance was found.


 

Sydsney Morning Herald, 23 October 1856

GOULBURN.

SHOCKING CASE OF SELF-DESTRUCTION BY STRYCHNINE.

  [First line overwritten.] before Mr. Robert Waugh, on view of the body of Bridget Seaman, who had out a period to her existence by taking strychnine. The following evidence was taken:

  Edward Seaman deposed: the body on which the inquest is now sitting is that of my late wife Bridget Seaman; she was 40 years of age at the time of her death, and was the mother of nine children; she was four or five months gone with child; I never knew her to be desponding or melancholy; deceased was absent from home kon Wednesday last for the purpose of attending service at a neighbour's house, where a priest was on a visit, and returned home on Thursday, and appeared occasionally dejected, but not particularly so; deceased slept well that night, and rose early on the following morning; I did not observe anything particular in her manner that morning; after breakfast on Friday I went to the creek close by  this house to repair a dam, and while there deceased  came down, dipped a cup into the water, and after drinking the contents went away; in two or three minutes afterwards she returned to me and said, :I have done it"; I asked her what she had done, to which she replied that she had poisoned herself with the strychnine, and that she would no longer be a trouble to any one; I accompanied her back to the house, and persuaded her to have some melted butter and lard, thinking it might make her sick; at first she refused, saying that she had taken the poison purposely to kill herself; however, she afterwards drank it; shortly after she had done so she complained of being very ill, and wished to lie down in her bed, which she did; I sent one of my children to tell a neighbour about what had happened; I got a horse and saddled it, and at the request of the deceased  rode after a boy, who had been in my house the previous night, and who had left after breakfast to tell him what she had done, so as he might let it be known that no one might be blamed for her own act; I did so, and overtook the boy, and returned after an absence of three-quarters of an hour, and found deceased dead; she gave no reason for poisoning herself, and I can form no idea why she did so; we had always lived friendly together, and she has left me nine children; her habits were temperate; I was with her for tern minutes after she had taken the strychnine; she was not convulsed  during that time; I always keep strychnine in my house, and keep it in a safe place; one of my young children saw deceased take and mix up the poison with water, and drink it, and thought deceased was taking Epsom Salts; deceased died twenty or thirty minutes after that; the quantity taken I am told was a teaspoonful; I am in good circumstances and nothing of a pecuniary nature could have been annoying deceased.

  James Donnelly of Carrabungala then deposed: I attended service on Thursday at Mr. Lalor's, about eight miles from here; deceased was there; she stayed the night before at Mr. Cummins; I accompanied her home; she rode on horseback; she was in excellent spirits; I have known her for many years; she was a sober, well-conducted and industrious woman; she lived on good terms with her husband.  

 Sarah Seaman, aged about 15 years, deposed: I am the daughter of the deceased; on Friday last deceased was up before me; she did not do anything before breakfast; she sat still that time on a block by the fire; she looked dull like; after breakfast I observed her at the drawer where the strychnine is kept; shortly after I observed her with something in a table-spoon, which she mixed with some water, and drank; I thought it was salts, of which she used to take some every morning; she then went outside, and returned with my father; he made me mix some butter and lard for my mother; she refused to take it at first, but took it afterwards; she said it was her intention to die; she went outside the house, shook hands with all the children, and bade them "good bye;" she then came in, laid down on her bed, and became convulsed; she told me to tell father, on his return, to write to her sister in Ireland that she had poisoned herself; she then became speechless, and died shortly afterwards.  

 The jury having heard the evidence, returned a verdict of felo de se.  This melancholy occurrence has caused a painful interest.  The deceased and her husband were much respected and industrious hard-working people.


 

Empire (Sydney), 24 October 1856

DEATH OF A CHILD FROM SCALDING. - An inquest was held yesterday by the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Land's End, public-house, Pyrmont, on view of the body of a child named Henry Hogan who met with his death under the following circumstances.  Mrs. Clara Hogan, wife of John Hogan, a turner, residing at Pyrmont, stated, that on Monday evening last, about seven o'clock, she instructed her servant to make the hot water ready to wash the children; the servant went out of the kitchen to get some cold water; the deceased was playing about the kitchen, and the deceased told witness that his foot went into the pan and turned the contents of it over his person, causing him to fall to the ground; he screamed out, and witness ran to see what had happened; she took the boy into the parlour and undressed him when she found that his right leg and thigh were very much scalded - the skin peeling off in some parts, and blistered in others; she applied cotton and sweet oil to the parts, and sent for Dr. Ure, who came about eight o'clock and dressed the wounds; the doctor did not examine the child very particularly, but said he was not in danger; Dr. Ure called the next day and felt the pulse of deceased, and said there was no danger.

  It appeared, however, that the bladder of the child was seriously affected; at seven o'clock on Tuesday evening, he became convulsive, lost his reason and expired between three and four o'clock on Wednesday morning.  John Redhead, a legally qualified medical practitioner, stated that he had examined the body if the deceased, and found that he had been very much scalded, particularly about the posterior part of the right thigh, and the anterior aspect of both thighs and legs; he considered that the deceased was in grave danger, and that there was little hope of his recovery; the treatment he had received, so far as witness could ascertain, was correct - with the exception of no stimulants having been given, of which there was no evidence, but which witness considered absolutely necessary, as the child appeared to have died from exhaustion; retention of urine generally followed severe scalds - likewise, severe torpid state of the bowels; the hopes of the child recovering were very slight indeed.

  The jury found that the deceased was accidentally scalded by upsetting a pan of hot water over his lower extremities, producing injuries sufficient to account for his death.


 

Empire (Sydney), 27 October 1856

INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Saturday, at the Wellington Inn, George-street South, before J. S. Parker, Esq., Coroner, on the body of a female named Elixxabeth Russell, 69 years of age, who was found in the water at Whittell's Wharf, foot of Bathurst-street, on Friday morning about 9 o'clock.  It appeared from the evidence adduced, that the deceased lived with her step-daughter, at a short distance from the wharf, and was in the habit of walking about the wharf and neighbourhood nursing a child of her step-daughter.  On the morning in question some words had taken place between the deceased and her step-daughter; the deceased shortly afterwards went out, taking the child with her.  James Wilson, a seaman, who has been lately employed at Whiitell's Wharf observed the deceased in the water a short distance from the wharf, apparently endeavouring to keep herself afloat, he immediately went to her assistance, and with two others succeeded in bringing her to shore, at which time she was alive.  A medical man was sent for who arrived in about a quarter of an hour, and on examining the body pronounced life extinct.  A second medical gentleman who had been called, was of the same opinion, and the body was removed by the police to the dead-house attached to the Benevolent Asylum.  The child was found left under a boat at the wharf, covered up and asleep.  The deceased had frequently said when irritated, that she would drown herself, - but the witnesses agreed in opinion, that she might have fallen in.  It is to be hoped for the credit of the city, that the horrible circumstances referred to in the verdict may not again occur; some one must be very much to blame in the matter.

  The verdict of the jury was to the following effect:- That the deceased Elizabeth Russell was found drowned, but how she came in the water there is no evidence to show.  On viewing the body we were very much disgusted to see that the face and tongue had been eaten apparently by rats, while in the dead-house of the Benevolent Asylum, and recommend that steps be taken to prevent any such occurrence in future.


 

Maitland Mercury, 28 October 1856

DEATH FROM APOPLEXY. - An inquest was held, yesterday, by Dr. M'Cartney, ay the Wheat Sheaf Inn, Morpeth, on the body of Michael M'Laughlan.  It appeared from the evidence that deceased, who was a farmer, residing near Phoenix Park, went on Saturday night to a sort of house warming, at the new abode of a neighbor.  He was intoxicated when he went there.  At about ten o'clock he went to bed, and rose again after daylight, when a scuffle arose between him and Dennis Maloney, senior, one of the party present, and also with Dennis Maloney junior.  They were all down together on the ground, when suddenly M'Laughlan drew his breath, and died in a moment.  He had been violent against the elder Maloney, who had tried to pacify him.  Dr. Getty, who made a post mortem examination of the body, was of opinion that apoplexy was the cause of death.  There was no appearance of violence on the person of deceased.  The verdict of the jury was that deceased came to his death from apoplexy, accelerated by habits of drinking and passion.  The two Maloneys had been apprehended, pending the inquest.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 28 October 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday, at Mr. George Ewan's, the King's Head Inn, touching the death of a man whose name is unknown.  The evidence taken before Mr. J. S. Parker, City Coroner, was to the following effect:- Benjamin Dawson, a boatman in the service of the Post-office, stated that, on the previous morning, he was in a small boat off Dawes' Point, when a man in a schooner, sailing down the harbour, hailed him and expressed his opinion that there was a drowned man or boy floating on the water astern of the boat in which witness was sitting.  On going to the spot indicated witness found the body of a naked man lying sideways in the water; he immediately made a cord fast round the body, and drew it into the wharf at the water police station; did not know the name of the schooner, nor whither she was bound; should suppose the body was not long in the water; observed some marks oi the deceased's arm, but nothing indicating violence; he had dark hair and whiskers, and from the appearance of the hands, &c., would suppose he was not accustomed to perform laborious work; his age could not be more than twenty-seven years, and from the crippled appearance of the body, witness imagined that the deceased had suffered from cramp the features seemed familiar, but witness was unable to identify the body.

  James Lindsay, of the water police, deposed to the reception of the body at the water police station, and also as to his having gone to the North Shore and elsewhere to discover the deceased's clothes, or some clue likely to lead to his identity.  He had failed, however, to discover either, although several people who viewed the body remarked that the features were particularly familiar.  Dr. Mackellar, having made a post mortem examination, deposed that the deceased was a man about five feet ten inches high, about 22 years of age, and apparently not accustomed to labour.  There was no appearance of decomposition having set in, and the only affections about the body were three or four ulcerations.  From the appearances, witness came to the conclusion that the deceased came to his death from suffocation by drowning, adding that the body could not have been many hours in the water.

  Before leaving the court, witness took occasion to complain of the filthy and inconvenient state of the present dead-house, and the want of any convenience for the medical men obliged to make examinations there.  The jury returned an open verdict, namely, found drowned.


 

Bathurst Free Press, 29 October 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Thursday last at the Hen and Chickens, Queen Charlotte's Vale, on the body of Jane Jones, who died in the bush towards Evans' Plains the preceding day.  There was nothing of any public interest in the case, and inquest only being necessary from the woman having been ill for a fortnight without having medical attendance.  A verdict was found that the deceased died from natural causes.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 29 October 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday, before Mr. J. S. Parker, at the Wellington Inn, touching the death of an aged man named William Price.  Richard Lee deposed that on Thursday afternoon, in consequence of information received, he went to a water-closet in Albion-street, and found the deceased on the ground, with his clothes on, and his back supported by the seat.  He was alive and able to talk.  Witness asked him what brought him there; to which he replied that the neighbours gave him permission to stop there.  Saw no food in the place with him.  His person was exceedingly disgusting; and on lifting him up witness found that he was not able to stand.  The lower part of his person was covered with vermin, such as usually attend the decomposition of animal bodies after death; in fact, his whole appearance was exceedingly disgusting and showed that he must have been in the closet several days.

  He told witness that his name was William Price, and that he was suffering from rheumatism.  He usually earned his living about the neighbourhood by tinkering, but he was a notorious vagrant, not having any fixed place of abode; the spot where he was found is rather dangerous, being surrounded by large holes and rocks.

  James Redgate deposed that he was a brickmaker, resident at the Surry Hills, and knew the deceased went by the name of Old Tinker; on yesterday week he saw deceased in his water-closet, leaning on the seat; he then said he was suffering from a bad leg, but when requested to go to the Asylum, said he would rather remain where he was, he would be better in a few days; witness knew he had been in the closet for some days, and had nothing but a few rags to cover him, and believed he had been furnished with some bread and meat by his (witness's) wife, but was not aware that his thigh bone was broken, but thought he stirred about in the day; he had seen deceased a few weeks back lying near a brick-kiln, without any covering; he was there all night, and was addicted to drinking; he told deceased, who was aged and infirm, that if he remained where he was he would lose his life, as there were rocks and holes some of them four feet deep about, but was not aware that he was in the filthy state described.

  James Smith, resident surgeon of the Benevolent Asylum, deposed that deceased was brought to the Institution on the 21st instant, in a very filthy state and unable to walk, by the police; having had him washed it was found that his thigh bone was broken; he seemed unwilling to state how the accident occurred, but having rallied a little said he was drunk and fell; he did not know when or where, that a man carried him to the brick-kiln - and afterwards by his own directions to the water closet where he  was  found, and that he had there resided for some weeks; from deceased's appearance he must have been in the closet for some days; the fracture on the thigh had probably been caused by a fall, there being no external injury;  had he been attended to in time he would gave recovered, but he died from the effects of the injury and exposure and neglect.  The jury returned the following verdict:- That the deceased came by his death from injuries received as well as exposure and neglect; and we regret that the deceased was allowed to remain in the water-closet so long without being attended to.


 

Maitland Mercury, 30 October 1856

COUP DE SOLEIL. - We regret to state that a little boy of four years of age, second son of Mr. John Clune, residing in Nicholas-street, died last week under the following circumstances:-  On  Saturday last, while Mr. Clune was transacting some business, with Mr. C. Wheeler, he heard a child crying in front of his house, and on going round found his son with his face lying on the ground with his cap upon his head.  On being taken up in his arms, he complained of being sick, and his limbs were found quite stiff.  Dr. Challinor was immediately sent for, and on his arrival found the child suffering from convulsions, which were relieved for a short time by the remedies employed, and he left the house.  In about half-an-hour the sufferer became much worse, and medical aid was again called in, when Dr. Challinor found that the convulsions had returned with increase violence, and with scarcely any respite until they terminated in death.  Dr. Challinor having been instructed to make a post mortem examination, gave it as his opinion, that the deceased died from tetanic convulsions, occasioned by what is termed a sunstroke, as he was in perfect health previously. - North Australian, Oct. 21.

ANOTHER MAN DROWNED. - We are sorry to have to record the death of Mr. Thomas Wallace, the well-known jockey, who was drowned on the 4th instant, whilst attempting to swim his horse across Sandy Creek, on the Warwick Road. It appears that the unfortunate young man had driven a lot of fat cattle from Messrs. Davidson's station on the Canning Downs, to Brisbane, and was on his return home, accompanied by Mr. Walter Davidson, on Saturday week last.  On arriving at Sandy Creek, about eight miles from Messrs. Balbl and Gray's Inn, they found the water had overflowed the banks, and was rushing down with great force.  Undismayed by the obstacle before them, and being anxious to proceed on their journey home, they determined to swim their horses across.  Mr. Davidson got safely to the opposite side, but Wallace's horse went under water, and after unseating his rider, rose to the surface, and swam ashore.  The poor fellow, finding himself sinking, earnestly implored Mr. Davidson to save his life, when that gentleman, who was still mounted, again plunged into the stream, and swam his horse up to him, but not being quick enough, her grappled with the rider, both sank together, and the horse likewise.  A fearful melee and death struggle then took place under water, and the dreadful ;position of the parties may be imagined when we state that Mr. Davidson had not only to extricate himself from the horse, but also from the dying grasp of the drowning man.  He did not, however, lose his presence of mind, and after a violent effort succeeded in releasing himself from Wallace's hold, and regained the shire quite exhausted his horse having preceded him.  Nothing more was seen of his hapless companion, who never rose again.  We understand that the body of the deceased was found near the spot where he was drowned, two or three days afterwards, in a state of putridity, so much so that it was found impossible to remove it on horseback, and as the drays could not travel, it was buried, the funeral service having been reads over by the survivor.  It is to be hoped that the untimely end of this young man, who was only twenty-five years of age, will operate as a warning to others heedlessly risking their lives by attempting to cross flooded creeks in such perilous circumstances. - North Australian, Oct. 14.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 31 October 1856

  An inquest was held on the 22nd instant, at North Richmond before Dr. Dowe, the Coroner for the district, and a jury, on the body of John French, a labourer, 74 years of age, then and there lying dead.  The evidence showed that the deceased had been indulging in excessive intoxication which, bringing on a violent attack of dysentery, resulted in death; and a verdict was returned accordingly.




 

Empire (Sydney), 1 November 1856

THE LATE BOAT ACCIDENT. - We learn, with respect to the accident by which the boat known as the Three Brothers was capsized off Shark Island, during a gale on Monday afternoon. That the crews of the Water Police boats have for two days past diligently, but unsuccessfully, dragged and made search for the two missing men and the boast, which is supposed to have sunk, as it was heavily ballast-laden, and it has transpired that the persons whose bodies were recovered at the time of the accident, and for whom so much anxiety is felt, are Mr. John Moorland, carver and gilder, of Castlereagh-street (the owner of the boat,) and a workman sat the Woolloomooloo gas house, who went by the name of "William,."  The Water Police crews still continue their search.


 

Maitland Mercury, 1 November 1856

IDENTIFICATION OF A BODY. - The body found off Dawes' Point - the inquest on which was reported in Tuesday's Herald, - has since been identified by the friends of the deceased as that of Mr. James Butters, aged twenty-nine, draper, who left his brother's residence, Surry Hills, last Saturday morning, in a state of despondency, supposed to arise from his being out of a situation; he having arrived in Sydney, a fortnight ago, from Grafton, where he was employed in Mr. Sharp's store.  The description of the body in the Herald of Tuesday by Dr. Mackellar led his friends to have an interview with that gentleman, and on hearing his description of marks on the body mentioned at the time, they are convinced that it is the body of their relative. - Herald, Oct. 30


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 1 November 1856

PARRAMATTA.

AN inquest was held at Her Majesty's County Gaol, on Tuesday last, before Mr. C. B. Lyons, coroner, on view of the body of Johanna Macarthy, then and there lying dead.  From the evidence of the governor of the gaol it appeared that the deceased was tried at the Sydney Quarter Sessions for stealing from the person, and sentenced to 18 months hard labour, but she was sick when forwarded from the gaol hospital in Sydney, and received into that gaol on the 1st August last; she remained ailing until her death, which took place yesterday.  Dr. Dr. Bassett deposed, that deceased died from disease in the stomach and spleen; that she received every attention during her illness.  The jury returned a verdict of died from natural causes.

  After the inquest some of the jury looked around the gaol, which speaks very highly in favour of Mr. Forbes, the visiting justice,  .  .  .

ACCIDENT. - A daughter of Mrs. Smith, of George-street, was sitting at needle work under the balcony of an old building belonging to Mr. W.  F. Grose, when suddenly the whole balcony gave way, and crushed the young girl in as most fearful manner.  She was taken up by Mr. Underwood and other kind neighbours, and carried to her mother in a state which left but faint hopes of her recovery.  The ruin has been for many years in a shamefully dangerous state.

ALBURY.

BURSTING OF THE LADY AUGUSTA'S BOPILER.


 

Empire (Sydney), 3 November 1856

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE. - A coroner's inquest was held on Thursday last, at the house of Mr. J.  Finn, lime-burner, Cook's River, before J. S. Parker, Esq., on view of the body of a man named Thomas Simmonds, aged 56 years, who died on the previous day under the following circumstances.  From the evidence, it appeared that the deceased, who was formerly a sailor, had for some time been employed by Mr. Finn to obtain shells for him - an occupation at which he could earn 2 Pounds 1s. 8d per week; but he was so inveterate a drunkard that Mr. Finn at length declined to employ him any longer.  On Sunday last, Mr. Finn saw the deceased, and gave him something to eat; and about eight o'clock on Tuesday evening, was informed that he had expired.  Mr. Finn did not go to see the deceased; he considered that he had died through drunkenness and exposure to cold.  Richard Johnston, a shell-gatherer, deposed that he resided in a hut with the deceased, who was about 56 years old, and had been 30 years in the colony; the deceased was a confirmed drunkard; lately, his mind was much impaired; there was hardly any covering over the hut, and it would not keep out rain or wind; witness wanted him to go to the Infirmary, but he said, "If he went there,  he would be cooked at once;" he never asked for a doctor' witness obtained fort him everything he could eat; on Monday morning about 12 o'clock, the deceased became light-headed, and continued in that state till about eight o'clock on Tuesday evening, when he expired; he had very little to drink for nine days previous to his death;  witness had seen him in a similar state before, and did not think he was about to die.  The jury found that the deceased came to his death by disease brought on from intemperate habits, exposure, and neglect.

CORONER'S INQUEST, - An inquest was held on Saturday, before J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner of Sydney, on the body of William Dickenson, landlord of the Liberty Inn, corner of Riley and Liverpool Streets, who had been found lying dead in the street under a window of that house, on the previous night. The jury returned the following verdict:- That the deceased William Dickenson, a publican, residing at the corner of Riley and Liverpool Streets, came to his death by injuries received in a fall from a window while under the influence of drink, and we consider at the same time that deceased was labouring under temporary insanity - but there is no evidence to show how deceased fell from the window.


 

Empire (Sydney), 4 November 1856

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE. - A coroner's inquest was held on the 2nd instant by J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Farmers' Inn, St. Anne's, Liverpool-road, touching the death of a man commonly known as "Flash Charley," who died suddenly on Thursday night last, at the Bark Huts public-house.  William Davis, a wood cutter, deposed that he was at Davis's public-house, the Bark Huts, on Thursday last, in company with the deceased and two other persons; they were all drinking; the deceased had no money, and witness gave him a glass now and again; the deceased was a little the worse of drink, and sang a great deal; they were together all day at the public-house; witness was intoxicated; he had five pounds when he went into the house, but had only 10s. when he left; witness slept in the kitchen that night with Davis's man Bill, and, when he awoke in the morning,  found that he had only one shilling in his possession; witness observed no quarrelling at Davis's on that day; the deceased was sitting alone in the tap-room when witness last saw him alive; some time afterwards witness heard a noise in the tap-room, and went in; the deceased was lying on the floor;  something gurgled in his throat, and blood was issuing from his nose; he could not speak; he threw his head back, and was dead; Davis, the publican, was then in bed, and witness called him up witness had often had a spree at Davis's; he had known the deceased between three and four years; he (the deceased)  was a hard drinker, and did not care where he threw himself when he was groggy; there was no light in the tap-room at the time; the deceased was to have remained there till morning;  it was about ten o'clock when the deceased died; when the deceased fell from the form to the ground he was doubled up; the noise heard was the gurgling in his throat and not the fall; witness saw a mark on the face of the deceased, one of whose eyes was much bruised and "bunged up"; a small quantity of drink would not take effect on the deceased; witness had known Davis's tap-room to be open all night, and persons to go in and sleep before the fire; George Priest., Kelly, and some others had said they often rolled out casks of ale and drank it in the bush; witness knew of their doing so once, and he had heard that deceased was one of the party, but not recently; the deceased said the injuries about his eye were the blight.

  Duncan M'Phee, a legally qualified medical practitioner, deposed that he had made an external examination of the body of deceased, from the appearance of which, and the history of the case, her was of opinion that death was occasioned by the bursting of a blood vessel, causing serous effusion on the brain - or, in other words, that death resulted from apoplexy; the black eye was recently done, and appeared caused by a blow; the puffed features of the deceased were the result of habitual drunkenness; and witness had no doubt that drink was the immediate cause of his death, just what might have been expected. The jury found that the deceased, Flash Charley, died very suddenly from apoplexy, brought on by constant acts of intemperance.

 The following was also appended as a rider to the verdict: We, the jury, are of opinion that Mr. Davis should conduct his public-house with more propriety than he has hitherto done; as the evidence which has been brought before us in this case proves that his house is a very disorderly one.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 8 November 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Thursday last, at her Majesty's Gaol, Darlinghurst, touching the death of a man named John M'Bride.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was a boilermaker by trade, that he was taken into the gaol, on the 1st instant, under a sentence of 14 days' imprisonment, for drunkenness; that in consequence of his suffering from delirium tremens; he was sent to the gaol hospital, where he became so violent that the authorities were obliged to send him to the insane asylum, and place him under the restraint of a straight-jacket.  He was attended by two medical gentlemen, Drs. Wood and Galbraith, but notwithstanding he continued to get worse, and died between 11 and 12 o'clock on the 4th instant.  Verdict - Died from the effects of intemperance. [See also Empire (Sydney), 10th November.]


 

Empire (Sydney), 15 November 1856

INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Saturday last before R. Waugh, Esq., coroner for the district, on view of the body of James Campbell, a shepherd in the service of J. Kerr Kinghorne., Esq., of Maxton.  It appeared from the evidence that on Tuesday the deceased solicited and obtained permission to visit Goulburn.  He did not return until the following Friday, when he was brought home on a dray.  He then told his master that he had fallen into a hole and injured himself, and he complained very much of a pain in his kidneys.  He was carefully treated, but died on Saturday morning, when information was sent to the coroner.  Robert Macalister, lime-burner, living about four miles from Mr. Kinghorne's, was going into Goulburn on Wednesday, and when about a mile from town, saw the deceased upon the road, apparently asleep.  He roused up the man, who told him he had had some drink in town, but was sober when he left.  After walking a bit, he had become giddy and unable to go any further.   He had lain where he was all night.  McAlister told him if he stayed there awhile he could pick him up as he returned home, which he did.  Deceased stayed at his house until dinner time on Thursday.  He was supplied with nourishing food, but no liquor.  He appeared to be suffering from no illness except the effects of drink.  He left for home on foot about dinner time on Thursday; he expressed himself competent to walk the distance, which was short.  Next day his wife told him that she had seen deceased lying on the road; he went to the spot and had him conveyed to Mr. Kinghorne's.  Tuesday night was wet and cold, and Thursday very cold. Notwithstanding he was very kindly treated at Mr. Kinghorne's, he died at 2 o'clock on Saturday morning. It appeared he was suffering from disease of the kidneys. Verdict - died from natural causes.

  It was rumoured in town on Saturday that the unfortunate deceased had met with foul play, and that he had been robbed of a wallet (bought the day he was in town from Mr. H. S. Clarke) and other property.  The result of the inquest will show, however, that these statements were without the slightest foundation.  The watch he himself gave into the hands of Mr. Kinghorne, and none of the other property was missing.  It would seem that the exposure to damp and cold had accelerated the fatal termination of a disease from which he had long been suffering.


 

Empire (Sydney), 19 November 1856

CORONER'S INQUESTS.  -An inquest, adjourned from the 10th instant, was resumed on Monday last, before J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner, and a jury of twelve, at the Newtown Inn, Newtown, touching the death of a child named Sarah Keen, aged two years and four months, who came by her death suddenly and under mysterious circumstances on Sunday week last.  A very lengthy and searching inquiry was made, and at the request of the jury, the medicine and contents of the child's stomach were analized, the result of which showed that death arose from teething and water on the brain.  Dr. Foulis stated that taking into consideration the condition of the heart and the distended state of the pericardium, as also the quantity of serum on the brain, he thought there was quite sufficient to account for the suddenness of the child's death.  The jury found that the deceased child, Sarah Keen, came by its death from natural causes, and were of opinion that no blamed attached to the doctor who attended the child.

  Another inquest was held yesterday by the City coroner, at the Constitution Inn, York-street, ion view of the body of Charles Fagg, aged twenbty-p0five years, who died suddenly under the following circumstances:- It appeared that a person named Daniel Martin slept in the same room with the deceased, in a lodging house, kept by Mrs. Brown, in York-street.  On Monday night, about eleven o'clock, he went to bed, and observed the deceased asleep.  About six o'clock yesterday morning as he was getting up he saw the deceased fall from off his bed to the floor in a fit.  The deceased fell on his face, and witness turned him over on his back, and then called Mrs. Brown, who immediately came up; but the deceased had then expired.  It further appeared that the deceased was a very intemperate man, appeared to be in delicate health, and was very subject to fits.  The jury found that the deceased, Charles Fagg, died from disease brought on by habits of intemperance, and not otherwise.


 

Maitland Mercury, 20 November 1856

INQUEST. - An inquiry was held on Tueday last before Dr. M'Cartney, coroner, at the house of the deceased, at Alnwick, touching the death of Michael Connors, then and there lying dead.  The witnesses examined were Catherine Connors, William Brown, and Malachi Keating.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was of a healthy and robust constitution, and led a very abstemious life.   At the time of the late rains he had been very much exposed to the wet, and was in the water one day during the flood; since then he had frequently complained of a pain at the pit of his stomach.  On Sunday last, on his return from chapel, he sent for Dr. Brown, and complained of a severe cold, and being a teetotaler he obtained leave to take a glass of hot spirits before retiring to bed.  He did not, however, take advantage of the permission.  During that night he was very ill; a dose of castor oil relieved him a little, but the next day he gradually grew worse until his death. Dr. Brown examined the body, and was of opinion that death was caused by severe and spasmodic action of the stomach.  A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned.

SUN STROKE. - On Tuesday morning a person named James Horrocks, at work at a fence of Mr. Brown's, near the Hospital, was observed suddenly to fall to the ground. Mr. Riley's assistance was obtained, and the sick man was taken in-doors, when Dr. Wigan promptly attended.  Horrocks was then suffering from collapse, apparently from sun-stroke, though the symptoms were peculiar.  Some few hours after, when it was safe to do so, he was removed to the Hospital, where he is now under fair way of recovery.

INJURY FROM BURNING. - Some short time back, a woman named Mary Hunt, living at Black Creek, was brought to the Maitland Hospital, suffering from severe injuries on the left side of her body, apparently caused by lying on hot ashes, or in some similar way coming in contact with fire.  She was unable to give any very distinct account of the circumstances, and she is still lying in a precarious condition. [See below.]


 

Empire (Sydney), 21 November 1856

AWFULL SUDDEN DEATH. - An inquest was held yesterday before J. S. Parker, Esq., the Coroner for Sydney, at the Victoria In, Parramatta-street, on the body of a man named Charles Howson, who had died suddenly on the previous evening.  It appeared that deceased was a dealer, and was about thirty years of age.  He resided in Parramatta-street, and was at home all day on Wednesday, in perfect health.  About seven o'clock in the evening he sat down to tea of which he partook, and also took a basin of ox tail soup.  Suddenly he started up, and placing his head in his neckerchief, exclaimed, "hallo!"  He never uttered another word, but fell on his face and expired at once.  There were three persons in the room at the time.  The deceased was a sober man. He had been previously attended for disease of the heart, but had apparently quite recovered.  Dr. Thomas Johnson had made an examination of the body, and was of opinion that the cause of death was an attack of serous apoplexy.  The jury returned a verdict of Died by the visitation of God.


 

Maitland Mercury, 22 November 1856

DEATH FROM BURNING. - We are informed that the unfortunate woman whose sufferings from burning were notified in out last issue, died at the hospital, early on Wednesday morning, without having exhibited premonitory symptoms.  An inquest was held on the body, and the death was attributed to the effect of the burning.

FATAL ACCIDENBT NEAR ANVIL CREEK. - A magisterial inquiry was held at the Crown Inn, Anvil Creek, on Tuesday last, before C. F. H. Smith, Esq., J.P., touching the death of Michael Clare.  From the evidence it appeared that Clare was coming down the country with a load of wool for Mr. Busby, and when about two miles from Anvil Creek, near a place called  the "Nullora," foreseeing the approach of a storm, he was about to turn his bullocks upon a rise.   He was then on the near side of the leaders.  The bullock on the off side, however, caught him with the horn, and slung him under the feet of the other bullocks.  His wife, with the assistance of Chapman, the driver of another team, and a black boy, extricated him, and he asked for a drink of water, and speaking faintly, desired to be bled.  He died soon after.  Mr. Chapman, of the Cross Inn, went for a doctor, but to no purpose.  There was a long cut on the right jaw of the deceased, apparently caused by the horn or hoof of a bullock, the bone under the right breast was smashed, and there were other marks shoeing the injuries inflicted by the bullocks in trampling on him.  He was quite sober at the time of the occurrence. The death was pronounced to be purely accidental.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 22 November 1856

INQUEST. - An inquest was held at Redfern, yesterday, before Mr. G. S. Parker, coroner for Sydney, on the body of Louisa Pemberton, a girl about 18 years of age, whose death had been occasioned by her clothes taking fire on the 29th of last month.  The father [Thomas] of the young woman deposed that, on the above named day, his daughter was cooking in the kitchen by herself; it was a detached building; he was in the dwelling-house, and hearing a loud scream ran towards the kitchen; met deceased in the yard, with her clothes all in a blaze, which he extinguished, but not until they were nearly all consumed; deceased told him that her clothes became lighted as she was lifting a pot off the fire, and that she tried to tear them off, but could not; she then  called for help.  Mr. W. J. Jenkins, surgeon, stated that he had been called in to see deceased on the afternoon of the 29th ultimo; she was suffering great pain; did all that was necessary, and informed her parents at the time that she would neverr recover; her body was one mass of ulceration; she died on the morning of the 20th instant, her death resulted from the effects of the injuries occasioned by the burning.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

MYSTERIOUS DEATH, - A few days ago a man named White was committed to Darlinghurst Gaol for a month, having been convicted of a violent assault upon his wife.  At the time of his committal, White asserted that he had been poisoned by strychnine by a relative.  He was certainly in a tremulous state, but not actually in delirium tremens.  His symptoms were precisely similar to those of a person suffering from the administration of strychnine.  He died yesterday in the gaol, and his case is one which demands serious enquiry.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 24 November 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Saturday last before Mr. J. S. Parker, Coroner, at the Gas-fitters' Hotel, touching the death of a female named Mary Weeks, aged about 55 years.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased was a midwife, and had been suffering for some time past from the bowel complaint.  On the evening previous she was called in to attend a Mrs. James Waters in her confinement, and, while engaged in performing her duties, she fell dead upon the floor. Verdict - Died by the visitation of God. [See also Empire (Sydney), of same date.]


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 25 November 1856

CORONER'S INQIUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday before the Coroner, Mr. Parker, at Mr. O'Riley's, Royal Hotel, Woolloomooloo, on view of the body of Charles Henry Weeks, aged five years.  Eliza Weeks, the mother of the deceased boy, on being sworn, said that on Saturday morning, about 3 o'clock, the child woke up complaining of a pain in his forehead¸ and a sked for drink, which she gave him; he drank heartily; he seemed restless, and they took him into their bed, and continued in  that state all day on Saturday; on Sunday morning placed a couple of mustard poultices on his chest; he was wandering, and breath very short; he commenced getting worse, and died about half-past 6;  Dr. Duigan saw him about two months since, after he came home from the National School, complaining of his head, and stated that he was laboring from a sun stroke, from which he recovered and got perfectly well; the deceased did not complain of his head from that time, but was a delicate child.  Dr. M'Donn, being sworn, deposed that he examined the body at the house of its parents; there were no external marks, but appeared a delicate child; he was of opinion the immediate cause of death was congestion of the brain [and lungs, an attack to which the formation of his chest and head which were very large, denoted him to be liable., - Empire (Sydney), 25 November.] Verdict - Deceased died suddenly by the visitation of God.

INQUEST. - On the 14th instant an inquest was held at Bellmount, North Richmond, before the Coroner for this district and a jury, on the remains of a man supposed to be named John Nash, 70 or 80 years of age.  The remains had been accidentally found in the bush at Kurrajong, on the day previous, by a shepherd boy, and were of a very scanty character, being little more than a parcel of bones.  No evidence being obtainable to account for the cause of death, the jury found that they could form no opinion thereon.  No person claimed the remains of mortality, and he was interred by the police.


 

Maitland Mercury, 25 November 1856

DEATH BY SCALDING. - On Sunday an inquest was held by Dr. M'Cartney, at Alnwick, on the body of an infant of fifteen months old, named Thomas Gannon.  From the evidence of the father and mother, it appeared that von Thursday, while their children were playing the baby fell into the fire, and knocked against a kettle of boiling water, which had no lid on.  His little hands and arms were badly scalded, and though Mrs. Gannon instantly took his clothes off, and put oil and flour on the wounds, he never rallied, and died on Saturday morning.  His parents and the neighbours nursed the poor child carefully, but though Gannon went twice for a medical man, Dr. Brown, he found him out on both occasions, and the child was dead before Dr. Brown reached the place.  The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.

DEATH CAUSED BY A KICK FROM A HORSE. - An inquest was held at the Maitland Hospital on Saturday, before Dr. M'Cartney, on the body of George Fleming.  The witnesses examined were Mr. Francis L. Riley and Dr. Wigan.  It appeared that the unfortunate man had been received into the hospital on Monday last; he was then suffering (as reported in our last) from injuries sustained by a kick from a horse, which appeared to be principally about the head.  Dr. Wigan attended upon the deceased, and applied the usual remedies, but he never recovered, and died on Friday evening.  The accident occurred at Black Creek, and the horse, although extremely quiet, was on this occasion irritated by the deceased pulling his tail.  A verdict of accidental death was returned.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 28 November 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - The adjourned inquiry which was commenced before Mr. J. S. Parker, at the Darlinghurst Gaol, on the 21st instant, was terminated yesterday at the Victoria Inn, South Head Road, on view of the body of Alexander White, aged 49 years.  The following are abstracts of the depositions.

  William John Brown deposed: He was an inspector of the Sydney police force; between 12 and 12 o'clock, on Tuesday morning, he took deceased into custody at the Clarence River Inn, Sussex-street, upon the charge of having stabbed his wife with a knife; he was lying upon a mattress up stairs in a back room, with a three pronged fork in his hand, and staring wildly; seized him and took the fork; with the assistance of other officers, raised him from the floor; the muscles of his arms were quite rigid and his limbs stiff; sent him to the police station, and told him the charge; the deceased replied, I did not cut the skin but only the clothes to frighten her; he stated he had strychnine given him by Mr. Farrell, his brother-in-law; deceased seemed perfectly sensible and conversed about his friends in Ireland; did not say when the strychnine was administered; appeared to be in the same state when before the Court on the following day as when apprehended.

  Thomas Harrison, principal turnkey at Darlinghurst Gaol, deposed: Received the deceased from the prison van on the evening of the 18th instant; he was sentenced to one months; imprisonment for an aggravated assault upon his wife; his death was reported to me on the 21st instant; left the keys of the hospital with the turnkey to allow the dispenser to visit him during the night; he appeared to be suffering from the effects of drink when he arrived at the gaol, and was able to walk himself; Dr. Galbraith sent him to the hospital.

  William Hamilton Galbraith, dispenser of the gaol, deposed: On the 18th instant, saw deceased getting out of the van; examined him, and found him suffering from delirium tremens; sent him to the hospital, and administered the usual remedies, prescribed by Dr. West; he passed a sleepless night; had two men to look after him; visited him at 9 a.m., 3 p.m., and at 11 p.m. on the 19th; desired the same treatment, and to be carefully watched; visited him at 9 a.m. on 20th; had to put him under restraint for half-an-hour; he said his wife had killed his two children; gave him castor oil; he asked for some tobacco to chew which I gave him; saw him again at 12 a.m. and 3 p.m.; at 6 he became more violent; asked Dr. Alleyne to see the deceased; he did so, but did not approve of any treatment; saw him again about half-past 120, when he said the medicine I was administering was vitriol, which he took upon seeing me taste it; her then became very violent; at a quarter to four saw he was dying, and he expired about a quarter past four.  He told me he had been drinking since his return from Ireland.  It is my opinion that strychnine might have produced similar effects to those which deceased was labouring under; saw nothing to lead me to believer that it had been administered; received a letter from Dr. Rutter in relation to deceased.

  Donald M'Lennan deposed: Am barman at the Ship Inn., Sussex-street; between six and seven on Monday evening, deceased came in and asked to see Mr. M'Lennan, stating that he wanted him to write to his brother at Newcastle; said White the butcher, at Newcastle, was his brother, whom I had known for eight years; told the deceased he was under the influence of drink and had better go home; he said, "No! I am poisoned."  He asked me whether I would write to his brother; told him no; he said he was master of the Clarence River Hotel; he appeared perfectly aware of what he was doing; saw a wildness about his eyes.

  Dr. John Yates Rutter deposed: Made a post mortem examination on deceased Alexander White; deceased was apparently 40 years of age.  There was no external marks of violence on the body; decomposition had rapidly set in; the neck, shoulders, back, chest, and side presented a greenish discolouration; on removing the calvarium the dura mater  was found somewhat thicker than usual, but healthy; the tunuca arachnoides slightly thickened; the ventricles of the brain contained a small quantity of slightly reddish serum; the cerebrum and cerebellum were healthy in structure and consistence; on examining the chest, and removing the sternum, the appearance and situation of the chest was natural; an old adhesion of the apex of the tight lung, about the size of a crown piece, and the lung at that part contained two or three measures of tuberculous matter of the size of a pea; both lungs were much conjested from the  position of the body after death; on examining the heart, the pericardium contained about half an ounce of serum, was of natural size, pale and flaccid, having a considerable deposit of fat on both surfaces; its muscular substance paler than usual; there was nothing that I saw that led me to believe that any pernicious drug had been administered; deceased presented the ordinary symptoms induced by continued intemperance, and it is my opinion deceased died from exhaustion.

  Dr. Alleyne stated that he had assisted in the post-mortem examination, and having heard the statements of Dr. Rutter, perfectly agreed with them.

  John Smith deposed: Am Professor of Chemistry at the University; received on Saturday a jar containing stomach, portions of liver, and a kidney, said to have been taken from deceased; examined for strychnine, but found none; examined also for arsenic, mercury, and antimony, but found none; in the course of my examination found the liver in that  state descried fatty degenerative; have had considerable experience in poison, and consider it very difficult to detect strychnine, if administered in small quantities; the invariable account of poisoning by strychnine is that it produces convulsions of various sorts; it is quite possible a small quantity might have been taken, and yet not detected; the deceased having lived as long after it might have been excreted from the body.  

  In reply to a question from a juryman: I think it is certain that he did not die from the effects of strychnine.

 Verdict: the deceased Alexander White died from delirium tremens, and we are satisfied that every attention as paid to deceased as far as we know, [Empire (Sydney), same date, gives Dr. Rutter's letter, mentioned above.]


 

Empire (Sydney), 28 November 1856

ACCIDENTAL DEATH. - An inquest was held yesterday by the City Coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Three Tuns Tavern, Elizabeth-street, on view of the body of John Donalan, aged 63 years, who died on Tuesday morning from the effects of injuries received under the following circumstances.  The deceased, who was employed at the Custom-house, was proceeding to his duty on the morning of the 10th instant, when, passing near the Surveyor-General's Office, two horses, attached to a cart belonging to Mr. Randle the contractor, rushed up at full speed behind him and knocked him down.  He was picked up immediately afterwards in a state of insensibility, and bleeding from a wound in the forehead; and was taken to the Infirmary, where he lingered until death closed his sufferings.  Dr. Nathan deposed that the deceased was brought into the Infirmary on the 10th instant, when he examined him and found that he was suffering from various injuries, namely, a cut over the right eye, fracture of the supper part of the right arm, and fracture of ribs on the right side.  The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence.


 

Freeman's Journal (Sydney), 29 November 1856

SUDDEN DEATH. - A respectable young man, name Burt, died suddenly, early on Wednesday morning, at his lodgings in Macquarie-street.  Mr. Burt had been a clerk in the employ of Messrs. George A. Lloyd and Co. for about three years. A few months ago he was sent up to China in the Hellespont steamer, as supercargo, and he returned thence in the Chrishna only last Sunday.  Mr. Burt retired to bed near midnight on Tuesday, and soon afterwards he was found to have burst a blood-vessel, and died almost immediately.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 29 November 1856

Letter to the Editor, from Robert Donelan, stating that his father was not deaf.  [See above.]


 

Illawarra Mercury, 1 December 1856

DEATH BY FIRE. - A magisterial inquiry was terminated this day by Thomas A. Perry, Esq., at the Police Office, Merriwa, touching the death of Bridget Johnson, who was burnt to death at a sheep station, near Brindley Park, on the 9th instant.  It appeared from the evidence that deceased was employed at a sheep station with her husband, George Johnson, and that on Saturday, the 8th, she had been drinking, when the Brindley Park storekeeper arrived at the station with rations; and it is supposed that in hanging up some salt beef to dry in the chimney her clothes had caught fire, for in the evening she was seen, by her husband and Edward Marlay, Esq., to run out of the hut in flames.  Her husband, who reached her first, pulled the remnants of burning clothes off her back.  She was dreadfully burnt all over.  Mr. Marlay immediately returned home, and sent his storekeeper with some oil, but the unfortunate woman expired in agony the following day. - Merriwa, November 19, 1856, Maitland Mercury, Nov. 22.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 1 December 1856

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held on Saturday last before Mr. J. S. Parker, city coroner, at the Captain Cook Inn, Clyde-street, touching the death of a child named Alfred Ford, about eight months old.  It appeared from the evidence that on Tuesday evening last, the child, which was just able to crawl was seated by the mother on the table preparatory for tea.  Immediately her back was turned she heard the deceased scream out, and on running to the child's assistance, she found that the latter had capsized the contents of the tea-pot (which was seated on the table) over his arms and person, causing a severe scald which ultimately ended in convulsions, of which the child died.  Medical aid was procured shortly after the accident occurred, but unfortunately without avail.  Verdict, accidental death.

To the Editor of the Sydney Morning Herald.

Letter from J. S. Parker, City Coroner, requesting a correction of the report on the Inquest of Alexander White.


 

Empire (Sydney), 2 December 1856

THE LATE FATAL ACCIDENT IN THE HARBOUR.

  An inquest was held yesterday by the city coroner, J S. Parker, Esq., at the Dumbarton Castle, public-house, Kent-street, on view of the body of Kenneth Donovan, a blacksmith, aged  29 years, who was drowned on Sunday afternoon last, under the following circumstances:-  .  .  .  

  The verdict by the jury was to the effect that the deceased Kenneth Donovan came to his death by suffocation from drowning, caused by the upsetting of his own boat, with the management of which he appeared to be unacquainted.


 

Maitland Mercury, 4 December 1856

SUDDEN DEATH THROUGH TAKING OVERDOISES OF TARTAR EMETIC. - Two German women, one the mother of two children, met their death in a very extraordinary manner, a few days past. It appears from the evidence elicited at the inquest held on the bodies, that the unfortunate women, neither of whom could speak English, had been induced to take a large dose of tartar emetic for the purpose of purging the blood, and to clear (as the witnesses deposed) their skin of some spots or blemishes.  The husband of one of the women, a German, named John Welse, in the employ of Mr. Robert Cribb, of this place, gave evidence  the inquest to that effect - that the emetic caused severe retchings in both cases.  Unfortunately their employer, not understanding sufficient German to comprehend their case, did not produce medical assistance until too late.   The parties reside some miles from town, or the result would not have terminated fatally.  The elder of the two females had only recently come on to this place to join her husband, who had sent money home for that purpose, and the poor woman was only waiting till her shipmate, Mrs. Welse, until she could hear of her husband's whereabouts.  The jury, after a post mortem examination of the bodies, returned verdicts of Accidental death through taking an overdose of tartar emetic. - Empire Brisbane Correspondent.


 

Empire (Sydney), 4 December 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT. - A coroner's inquest was held yesterday at the Three Tuns Tavern, Elizabeth-street, before J. S. Parker, Esq., on view of the body of Matthew Middleton, aged 45 years, who died from injuries accidentally received by falling down a ladder in Tooth's brewery.  It appeared that the deceased, who was a sober man, was employed as a cellarman and tunman at Messrs. Tooth's brewery, and while descending a ladder from the tun room, on Friday afternoon last, with a bucket on his head, his foot slipped, and he fell from the top to the bottom, a distance of about seven feet, and broke his collar-bone.  Dr. Foulis was immediately sent for, and attended the deceased until Monday last, when delirium tremens attacked him.  Dr. Foulis then recommended him to be taken to the Infirmary.  Dr. Nathan deposed that the deceased was admitted under his care in the Sydney Infirmary on the 1st instant; he observed a severe contusion on the right shoulder, with the fracture of the collar-bone; the deceased was also labouring under delirium tremens and very bad; he died the same evening about ten o'clock, and death was the result of the injuries combined with delirium tremens; he was a man of full habit, and the shock of the injury upon a person of his habits was sufficient to cause death. Harriet Middleton, widow of the decease, deposed that her husband was quite well and perfectly sober on the day of the accident; at four o'clock in the afternoon he was brought home, suffering severe pain, and told her that there was some yeast on the steps of the ladder which made him slip, and that as he fell his breast came in contact with the edge of bucket; he would drink a glass of spirits occasionally, but could not get drunk without her knowledge; she could not remember when he was last intoxicated.  A verdict was returned in accordance with the evidence.

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An adjourned inquest was concluded yesterday before J. S. Parker, Esq., on view of the body of Susan Amen, aged 128 years, who died suddenly on Monday afternoon.  From the evidence, it appeared that the deceased had complained, about a week previously, of cramp in the stomach.  She had no medical advice about it, but appeared to recover.  On Monday afternoon, she went into the Domain with a young man named Joseph Woodward, and, after having walked about an hour, again complained of the cramp in her stomach, and sat down.  About ten minutes afterwards, she arose for the purpose of going to Brady's public-house, in Palmer-street, to get a stimulant, but complained that she felt very ill and fell backwards, writhing in agony.  She was then removed to Brady's public-house, where she expired ten minutes afterwards.  By order of the coroner, a post mortem examination of the body was made by Mr. James Smith, resident surgeon at the Benevolent Asylum, who deposed that he found the chest of the deceased healthy, the heart quite empty and flaccid; the viscera of the abdomen were healthy; haemorrhage had taken place between the two folds of the mesentery, which, bursting, caused fatal syncope and death; the liver was in a state called fatty degeneration, and showed that the deceased was a tippler.  The verdict of the jury was death from natural causes.

SEAMAN DROWNED. - About midnight on Tuesday a seaman, named Edward Hutchinson, belonging to the schooner Sancho Panza, now lying at the Police Wharf, whilst endeavouring to get on board in a state of intoxication, fell into the water and was drowned.  At a late hour yesterday, it was said that the body had not been recovered.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 6 December 1856

NEWCASTLE.

DECEMBER 1. - An inquest was held yesterday at a place called the Five Huts, about four miles from Newcastle, before R. R. S. Bowker, Esq., M.D., coroner, on the body of Emma Marshall, the wife of Henry Marshall, a labourer, who had died suddenly that morning.  The case excited additional interest in consequence of a report that deceased had died from the effects of violence, but the report was not in any way borne out by the evidence at the inquest.

  Henry Marshall, a boy of about seven or eight years of age, son of the deceased, was questioned, previous to being sworn,  as to his knowledge of an oath, and his answers being deemed sufficient, he was permitted to give evidence.  He proved that he had been in Newcastle all the previous day with his father, and had not seen his mother during that time.  He returned home with his father about dark, when he observed his mother asleep on the bed in their tent.  She had her clothes on, and he went to bed without speaking to her; when he awoke in the morning, a woman was attending her; never knew his father to striker or ill-use his mother, and did not before know his mother to have gone to bed undressed; his father had been at work at Newcastle on the previous day, and had not been drinking.

  Harriett Harding, who lived near the tent of Marshall, proved that she had seen the deceased on the previous day about half-past 3 o'clock, p.m.; she then appeared quite well, as usual, and did not complain of illness; had never seen her the worse for liquor; had never known her and her husband to quarrel; they lived on the best terms; that morning, Marshall  had called her to say that his wife was dying or dead, or in a faint; she went to their tent and found Mrs. Marshall on her knees on the floor, her husband supporting her; she seemed quite dead; she was not very cold, but seemed getting so; her limbs were not stiff; and no marks on the body before or after death.

  Emma Knowles, another neighbour, deposed to same effect.

  Robert S. Bowker, member of the Royal College of Surgeons, was examined, and proved that he had made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased; there was a  contusion on the nation of the body of the deceased; there was a contusion on the right eyebrow, and one on the right side of the jaw, near the ear; they might have been made by a blunt instrument, or by falling on a blunt substance; had cut down upon the contusions, but they did not lead to the discovery of any serious injuries; the vessels of the brain were much congested with blood; there was an effusion of blood on the lateral ventricle of the brain; there were no fractures or a mark of injury on the skull; there was some redness of the lining of the stomach; the left ventricle of the heart was very much contracted, so much so as to obliterate the cavity; it was also thicker than usual; believed the deceased to have died of apo0plexy.  Verdict: Die by the visitation of God.


 

Bell's Life in Sydney, 6 December 1856

CORONER'S INQUESTS.

  On Thursday, at the Wellington Inn, George-street, on the body of Edward Hutchinson, a man of color, late cook on board the schooner Sancho Panza, who was accidentally drowned between 10 and 11 o'clock on Tuesday night. Verdict accordingly.

  On the body of H. Wagner, a young man lately in the employ of Mr. Beckman, who had been missing since the 22nd ult., and whose body was found floating near Clarke's Island, on Wednesday morning.  Verdict, found drowned.


 

Empire (Sydney), 6 December 1856

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE. - A coroner's inquest was held yesterday by J. S. Parker, Esq., at the house of Mr. Samuel Oxford, Randwick, near Coogee, touching the death of a man named Malachi Green, who was found dead in bed on Tuesday last.  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased, who was a carpenter in the employ of M<r. S. H. Pearce, Crown Lands Commissioner, was an inveterate drunkard.  He was last seen alive on Monday evening, when he was merry and walking about, having partially recovered from a drunken bout.  On Thursday morning last, a labourer named Joseph Lee, who lived in the same house with Green, went into the room occupied by the deceased and found him in bed, quite dead, undressed, and with the bed-clothes drawn over him.  Thomas Revel Johnson deposed that he was a legally qualified medical practitioner; he had viewed the body of the deceased and found no marks of violence externally upon his person; saw a slight abrasion of the chest; from the appearance of the body, and the history of the case, her was of opinion that death resulted from serous apoplexy, the result of long-continued intemperance.  The jury unanimously recorded that the deceased was found dead in bed, in an unfurnished house, at a place known as Randwick, near Coogee; and his death was caused by serous apoplexy, accelerated by drunkenness.


 

Empire (Sydney), 6 December 1856

SUICIDE.  - The city coroner held an inquest yesterday, at the Wellington Inn, George-street South, on the body of a woman named Catherine Dunleavy, aged 34 years, who came by her death under the following circumstances.

  Francis H. Phillips deposed as follows: I am about eleven years of age, and reside at Newtown; yesterday afternoon between the hours of three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was playing with some other boys at the bottom of Mr. Brigg's garden, where there is a large sheet of water, when I saw the deceased come towards it from the direction of Camperdown, and I heard her calling out, "I will never see Tommy;"  shortly afterwards another woman brought down a baby to her, which she  refused to take, and shaking her fist at the woman, said "I will kill you, when I meet you in Sydney;" the other woman put down the baby and ran towards Camperdown; the deceased then took up the baby, and walked about examining the water-hole, and when she came opposite the place where her body was found, put down the baby and pulled her hood over face; she then took off her shoes and walked deliberately into the water till she came to the deep part, when she ducked her head three times under the surface and then threw herself forward into the deep part; she told  us to go away, or she would kill us; so we went back and remained behind a bush; this was where she went into the water; I then ran with another boy to Newtown and told Sergeant Conway what I had seen; she could not have been more than ten minutes in the water before I left; she sunk without a struggle.

  Sergeant Conway, of the Sydney police, deposed that from information given to him by the last witness, he went to a water-hole on the Kingston Estate, Newtown, and found the body of the woman floating in deep water; as he could not swim, he went and fetched down Mr. Briggs, who immediately plunged into the water and brought out the body; he saw a baby on the bank close by, which had since been identified as belonging to the deceased.

  Mary Ann Dunleavy; the eldest daughter of the deceased,  stated that she went out to deliver some washed clothes, between nine and ten o'clock, on Thursday morning; on her return, about an hour afterwards, she found that her mother had gone out and left two of the children at home in the evening she heard that her mother was drowned in a water-hole about a mile from her house; her mother's mind was very much disturbed since the death of her little brother Tommy, who was drowned in the same water-hole about twelve months ago; her father was a shepherd in the employ of Mr. Lebat, at the Gwydir; there were four of them in the family, without any means of support, except what her father sent down occasionally.  

  It further appeared that the deceased had made several attempts to drown herself shortly after the death of "little Tommy," but was prevented by her friends, who took her away from the neighbourhood.  The jury found - That the deceased woman, Catherine Dunleavy, came to her death from suffocation by drowning, whilst laboring under temporary insanity.


 

Empire (Sydney), 6 December 1856

DEATH OF A CHILD BY SCALDING. - An inquest was held yesterday, before J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Victoria Barracks, on view of the body of a child named Herbert Day Armstrong, aged two years, who died through falling into a tub of scalding water on Wednesday last.

  William Weymouth, a private of the 11th Regiment, deposed that a little after eleven o'clock on Wednesday forenoon last, he was going in to the Barracks, when he saw the deceased at the bottom of a passage, creeping round a washing tub  containing suds; the mother of the child was washing, with her back towards the child; he saw the deceased turn round and place his hand against the tub, which was very low - and, over balancing, fall into the water; the mother, hearing the splash, turned round and instantly snatched the child out; thinking the water in the tub was cold, he took no further notice of the accident at that time; there were no other persons near, and he did not hear the child cry.

  Peter Divorty, assistant-surgeon to the 11th regiment, stated that on Wednesday last her was sent for to see a young child belonging to Colour-Sergeant Armstrong, who was reported to have fallen into a tub of scalding water; he found the deceased in his mother's arms; had him undressed, and found the back, the lower part of the abdomen, and back part of the thighs scalded; the child was suffering great pain, and the skin was blistered; he applied the usual remedies in such cases, but the child sunk gradually, and died from the shock to the nervous system.  A verdict was given in accordance with the evidence.


 

Empire (Sydney), 6 December 1856

MYSTERIOUS DEATH.

  An inquest adjourned from Thursday last, was concluded on Saturday afternoon before the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., at the King's Head Hotel, touching the death of a young man named Henry Wagner, whose body was found floating in the harbor under rather suspicious circumstances.

  Edward Holland Cowell, an inspector in the Water Police force, deposed that, from information he received, he proceeded down the harbor on Wednesday morning last, to between Shark and Garden Islands; after passing Garden Island he saw a body floating in the water,  washing against the rocks; as it was much decomposed, he put a lashing round it, and towed it to the Water :Police Station and placed it in the dead-house, where it was identified as that of Henry Wagner, a shopman in the Employ of Mr. Beckman, jeweler, of George-street; witness examined the body and found two perforated wounds in the left side, under the breast, as if from pistol balls; the shirt opposite the wound was perforated and blackened, as if by gunpowder; he saw no blood about the clothes of the deceased; the waistcoat was open; and witness found some gun caps in one of the pockets; in the trousers there was a purse conytaining2s. 9d. in silver; the deceased had been missing since the 22nd of last month.

  Edward Beckman, jeweler, of George-street, deposed that the deceased, Henry Wagner, was a young man in his employ; his age was 21 years; and witness recognixxxed the body by the clothes and initials on the shirt, the features being entirely destroyed by decomposition; the deceased left witness's house on November 22nd, in the evening; in the morning of that day, he told witness that he intended to take a boat and go over to the North Shore; previous to this a letter came from the North Shore for deceased from a young lady there; and after the deceased  received it witness observed a change in his manners, and that he appeared to be low-spirited; witness asked him if he had received a letter; and he said, "Yes, and I feel very vexed that she is going to leave her situation, and wish that she would remain till you wife comes here, that we might consult her;" deceased also told him that the lady had mentioned in her letter that she was afraid she would not be able to see him that night, but that he should take a boat and row himself over, for the purpose of persuading her to stay a little longer if she could; when deceased went away that evening he had on a brown coat and grey trousers, and a mackintosh over his arm; he wore a gold albert chain, attached to which was a gold geneva watch marked "Motter, Geneva, No. 4271," worth about nine or ten pounds; the deceased never showed any symptoms of a deranged intellect, and witness was positive he would not have contemplated self-destruction; he was a man well to do, and could earn from five to six pounds a week, with board and lodging; he was a native of Dresden, and was a strong, athletic man; on the next morning witness sent a boy with a letter over to the North Shore, to inquire whether the deceased had been at the lady's house, as he had not returned; she came over herself, and, seeming very much distressed, said she had not seen him; the boat which deceased hired was found about five days afterwards, together with a fragment of one of the paddles, on the rocks in Mosman Bay; witness was once in  a boat with deceased, and saw that he could row very well; the motive of the deceased in not taking a waterman's boat was the inconvenience of getting back; witness was under the impression that the deceased had been murdered; he had examined all his papers and found nothing to show that deceased contemplated self-destruction; nor was he aware that he had any cause for jealousy.

  David Stolworthy, M.D., deposed that he had, in conjunction with Dr. A. M. Brown, made a post mortem examination of the body of the deceased Henry Wagner; they fund a wound having all the appearance of being caused by a pistol bullet, immediately corresponding with a charred rent in the waistcoat and shirt; it was situated on the left side, between the fourth and fifth ribs; the fourth rib was fractured; on opening the chest and further tracing the wound, they found that it passed completely through the pericardium and heart, in a slanting direction upwards; the lungs were so decomposed that they could not trace any thing that might have passed through them; nor was there any wound on the opposite side of the body to show that anything had passed through; they made diligent search for a ball, and could find none; there were no fractures on the skull; such a wound as that described in the side of deceased, was quite sufficient to have caused death; there was another wound close under the first, but it did not enter the body; from the charred state of the waistcoat and shirt, a gun ort pistol must have ben discharged close by the body; it was possible for the deceased to have inflicted the wound himself; blood might have flowed from such a wound as that described, but it depended entirely on the way deceased fell; great internal haemorrhage had taken place, as the chest was gorged with coagulated blood; the whole cavity of the thorax was full of blood; there was no blood visible on the clothes, but as the body had been so long in the water, it might have been washed away.

  Alexander M. Brown, M.D., entirely concurred on the statement made by Dr. Stolworthy, that the deceased came by his death either from a gun or pistol-shot wound; and he arrived at that conclusion from the marks he saw, as well as the quantity of blood contained in the thorax, which proved that it must have been inflicted before death.

  James Heaton., son of William Heaton, as boatman, residing in Dowling-street, Woolloomooloo, stated that on the evening of Saturday, the 22nd of November, a young gentleman, a foreigner, came and hired a boat for two hours, saying he was going over to the North Shore; the paddles in the boat were of ash; fiber days afterwards, when the boat was found, they were missing; the boat was discovered in Mosman Bay on the rocks, and was not injured; the young gentleman was to have paid 2s. 6d per hour for the hire of the boat; he left no security for the boat; there was nothing particular in his manner; he said he was going over to the North Shore to keep an appointment.

  Mary, wife of William Heaton, deposed, that her husband was ill and unable to attend the inquest; he had boats which he was in the habit of letting out for hire; she heard of a young gentleman having hired one of the boats, which  was not returned until she found it in Mosman Bay; her husband was uneasy about the boat when he found it had not been returned for three or four days, and hired a man to look after it; witness accompanied the man, and after searching for five days, found the boat by chance moored off with a kellick in Mosman Bay; she did not suspect that anything wrong had happened, being often served with tricks with the boats, and therefore did not report the occurrence to the police; the paddles were both gone; she saw two oystermen in Mossman Bay, and they pointed out the boat to her, saying they had found her on the rocks and moored her off for safety; one of the men also picked up a part of the blade of one of the paddles, which was branded on both sides "W. Heaton,"; the oystermen did not say that they had found anything in the boat, nor did she observe any marks of blood upon it, or signs of a struggle having taken place in it. After a short consultation, the jury returned the following verdict: Found floating in the harbor of Port Jackson, under very mysterious circumstances; but for want of evidence it is impossible to determine whether it was an act of suicide or a case of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown.

CIRCULAR QUAY.

 The following was appended as a rider to the Verdict: - And we further beg leave to call the attention of the coroner to the filthy and disgraceful state of the dead-house at the old Water Police station.

  The above was added in consequence of the refusal of Dr. Mackellar to make a post mortem examination of the body in the dead-house.  It appears that some time ago Dr. Mackellar performed an operation of that kind in the dead-house, which he then found in such a disgustingly filthy and horrible condition, that he determined never again to enter it until some alteration had been effected.  There was not even water there for him to wash his hands, and he was compelled to go out to the water side to wash them before he returned home.  "No power on earth," he said, "should compel him to enter that charnel-house again."

  One of the jurors remarked that there was then a body lying in the dead-house, but he would not go in to look at it for a thousand pounds. [Concludes with a report on the dead-house by Drs. Stolworthy and Brown.]


 

Empire (Sydney), 8 December 1856

DEATH FROM DROWNING. - A coroner's inquest was held on Saturday last by J. S. Parker, Esq., at the King's Head Hotel, George-street North, on view of the body of Joseph Coffey, aged 23 years, who came by his death through falling into the water, on Thursday night last, when endeavouring to get on board the ship Edward Oliver, at the Circular Quay.  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was an immigrant by the above-named vessel, and on Thursday night last, having met with two or three of the crew, accompanied them to the ship for the purpose of spending another night on board.  The ship had risen with the tide, and moved off a little, so as to leave a space between herself and the quay.  One of the party, therefore, jumped off to the ship's ladder, which was hanging loosely alongside, and held out his hand for Coffey to take hold of.  The deceased then jumped, and his foot caught the ladder; but, unfortunately, it gave way from under him by slipping aside, and he fell backwards into the water.  One of the witnesses said he thought the deceased must have struck his head in falling, as he never spoke afterwards, although he knocked his arms about a good deal in the water.  The police were on the spot almost immediately afterwards with grappling-irons, and tried every means to recover the body; but bit was not found till the following morning.  On the passage from London to the colony, the deceased stated that he was a "navvy," and had been employed at Balaklava.  Verdict - suffocation by drowning, accidentally caused by falling off a ladder attached to the ship Edward Oliver.


 

Empire (Sydney), 9 December 1856

SUDDEN DEATH. -An inquest was held yesterday by J. S. Parker, Esq., sat the Victoria Barracks, on view of the body of a young man named Daniel M'Farlane, aged nineteen, who died from disease of the heart, whilst bathing in a water-hole, on Sunday afternoon.  Captain William Browne, Gold Commissioner, and Police Magistrate for the Western Gold Fields, deposed that the deceased was in his service, which he entered about the latter part of last year; he was very delicate and, witness thought consumptive; witness found him  at a shepherd's hut just as he had recovered from a rheumatic fever; he joined witness's service having no relatives; some months afterwards, witness came to Sydney, and requested the surgeons of the Eleventh Regiment to examine the deceased; they did so, and informed witness that his lungs were sound, but that he had very extensive disease of the heart, and that he was liable to drop down at any time upon any violent exertion; he was a lad of very steady, sober habits, and a most faithful servant; he was with witness at one o'clock on Sunday, and then appeared to be in perfect health.  Nesbitt Heffernan, a surgeon of the Eleventh Regiment, deposed that shortly after three o'clock on Sunday afternoon he was informed that the servant of Captain Browne was  dying outside the barrack gate; he went immediately, and found the deceased at the edge of the water-hole at the back of the barracks, naked and quite dead; he had the body removed to the hospital, and tried every means to resuscitate him, but without effect; from his previous knowledge of the deceased and the information he had received, he was of opinion that death was the result of a disease of the heart.  William Pooley, a drummer, said he was at the water-hole, bathing, when the deceased came down, took off his clothes, and jumped into the water; he swam  towards the middle, where there was a  table floating about; deceased caught hold of the table, and vomited some blood; he said, "I shall never get out of the water alive": witness and some other boys then helped to get him out by towing the table ashore, when a man took him out of the water, the deceased bring too weak to stand; he was laid on the sand, and died immediately.  The verdict of the jury was in accordance with the evidence.


 

Empire (Sydney), 9 December v1856

DEATH THROUHGH FALLING FROM THE ROOF OF A HOUSE. - An adjourned inquest was concluded before the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., at the Three Tuns Inn, Elizabeth-street, yesterday, touching the death of a man named John Lynch, aged 63 years, which happened under the following circumstances.  About the 20th October last, the deceased was on the roof of a house, at Surry Hills, shingling, when the battens on which he was seated, sprung, and caused him to fall off the roof, a height of about nineteen feet.  He was take up in an insensible state, and subsequently removed to the Infirmary, where he lingered until Saturday last. He was quite sensible while in the Infirmary, and did not attach blame to any one for having caused the accident.  Verdict - Died from injuries accidentally received.

A CHILD FOUND DEAD. - A coroner's inquest was held yesterday before J. S. Parker, Esq., at the King's Head Inn, Lower George-street, on view of the body of a female infant, that was found dead on Sunday morning, in a garden belonging to Mrs. Campbell, Bligh-street.  From the evidence it appeared that the body was found by Mrs. Campbell's gardener, about eight o'clock in the morning, on an onion bed, about four yards from a six foot fence that divided the garden  from Phillip-street, and over which it had evidently been thrown.  It was wrapped up in a piece of flannel, covered with black merino.  Dr. Rutter, police-surgeon, deposed that he had made a post mortem examination of the body, which he found in a very decomposed state, and was, in consequence, unable to say whether the child ever live; nor could he say how it came by its death; there were various ways by which the death might have been occasioned the body was of a full-grown child.  The verdict was as follows:- That the deceased female infant, name unknown, found in a garden belonging to Mrs. Campbell, Bligh-street, was found dead, but how it came to its death there is no evidence to show.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 10 December 1856

DEATH BY SUN STROKE. - On Sunday afternoon a child of between 4 and 5 years of age, residing with his parents in John-street, became suddenly ill, supposed to have been caused by a coup de soleil.  Medical aid was sent for, but although no time was lost, before a doctor arrived the poor child breathed its last.  The Coroner did not hear of the occurrence until late on Monday evening, and until after the boy was buried.

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday before the coroner, Mr. J. S. Parker, at the Dove Inn, Ashfield, touching the death of a lad named William Cottrell, aged 13 years, who was found drowned in a waterhole on Mr. W. Wilkinson's property, Enfield.  Thomas Cottrell, an intelligent little boy, was examined, and deposed that on Sunday evening he was coming along a by-road with his brother, the deceased, and five more boys, looking for a strayed goat; the deceased ran away into the bush, cannot say what for; two boys followed him a little way into the bush but came back; we all then followed deceased to the water; about a quarter of an hour afterwards saw deceased's clothes lying on the bank; called deceased, but could not see or find him; two boys ran across to my father, who came with Thomas Lucas, who brought the body out of the water to the side; my brother could not swim; when we saw the clothes we agreed that he had sunk.  John Lucas deposed that he jumped into the waterhole, and after searching ten minutes found the body close to the bank, opposite the clothes, and brought it out; the water was about six feet deep in the middle, very muddy; the hole was dug out for a waterhole; saw no marks on the body; the body was not warm; cannot say how long it had been in the water.  Edward Sharp deposed that he had cautioned the deceased from bathing in the hole, as it was deep in some parts and shallow in others.  Verdict - Found drowned, supposed to be an accident.


 

Empire (Sydney), 12 December 1856

MELANCHOLY AND FATAL ACCIDENT. - About seven o'clock yesterday evening, a young man named Charles Burrows, one of the midshipmen of the ship Dunbar, lying at the Circular Wharf, unfortunately lost his life by falling from the gangway of the ship.  It appears that the deceased had been bathing at the side of the vessel, and had just got on to the gangway, when by some means his foot slipped, and he fell backwards into the water.  In his fall, his head struck against a spar placed between the Dunbar and the schooner Camilla, for the purpose of keeping the vessels asunder; and being, as it is supposed, stunned by the blow, he sunk immediately and did not rise again.  The Water Police were quickly on the spot, and commenced dragging for the body, but up to eleven o'clock last night, they had not succeeded in finding it.  The deceased was about seventeen years of age.

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held yesterday, before the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., at the King's Head Hotel, touching the death of a woman named Frances Reynolds, aged 40 years.  Francis John Weale, inspector of police, deposed that, upon information he received, he went to Wentworth-street, Miller's Point, between eight and nine o'clock yesterday morning, and there  found the deceased quite dead; he procured a dray and had the body removed to the dead-house, Circular Quay, and got Dr. M'Kay to see it; he pronounced life to have been extinct for some time; witness recognized the deceased as having called at his house two days before, complaining that she was very ill, and wanting to go into the Infirmary; she then said she had seen Captain Towns, who told her there was no room in the Infirmary; witness referred her to the Water Police magistrate, but did not know whether she applied or not; she appeared more dead than alive when at his house.  Dr. A. Brown deposed that he had examined the body of the deceased; there were no marks of violence on it, but from its appearance he was of opinion that the deceased had been a woman of very intemperate habits, and that exposure and her previous habits were the cause of death.  Isabella Evans, a married woman, residing in Clyde-street, Miller's Point, said she had known the deceased for the past twelve months; she lived with witness for the last three months up to last Saturday, when she was obliged to turn her away on account of continued drunkenness, filth, and dirt; the deceased would eat but very little, and a slice of bread would serve her for a week; she had received an order for admission to the Benevolent Asylum, but would not go in as, she said, she could get no nobblers there; she always had a regular home till Saturday last. John Reynolds, an intelligent boy, said the deceased was his mother; on Saturday morning he and his mother slept at Mrs. Oliphant's, Miller's Point; his mother did not pay anything for her bed; they slept there also on Sunday night, and then went to Mrs. Martin, where they slept on Monday and Tuesday nights; on Wednesday evening, Mrs. Martin not being at home, they went back to Oliphant's, but Mrs. Oliphant would not let the deceased sleep there again; that night they slept in the closet on Martin's premises; before they went to the closet a man and woman offered to give his mother a night's lodging, but she said she could not walk up the hill, if they would give her a thousand pounds; in the middle of the night his mother woke him up and told him she was going to die; in the morning he  fetched a nobbler of gin and some vinegar for her; shortly afterwards, about eight o'clock,  a man came and told the deceased to come out, she did so, and when trying to walk up the hill, fell down and died; her had seen his mother often drunk, but she was sober before her death; she was drunk two days before.  Verdict - Death from natural causes, accelerated by intemperate habits


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 15 December 1856

SHOALHAVEN.

  A case of very sudden death took place on Sunday.  A man on his way home called at a friend's, and after taking a cup of tea fell dead from his chair.  An inquest is to be held to-day.


 

Empire (Sydney), 15 December 1856

SINGLETON, DECEMBER 10. - With reference to the report of the murder at the Wollombi, given in our last communication, I have now to state that an inquest was held at Mr. Snape's, Yellow Rock, on Friday last, by Henry Glennie, Esq., the coroner of the district, when a verdict of wilful murder was returned against the unfortunate woman, who was committed for trial at the next circuit court at Maitland.  The poor woman is now in the lock-up here, under charge of Mr. Murray.  She is a stout, rather good-looking, and, indeed, we would say, motherly-looking person, with no appearance whatever of the ferocity of disposition of which the act of which she is accused would indicate.  She has an infant at the breast, towards which she evinces the most tender solicitude. - Correspondent.


 

Empire (Sydney), 15 December 1856

DEATH BY A KICK FROM A HORSE. - A coroner's inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Sydney Arms, public-house, Castlereagh-street, before J. S. Parker, Esq., on view of the body of John Flanagan, aged thirty-two years, who came by his  death under the following circumstances.  Joshua Pearson deposed that he was a farrier in the employ of Messrs. Pearson and Flanagan; a little before eleven o'clock that morning, the deceased was in the smith's shop, at Messrs. Burt and Hasssall's yard, Pitt-street; there were two or three other persons present, and they were going to dock a horse's tail; a man named Gibson held the foreleg up, and John Flanagan (the deceased) cut the tail off; witness stood by with a hot iron and rosin to give to the deceased; after the tail was cut, the deceased began to apply the rosin to the wound when the horse reared and plunged; the deceased then let go the tail and stepped on the side, but the horse wheeled round and lashed out with both hind feet, striking the deceased in the stomach, and causing him to fall and roll over six or seven yards, like a person making a somersault; the deceased never spoke again, and died in about five minutes after; the horse had not been touched with the iron; several horses had been docked in the same place, and with no other precaution than holding one leg up and putting winkers on; the deceased was perfectly sober at the time; they generally had five men to assist in docking horses, but on this occasion there were only three - the deceased, Gibson, and witness; witness had suggested the propriety of waiting for other hands, but deceased thought it unnecessary; the horse did not move when the tail was taken off; it was quiet horse, and about seven years old; they never had any horse lashed and  thrown down, but always docked them in the manner described.

  Herbert Gibson  deposed that the horse was his property; he took him to Burt and Hassall's to have his tail docked; the deceased had taken the tail off, and placed rosin on the wound, and apparently turned round to get the searing iron; on turning back, he laid hold of the tail, when the horse snatched his forelock out of witness's hand, reared, and lashed out once with both feet from behind striking the deceased in the chest; witness ran off for a doctor, and in two or three minutes Dr. Warren was on the spot; the occurrence was so instantaneous that the deceased had not time to get out of the way; the horse remained quiet afterwards.  Dr. Warren stated that he had known the deceased for some time; he was a sober, steady man, and well acquainted with the manner of treating horses; having been informed that a man had been  kicked by a horse at Burt and Hassall's, witness went there immediately; he found the deceased on the ground supported by some men; he examined him and found a slight mark over the pit of the stomach; the man was dying, and expired two minutes afterwards;  a blow such as that described would cause paralysis of the diaphragm and ultimately death, and witness believed that was the cause of the death of deceased.  The jury unanimously returned the following verdict: That the deceased, John Flanagan, came to his death by a kick from a horse, accidentally received while docking its tail - and we consider that proper precaution was not used.


 

Empire (Sydney), 16 December 1856

RECOVERY OF THE BODY OF THE LATE CHARLES BURROWS, OF THE SHIP DUNBAR. - A coroner's inquest was held yesterday, before J. S. Parker, Esq., on board the ship Dunbar, on view of the body of Charles Burrows, the young midshipman, who was killed by falling overboard, on Thursday evening last.  James  Green, Captain of the ship Dunbar, now lying at the Circular Wharf, deposed that the decease, who was sixteen years of age, was a midshipman on board the Dunbar, and had been two voyages with him; the deceased was an excellent swimmer; on the 11th instant, about six o'clock in the evening, witness was in his cabin, when it was reported to him that there was a man overboard; he immediately  went on deck,  and found that the deceased Charles Burrows had fallen forward from the gangway overboard, in the fall had struck his head against a schooner lying along-side he fell a height of about ten feet; witness was on deck about a minute after the occurrence; the deceased did not rise, nor was he seen until picked up that morning; every effort was made to recover him, by drags, and getting the schooner out of the way, and every other means was resorted to till eleven o'clock on the night of the occurrence - and until one o'clock that morning, when the body was found floating alongside the Nimrod, a distance of about 200 yards; the deceased was very much liked on board.  George White, butcher's mate on board the Dunbar, stated that on Thursday evening last, he was standing at the after-gangway when he saw the deceased Charles Burrows come up out of the water where he had been bathing, and cross the schooner Camilla lying along-side; after he had crossed the schooner, he got up in the chains, and came along the ship into the gangway; he then stooped to arrange his trousers, when his foot slipped and he lost his hand-hold; he made an attempt to catch hold again, but missed and fell down, feet foremost, the front of his head striking against the Dunbar which sent him back against a spar used as a fender on the schooner; he then went down like a stone, and witness did not see him again; he was very close to the deceased, and could have touched him but was confused, and called out for assistance; the second mate came immediately, and every effort was made to recover the deceased, but without success; the deceased had been bathing about, and had only his bathing trousers on; witness called his attention to as defect in his trousers, and it was in the endeavour to set that right, that he lost his hold and fell.  

  John Dempsey deposed: He was a seaman on board the Nimrod, bow lying at the Circular Quay; that morning, about one o'clock, he was called out of his berth by one of the boys, who said there was a dead body floating by the ship, and that he was frightened to go near it; witness went on deck immediately; it was clear moonlight, and he saw the body floating between the ship and the shore, and got a long pole and drew it ashore; it had on a pair of drawers and a belt, and was the body of a young lad; knowing that a young man had fallen from the Dunbar, they carried the body immediately to that ship, where it was at once identified as that of Charles Burrows; the body was sweeping down with the tide between the Nimrod and the shore.

  Alexander Fraser Bayne, surgeon of the Dunbar, stated he had examined the body of the decease externally, and found a cut and bruise over the left temple, but no fracture; the cut and bruise were no doubt inflicted before death, and were such as deceased would get by a fall like that described against a hard substance and would [stun] and render him unconscious for the time, but not sufficient to cause death; the immediate cause of death was suffocation by drowning.  The finding of the jury was as follows: That the deceased Charles Burrows came to his death from suffocation by drowning accidentally caused by falling out of the ship Dunbar, striking his head at the time, rendering him insensible, on the evening of the eleventh instant.


 

Maitland Mercury, 16 December 1856

SUDDEN DEATH. - A man named Robert Price died very suddenly at Tala Station, on the 1st November. It appears that he was employed as a shearer, and on the morning of the day named had shorn two sheep out of a lot of ten, which were allocated to him, when he was observed to fall suddenly to the ground.  On his being raised, life was found to have become quite extinct.  The deceased was a great drinker, and by the use of ardent spirits had completely ruined his constitution; but the immediate cause of his death is supposed to have been the rupture of a blood vessel in the heart, occasioned undoubtedly by his exertion in shearing, and moving about the sheep. - Herald's Murrumbidgee Correspondent.


 

Maitland Mercury, 18 December 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT. - Information reached town yesterday morning of a fatal accident that occurred on Wednesday last, near the Narrawa.  It would appear that as Mrs. Kemp, who resides at Burrowa, was returning from Goulburn, when near the Narrawa Inn, the vehicle, while passing over a very bad piece of road, capsized; Mrs. Kemp was thrown out, and the cart fell on her; she survived the accident but a few minutes.   .  .  .   Several accidents that have nearly proved fatal have occurred at the spot where the fatal affair happened. - Goulburn Herald, Dec. 13

SERIOUS ACCIDENT IN THE DOMAIN. - During the excitement bin the Domain last evening, consequent upon the non-ascent of M. Maigre's balloon, two serious accidents occurred, one to a boy name Charles Wood, and the other to a bot named White, of a less serious character. The case is more immediately attributed to the reckless conduct of some sailors, who having worked themselves into a state of great excitement because the expected balloon ascent turned out to be a failure, proceeded to pull down the two lofty poles that had been placed in the ground by M. Maigre to assist him in his operations.  One of these poles fell suddenly, and unfortunately the two poor lads were unable to get clear of it in time, and both were struck to the ground.  Woods [Downs] had his skull severely fractured, which rendered an operation in the Infirmary, whither he was almost immediately conveyed, indispensable.  This was performed by Dr. Nathan, assisted by Dr. M'Farlane, who found that the scalp-bone to the extent of five inches had been depressed and driven upon the brain.  The medical gentlemen informed our reporter at a late hour last night, that the boy could not recover.


 

Empire (Sydney), 18 December 1856

THE LATE BALLOON RIOT. - DEATH OF THE BOY THOMAS DOWNS. - At an early hour yesterday morning, it was reported to the Coroner that the unfortunate boy Thomas Downs, whose skull was fractured on Monday evening last by one of the spars which were thrown down by the rioters in the Domain, was dead.  Steps were thereupon immediately taken for the holding of an inquest upon the body, and thirteen persons were for that purpose sworn in to act as a jury. The three seamen, John Kale, John Atkinson and Joseph Prior, of H.M.S. Juno (who were charged at the Police office on Tuesday with having taken an active part in the riot), were brought in custody before the court on suspicion of having been concerned in throwing  down the pole by which the deceased was killed.  Several witnesses were examined at great length, and the evidence, although in some points conflicting, tended to show that the prisoners Kale and Atkinson were conspicuous as the ring-leaders of the riot, and the chief instigators of the throwing down of the poles; but there was nothing said to implicate the other prisoner.  The inquiry was continued from twelve o'clock in the day till nearly seven in the evening when the Coroner adjourned it until twelve o'clock today, at the same time expressing a hope that, for the sake of humanity and justice, those citizens who witnessed the throwing down of the spar, by which a human life had been sacrificed, and who were able to identify any of the parties concerned in the deed, would boldly comer forward and state the facts which had come under their observation.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 18 December 1856

WINDSOR.

PAINFUL CASE OF DROWNING.  - An inquest was held on Sunday afternoon last, at the Windsor Hotel, before Mr. J. Dowe, the coroner for the district, and a jury, upon the body of a young woman 18 years of age, which had been found drowned that morning in the South Creek, near Mr. Stewart's farm, Peninsula.  There was unfortunately no direct evidence adducible to account for the particulars of the death, though there was every reason to suspect that the deceased had died by her own act, whilst laboring under derangement, consequent upon pregnancy.  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had for the last six months been a servant at Mr. Dawson's drapery establishment on George-street, Windsor.  She left her place of service on Friday morning last, and was proceeding over the Fit Roy Bridge, with the intention of going home to her parents, who live about three miles out of town, when she was accidentally met by her mother.  The mother said, "Good morning, Sarah, where are you going?" to which she replied, "Home."  Mrs. Field then said "I don't see how you can go home, what will your father say to you going in this state?" - alluding to her advanced state of pregnancy, and then went on her way.  The poor girl called after her mother, "Could she say any thing for herXXX" to which the latter answered "No, go on," intending, as she said, that the girl should go home.  However, it seems she went no further, but retraced her steps, for when Mrs. Field, who had now proceeded some distance onward, looked round, she perceived her daughter coming back along the bridge; after that she saw no more of her.  One of the lady members of Mr. Dawson's establishment deposed, that on its being discovered that the deceased was pregnant, she mentioned the name of her heartless seducer; fretted much, and threatened that she would destroy herself if her parents did not receive her home again.  After this she was kept a month longer at Mr. Dawson's, - an endeavour having been made, in the mean time, to make her resigned; and she left the place on the day above mentioned, on the understanding that she was to return if her mother did not receive her.  Dr. Day was examined and certified that no marks of violence were about the person.  The jury, after some consideration, brought in a verdict of found drowned, but whether by accident or intention there was no evidence before them to determine. The fate of the unfortunate deceased has excited much commiseration and painful sympathy throughout the town.


 

Empire (Sydney), 19 December 1856

DEATH IN DARLINGHURST GAOL. - A coroner's inquest was held yesterday, before J. S. Parker, Esq., in Darlinghurst Gaol, on view of the body of a man named Gilham Ebenezer Bull, aged 30 years, who died on the previous day.  It appeared that the deceased was under a sentence of six months' hard labour in the gaol for embezzlement, and was in a debilitated state at the time of his trial, having a very bad ulcerated leg.  He was also, when admitted to the gaol, in a filthy state from vermin. He was attended by Dr. West and Mr. Galbraith, the dispenser, but gradually declined from the 10th November, and e expired at 10 o'clock on Wednesday morning last. His death was attributed to a worn-out and shattered constitution.  Verdict, Died from natural causes.


 

Empire (Sydney), 19 December 1856

THE BALLOON RIOT. - CORONER'S INQUEST.

  The adjourned inquest, held before J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner for Sydney, and a jury of twelve, on view of the body of the boy Thomas Downs, aged 11 years, who was killed by a blow on the head by a spar pulled down in the Domain by a number of persons unknown, on Monday evening last, was brought to a close yesterday, at the Three Tuns Inn, Elizabeth-street.    .  .  .  

 Dr. D. M. M'Ewan deposed as follows: I am a duly qualified medical practitioner, and reside in Sydney; on Tuesday morning last, between nine and ten o'clock, I made my usual visit to the Infirmary, and there saw the deceased Thomas Downs, who had been attended by Drs. Nathan and Macfarlane in conjunction with the house-surgeon; I examined the deceased, and found him in a state of insensibility with as very severe fracture on the left side of his head, extending from the forehead to the vertex; about the vertex there had been several pieces of bone removed from the substance of the skull; I saw the place they were taken from, and I now produce the pieces; the injury that I have described would be quite sufficient to cause death, and such an injury might be inflicted by a blow with some heavy substance; there was a clean cut extending from the middle of the frontal bone to the vertex; such a cut would be inflicted by a heavy substance, such as the spar described, falling on the head of a child of such tender years; the wound must have bled freely; a stick in the hand of a powerful man would cause such a wound and fracture as I have described; there were no other marks of violence on the body of the deceased.  .  .  .  

  The jury then retired, and after an absence of two or three minutes returned with the following verdict:- That the deceased, Thomas Downs, aged eleven years, came to his death by the falling of a pole in the Domain, on Monday evening, the 15th instant, which was thrown down buy a disappointed and excited crowd of people out of whom it is impossible to single any individuals as the ringleaders, or as throwing down the poles; and we unanimously consider that if any person is to blame, it is Monsieur Maige, the perpetrator of the sham balloon ascent, which ewe consider caused the death of the said boy.

  At the suggestion of the coroner, an explanatory sentence was added to the verdict, to the effect that the remarks upon M. Maigre were intended only as an open censure upon that person.


 

Bathurst Free Press, 20 December 1856

INQUESTS. - An inquest was held at Chesher's Creek, Wayaglon, on Monday last, before Mr. Busby, touching the death of John Webster, who was killed on the Saturday previous by a fall from his horse.  It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased with two other men were camped by the sider of the creek, where they were engaged in washing and shearing, spent the night of Friday in drinking spirits.  On the following morning one of Mr. Cumming's sons went down to the camp and found the deceased and another man quite drunk, and the third sober.  About three hours after this, the deceased was seen to mount a horse which he had with him, and to gallop across the adjoining flat, and up a  ridge, at some distance from it, on reaching the top of which he was seen to fall from his horse.  One of the men ran off immediately to his assistance, but on reaching the spot found the man quite dead.  On examination of the body, the neck was found to have been broken, and the head bruised in several places. A verdict was returned of accidental death, whilst under the influence of intoxicating liquor.

  A second inquest was held on the same day, at Pyke's Hotel, on the body of Edward Nettleship, who died suddenly on the previous day at that house.  It appeared from the evidence, that the deceased who had been drinking for some two or three weeks, was suddenly seized with a fit of apoplexy and died immediately.  The deceased was not intoxicated at the time of his death.  A verdict was returned that the deceased died of apoplexy, accelerated by intemperance.

  On the following day Dr. Busby held a third inquest on the body of Charles Charlewood, who had been found dead on the previous day in a paddock adjoining the Vale Creek.  According to the evidence it appeared that the deceased, who was a bar-keeper in Mr. Robert McPhillamy's employ, was ion consequence of his suffering from dysentery, admitted into the Bathurst Hospital, on Tuesday last, and on the following Friday, being quite recovered, left with the intention of returning to Mr. McPhillamy's employ.  The day followi9ng he was seen by Mr. McPhillamy;s gardener, lying under a tree, who, believing the deceased to be simply resting himself, he said nothing to him.  Nothing more was seen of him until the following Monday, when he was found in a paddock at the foot of Gorman's Hill, near the Vale Creek, by some lads, who were going fishing, quite dead, and to all appearances had  been so for some time.  The cause of death appears, on examination to have arisen from a disease of the lungs and chest, which he had been known to suffer from for some years.  A verdict was returned in accordance with the above facts.


 

Goulburn Herald, 20 December 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT. - Yesterday morning a fatal accident occurred to as young man named Henry Grove, aged 24.  It appeared that while he was riding on a lad of hay at Windellame, with a hay-fork in his hand, one of the wheels of the dray passed over a stump throwing the unfortunate young man to the ground, the prongs of the fork passing under the ribs up towards his heart.  He lived but a few minutes.  An inquest will be held on his body this day.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 20 December 1856

  As a man named Joseph Wilkinson, a reaper in the employ of Mr. J. G. Church, was returning from Wagga Wagga, ion Sunday afternoon, his horse ran away and threw him violently against a tree, where he was picked up by some travellers on the road shortly afterwards.  He was removed to the hospital, where medical assistance was immediately afforded; but the poor fellow lingered in a state of insensibility until next day, when he died.  Cause of death - Extravasation of blood on the brain.

TUMUT. - On Sunday, the 7th instant, a German carpenter, named William Schoppal, employed in erecting the new quarters for the Crown Land Commission, committed suicide.  It appears that the unfortunate deceased had formed a strong attachment to a young girl in the service of Mr. Lockhart, the Commissioner of Crown Lands.  Having received some imaginary slight, a coolness rose between them.  On Sunday morning, about 8 o'clock, the deceased came into Mr. Lockart's kitchen and asked to shake hands with the girl.  On her refusing, he rushed up to her, and seizing one of her arms, bade her farewell.  He walked a few yards on one side of the fence, and placing a pistol to his breast discharged it, causing thereby instant death.  When the inmates went out to see the cause of the shot, his clothes were on fire; but although only two minutes had elapsed, he never moved.  Some entries were found in his diary, evidently showing a weakened mind; and his own death was entered.  The pistol found by his side recently discharged was identified as his own property.  An inquest was held on the body, and a verdict of Temporary Insanity returned.  His remains were committed to the ground on Monday, the 8th.  The deceased was much respected, and was one of six German carpenters, who had recently settled at the Tuena.


 

Freeman's Journal (Sydney), 20 December 1856

POISONING BY STRYCHNINE. - An inquest was held upon the body of Elizabeth Haynes, a child, aged thirteen months, when the following particulars were elicited concerning her death: Mr. Haynes purchased some strychnine on Thursday afternoon, for the purpose of poisoning rats.  Mrs. Haynes was out walking with the child at the time, and thinking this offered a good opportunity to prepare the poison Mr. Haynes cut up some pieces of cooked meat putting a small quantity of strychnine on each, when Mr. Street called to speak with him on business, and he left the room for a few minutes.  In the meantime Mrs. Haynes returned and placed the child upon the table where the meat was lying, and went into the adjoining room; upon her return she saw the child with a piece of meat in her hand.  The thought instantly struck her that it contained poison; she inquired if such was the case, and upon being answered in the affirmative, took the meat from the child, wiped her hands and mouth thinking that no injury was done.  In about ten minutes the usual symptoms of poisoning by strychnine appeared, and after most intensive sufferings for about an hour and a half the child died.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death by poisoning. - Banner of Belfast.


 

Empire (Sydney), 20 December 1856

SHOCKING AND FATAL ACCIDENT. -A man named Charles Harris, employed as a labourer on the Sydney Railway, unfortunately met with a violent death yesterday, through attempting to cross the line just as the 4.25 p.m. train left Sydney terminus for Parramatta.  It appears that he was a single man about 40 years of age, and was very deaf; and it is supposed that he did not hear the train approaching.  Before it could be stopped, he was knocked down by the engine, which, together with the carriages attached to it, passed over him and killed him instantaneously.  The body was picked up immediately afterwards, in a frightfully mangled condition, and conveyed to the dead-house of the Benevolent Asylum, where it awaits an inquest.


 

Empire (Sydney), 22 December 1856

THE LATE RAILWAY ACCIDENT. - An inquest was held before the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., on Saturday last, at the Wellington Inn, George-street South, on view of the body of Charles Harris, a labourer, aged about forty years, who was accidentally killed on the Sydney Railway, on Friday last.  George Doyle, having been duly sworn, deposed, I am foreman of a gang of labourers at present employed near the Sydney station of the Sydney and Parramatta Railway; the deceased, Charles Harris, was one of the gang; yesterday afternoon, at twenty-five minutes past four, the down train from Sydney left the station, with the usual number of carriages; when it had proceeded about 250 yards, I saw a man under the leading wheels of the engine; I immediately gave the signal to stop, that is, by holding up both hands; the train was stopped by the time it had gone fifteen to twenty yards over the body; it had but just started, and had only a speed of about  six or seven miles an hour when it struck the deceased; the deceased had been employed in carrying timber from one side of the line to the other, and was just returning to fetch some more timber; I saw nothing of the deceased until I saw him under the leading wheels; he was very deaf; the whistle of the engine was blown on its leaving the terminus; it is customary for any one to call out when danger is seen;  I was the nearest person to the deceased at the time that the engine passed over him; I believe the deceased has been working on railways all his life; the accident occurred on the down line, that is, the left hand line from Sydney; the deceased was found lying on his back with his feet towards Sydney; the engine, tender, and all the carriages passed over him, but the engine and tender only could have mutilated his body; when I came up I found that the deceased had his left foot smashed, and the arm and shoulder dragged out from the left side, from which also the flesh was torn; he was then quite dead; when I held up my arms to the driver, I think he took immediate steps to stop the engine, and the engine was stopped as soon as it possible could; no one could tell me how it occurred; all the other men were employed stacking timber about ten yards from the deceased, and their backs were towards the place where the accident occurred; I have a watch, and know the times when the trains start; I looked up the line on this occasion and could see no one on it; I have seen men hat were deaf employed on the line; it was very seldom that deceased had to cross it; he wore a cap and could see very well.  Some further evidence, confirmatory of the above, was taken, and the jury returned a verdict of Accidental death, with no blame whatever to any one connected with the railway.


 

Empire (Sydney), 22 December 1856

DEATH OF A CHILD FROM OVER ADMINISTRATION OF MEDICINE. - A Coroner's inquest was held before J. S. Parker, Esq., on Friday and Saturday last, at the Wellington Inn, George-street South, touching the death of a male child, named Thomas Lampey. The deceased, it appears, was the son of a prostitute, residing in Durand's-alley, and died on Friday morning last from an illness of some duration arising from teething.  No medical man attended the child; and on its death a report was circulated that it had been poisoned.  An order was therefore given by the coroner to have the body removed to the Benevolent Asylum, and a post mortem examination made.

  This was performed by Mr. James Smith, resident surgeon at the Benevolent Asylum, who, after having described the appearance of the body, said he was of opinion that death was caused by exhaustion, produced by profuse administration of mercury; he could not say for what the child had been salivated, as he found no disease that required such a profuse administration of mercury; it must have been going on for some time, and have been produced by small doses; and the child evidently appeared not to have received proper nourishment.

  A great mass of other evidence was taken, but it chiefly referred to the conduct of the mother, which was not unkind for a person of her character.  The jury returned the following verdict - That the deceased, Thomas Lampey, aged 13 months, came to his death from over administration of mercury, but by whom administered there was no evidence to show.


 

Empire (Sydney), 22 December 1856

DEATH FROM INTEMPERANCE.-=An inquest was held on Thursday, at East View, Potts' Point6, before Dr. M'Cartney, on view of the body of Flora M'Innes, aged forty-eight.  The witnesses examined were John M'Innes, Henry Garvin, and Dr. Scott.  The case had excited some interest, through a report which had been circulated that the deceased had poisoned herself, and which report had originated from her husband himself, who firmly believed it to be the case. It appeared from the evidence of John M'Innes, that he had been married to the deceased about thirty tears, but that it was only within the last two years that she had been addicted to drink.  On Monday last she had been in Maitland, and although returning sober, brought grog with her, and was very soon drunk; she then became excited and boisterous; she continued drinking until Wednesday evening, when she died.  During that day her husband had seen her lying with her head on the table, muttering her prayers, after which she drank a cup of water; in a few minutes she became very sick, and vomited several times.  This behavior on the part of his wife, and also her apparent carefulness in washing the cup, led M'Innes to believe that his wife had taken some poison, and he stated his suspicions to the chief constable, who upon searching the house had these suspicions strengthened by finding some white powder.

  Dr. Scott, however, on examination, pronounced the powder to be calomel, some of which he had given the deceased a few days previously.  It was stated that the deceased and M'Innes were a happy couple, and that no family quarrels had occurred.  Dr. Scott, having examined the body, was of opinion from its condition, and his previous knowledge of the deceased, that she had died from the excessive use of ardent spirits, and "no other poison." A verdict in accordance was returned.


 

Empire (Sydney), 24 December 1856

MAN FOUND DEAD HANGING BY THE NECK. - A coroner's inquest was yesterday brought to a close at the Supreme Court Hotel, South Head-road, before J. S. Parker, Esq., and a jury of six, on view of the body of a man named Thomas Wirney, age about 39 years, who was found, quite dead, hanging by the neck from a paling in his own garden, close to the house, on Sunday morning last.  James Ryeland, inspector of the Sydney Police Force, deposed that he received information, a little before 8 o'clock on Sunday morning last, that a man had hanged himself in West's-lane; on proceeding thither, he found a man hanging to the  fence at the end of the deceased's house by a red cotton handkerchief; the handkerchief was over the palings and then tied round the deceased's neck, but without a running noose; the weight of the body seemed to be on the right side of the neck, the handkerchief passing under the left side of the chin and the right hand tightly grasping it - the left hand leaning against the fence; the knees were slightly bent inwards, and resting on the toes; when the handkerchief was cut, the body fell, and was quite stiff, the limbs rigidly retaining their position; it was witness's firm belief that the deceased caused his own death, by a most determined act.  It further appeared that the deceased, who was a carpenter, was addicted to drinking though not an habitual drunkard.  Some time ago he received a severe blow on the top of the heard from a piece of timber which fell upon him, and latterly complained of a pain on the top of his head.  On Saturday afternoon last, he left his house in his usual good health, and went to Woolloomoolo, where he received payment for some work he had performed.  Subsequently, he had some words with a bricklayer in a public-house, and fought with him; but they were separated by the landlord, and afterwards shook hands.  At seven o'clock in the evening he returned homer, during the absence of his wife.  He then went into the garden and was not seen alive afterwards.  In the morning his wife discovered him in the position above described, and called for help. She state that she had heard him say latterly when drunk, that he would drown himself; the only cause she could suggest for the threat was, that he had some difficulty in obtaining his money, for work done; she had been married to him thirteen years, and they had three children.

  A post mortem examination of the body was made by Dr. Stolworthy, who came to the conclusion that death was occasioned by strangulation, producing apoplexy; and said there were none of the usual appearances attendant upon a person hung from a considerable height, and falling suddenly; he saw nothing in the appearance of his brain to indicate a diseased intellect. There was a great deal of evidence taken, and the jury returned the following verdict - That the deceased Thomas Witney was found dead, suspended by a handkerchief in his own garden but there is no evidence to show how her came by his death, whether by his own hand, or that of another. [See also Sydney Morning Herald, 24 December.]


 

Maitland Mercury, 25 December 1856

INQUEST. - An inquest was held by Dr. M'Cartney, on Tuesday, at the Red Lion, East Maitland, on the body of John Harrison, then and there lying dead.  The witnesses examined were William Farthing and Dr. Wilson.  From the evidence it appeared that the deceased was in the employ of Mr. Farthing; on Tuesday he was assisting his master in driving a horse-team form the coal-pits, and while coming down Church Hill, East Maitland, the back chain that held the dray suddenly snapped, causing the shafts to drop; the frightened horses becoming unmanageable started off, and capsized the dray.  Upon looking round, Mr. Farting observed the deceased lying on the ground, a few yards behind, and upon going to him saw that he had been seriously injured; he immediately therefore went for Dr. Wilson.  He did not see how Harrison was knocked down owing to the momentary confusion.  Dr. Wilson rendered every assistance, but the unfortunate man died within a few minutes of the occurrence.  From examination of the body he was of opinion that death had been caused by internal injuries received, through the passing of the dray over the deceased.  In answer to questions put, Dr. Wilson stated that the road on Church Hill was in such a wretched condition, as to be likely to occasion accidents of a serious nature, and that several severe accidents had already occurred from that very cause during his residence in the vicinity.  The Jury returned the following verdict  That the deceased, John Harrison, came to his death from injuries accidentally received by a dray passing over his body; and the Jury beg to call the attention of the Road Trust to the wretched state of the road in this locality.

CLARENCE TOWN. - A short time since a little girl, 17 months old, named Petrie, was found drowned in a water-hole near Limeburner's Creek.  Clarence Town, Dec. 18, 1856

                                                                                                                                                                                     

Freeman's Journal (Sydney), 27 December 1856

THE DEAD HOUSE CIRCULAR QUAY. - Measures have at length been taken by the Government to expurge the putrescence and filth which had accumulated in the dead-house, Circular Quay.


 

Empire (Sydney), 29 December 1856

FATAL ACCIDENT. - An inquest was held on Saturday last, at the Harp of Erin, public-house, Sussex-street, before J. S. Parker, Esq., coroner., on view of the body of a woman named Mary Lee, aged 25 years, who came by her death under the circumstances detailed below.  Patrick Lee, of Sussex-street, Sydney, deposed that he was the husband of the deceased; he accompanied her to Ashfield to see the races on Friday, and remained there till they were over; he then started homewards in the gig; vat the toll-bar, a pony threw a boy as they were passing, and witness's mare became restive and tried to follow the pony; several horses and gigs passed in pursuit of the pony, and at the same time a pig crossed the road which occasioned the mare to become quite unmanageable, and she bolted along the road towards Sydney; the deceased caught hold of the near side reins and pulled the mare's head towards Parramatta; witness then desired her to let go the reins, and she did so; the mare then made for the pathway, and got close to it, when witness slackened her speed from a gallop to a canter; but shortly after, one of the wheels got into a rut, and the mare, finding the gig was checked, gave a sudden jerk and broke one of the reins; witness was thrown from the gig; shortly afterwards he saw his wife picked up, but he could not say how she was thrown out of the gig; the deceased was near the time for her confinement; the accident occurred between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; the deceased was attended by Dr. West; she expired on Saturday morning.  

  James O'Neil deposed that he was on horseback, on the Liverrpool-road on Friday afternoon, and saw a horse and gig coming towards him, the horse having bolted; when near Lucas's public-house on the Parramatta-road, one of the wheels of the gig got into a rut at the side of the road; the horse gave a jerk, and flung the driver out; shortly afterwards, the deceased fell back into the body of the gig,  then on to the step, and from that to the road, when one of the wheels struck her and passed over her breast; the deceased attempted to get up, and witness then followed after the gig, which was stopped before he reached it; he immediately weren't into Sydney for a cab, and the deceased was conveyed home in it.  Dr. George West described the injuries received by the deceased; he said he had examined her body, and found the mark of a wheel across the stomach; the deceased was suffering from great internal pain; she was advanced in pregnancy; he was of opinion that here death was caused by rupture of some of the viscera.  The jury returned the following verdict - That the deceased, Mary Lee, aged 25 years, came to her death from injuries accidentally received by being thrown from a gig, in consequence of the horse having bolted and become unmanageable.  It is somewhat remarkable, we think, that under the particular circumstances of this case, no post-mortem examination should have taken place.

Empire (Sydney), 29 December 1856

A BOY KILLED BY LIGHTINING. - An inquest was held on Saturday last at the Prince Albert Inn, Parramatta-street, before the city coroner, J. S. Parker, Esq., touching the death of a boy named Patrick Dunn, aged 9 years, which occurred under the circumstances detailed in the following evidence.  James Carey deposed as follows: I reside on the Ultimo Estate; yesterday morning I was seated at the door of my house when I heard the scream of a girl, who came to my door, saying, "My brother is dead."  I went out about six yards from my door and observed four boys lying on the ground; I thought three of them were dead; I carried them all into my house, and sent for Dr. Johnston, who promptly attended; three of the boys recovered, but the decreased never spoke;  it appears that the deceased was elevated on a  rock, some eight feet above the other three boys, and a second or two before the girl came, a very loud  clap of thunder  occurred, accompanied with a vivid flash of lighting that was close to the earth; when I went to the place where the boys lay on the ground, I found a felt hat, rent on the top , closed to the head of the deceased; the rent was quite fresh, and the hat smelt of brimstone; the other boys were about a yard apart from each other, and likewise smelt of brimstone; all the boys but the one were insensible at this time,  and so close was the shock that I felt the effects of it, and was for a few minutes afterwards quite sick; the little girl that came to me  is so unwell and excited that she cannot attend.

  William Carey, a boy aged eleven years, deposed as follows: On Friday afternoon I was standing at the [house] close to my father's house; three other boys were at a little distance from me; the deceased was standing on a rock above; there was thunder and lightning, and it  [pXXXXXXX] with rain; I was near a bush, when a flash of lightning struck me; I cannot say what occurred next; the deceased was threatening the other boys, in fun, that he would  tumble the rock down over them; I was about six yards from him, and I believe it was the second flash of lightning that struck us all. The jury did not think it necessary to call for the testimony of a medical man, but returned a verdict in accordance with the above evidence.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 29 December 1856

NEWCASTLE.

DECEMBER 27TH. - An inquest was held yesterday before Mr. R. R. S. Bowker, M.D., coroner, touching the death of Mr. John Devonald, who had died on the previous day from injuries received on Tuesday last, on the tramway at Burwood, about two miles from Newcastle.  The enquiry excited much interest, in consequence of the deceased, who had been an old resident here, having been well known and esteemed in this neighbourhood.  The evidence showed that Mr. Devonald, who was proved to have been perfectly sober at the time of the occurrence, had called at Mr. Wood's public-house, which adjoins the tramway, and had taken a bottle of ginger beer, when a Mrs. Parkinson, a dealer, was observed driving her cart, in which she was seated, towards the tramway, for the purpose of crossing it.  At that moment, as train of coal wagons, drawn by horses, was coming down the incline, which terminates about the place where the woman was intending to cross the line, and it being impossible to stop the train in time to prevent a collision, the driver, who had approached very near before the intention of the woman was observed, shouted to her to keep back from the line.  This, aware of her danger, she appears to have been endeavouring to do, by trying to pull the horse to either side, but the animal refused to obey the reins, and continued to approach the tramway, on which he seems to have got his fore legs when the waggon  came up.  At this moment Mr. Devonald, seeing the woman's danger., rushed down a steep which leads from Wood's house to the tramroad, and endeavoured to grasp the reins of the woman's horse, to draw it back, but failing in this, he was carried by the impetus of his descent on to the line and came in contact with the wagons, which bore him down, and by which he was fearfully crushed on the side of his leg and arm.  A number of people came to his assistance, to whom he said he was a dead man, and wished to be taken to the hospital.

  He was immediately brought into town, and lingered until Thursday, when he died.  Mrs. Parkinson's evidence showed that she had long reins in driving the horse, which was a hired one, and which she found to be unmanageable when she wished to turn him from the line; she had not looked along the line before approaching to cross it, and had therefore not seen the waggons until within a few yards of them; she did not see Mr. Devonald run towards her, but had heard him and the waggon-driver shout to her, and had no recollection of what had subsequently occurred until she had been thrown out of the cart, which was upset by the collision, when she observed Mr. Devonald lying on the line after the waggons had passed; she escaped uninjured, but one of the legs of her horse was cut off; she could have seen the waggons coming along the line for as considerable distance before she tried to cross it, had she looked.  The evidence of Alfred Ashmore, one of the drivers of the train, proved that he was coming down the incline at the usual speed when the collision occurred, and that it was impossible to stop the waggons in time to prevent it.  A plan was submitted by which it was shown that the place where the woman attempted to cross was not the public road.  The jury returned a verdict, That Mr. Devoinald had received the injuries of which he died, by accidentally coming into collision with the coal waggons, and appended a rider recommending that a fence be erected on the off side of the tramway from Mr. Wood's house, and that the latter be requested to place as fence at the steep (noticed in the evidence) which leads from his house to the tramway. [Editorial comment follows.]


 

Illawarra Mercury, 29 December 1856

SIUICIDE. - An inquest, touching the death of Anastasia Walker, was held, on Tuesday, at Penrose Villa, the residence Mr. E. Evans.  From the evidence it would appear that the deceased and her husband, William Walker, were in the service of Mr. Evans, and on Monday they were in the milking yard together, when some words took place between them and she struck him with a milking pail.  When Walker got to the hut she was crying.  He tried to conciliate her, and told her to put the children to bed, when she said they wanted their tea, and he was to get it for them, which he did.  After they had had tea, she gathered the tea things together and went out, as he thought for the dishes in which to wash them.  She was out about as minute and a half, when he went to look for her, thinking she was long, when he could not find her.  He ran to a hut about 40 yards off to ask a man of the name of Bagster to assist him in looking for her, saying he would put his coat on.  Walker ran back to his hut, when he heard a scream, seemingly from a flat near the creek, he ran to the edge of the creek, but being very dark he could see nothing, but he heard a faint moan.  He went into the creek, until he got out of his depth, (the creek being about ten feet deep) when he got hold of her in his arms, and called for assistance, but being a poor swimmer he was compelled to let go his hold.  Two other parties came to the bank of the creek, and one of them, Luke Bourke, threw his boots off, and plunged into the creek, and pulled out the man, and then went into the creek again to look for the woman, after about ten minutes search he touched her with his feet, and, diving, got hold of her by  the hair of the head and brought her out.  After hearing the evidence the Coroner summed up, and the jury returned a verdict of felo de se.  She has left two children, and is about 38 years of age.  This lamentable event appears to have originated in jealousy on the part of the unfortunate deceased.


 

Sydney Morning Herald, 30 December 1856

ACCIDENT. - On Tuesday morning last, a farmer at Eastern Creek, named James Whitfield, mounted his horse, a young animal, with the intention of going after some cows to get milk for his breakfast.  From some cause or other, whether from spurring or otherwise, the horse commenced bucking, throwing Mr. Whitfield violently off the saddle, and in his fall causing him to injure his bladder.  The injury received was so severe that death resulted on Christmas morning, the 25th instant.  An inquest was held before Dr. Dowe, the coroner, and a Jury, and a verdict of accidental death was returned.


 

Bathurst Free Press, 31 December 1856

DEATH BY DROWNING. - A melancholy instance of this kind occurred at Orange, on Christmas-day, under the following circumstances.  On the morning of that day, a party consisting of Messrs. D. Jackson, C. W. Favell, J. A. Favell, and the deceased, John Jeffaries, started from Orange for the purpose of duck shooting.  On reaching a water hole on Brown's Creek. About 7 miles distant from orange, they came upon a covey of ducks, two of which the deceased shot. He then went into the water after them, and after throwing one of them on the bank, went across the water hole fort the other.  On reaching it he was seen to take the bird into his mouth and to swim across to the opposite side of the creek, on nearing which he sank suddenly.  Mr. Jackson immediately rushed in followed by Mr. C. Favell, to endeavor to save him, but after nearly losing their own lives by becoming entangled in the weeds were compelled to return.  They then immediately went on to Mr. Bray's, the nearest station, and there procured a line and some strong hooks with which they succeeded in getting up the body.  A magisterial inquiry was held the next day before Dr. Kerr, and a verdict was returned in accordance with the above facts.   .  .  .  

  Another accident, which terminated in the death of one person and was nearly proving fatal to the two others who accompanied him, occurred on Sunday last under the following circumstances.  Between one and two o'clock on Sunday Mr. Thomas Orton, Inspector O'Keefe, and the deceased, William Hartill, a detective constable, whilst travelling into Bathurst from the Sydney Creek diggings, on reaching Lewis's Pond Creek, inquired of a girl on the opposite side respecting the crossing place, to which she directed them by throwing some stones into the stream.  Hartill then went into the stream, followed by the two others.  Immediately after getting in, the whole three were washed off their horses and carried down the stream.  Mr. Orton, by holding on by the horse's neck, succeeded in getting on to the bank, about one hundred yards down the stream.  Mr. O'Keefe, after holding on by the mane for some distance, lost his hold by the mare's coming out; he then caught hold of the stirrup bar, but owing to its getting away from the saddle, was again set adrift, but being able providentially to catch hold of the saddle succeeded in reaching the bank about two hundred yards from the crossing-place.  Immediately on recovering themselves, both being nearly exhausted, they looked round for Hartill, but could see nothing of him.  The last time he was seen was immediately after going in with his head above water, holding on by his horse.  After looking for the body some little time without success, Messrs. Orton and O'Keefe made arrangements with some persons in the neighbourhood to look for the body, and then started into Bathurst, where they arrived on the following morning.  Two constables have been since sent pout, but we have not yet heard whether they have succeeded in finding the body. .  .  .  

CORONER'S INQUEST. - An inquest was held at the Black Bull In, on Monday last before Dr. Busby, on the body of William Lowence, who was found dead in the Vale Creek on the previous day.  It appeared from the evidence that the deceased, who was in the employ of Mr. John Mutton, and was in the habit of sleeping in a shed adjoining Mr. Mutton's slaughter0house on the Vale Road, came to his breakfast, between 7 sand 8 on Sunday morning at the house in Piper-street, apparently under the influence of drink.  After breakfast he went over to Godfrey's public house opposite, and after drinking one glass of rum, left the place in company with another man named John Reid, in Mr. Mutton's employ, for the hut in which they slept.  After they had got some distance on their road, Lowence expressed his determination to cross the creek to see some one on the opposite side.  Reid seeing that he was too intoxicated to do so with safety, endeavoured to dissuade him from his purpose, but finding his entreaties unavailing left him.  About two hours afterwards the body was seen in the creek, about twenty yards below a crossing-place, lying with his face in the mud quite dead.  It appearing from the evidence of Dr. Brown, that death arose from suffocation by drowning, a verdict was returned accordingly.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School