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Colonial Cases

In re Schjott, 1899

[bankruptcy]

In re Schjott

London

19 April 1899

Source: The Times, 20 April 1899

LAW REPORT, APRIL 19.

(Sittings in Bankruptcy, before MR. A. H. WILDY, Official Receiver.)

IN RE SCHJOTT.

This was a first meeting of creditors under a receiving order made against Edward Peter Schjott, commonly known as Edward Schott, described as of 2, Garden-court, Temple, barrister-at-law.  It appeared that the debtor held the degree of B.A. and LL.B. Cambridge, and was formerly engaged as a private tutor.  In January, 1894, he was called to the Bar, but, finding that he could not obtain a living in this country, he went to Constantinople and practiced before the Consular Court of the Ottoman Empire.  In December, 1897, he was appointed Registrar and Summary Criminal Judge to her Britannic Majesty's Supreme Consular Court, Constantinople, at a salary of £18 per month.  He resigned the position in April, 1898, as his pay was not sufficient to meet the expenses connected with the office, and he then proceeded to Bulgaria in order to prosecute a claim on behalf of a dispossessed Turkish prince against the Bulgarian Government. In the event of the claim being successful he would be en titled to to receive £5,000 or £6,000 in respect of fees, &c.  He remained in Bulgaria until June, 1898, when he came to England to enforce a claim against the Foreign Office on behalf of a British Indian subject of Constantinople.  In the event of this case being satisfactorily established he would become entitled to £1,000 for his services and expenses.  The debtor returned his unsecured liabilities at £2,749, and the assets were estimated at £12,500, subject to realization.  He ascribed his present position to going to the Bar without means or influence, to the uncertainty of practice in Turkey, to difficulty in obtaining payment from clients, and to loss of time and money in prosecuting the claims against the Bulgarian Government and the British Foreign Office. ...

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School