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Colonial Cases

The Kow Shung [1894]

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The Kow Shung

Consular Court, Shanghai
1894
Source: Portland Guardian (Victoria, Australia), 20 August 1894

KOW SHUNG INCIDENT.

CONSULAR COURT INQUIRY.

THE OFFICERS PRAISED.

(HERALD CABLE.)

LONDON, Aug. 17.

The Consular Court [Shanghai] has concluded its inquiry into the circumstances associated with the sinking of the British transport Kow Shung by a Japanese cruiser, while the transport was engaged conveying Chinese troops to Corea, before the declaration of war.

The Court warmly praises Captain Galsworthy, who was in charge of the Kow Shung, and his officers, saying that they did all they could under the trying conditions, and were in no way to blame for the sinking of the vessel.

Since the captain and officers of the transport are thus acquitted of having given any provocation, and held to have simply stood upon their undoubted rights in refusing to take the Kow Shung to a Japanese port when ordered, it is assumed that the whole blame of the occurrence is thrown upon the Government of Japan.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School