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Colonial Cases

Newspaper commentary and minor cases, Burma

The Times, 12 October, 1898.
BURMA.
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.)
RANGOON, OCT. 11.
The Government of India is in communication with the local Government on the subject of establishing a High Court in Burma. India is at length favourably disposed to this much-needed reform.

 

The Times, 28 July, 1925
RANGOON CHURCH DISPUTE.
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.)
RANGOON, July 27
  An application for a summons was made at the Police Court here today against the Bishop of Rangoon, Dr. R. S. Fyffe, the Rev. V. N. Kemp, and two police sergeants, on a charge of trespassing in St. Gabriel's Church and removing church property.
  It was alleged that the Bishop and Mr. Kemp, under police protection, went to the church, which was locked, and demanded the keys.  And that on this request being refused, the doors were forced open and sacred vestments, vessels, documents, and a cross were removed, in spite of a protest by members of the congregation. There has been trouble about the possessions of the church for some time, and when the regular clergy were withdrawn last September what was called a special committee of St. Gabriel's Church was appointed by the congregation and has been in possession ever since. It is alleged that the articles removed were purchased by the congregation.
  The Magistrate said he would give his decision tomorrow.

The Times, 14 August, 1925
BURMA HIGH COURT CASE.
ALLEGED ATTEMPT TO BRIBE A JUDGE
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.)
RANGOON, AUG 12.
  The High Court dismissed the appeal of the Government of Burma today against the acquittal of Mr. R. A. Mamsa on a charge of criminal breach of trust in respect of gold and diamond jewellery valued at Rs. 378,000 (£28,000) belonging to Mr. E. A. Majid, with whom he had been in partnership until they had quarrelled and separated. Before
delivering judgment, Mr. Justice Heald protested strongly against a gross indignity to which he had been subjected in connexion with the case.
  An Indian, whose name sounds like "Mamsa," approached Mr. Justice Heald's driver and offered to buy the Judge's motor-car for a greater sum than it was worth.  Mr. Justice Heald regarded the offer as a piece of stupidity and took no notice, but last night he received a telephone call at his house from a man giving the name of Mamsa, who said: "I am greatly obliged to you for dismissing my case and I will take your car." The Judge replied, "I cannot talk about cases," and put down the receiver. Today the Judge expressed the strongest possible indignation and reprobation at such conduct, and said that the outrage would be further investigated.

Published by Centre for Comparative Law, History and Governance at Macquarie Law School